Tag Archives: house

Documenting 178 Flora Street Carleton Place

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Documenting 178 Flora Street Carleton Place

Hi Linda I grow up in Carleton Place I childhood home was 178 Flora St. We bought the home in 1965 when I was 5 and my Mother sold the home in 1998 a year after my Father had passed away. I had always what to know the history of the home- Lyann Lockhart

Kate TeleckiMy grandpa Stewart Drummond grew up in this house and attended cphs! My mom always told me the story of how he was the first kid at cphs to have his own bicycle and all the kids lined up to have a turn on it !

Gail GrabeWe lived in the Bungalow beside this house for about 11 yrs. (69-80), the Hamiltons lived in that home, our young children played together.

Angela Hurdis BeazleyHi there, we currently live in this home. We purchased it about 10-11 years ago with my parents as joint project to renovate.My husband, myself and our children have lived here now for about 7 years.We don’t know about the history of the home but we did purchase it from the Hamilton’s. My parents & husband did a lot of renovations to take the house back to its original state with a modern look to it.We are looking at having some landscaping done this summer to give it a better curb side appeal.We would also love to know any history of the home as well.

Kyla BaronHey Kate, Sorry this is late. My Mom doesn’t know much at all. She said they were just told that was where her grandparents lived, the rare time they drove by it. Uncle Bill probably knows more (Grace Drummond). What we do know is: Great Grandpa Drummond was a wealthy man and owned tenant properties (Mom doesn’t know how many or exactly how he came to have that money). Sometime during the Great Depression, the farmer who worked the property on County Rd. 29 defaulted on the mortgage (held by Great Grandpa Drummond) and so, the Drummond family moved there, selling the Flora Street house at some point. We don’t know how old our Grandpa Stewart Drummond was when they moved to the farm on 29 but he spent the majority of his life there. His father owned many horses and the barn there was originally built as the stables to house them. Our Grandpa Stewart hated horses and when his father died, he got rid of them and over the years, lost all the money his father had. Mom says he never talked about his father so she doesn’t know much more than that. She said it’s possible that her Great grandparents (our Great – Great grandparents) might have built that house but she doesn’t know for sure. Sorry we can’t be more help!

Ray PaquetteLinda Seccaspina When I was in Grade 9, ca. 1954, Arthur and Catherine (MacGregor) Cousens lived in part of this house but as he was often moved in his work, I believe they were just renting the north part of the house. I have no idea who owned the home at the time….

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Did you know?

James E. Bennett built three houses in the Flora Street area.  One of them is occupied by his grandson Bill and his wife Lois.  Behind the house were stables where up to five horses were housed.  They were used as delivery horses for the meat market, and they knew the routes as well as the men who drove them.  One old horse, the story goes was so familiar with the routine of the business that when Findlay’s Foundry whistle blew at 12 noon, the horse headed for Flora Street with or without the driver.  “You better be on that cart when the whistle went, or the horse went home without you”, was the saying of the day.  In the morning a delivery man went door to door picking up order for meat.  There were no telephones, and this was the way the business ran.  The lady ordered from the delivery man, he rushed back to the store, filled the order and rushed back out to deliver it so she could cook it for the noon meal.

Abner Nichols once owned a saw mill along the Mississippi River at the bottom of Flora street. Nichols was also in the timber business and owned a planning mill on the corner or Lake Ave and Moore Street in 1896. The Nichols home was the first home of a family that produced three mayors of Carleton Place over three generations. Nichols was also Carleton Place’s first Reeve, and served as Mayor in 1894 and in 1899. Later the house served as the rectory for St.James Anglican church.

Katie ChallenMy husband, daughter and I recently moved into “Butcher” Bill’s and Lois Bennett’s house on Flora Street. We’ve heard so many lovely stories about them since coming here. I’ve been doing a bit of research on the Bennett family…what a legacy! We’re currently working on cleaning up the garage, which apparently housed the delivery horses for Bennett’s Meat Market.

Related reading

Old McRostie Had a Farm in Carleton Place …..

The Floating Bridge of Carleton Place — Found!

