Tag Archives: hunting

Stayin’ Alive During Partridge Season 1958

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Stayin’ Alive During Partridge Season 1958

The partridge and duck hunting season opens on Saturday, Sept. 27 and if the present weather prevails there will be a large exodus to the woods and lakes. Up Sudbury way, the first hunting casualty is reported. A man engaged in the innocent passtime of picking mushrooms was shot and killed a few hours after the season opened. The killer ran away.

Commenting on this tragedy the Sudbury Star advises hunters to stay out of the woods in masse this year and make Queen’s Park tighten up on the regulations about firearms. At the present time anyone can buy a license, be he a maniac or an idiot if he has $1.

The local issuer of licenses, Mr. Russell Dodds, has sold 100 to date. He says there is a new form this year, much like a driver’s licence which must be filled in with name, address, age, etc. This is a step in the right direction! but is scarcely enough in the larger centres where the applicant is unknown to the issuer.

“Stay Home and Stay Alive” says the Pembroke Observer where 11 were killed in a few days in 1957. It reminds one of the old rhyme “Drinking water is as risky as the so-called deadly whiskey. Some say it’s a mistake to breathe the air.” It is especially, alarming about the poor mushroom man as we don’t want our friends Baldy, Cliff, Bob and Oral to have their heads bopped off and our supply o f mushrooms too. Sept 1958

Almonte Hunting Parties — November 1941– Names Names and more Names

Where Did the Wild Geese Go?

The Tale of a Teacher, a Duck, and the Mississippi River

Stories of the Mississippi River — Elk, Rice Beds, and Corduroy Roads

WHO’S AFRAID OF BIG BAD BEARS? Louis Peterson and Harvey Scott

Sometimes You Just Need to Remember– Reggie Bowden

Almonte Hunting Parties — November 1941– Names Names and more Names

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Almonte Hunting Parties — November 1941– Names Names and more Names

Greville Toshack poses with his hunting dog and rifle.
1900
Almonte Mill of Kintail Conservation Area Lanark, Ontario Photo

November 1941- Almonte Gazette

The old saying about distant fields looking green certainly applies to deer hunting this year. While more hunters than usual are roaming the wild country around the Black Donald and Matawatchan, and the northern parts of Lanark and Frontenac Counties deer have walked right into town as if they knew all the crack shots were far away.

The other day a deer swam across the river landing just above the fairgrounds. This may have been the same buck that appeared on Tuesday in the Spring Bush, now a part of Gemmill Park. The animal was spied on by the Separate School pupils and as it was nearly time for the junior room to be let out the class was dismissed. Another deer swam the river and landed at John Grace’s farm on highway 29.

Other similar instances are being reported from many points and it is hard to keep track of them all or to verify the stories. W. A, Jamieson, E. C. Gourlay, Jas. McDonald and Louis Peterson are hunting up at White Lake. Reports have reached civilization that Mr. Gourlay got a deer. Another buck or has it that the party bagged a large bear. Whether it is a polar bear, a grizzly bear or a common brown bear has not been learned nor is it clear which one of the Nimrods shot it although some give credit to Mr. Jamieson.

On the other hand Mr. Peterson has long been considered an authority on bears since one night, long ago, when he and a friend hid all night in his car at the Black Donald while a bear sniffed around near them. Robt. Cochran shot a deer right near his home in the woods on R. A. Stewart’s farm. In this party were Wilbert McKay, Jim McKay, Harvey Boal, Russell Cochran and Archie Lockhart. This was on Monday.

Mayor Scott has been hunting in the Burnt Lands with the Meehan boys, Jack Command and Jack Kennedy. The first day Messrs. Command and Kennedy each got a deer. Hunting at White Lake also included Bob Leishman, Andrew and Robt. McPhail, Mel Royce, Oral Arthur and Mike Walsh. This party got two deer—one on Tuesday and another on Wednesday.

