Tag Archives: hughes

W. J. Hughes — The Rexall Drugstore on the Corner

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W. J. Hughes — The Rexall Drugstore on the Corner
Photo-Adin Wesley Daigle
Mayor of Carleton Place – 1922 – Druggist Photo- – Rootsweb–
Photos-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

127-131 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870

The first storey storefronts of this building have been modified from the original glass windows for easier viewing of merchandise–hence the different colours of brick. 127-131 Bridge Street has housed a number of different businesses including pharmacies, clothing stores, grocery stores, and poolrooms.

The Hughes family bought the pharmacy from Dr. Preston in 1905.

W. J. Hughes Rexall Drug store was located on the corner and Thomas Lloyd Hughes born in 1897 along with his brother Harold until they each decided to run a smaller store at the opposite  ends of town. Lloy’s store was on Moffatt Street and Harold on Lake Ave West. For 50 years they were in groceries together and then the store was sold to Thomas’s nephew and for 12 years Thomas drove a butcher wagon. There was a dark room at the rear of the store where Mr. Hughes tested your eyes for glasses. You could buy a roll of film #116 for a Brownie Box camera for 25 cents and for $1.25 he would send it away to be developed.

The folks in Carleton Place will always remember the Rexall Drug annual 1 cent sale and every local household stocked up on cough medicine, cough drops, peroxide and all sorts of liniment. Some of the clerks that worked there were: Olive Dick, Ruby Voyce, and John Briscoe and Wilbert Robertson.

Harvey Asselstine attended the Ontario College of Pharmacy in 1929. In 1944, he
returned to Carleton Place and bought the drugstore at the corner of Bridge and
Franklin, from W.J. Hughes who operated it for 38 years. Betty Findlay and Mary Cook both worked at Assestine’s Pharmacy.  In the rear of Asselstine’s drug store the CPR Telegraph operated during the 1950s. Asselstine expanded his drug store and bought out Hughes Grocery. In 2006 the Athen’s Corners Restaurant  was located there.

Taber and McCrae operated a Men’s and Boy’s clothing store within Struther’s Block, which later became a pool hall  (next door) operated by Mel Barclay. Charlie Giroux, who only had one arm took over the pool hall then Ab Dowseth from Smiths Falls operated it for a short time but when McCann and Porter gained ownership they moved the pool hall to the old Bank of Commerce.

Jeremy Stinson— That corner was, for much of my childhood, the home of the Blossom Shop. Back before the one way street.

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Aug 1965, Mon  •  Page 31

Photos-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum ( see the Queens Hotel across the street)

Son of William James Hughes and Mabel Vaughan (nee Strong) Hughes, of Carleton Place, Ontario. Brother of Freda, Morley and Cyril. The Town of Carleton Place remembered Pilot Officer Hughes by naming a street for him.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Tue, Sep 02, 1941 · Page 9
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Apr 1947, Mon  •  Page 3
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Dec 1921, Sat  •  Page 5

Documenting 60 Moore Street Carleton Place

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Documenting  60 Moore Street Carleton Place

Jayne GrahamThis was my great grandparents home (Lorne and Jennie Campbell) in Carleton Place. I don’t know when they purchased the home. My parents (Cam and Janet Hughes) lived on one side when I was born in 1963. The house caught on fire I think that year.

When my great grandmother went into what was then called the Lake Avenue Nursing Home, my grandparents Cora (her daughter) and Harold Hughes became the owners. My mom and dad returned to Carleton Place in 1979 and we did some renovations on the house. The house was hit by a car that year when an intoxicated man driving a stolen taxi from Traffords two doors up hit the right hand side in the front.

After my dad died in May 1980, my mom moved from the house to London and my grandparents sold the home. Unfortunately it has never looked the same as I remember growing up. My great grandmother had beautiful roses in the backyard as well as rose bushes growing up the side of what was a lovely front porch.