Willis House Clippings Photos and Comments

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Willis House Clippings Photos and Comments
Larry Clark photo– 2015

Margaret McCann-patterson

This was my Grand Parents house, Michael and Julia McCann. The house was sold when they died but the back parcel of land was kept for sometime and we had a Christmas tree farm. The land was sold I think in 1982 or around there. I also had an Aunt, Alice Quinn who lived on Neopolitan Street. I believe Doris Quinn is doing a tree on the Quinn side. I have alot of history in Carleton Place and loved seeing the house.

Wes White-remember many meals and sleep overs within that house as a.kid. it was owned by the Noyse-Browns at that time.

Janice Tennant Campbell

April 5 at 1:53 PM  · One I took in August 2019

Johnna Ferrill GloverClaire and Timmy Noyes-Brown lived there. They had ponies too

Wes White-Johnna Ferrill Glover … and goats, chickens, ducks and pigs. Lol

Sandi RasmussenClaire actually sent me this article on the house last week! Loved that house😃

Dan WilliamsBird’s eye view of all the parkin’ up at the point back in the day.

read more at Whatcha’ Talkin Bout Willis? — This Old House in Carleton Place

Let’s look at some real vintage fashion, as modelled by this unknown Carleton Place gal! Taken c. 1880, the photo includes lots of nice details. Our model is wearing a watch at her waist, and an interesting floral/bead/feather brooch, as well as earrings and another brooch at her neck. She’s holding “Anthony’s Photographic Bulletin” – perhaps she worked at the studio? The photo was taken at the George E. Willis studio in Carleton Place. He operated on Bridge Street from 1870 to 1896 and was a member of the Willis family whose log home stands today at the western end of Lake Avenue. George was a photographer, musician and bandmaster, who died in Vancouver in 1940 , aged 96 while living with his son Stephen T. Willis of Ottawa business college fame.–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
Geordie (1872 – 1951) and Henry (1875 – 1957) were the sons of Richard and Martha Willis. Richard was a steamboat engineer on the Mississipi River.
In 1891, at the age of 16 Henry was working as a spinner in a local woollen mill. As adults, the two brothers worked odd jobs and lived on Frank Street. They never married and are buried at St. James Anglican Cemetery.
The men of the Willis family were known as “River Rats” as they were river men and steamboat drivers–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Dec 1935, Thu  •  Page 17

Also read

George Willis — Photographer and Son of Pioneer Family

Before and After on Lake Ave West — H. D. Gilmour

Threads of Morals on Lake Ave West

The Forgotten Cemetery at the End of Lake Ave West

Ed Fleming — The First Funeral Parlour in Carleton Place

The Last Man to Let you Down? Political Leanings at Local Funeral Homes?

“Sufferin” Sinders! What was Happening on Lake Ave West Today?

Whatcha’ Talkin Bout Willis? — This Old House in Carleton Place

71 Lake Ave West — The McGee House

Documenting 25 Charlotte Street

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Documenting 25 Charlotte Street
Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum added a new photo to the album: Then and Now: Homes.
March 10 at 5:08 PM  · 
25 Charlotte Street

Kathy DevlinThis house was owned by Mrs. Andrews when I was a child. Our back yards connected. We lived on Herriott St

Darleen Wallace –We lived there when we were first married in 1971, 50 years ago. Mrs Andrews was the sweetest lady. We were in the upstairs apartment and we did encounter bats a few times.

Joann VoyceI grew up on the street in front of this house. In the early 1950s. The McLaren family down, the Tinslay family up and the Lyttle family at the right rear On the opposite side, Drummond and Patterson families

Dale CostelloDon’t remember this house, and lived on HerriotSt.

Joann VoyceDale Costello That’s because we had our own gang on Charlotte St. but we let the Bassett’s from Herriot on our street as they were related

John EdwardsWas this the Taylor family home? (Of the Taylor Block on Bridge St

Karen Fleming FergusonI lived in the “penthouse” as I liked to call it. I rented from the Lackey’s who owned Lackey Locksmith

Marlene SpringerMy grandfather in 1960 lived across the street in the nursing home run by Mina Lyons!❤

M Terry KirkpatrickI believe this is where I lived after getting married in 1975. $65 a month rent. Back apartment.