Among those from this district who are deer hunting are the following: Wm. and Mac Davis, Eddie Moone, Bob Cochran, E. C. Gourlay, Walter Moore, Carmen Munroe, Ronald Gunn, W. J. Drynan, Harry McGee, Clayton, W illard Smithson, Charles McKay, Clayton, Cyril Pierce, Herb and Elmer Rath, Clayton, James M. Brown, Gervaiss Finner, Eddie Manary, A. J. McGregor, W. A. Jamieson and Bill, Felix Finner, Michael Walsh, Jerry Price, John Gourlay, John H. Munroe, Russell Cochran, W. G. Yuill, Gordon Hanna, Andy McPhail, Wilfred Meehan, Corkery, Harvey Boal, John Command, Allan Carswell, Wilbert McEwen, Desmond Vaughan.Among those from this district who are deer hunting are the following: Wm. and Mac Davis, Eddie Moone, Bob Cochran, E. C. Gourlay, Walter Moore, Carmen Munroe, Ronald Gunn, W. J. Drynan, Harry McGee, Clayton, W illard Smithson, Charles McKay, Clayton, Cyril Pierce, Herb and Elmer Rath, Clayton, James M. Brown, Gervaiss Finner, Eddie Manary, A. J. McGregor, W. A. Jamieson and Bill, Felix Finner, Michael Walsh, Jerry Price, John Gourlay, John H. Munroe, Russell Cochran, W. G. Yuill, Gordon Hanna, Andy McPhail, Wilfred Meehan, Corkery, Harvey Boal, John Command, Allan Carswell, Wilbert McEwen, Desmond Vaughan.

In 1871 in Dalhousie Township the deer disappeared and Archibald Browning decided to put an end to it by going on a hunting spree in 1873. One of the wolves he caught was over 3 feet high, 6 feet long and weighed over 80 pounds. It was purchased by the Museum of Natural History in Montreal. Browning ended up killing 72 wolves 70 bears to save the deer population in Dalhousie Township.

Kevin Bingley–Archibald Browning recorded in the 1851 Agricultural Census living at Lavant. Item/listing # 6 Browning: Con, 7 West part lot 6 – 100 acres. Photo courtesy of Michael J. Umpherson.
When Archibald Browning was born on February 19, 1819, in Neilston, Renfrewshire, Scotland, his father, Archibald, was 39 and his mother, Janet, was 26. He married Janet “Jessie” Robertson in 1838. They had two children during their marriage. He died on February 16, 1900, in Lavant, Ontario, having lived a long life of 80 years.
Paul Rumleskie Further up the valley around Wilno the settlers hated the wolves also and I even remember my father speaking of this…
Claudia Tait You can’t judge what these people had to do to survive unless you had to feed a family without the privileges of a supermarket, a vehicle, warm winter clothes, electricity, air conditioning, central heating and medical assistance.
Elaine DeLisle Very interesting read. Back then venison was what got most families through the winter. Bear meat too. Skins were tanned and used for mitts and clothing. It was a way of life. No big supermarkets people.

Where Did the Wild Geese Go?

The Tale of a Teacher, a Duck, and the Mississippi River

Stories of the Mississippi River — Elk, Rice Beds, and Corduroy Roads

WHO’S AFRAID OF BIG BAD BEARS? Louis Peterson and Harvey Scott

Sometimes You Just Need to Remember– Reggie Bowden

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
01 May 1907, Wed  •  Page 1

Do Gopher’s Regrow Tails? Tales of the Depression

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Do Gopher’s Regrow Tails? Tales of the Depression

May 1887 –Almonte Gazette

The municipality of Qu’Appelle offered fifty cents for gophers’ tails. The clerk of the municipality has been kept busy paying out the bounty. Parties who were out shooting lately got quite a number of gophers minus their tails.The explanation now is that the Indians snare the gophers, take the tails off, and let the gopher go so as to grow another tail for next year’s bounty. The untutored children of the prairie gopher of our municipality are in good shape .

In the early history of our province, there were all kinds of gophers, millions of them. The municipalities tried to get rid of them, as they were destroying the crops. So they offered any person one cent for every gopher tail. In the era of the Depression, there were very few students that had any money. So it was a good thing for them to kill gophers. Kill 10 gophers, they made 10 cents, and 10 cents in those days would’ve bought a lot.

So every person who lived through the Depression has killed gophers, drowned them. Their tails are sensitive and are used as feelers when the animals travel backward in their burrows.Amateur biology tried to see if they’d grow another gopher tail and they’d nip off the tail the gopher had and let them free. They would watch out, and see if the gopher would mutate another gopher tail, but they never did. They even split gopher tails to try outdo each other in the municipality.