Name:Lorne John Campbell
Gender:Male
Race:Scottish (Scotish)
Age:63
Birth Date:29 Nov 1884
Birth Place:Ontario
Death Date:20 May 1948
Death Place:Carleton Place, Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Father:John Campbell
Mother:Mary Anne Campbell
Spouse:Jennie Mc Mullen

Photos from Jayne Graham

Jayne Graham
3m  · 

My great grandmother standing at the side porch with her roses.
Jayne Graham
3m  · 

Jayne Graham
5m  · 

My great grandparents sitting on a couch in the sitting room on Moore Street

Genealogy — Hello From Calgary— Hughes Innisville

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Genealogy — Hello From Calgary— Hughes Innisville

I descend from James McAlister and Mary More. James McAlister (Sr. or Jr.) had the west 1/2 of Lot 18, Concession 7, Ramsay Township.

I THINK James McAlister and Gavin McAlister (of the 8th concession) may have been brothers, and I believe that Janet McAlister, who married Robert Peacock, may have been their sister. Still working out that angle.

I’m also related to the Coburns of Pembroke, Lowes of Pakenham and McDowells of Shawville.) —KH McAlister

Feb 26 1909– Almonte Gazette

KH- I found these things and thought you might like them for your research

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Feb 1911, Fri  •  Page 3
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The Windsor Star
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
20 Feb 1909, Sat  •  Page 1
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The Winnipeg Tribune
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
06 Jul 1911, Thu  •  Page 1

Lanark County 1869

Vol 1, pg 289 – James ANDERSON, 26, blacksmith, Beckwith, Innisville, s/o Matthew & Fanny, married Mary MORRIS, 20, Beckwith, Innisville, d/o Thomas & Mary Ann, witn: Robert HUGHES of Innisville, 6 Nov 1869 at Perth

Innisville Ontario school students, 1888, in which there are several McCoy children named.
This picture was taken about 1888 at the Innisville School and includes some adults from the community as well as the regular school children and some younger ones who had not yet started in school. Standing on the platform: Fred Clifford, W.H. Churchhill, Mrs. Margaret Code, Kate Jackson, Eliza Code, Dorcas Butler, Kate Hughes, Emma Ruttle, Mary E. Code, Selena York, Rose Burns. On the Steps: Tom Dial, Stella Way, not known, Annabel Hughes, Carrie Hughes Lily Hughes, Ida
Belle Crampton, Maggie Crampton, Verda Hughes, Maggie McCoy, – McCoy. Standing: Betty Dial, Esther Jackson, not known. Bertha Crampton, Eva Code, – Hopkins, the Crampton twins (Margaret & George). Front Row: Hugh McKim, Ernie Ruttle, Will Crampton, George Code, Eddie Martin, Lloyd Moore, – Lowe, Will Hughes, Gladys Code and her cousin from Perth, Jack Code (sitting), Norma Code (sitting), Arthur Code, Edmund Code, not known, Bertha Moore, 2 McCoy sisters.”
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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Dec 1897, Thu  •  Page 2

Perth Courier, October 10, 1873

Hughes—Died at Innisville on Wednesday  of malignant puerperal pock (?), Christy Ann, beloved wife of Mr. Robert Hughes, aged 22.

Hughes—Died at the same place and of the same cause on Wednesday the 1st inst., the beloved wife of Mr. John Hughes, aged 22.