Karen ClarkLinda, I can’t believe that both houses my parents lived in have been on facebook in the last few days. We lived in this one after Dad came back from Korea and was posted to Ottawa 1953-55. It was rented from Charlie Cox.

John ArmourHave always known the Bruntons (horses) house. (I was born and grew up at 93 Frank Street and grandparents next door at corner Emily and Frank.) Waughs lived next door, then the Patterson’s house (once damaged by fire), then the Williams house and then your house (Bruntons)

Lizzie BruntonAngela Bennett I’m not sure who built the house, but I believe Arnold and Eunice lived there over 50+ years. Nancy GiffinJohn Brunton Flooring Diane. I’m sure you all have way more info then me. Loved that home, lots of amazing family memories there💜

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Apr 1971, Sat  •  Page 35
Former Peden Nursing Home read-Who Was A. W. Bell of Carleton Place?

Charlotte Street Clippings

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Jul 1957, Sat  •  Page 5

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
19 Jul 1911, Wed  •  Page 2
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Jun 1939, Mon  •  Page 14

Larry Clark — Upper Bridge Street in Carleton Place

More on 266 Bridge Street — Nancy Douglas

Who Was A. W. Bell of Carleton Place?

Before and After — Photos of Carleton Place

The Renting Racket of 1942

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The Renting Racket of 1942

Renting rooms in a house at a total revenue of more than is being paid for the whole place seems to be developing into a racket”.

One such case bared the fact that a tenant of a nine-roomed house in Overbrook, for which he was paying $27, asked the committee to allow him an increase of $4.25 from $21.75 for three rooms. The increase was disallowed.

A landlord in the West End who had converted a single house which formerly rented at $45, into a duplex and was occupying the lower half himself, sought permission to charge $65 for the upper duplex. He was allowed $50.

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Jul 1942, Wed  •  Page 18

However, all landlords were not unreasonable, by any means, and wherever increases were justified in 1942, they were given–of 17 cases heard, increases were allowed to tally or partially on 15.

A summer cottage in Woodroffe renting at $175 for the season was allowed a $25 boost to $200 instead of to $250 as sought. The present lease expires this month and the increase was for next year. The judge remarked that it was early to ask for next year’s rental. “Not at all,” replied the land lady. “We have people wanting to rent it in January for the summer.” There is a cabin and garage on the property, for the same rental, and the cottage is furnished.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Aug 1942, Sat  •  Page 29

A single house in Lower Town which had been gutted by fire was made into three apartments. The landlord occupies one and wanted $45 each a month on the other two, claiming he spent $8,000 in remodelling. A tenant argued that it was not worth the price since there was no electric stove or refrigerator and she had to buy ice. The walls are gyproc and we hear all the noise. The rooms are small the bathroom is only 4 1-2 by feet and it has no window, so have to pay extra electricity for the ventilator,” she said, and enumerated several other things which were wrong with the apartment. When she stopped talking Judge Daly remarked dryly “Aside from all that, though, the place is all right?” Everyone, including the landlord, laughed heartily. Rental was set at $40

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 May 1942, Sat  •  Page 25
"I rented three rooms in the lower part of the house believing I'd pay half the rent, lights, heat, etc. I've got in two tons of coal already for it." . . . "You've got two tons of coal?" interrupted Judge E. J. Daly during a fiery case at the Rentals Committee session last night. "That's no way to do. You should pay the landlady rent and let her pay expenses. I think I'll fix it that way." The tenant got excited. "If you do. I'll never have any life with her." she said emphatically. Her landlady, who asked a boost from $15 to $30 a month for the winter months, remarked, "It used to be rooms. Then she padlocked the door so we couldn't get through, so it's a flat now. I'm supposed to be the landlady but at times I feel like the tenant." The rental was set at $23 a month the year round."

