Tag Archives: hurricane

The “Hurricane” of 1950

Standard
The “Hurricane” of 1950
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Jul 1950, Tue  •  Page 1

Damage that can be done by a hurricane such as visited this continent last Saturday is unpredictable and terrifying. Almonte got off lightly in comparison with some other places. Here the wind reached its high point about eleven o’clock Saturday night when it ripped many roofs off buildings, felled trees, blew down a barn owned by Mr. Harold Robertson opposite the Rosamond Memorial Hospital, and did a lot of strange and awful things that were most unexpected.

The first property in Almonte to suffer serious damage here on Saturday was the grandstand at the fair grounds. The wind took off part of the roof and back wall turning it back and breaking electric light wires on Water Street. At night the roofing on top of the building occupied by the Bell Telephone Co. took wing and carried with it part of the roof atop the building owned by Mr. P. A. Greig, K.C., the main floor of which houses the Royal Bank.

Other buildings to suffer from torn roofs were those owned by R. J. France, the Hartley Woollen Mills, the Rosamond Woolen Co., the Almonte Garage and the Almonte Flour Mills which suffered loss of a chimney. The Baptist Church also was a victim of the storm when a chimney was blown over. There were many cases of roof damage which are too numerous to mention. Trees uprooted Mr. George L. Comba’s yard and he lost seven trees on his property but none of their downfalls damaged his house.

In the New England section, Mr. Winslow-Spragge of New Burnside had a queer visitation. A tree blew over which had its roots under oil pipes leading from an outside tank to his furnace. When this happened the pipes were broken and he lost about 500 gals, of fuel. It is hard to estimate the -over all damage done but it will run well over $10,000. Many people had wind insurance while some had none. The rain that accompanied and followed the wind storm added to the loss of those people whose roofs were damaged. Temporary repairs have been made in most cases and will be left that way until the warm weather of spring makes it possible to make permanent repairs in the form of new roofs. A strange fact about the whole thing is that the old fashioned shingle roofs seemed to stand up better under the strain than the new kind

Nov 30 1950

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Jul 1950, Tue  •  Page 1
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Nov 1950, Mon  •  Page 1

Yes We Have had Killer Hurricanes in Canada

The Smiths Falls Storm of 1897

The Storm of June 1899

Ya call that a Snowstorm? Linda’s Mailbag

Storms of Carleton Place- Which One?

Lightening Strikes Again –The Storm of 1972

The Day The Wizard of Oz Came to Carleton Place

To All the Snowmageddons I Have Loved Before

Yes We Have had Killer Hurricanes in Canada

Standard
Yes We Have had Killer Hurricanes in Canada

dbc5469b25b7418e84be6a7b822e17ef--atlantic-hurricane-a-hurricane.jpg

The Newfoundland Hurricane: 1775 (also known as the Independence Hurricane)

More than 4,000 people – mostly mariners – died off the coast of Newfoundland after a massive hurricane struck the area. The hurricane carved a path of destruction along the eastern coast of the United States from North Carolina to Newfoundland.

It is often referred to as the Independence Hurricane because it occurred just as the American Revolution was beginning.

Clipped from The Pennsylvania Packet,  25 Dec 1775, Mon,  Page 4

Hurricane Hazel: 1954

pictures-r-381.jpg

Toronto Public Library–Thumbnail of Humber River, 

Hurricane Hazel: 1954

Perhaps the most destructive hurricane in modern Canadian history ripped through southern Ontario in October 1954 after crossing the Caribbean and eastern U.S.

Hurricane Hazel left 81 dead and a path of destruction in its wake. Almost 2,000 families were left homeless as winds hit 124 km/h  and rains flooded low-lying areas.

The Greater Toronto Area was the worst hit. The Humber River swelled and broke through a footbridge, washed away an entire block of homes along the edge of the river just downstream and killed 32 people.

More than 200 mm of rain fell in 24 hours – the worst flooding in Toronto in 200 years. The water destroyed a trailer park in Woodbridge, killing another 20 residents.

Over the next several days, bodies washed up on the shores of Lake Ontario and in New York State. All traffic to and from Toronto was blocked while authorities and residents surveyed the damage, estimated at over $100 million at the time.

img.jpg

October 18 1954– Ottawa Journal

The effects of Hurricane Hazel in Canada included 81 deaths and C$137,552,400 ($1,281,202,354 in 2017) in damages. Hazel, the deadliest and costliest storm of the 1954 Atlantic hurricane season, reached Toronto, Ontario by the evening of October 15, 1954. It peaked as a category 4 storm, but by the time it reached Canada, it was an extratropical category 1 storm after merging with an existing cold front south of Ontario. Due to an area of high pressure to the north-east, Hazel stalled over Toronto and lost most of its moisture.

The worst-affected areas were communities near the Humber River, Holland Marsh, and Etobicoke Creek. Prone to flooding, the Humber River raced downstream from Woodbridge when an earthen dam failed. In the weeks prior to Hazel, Toronto had received copious amounts of rain, and the soil could not hold as much as 200 mm (7.9 in) of rain; consequently, over 90% of it went into Toronto’s waterways. The Humber heavily flooded Weston, and killed 35 people in Raymore Drive. Holland Marsh was severely flooded; while no one was killed, the economic losses were severe as the region’s crops were harvested but not collected.

In the neighbourhood of Long Branch, the Etobicoke Creek killed seven people and swept numerous dwellings into Lake Ontario. Toronto’s infrastructure also took a major hit, with as much as 50 bridges being washed out by the rising waters.

hurricane_hazel_homehr.jpg

The Wrath of Hurricane Hazel

The situation was exacerbated by the lack of preparedness and awareness. Torontonians did not have prior experience with hurricanes, and the storm as whole proved to be extremely unpredictable—even the arrival of Hazel came as a surprise. Also, the low-lying areas near the Humber were mostly residential, which were among the worst-affected during the storm. In fact, following Hazel, residential development in areas along Toronto waterways was prohibited, and they became parks instead.

1297439905260_ORIGINAL.jpg

Toronto Sun

To help with the cleanup, the army was summoned. Due to the destruction in Canada, as well as the United States and Haiti, the name Hazel was retired, and will never again be used for an Atlantic hurricane. Since it was retired before the creation of formal lists, it was not replaced with any particular name.

relatedreading

The Smiths Falls Storm of 1897

The Storm of June 1899

Ya call that a Snowstorm? Linda’s Mailbag

Storms of Carleton Place- Which One?

Lightening Strikes Again –The Storm of 1972

The Day The Wizard of Oz Came to Carleton Place

To All the Snowmageddons I Have Loved Before

Lightening Strikes Again –The Storm of 1972

unnamed (1)