Perth Courier October 17, 1873

Hughes—Died, at Innisville on the 2nd October, Christy Ann, beloved wife of  Mr. Robert Hughes aged 22 years.  At the same time and place, on 8th Oct., Catherine, beloved wife of Mr. John Hughes, aged 22 years.  Cut off in the morning of life and much domestic happiness, the deceased (unreadable word) have left a blank in the circle of their relatives and friends; but the bereavement to their kindred is their individual gain, for full of glorious hope of immortality through Christ they have passed into endless rest.  It was our privilege to witness day by day the gradual overthrow of their strength and beauty to the onset of that terrible disease, while a deep conviction forced itself upon us that at least death had no sting and we felt that it was good for us to be present.  A hallowed scene awaited us at Katy’s deathbed and the impression left upon our hearts we acknowledge to have been indeed solemn and salutary.  With a heaving breast we watched her patient endurance under much physical suffering; her calm fortitude when she meekly exclaimed when told when there was no hope of recovery “Thy will, not mine, be done” and as her gentle spirit hovered in the boundaries of another world and life and its attachments were fading fast from her earthly gaze, we saw it in fancy win its way through infinite space to join the band of ransomed ones around the throne.  The last interview between Katy and her friends cannot lightly be forgotten.  When the shadow of the dark valley was closing around her, when all that made life dear was becoming indistinct in the gloom of approaching dissolution—she breathed an eternal farewell to her friends, admonishing each one solemnly to meet her beyond the shining river in the New Jerusalem, where there is no more sorrow or parting—where God shall wipe away all tears and Christ shall be all in all.

Lloyd Hughes Carleton Place Grocer

So Where Was that Sign? MacGregor’s Body Shop — Hughes Grocery — Asselstine and Shwerdtfeger’s

Carleton Place Business–Lloyd Hughes List

Feathers in the Dusk of Night-Hughes Island

Lloyd Hughes Carleton Place Grocer

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Lloyd Hughes Carleton Place Grocer

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 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Dec 1980, Mon  •  Page 3

 

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Photos-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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127-131 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870

The first storey storefronts of this building have been modified from the original glass windows for easier viewing of merchandise–hence the different colours of brick. 127-131 Bridge Street has housed a number of different businesses including pharmacies, clothing stores, grocery stores, and poolrooms.

The Hughes family bought the pharmacy from Dr. Preston in 1905.

W. J. Hughes Rexall Drug store was located on the corner and Thomas Lloyd Hughes born in 1897 along with his brother Harold until they each decided to run a smaller store at the opposite  ends of town. Lloy’s store was on Moffatt Street and Harold on Lake Ave West. For 50 years they were in groceries together and then the store was sold to Thomas’s nephew and for 12 years Thomas drove a butcher wagon. There was a dark room at the rear of the store where Mr. Hughes tested your eyes for glasses. You could buy a roll of film #116 for a Brownie Box camera for 25 cents and for $1.25 he would send it away to be developed.

The folks in Carleton Place will always remember the Rexall Drug annual 1 cent sale and every local household stocked up on cough medicine, cough drops, peroxide and all sorts of liniment. Some of the clerks that worked there were: Olive Dick, Ruby Voyce, and John Briscoe and Wilbert Robertson.

Harvey Asselstine attended the Ontario College of Pharmacy in 1929. In 1944, he
returned to Carleton Place and bought the drugstore at the corner of Bridge and
Franklin, from W.J. Hughes who operated it for 38 years. Betty Findlay and Mary Cook both worked at Assestine’s Pharmacy.  In the rear of Asselstine’s drug store the CPR Telegraph operated during the 1950s. Asselstine expanded his drug store and bought out Hughes Grocery. In 2006 the Athen’s Corners Restaurant  was located there.

Taber and McCrae operated a Men’s and Boy’s clothing store within Struther’s Block, which later became a pool hall  (next door) operated by Mel Barclay. Charlie Giroux, who only had one arm took over the pool hall then Ab Dowseth from Smiths Falls operated it for a short time but when McCann and Porter gained ownership they moved the pool hall to the old Bank of Commerce.

Jeremy Stinson— That corner was, for much of my childhood, the home of the Blossom Shop. Back before the one way street.

 

 

 

So Where Was that Sign? MacGregor’s Body Shop — Hughes Grocery — Asselstine and Shwerdtfeger’s

Carleton Place Business–Lloyd Hughes List