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Dec 1942, Fri  •  Page 24



The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Mar 1942, Fri  •  Page 22


A tenant of two rooms in Center Town won a $5 a month reduction from $15 when he explained that others in the house had to pass through the room he ate in on their way to the toilet which was just beside his room. "There's no light and no ventilation in it." he said. "You'd better have the sanitary inspector there." J. C. G Herwig told him. "The Same Thing." Explaining that his tenant expected to be married but went to war instead, "it's about the same thing." a lawyer sought a changeover from $10 a month with $4 worth of services, to $25 a month without services. The tenant who had a three-year lease helped fix up the place and agreed to pay SI 8 a month before he discovered ht'd have to go before the committee to have it ratified. "But you're asking $23 a month?" the judge asked the landlord's mother. "Yes," she replied, "when my son found I'd have to come here for him he said I'd better ask more to pay for my trouble." The judge chuckled, "Well, well, ask and ye shall receive, eh?" The tenant said the place was not worth any more. "It's on posts. It has no foundation, the walls are not finished and there's no furnace or hot water . . . but there are cockroaches!" Rental was set at $20 a month. Judge Daly encountered some more interesting cases.

In April of 1946 she bought a house on Frank Street in Carleton Place complete with hardwood floors. They really enjoyed the new space after dealing with three people in one bedroom for a few years. Marian and I both smiled as we talked about the first electric (mechanical) washing machine she bought. I remember my Grandmother telling me the same story about hers and how it made life easier for a lot of women. Her sister babysat and lived with Marian until Muriel married in June of 1947. When her sister minded her son, Marian played cards, bowled, and enjoyed fellowship with women her own age at our local Zion Memorial Church. Marian MacFarlane

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Dec 1942, Thu  •  Page 14

Houses of Almonte

We will build Brick Houses in Rideau Heights For $900 to $1200!

Smiths Falls Woman Built House With Her Own Hands — McNeil

Documenting Houses -Almonte — 133 Marshall Street

The Brick Houses of Carleton Place

Win a House in Carleton Place!

The Little Red House– Dinner Parties were Frequent and the Wine Flowed Freely

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

Born Here Lived Here and Will Die Here —

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Born Here Lived Here and Will Die Here —

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Everyone hung their washing across the back yard and no one played out there on washdays, either. No one locked their doors, visitors walked straight in with a ‘hello’ and my mum and neighbour would put the kettle was on for a warm morning cup. I felt secure and loved, with absolutely marvellous places to explore within walking distance. This is the house which was home. Where I greased the walls with grubby hands, scratched the wood with sharp pens, left mud footprints on the hall carpet. I can still hear “Wear your shoes!” “Wash your hands!” and “Time for bath!” Now that was home.

 

Leslie Hanson of the village of White Lake just south of Arnprior is 98. When he was 19, he built his first and only home on the foundation of a former hotel, purchased for $20 in back taxes. In July, 1928, he brought his bride Orpha back from Coxville at Gull Lake to join him and his mother here. Hanson “never was a hand to travel” confides his wife. In fact, he travelled so much cutting lumber and working as a millwright while Orpha worked as a camp cook that staying at home with their two daughters became a treat.

Orpha came willingly to her new husband’s house, which reminded her of her childhood home. “From the beginning, it was just like Coxville where I grew up. It’s a beautiful spot in the summer and winter,” she says. Her husband adds: “I’ve never seen another place I’d rather have lived, so why would I want to give up my house? I was satisfied to go away to saw but it didn’t make sense to have to give up my home to work.” Orpha shows off her combination electric wood stove, and the kitchen cupboards built by her husband. “I can’t see anything in all this moving,” she says. “We added to the back part of the house (a new kitchen and family room) when the kids were pretty much grown up. And I used to keep tourist cottages here. There is a lot of hard work, a lot of memories in this house. You know, it’s your home.”

Harold Lisk is 69. He keeps a tiny herd of nine head of cattle, and lives in a farmhouse with his younger brother Murray. The house was built by his grandfather a stone’s throw from the village of Killaloe. “Born here, lived here all my life, and hope to die here if I’m able,” Lisk says laconically.