Edmonton Journal
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
08 Apr 1933, Sat  •  Page 2
Calgary Herald
Calgary, Alberta, Alberta, Canada
13 May 1925, Wed  •  Page 11–
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img-2021-05-18t151723.863.jpeg
The Bismarck Tribune
Bismarck, North Dakota
21 Oct 1984, Sun  •  Page 45

Related reading

Documenting Carleton Place — George Smith

Sometimes You Just Need to Remember– Reggie Bowden

Don’t Bring Your Guns to Town!

When Otters Attack — in North Elmsley in 1875

The Wolves of Lanark County

  1. This Ram was Ten Yards Long Sir and His Horns Reached the SkyDancing With Wolves in Perth
  1. Angry Mobs, Wolves and Bloodsuckers –Selby LakeShades of The Godfather in Dr. Preston’s Office in Carleton PlaceIs This Story Just Up a Tree?
  2. A Bird Weighing How Much was Found Near Barry’s Bay?

Documenting Carleton Place — George Smith

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Documenting Carleton Place — George Smith

Share what you learn, and this old gal is not getting any younger, so i saw this photo and as far as I am concerned, it needed to be documented.. So here is one day in the 1970s that The Canadian took a photo of a group of boys in the council chambers of the town hall getting a gun license.

Here are some comments:

Terry Latham–Same place I got mine. The old court room

Stephen Giles–Council Chamber, Town Hall

Tom EdwardsTed Hurdis Wasn’t his name George Smith. He teamed up with Lloyd Hughes and they teamed up to give us our gun licenses.

Sylvia GilesLooks like third from left David Johnson, Dave Moore and then Robbie Hutt??? Not sure?!

Llew LloydThe badge I received said I was a Safe Hunter.

Ted HurdisPretty sure second from left is Lynn Buffington

Tom EdwardsThe fourth guy from the left is Dave Munro.

Penny TraffordTed, Garry says for sure it’s Lloyd Hughes, and he’s still pondering on the other name. He knows he lived on the same block as the North Side Grocery

Yvonne Mahon told me about her father’s (Thomas J Mahon) leather hunting coat that was on display at the registration desk at the Mahon Family Reunion.  After he passed away in 1997 they thought the jacket that he used trapping hunting and fishing was lost. However to the families joy the jacket was found in his workshop inside a bag. Because it had been in the cold outside workshop for a long time mice had gotten to it and it was in need of some loving care. Yvonne’s daughter said during one summer she took that jacket outside and sat under the umbrella and repaired it tear by tear. Thomas was from Combermere which is a village located along the Madawaska River in south-eastern Ontario.

relatedreading

Sometimes You Just Need to Remember– Reggie Bowden

Don’t Bring Your Guns to Town!

When Otters Attack — in North Elmsley in 1875

The Wolves of Lanark County

  1. This Ram was Ten Yards Long Sir and His Horns Reached the SkyDancing With Wolves in Perth
  1. Angry Mobs, Wolves and Bloodsuckers –Selby LakeShades of The Godfather in Dr. Preston’s Office in Carleton PlaceIs This Story Just Up a Tree?
  2. A Bird Weighing How Much was Found Near Barry’s Bay?

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Sometimes You Just Need to Remember– Reggie Bowden

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Sometimes You Just Need to Remember– Reggie Bowden

 

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-Photos from the Canadian and Gazette files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Author’s Note- Everyone deserves to be remembered– and so many remembered Reggie. If you have any more info to add about Reggie -leave a comment or email me at sav_77@yahoo.com

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Dawn Jones– The late Reggie Bowden from Tatlock. He lived on the Darling Road (formerly 8th line Darling Twp) now Lanark Highlands. He was a well known trapper and hunter in these parts. He used to stop when I was wee and show us some of his efforts of trapping.

 

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Ray Paquette Unfortunately, I never met him although my late wife was able to regale me with stories of Mr. Bowden who she met during her nursing stints at the Almonte General Hospital. Seemingly, he was quite a character…

Dawn Jones He was a character for sure. I knew his family well. He was unique–trapping fishing and hunting to sustain his family and his lifestyle. The mould was broke after Reg was made and respected by many.

Mary Hurdis I remember in his later years his art work was special.