 

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Harold Lisk of Kilaloo and the Hansons of White Lake and Carol Doran of Pembroke

 

“I’m happy here as long as I can keep things going. There is work to do, things to keep busy.” He won $100,000 in a lottery in 1987, but he didn’t get around to picking it up in Toronto for five months. The windfall, his second in five years (Lisk won $10,000 in the same lottery in 1982), hasn’t changed his life much. He’s smartened up the plact a bit, with a vinyl cushion floor and running water in the kitchen, and he’s thinking of springing for an indoor toilet soon, too. But move? “What would I want to move into the village for?” It isn’t only oldtimers who stay put The Citizen’s Pembroke bureau chief Carol Doran, 37, grew up in the comfortable, meticulously-maintained brick bungalow she shares with long-time companion John Freeman. Doran, an only child, inherited her family home in 1980 following the death of her mother and relocation of her father, who has also since died. At the time, she had recently ended a five-year hiatus away from home in Ottawa, to return to Pembroke and the quality of small-town life. “This house was always home, but it was my parents’ home. When your parents are alive, you are always a kid always proving yourself one way or another.” “When I was younger, I had to spread my wings, to pull away. But I don’t have to prove anything anymore. You reach a stage in your life when you don’t And particularly since my parents have died, there are a lot of fine, important memories here for me.” Doran and Freeman have retained some of the original furniture for sentimental reasons. A kelly green sofa in the living room, for example, was once spirited away by an Irish ancestor in Eganville “who tippled a bit” and was “one step ahead of the bailiff,” Doran recalled with a laugh.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Apr 1988, Sat  •  Page 58

 

A House is no Longer a Home When a Landslide Brings You Down

SISTERS TAKE ACTION TO RECOVER LAKE AVE HOMESTEAD– Nolan Vs Nolan

The Doctor Dolittle of White Lake–Harry Brown

Houses of Almonte

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Houses of Almonte

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“We wanted a good view of the pond and we didn’t want a room that would collect sun and heat at the times of day we’re most likely to use it in the evenings and on weekends. Besides, the evening sun lights up the far shore of the pond and it’s a spectacular view.” Working from architectural drawings, Parent built a scale model of his new home out of cardboard.

The heating system is forced air electric with a heat pump that Parent estimates saves one-third on the annual fuel bill. The monthly hydro bill for the 3,000 square foot home is $100. Parent decided on 400 amp service and there’s room to add more, he says. The couple also installed a central vacuum system in the laundry room.

At the southeastern end of the ground floor, Parent placed  a large airy kitchen and a dining room with sliding glass doors that lead out to a stone patio, and a family room overlooking the lake. The kitchen, like the foyer and ground floor hall, is covered in red clay tiles. It also stainless steel cupboards.

A sunken living room and entrance foyer occupy the next level. The 27 foot by 16 foot living room has corner windows overlooking the lake of a yet to be installed fireplace. Three bedrooms, sauna and bathroom occupy the third floor. The ensuite master bedroom has a large bath and a separate dressing area with oodles of storage for suitcases and clothing. A small angular window gives the room plenty of natural light.

The fourth level is Parent’s hideaway a two-tiered studio with plenty of room for drafting tables and book cases as well as a photography darkroom. Off the studio is the home’s only sun deck. “We didn’t want decks to obstruct the views of the-pond,” says Renee Parent. “We preferred to walk out of doors into a completely natural setting.”

It took the couple three years and $100,000 (including the cost of the land) to build the house. “We didn’t go to a contractor because of the complexity of the design,” says Parent. “We had a builder put in the foundation and the skeleton frame then we took over.”

The couple spent one winter living in the lowest level while they tackled the insulation and drywall. A drywaller contractor was hired to do all the joints, a task Parent felt unequal to attempt. Though they haven’t kept a complete accounting of their expenditures, the Parents say the custom built  windows cost $6,000 and the heating system was another $4,000 to $5,000. They figure it will cost an additional $10,000 to completely finish their home. “Materials have skyrocketed in the last two years. The replacement value of this place is about $185,000 and we just couldn’t afford to build it now,” says Parent.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Oct 1980, Sat  •  Page 63

 

 

 

Documenting Houses -Almonte — 133 Marshall Street

Union Almonte & Ramsay Contagious Hospital (Pest House) — Looking for Information

More About the Eccentric Stafford Family in Almonte

Almonte Bridge- Unsurpassed in the County

What Almonte Would Like to See in 1892

More Almonte Memories – Marty Taylor’s Mum

Tears From the Old Gears of the Mills

A House is no Longer a Home When a Landslide Brings You Down

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A House is no Longer a Home When a Landslide Brings You Down

springside

Part 1 2012

I began this story last Saturday after I took pictures of homes that are now red and yellow tagged and about to slide down one of the hills in San Pablo, CA. For 21 days it has rained and anyone living on a precarious slope in the Bay Area knows the dangers. One of the homes that is red tagged was actually built on the same spot that a former residence in 1973 tumbled down to its final fate. How people can build on hills, or on fault lines, just for a view in this area boggles my mind.

As I drove by and watched neighbours help each other load belongings into U Hauls I understood the feelings that everyone had. In 1995 my home had been ravaged by fire and I too sat there looking at destruction that I did not have any control over. I cannot begin to tell you how one feels when devastation hits your inner core as you watch something you loved vanish in a few fleeting hours.

It was a cold January day and the kids were flooding the rink outside when I noticed our German shepherd, Snoopy racing in from the greenhouse with a huge plume of black smoke trailing him. If there is an emergency I am not the one to send to an EMT unit as I panic easily. I screamed for someone to call 911 and Angelo thought a hose spraying a steady stream of water into the basement window was enough to contain the fire.

Within five minutes the basement was engulfed with flames and I attempted to go into the greenhouse to save the birds and my ferret. Smoke quickly turns into a blackness that cannot be measured on a colour chart and within seconds I was trapped. A local fireman, Ab Hurdis, came in to search for me and ended up saving my life as I could no longer find my way out.

My sons and I were sent over to a neighbour’s home and we sat there, shivering and watching the firemen try to save our house. I wanted to cry but I couldn’t, and the kids kept asking me if everything was going to be alright. In my irrational mind I thought things would return to normal once the fire trucks were gone and life would go back to the way it was.

The fight for our home was not over for another 18 hours. The Ocean Wave firemen left at about 5 pm overwhelmed with the intensity of the smoke and one ended up in the hospital. They had done their best and thought the fire had been put to rest but Angelo and his father sat guard all night watching for hot spots. Sure enough at 1 am a wall in the living room went up in flames and had they not been there the house would have been a total loss.

The next day the kids and I returned to our home and I knew then and there that everything was not going to be alright. The living room hardwood floor was swollen with water and raised in many places. The charred Christmas tree and all its decorations stood against silent black walls. I stood there and realized that there was a long road ahead of us and my tears began.

My eldest son told me that he was so sorry that his stuffed monkey “Congo” had caused all of the damage. I looked at him in shock and realized he thought that the Beanie Baby he had bought at Michaels two days before was the cause of the fire. I quickly tried to change his mind but knew that he would forever blame the little stuffed monkey as the cause.

Within three days a restoration unit had been summoned by the insurance company and we were notified that because the house had been built with three foot stone walls that they were not going to tear it down. It would take an eternity of gutting the house and rebuilding the interior at a cost of $500,000.00 to make it whole again.

Watching the contents of your home that were not damaged being catalogued, wrapped and sent away in boxes by strangers is something I hope no one ever has to live through. For months I lived in the kitchen that had not been touched and baked for the 11 carpenters that worked in my home and became my surrogate family. They had smiles for me every day and helped me wipe away my tears. They became a source of laughter for my sons and the day they finally left I felt like I had lost my best friends.

No matter what has been done to your home, once it has been touched by tragedy it will never be the same. It seems to lose the original soul in the belly of its interior and because of the destruction many pieces of life are lost and will never come back.

As I sat on the floor of the restoration company looking at the items that had been salvaged and were going to be returned to my newly repaired home, I finally realized that life was not about the stuff you own.

From that day on I wanted very little and was grateful that the lives of my sons had been spared, but it was too late. Like the tree in the picture above that is fighting to remain erect against the sliding earth I had to fight too. The landslide in my mind had begun and it was slowly falling down the hill.

 

The Curry Herron House of Munster

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The Curry Herron House of Munster

 

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 - Happy MUNSTER, Ont. Curry Herron of the...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 24 Jun 1972, Sat,
  3. Page 34

THE DAVID GEORGE ROSS FAMILY HOME PAGE:Information about Thomas Herron

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

relatedreading

The Young Family Funeral Home Lanark County

Things You Don’t Know About Carlow Lodge and the Kidds

More Memories of The Beckwith McTavish House

Home and Garden Before Home and Garden Magazine

The James Black Homestead

Thomas Leach House- Donna Mcfarlane– Lot 12 conc 9 Beckwith

History Still Lives on at The McEwen House in Beckwith

The House on a Beckwith Hill–The McTavish House and Ceiling Medallions

The House of Daughters –Stonecroft House

Update on The Manse in Beckwith

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Home and Garden Before Home and Garden Magazine

The James Black Homestead

The Mysterious Riddell— H B Montgomery House

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Rescuing the Money Pits —The Other Dunlop Home with the Coffin Door

The Carleton Place House with the Coffin Door

Before and After in Carleton Place –The Doctor is in!

Heh Miss Wilsonnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn! Carleton Place Heroe

Was This the Architect of the Findlay Homes on High Street?

The Carleton Place House That Disappeared

The McCarten House of Carleton Place

Old McRostie Had a Farm in Carleton Place

Time Capsule in the ‘Hi Diddle Day’ House?

The Louis on Sarah Street for $43,500 — Before and After– Architecture in Carleton Place

Memories of Mississippi Manor

Day in the Life of a 70’s Pattie Drive Home – The Stay at Home Mom Era

Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

The Brick Houses of Carleton Place

So What Happened to The Findlay House Stone?

The Stanzel Homes of Carleton Place

The Appleton Chinchilla House

More Memories of The Beckwith McTavish House

The Wilkie Lowry House on Highway 29

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 - The Wilkie ALMONTE, Ont. We, of the cities, are...

 - al-, -post -with butternutstatr rail-lend a...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 09 Dec 1972, Sat,
  3. Page 39

The Wilkie Lowry house was owned by my great grandfather, John Fairbairrn Greig, in the 1860s

My great r\andfather, Thomas Campbell Arthur (not MCArthur), married J F Greig’s daughter

Frances Josephine Greig. My grandmother,Jessie Miller Arthur,(Hamilton) was born and grew up in the house as did her eight brothers and sisters. TC. Arthur also ran the Appleton store as dd his uncle Thomas Arthur. Granny was a friend if Mrs Hollie Lowry. I believe they were both members of the ROCKY RIDGE WI. When the Arthurs left the farm they carved there initials on an upstairs window. 2021 marks 200 years since the first of my family arrived in Ramsay. )Robert and Thomas Mansell. Enjoy all your articles,Linda. Thanks so much

Judith Salley

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What you Might Not Know About the Union Street House–The Walker Era

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What you Might Not Know About the Union Street House–The Walker Era

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Commander  Lawrence J. Walker and his lovely wife Dutch–born Gwen bought the former Jamieson home in 1958.

They completely decorated the interior and added a new kitchen and a modern bathroom.

They remodelled the front door and replaced a ultra-high front door with a shorter one topped by a decorative fanlight.

They added old carriage lights to the portico.

A lot of the ‘old world’ furniture came from Mrs. Walker’s father in the Netherlands.

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Photo- Linda Seccaspina 1982

 

There was once an old baking cupboard in the house, and the Walkers converted it into a HI-FI cabinet.

The interior woodwork was once all tiger striped ash and the Walkers painted it white and pastel colours.

Gwen Walker was also an artist who painted old pieces with scenic landscapes.

One of the Walker’s biggest projects was a playroom built for their daughter Wendy. It was originally the servants quarters.

Laurence Walker, who was a Civil War buff and scanned old battlefields in Virginia with a mine detector in search of souvenirs, and found old bullets, belt buckles and even a 12 pound cannonball which was featured in the playroom.

 

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Photo- Linda Seccaspina 1982

 

comments

Mary Sterling Jarick Use to smoke at the wall. It was the boundary for smoking at High School circa 1959 – 1962.

JoAnne Dale Commander Walker. We lived there for a while in the early ’70’s. At that point, the Walkers were with External Affairs and he had a posting overseas. My Dad, Armand Dale, was friends with Commander Walker.There used to be a couple of canons outside the front entrance.

Marty Taylor I used to live right across Union St from this house. Went to both the public school and grade 9 of the HS, both of which were just up the road. Believe we moved into that house around 1960. We had the train tracks in our back yard.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte