Tag Archives: hotel

The Tales of the Klondike Hotel/ Klondike Inn South March Road

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The Tales of the Klondike Hotel/ Klondike Inn South March Road

Carol McCarthy Martin

 here is the one photo I have of the Klondike Inn. Please note it was known by both names- Klondike Inn and Klondike Hotel. It was formerly on the March Road.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada07 Mar 2010, Sun  •  Page 3

by Kelly Eagan

Driving along the March Road the other day after an absence of some months we notice an old, creaky friend is gone. And buried. The Klondike Inn has vanished. Empty for many years now, it had always been a source of exotic speculation, coloured by the odd family story about drink, daring, desperation. Well, we just had to know, didn’t we? Not long after, we are at the kitchen table in a house two doors away, home to the Burke family, the Klondike’s last and longtime owners.

Outside, the afternoon rush-hour traffic is racing by, as high-tech alley unchains its workers for the weekend hands on wheel, blue teeth gritting, we imagine. The road, indeed the past, is under siege. This was once the stretch where the western city gave way to country, where Zarlink and Alcatel faded to cows and corn stalls and split-rail. Now it is all pipes and trucks and steel girders, the opening overture for Sobeys, Pharma Plus and Dollarama. The gold rush finally hit the Klondike, 113 years later, flattening the old girl in the name of progress.

Donna-Lee Burke is the unofficial family historian. With bits of archival material and family memory, we piece together the Klondike’s story. In 1870, there was a hotel on the same site, corner of March and Klondike roads, owned by a John Turner. It was lost to fire and rebuilt in pale red brick, opening in 1896 and licensed two years later. It seems to have had three names in its day: the Bytown, the Klondike Hotel, the Klondike Inn. In its early years, it had a wrap-around porch, giving it an air of grandeur.

This undated photograph shows the November to make way for new stores there was wood trim and fancy banisters. Its name suggests sawdust floors and fortunes lost at all-night poker, but hunters, trappers, loggers, tradesmen, short-hop travellers, railway men, were more its bread and butter. Donna-Lee says it was built with three layers of brick, about 50 of which she kept as keepsakes. It was three floors and consisted of large principal rooms on the main floor with a massive kitchen at the back. On the second floor, there were six or seven bedrooms.

Family legend has it that a certain John A. Macdonald once darkened the door. Before the modern era of travel, South March was considered a stopping point for horse-drawn travellers heading west a day from Ottawa, a day from Arnprior. So a collection of taverns grew up, so many that “Whiskey Road” and “Whiskey Town” were names attached to an intersection not far from here. The Klondike came to be owned by the Scissons family sometime before 1913, a family related to the Burkes by marriage. (In fact, Ken Scissons, 82, an Arnprior resident, says three of 10 siblings in his family were born in the Klondike.

Since then, it has been used mostly for storage, though Donna-Lee said the Burkes, for compassionate reasons, let a poor family live there for eight years without paying rent. With the imminent expansion of March Road from two to four lanes (six at intersections), the Klondike’s days were numbered. Moving it would have been difficult, if not impossible, and renovations would have wildly expensive. Demolition seemed the only reasonable option.

On Nov. 21, in a five-hour flurry, the building was torn down. It had no heritage designation. Across the street, the old March House restaurant sits on a new foundation, set back from the street. The building and a lovely stone one it is is to be preserved and given a new assignment. With the Klondike gone, it will live as an orphan, just as the road is losing its sense of long ago, a place of exotic possibility. Progress, for all its advantages, suffers this great flaw: it arrives with a ruthless predictability, place-less, bored at what came before. Contact Kelly Egan at 613-726-5896 or by e-mail, kegan(g)thecitizen.canwest.com

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa JournalOttawa, Ontario, Canada30 Apr 1898, Sat  •  Page 5

How the “Klondike” Hotel at South March Got Its Name

A lot of people in Ottawa have heard of the old Klondike Hotel at South March, but few have likely heard how the hotel came by its name. Burned in the fire of 1870, the old John Turner frame hotel was made over, bricked and reopened in 1897. Mr. Turner gave a party to his friends to celebrate the reopening. Somebody suggested that as the hotel was virtually a new one, It should have a new name. Suggestions for names were called for. A lot of names were offered.

As might be supposed, some were foolish, and some were quite unsuitable. Most of the names were discarded by ‘ unanimous vote. Names began to run low. Finally a man who was going to the Klondike rose and offered the name “Klondike.” He said that as the Klondike was full of gold, It would be a good omen to use that name. It might ensure Mr. Turner’s pockets being always full of gold. The idea took like hot cakes. Quickly the name was adopted. The name took with the public. At that time the Klondike was in everybody’s mouth. Its fame as a goldfleld was becoming widespread. In the years succeeding 1897 the Klondike was a popular hostelry.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa JournalOttawa, Ontario, Canada03 Oct 1952, Fri  •  Page 2

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa JournalOttawa, Ontario, Canada12 Apr 1907, Fri  •  Page 9

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa JournalOttawa, Ontario, Canada01 Apr 1899, Sat  •  Page 12

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa JournalOttawa, Ontario, Canada04 Jul 1929, Thu  •  Page 3

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada17 Jun 1902, Tue  •  Page 7

The Mystery of the Pump Handle — Gatineau Road

The Carp Flour Mill Fire 1991

The Suckers of Carp — Johnston Family

The Carp River Floating Bridge

The Lanark County “Carpetbaggers”–Lanark Electric Railway

Clippings of the Ferguson Falls Public Houses

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Clippings  of the Ferguson Falls Public Houses

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Thu, Apr 25, 1912 · Page 12

Originally known as Millford, Ferguson’s Falls, named for a Captain George Ferguson was a bustling hive of activity with a sawmill, grist mill, tannery, three hotels, two stores, a post office, a school house, a wagonmaker and a shoemaker and a church. Ferguson’s Falls was a thriving mill town, with a tannery and many small businesses. In the 1830s, the four O’Connor brothers from Ireland landed in Ferguson’s Falls and one built this log home close to the Mississippi River in 1835.

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
15 Jan 1913, Wed  •  Page 4

The lumber industry was a lucrative business for Ferguson’s Falls and log drives were a yearly event with a stop-over in the village as the logs headed to Carleton Place sawmills. A lovely log building still stands (2008)as a testament of those days. Back then it was called the ‘Stumble Inn’ and it welcomed the weary lumberjacks as it does modern travelers today– and was run by Bill McCaffrey.

From a history of drummond township

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
28 Apr 1897, Wed  •  Page 1

Robert Doyle also had a place around 1840 on lot 16 on Concession12 in Drummond near the Community Hall. In all there were four public houses. The last one closed in 1900 and there were none after that.

With files from Whiskey and Wickedness number 3.

There is a story that one night a group of young lads gathered at one of the local establishments in Ferguson Falls and they decided their friend Bruce should take himself a wife. His friend Jack Poole insisted that Bruce should marry his visiting cousinas she was available.

Jack went home, put his sisters clothes on, including a hat with a large heavy veil and returned to the hotel. After some discussion and no one being the wiser to Jack’s shenanigans they agreed to be married. Al Ruttle the Justice of the Peace proceeded to declare a long list that the groom had to provide. The newlyweds then went for a walk. A short time later the groom, Bruce came back and said the bride had run away, and he had no idea where she was.

The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
31 Jul 1916, Mon  •  Page 3

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
27 May 1914, Wed  •  Page 5

Photos from DNE Township

Ferguson Falls 101 — The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

Rothwell and Sheppard Genealogy Ferguson Falls

Thomas Hollinger Ferguson Falls Descendants Obituary

Business Directory for Ferguson Falls 1866

Scoundrels Ruining Ferguson Falls

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

Ferguson’s Falls Women’s Institute

Ferguson’s Falls Never Had Any Falls

Once A Ribald River Town, Ferguson’s Falls May Be Dying

Have you Ever Seen the Praying Station? The Buchanan Scrapbooks

Looking for Information —The Reindeer Hotel Watsons Corners -Updates!!!

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Looking for Information —The Reindeer Hotel Watsons Corners -Updates!!!
The Reindeer Hotel in Watsons Corners. 1840s and then destroyed by fire in 1988.

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
15 Apr 1914, Wed  •  Page 5

Name:John Crosbie
Gender:Male
Race:Scotch (Scotish)
Age:83
Birth Date:8 Mar 1864
Birth Place:Ontario
Death Date:3 Oct 1947
Death Place:Watsons Corners, Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Father:James Crosbie
Mother:Jane Crosbie
Spouse:Agnes Jockson

Romalda Park

My husband Clair Park was brought up in Reindeer Inn in Watsons Corners. He is now 87. We lived there in late 70s early 80s with our 2 small children plus his mother Annie Park for awhile. Lovely big house & wonderful yard with big old barn

John Crosbie
BIRTH
1864
DEATH
1947 (aged 82–83)
BURIAL
Saint Andrew’s Cemetery
Watson’s Corners, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada

Thanks to Faye Brownell we have updates!!!

Thanks to Faye Brownell we have updates!!! I also I have the table from the Reindeer Hotel as the Crosbies are related to me. (Faye)

Thanks to Faye Brownell we have updates!!!

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
22 Sep 1909, Wed  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Jan 1938, Sat  •  Page 2

We’ll Never See a Woman Again Like That-Irene Crosbie

Watson’s Corners Community Hall MB Wylie

Fire at the Manse in Watson’s Corners

The Landmark Pine Tree in Watson’s Corners– Gloria Currie

When Researching — Tragedy Somehow Shows Up- Fair Family- Watson’s Corners

More Photos of the Watson’s Corners Kangaroos – Thanks to Connie Jackson

The Valley Calendar 1976– Cindy Duncan–Watson’s Corners

Watson’s Corners School

Watson’s Corners

It’s the Watson’s Corners News 1895!

Social Notes from Watson’s Corners

All the Single Ladies?

It’s the Watson’s Corners News 1895!

The Miserly Woman From Watson’s Corners 1903

The Deserted Fireplace at Watson’s Corners

WATSON’S CORNERS NEWS. 1897-April 16

Watson’s Corners And Vicinity 1891–Shetland Ponies and Cheese

So…. We drove by Kangaroo Crescent

Tie Me Jackelope Down Boy–Tie Me Jackelope Down!

More about Cindy Duncan – Thanks to Connie Jackson

“Once it’s gone you can’t Replace it”- Co-Op Building 1985– Judith Hughes

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“Once it’s gone you can’t Replace it”- Co-Op Building 1985– Judith Hughes

Someone has made an offer to purchase the former Co-op building in Almonte before it is due to be demolished this week. “I am very busy with the Levine .building in Carleton Place,” Judith Hughes said last week, “ or personally, I wouldn’t have taken an interest. But when it comes to the last line,” she stated, she had to stop the building from being destroyed. (read-The Day The Moose in Carleton Place Burned Down)

“ Once it’s gone you can’t ‘replace it,” she said. “I like to put things back exactly as they were. That’s my business,” Mrs Hughes proposes to restore the outside of the structure to its original configuration, with a full-length front porch and balcony on the second floor. All of the bricked-in windows would be re-opened, and paint across the front of the building would be removed with a chemical wash.

The lookout tower would be rebuilt and opened to the public. The interior would see a new building constructed inside the existing shell. Her own engineers would determine the structural strengths and weaknesses, but sellers BAMP investments of Ottawa have stated that the building is “ structurally sound.”

Her plans call for the main floor to be a dining lounge. The upper two floors, with their impressive view, is being designed for a number of one bedroom apartments, “ suitable for couples or seniors,” she stated. “ I think there’s a need for a good dining lounge in Almonte.” The plans as outlined, “ would not conflict with planned zoning changes” slated for March 25 at the council chambers, which would change the back part of the property to “ residential,” for townhouse construction by Brylin Construction.

Clerk Des Houston said the lot line in the proposal is at the rear of the former Co-op building, and does not preclude the demolition of the building. Local Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee, (LA C A C ) members are ecstatic with the last minute development in status for the edifice, a life-long landmark in Almonte, built around 1860 as Riley’s Hotel. On July 1, 1865 it was advertised in the North Lanark Advance as “ The British Hotel, Queen Street, Almonte, Patrick Riley, Proprietor, The best boarding and lodging at reasonable rates. The best liquors always on hand. Good stabling attached to the house.” Jean Macpherson, chairperson of the Local Architectural Conservation Advisory Board said, “ LACAC supports any move to restore the building to its original condition.

Local historian John Dunn grew up across the road from The China Mission Society, which occupied the establishment briefly, as a site to train the first all-Canadian contingent of missionaries for the Orient. He felt it would be a difficult job, but was “ all for” seeing the original facade restored. Joan Rivington, a prominent businesswoman in Almonte said, “ I would do anything to see it saved.

There is a long battle ahead for Mrs Hughes, because her offer is contingent on many factors. Realtor Garth Teskey, acting for the present owners to sell the building, was not optimistic, but wished Mrs. Hughes luck in her efforts. “The building is not sold yet,” he stated Monday, “There are lots of hurdles and many conditions to be met. The demolition order has to be squashed and town council would have to change their direction.”

In the past, the council turned down a request from LACAC to have the building designated as a heritage site on the grounds that it would be more difficult to dispose of. Deputy reeve Herb Pragnell was active, in the movement at that time and is still interested in saving it from the demolishers, who are scheduled to start disassembling the building within days. Mr Teskey continued, “it would have to be inspected to see if it was structurally sound.”

Despite all the obstacles and last minute nature of the reprieve Mrs Hughes-was resolved, “I ’m a pretty determined person once I set my mind to something,”

1985

This was actually Reilly’s Hotel, also known as the Windsor House at one point I believe. It was built by Pat Reilly, who had previously operated the British Hotel. The Almonte House hotel was in the building currently occupied by Subway on Mill Street, and was originally Daniel Shipman’s home. The Almonte Hotel (also Hotel Almonte at one time) was at the corner of High and Bridge Streets. The building survives though no longer a hotel of course.– Brent Eades

In 1985 they began to tear down a 120 year old building in Almonte. To most of us it was known as the Co-Op on Queen Street.  Once upon a time in history it used to be a glamourous hotel in the height of the 1860’s called Reilly’s hotel. Photo- almonte.com
As the years progressed it became a deteriorating eyesore. Carleton Place resident Judith Hughes approached the Almonte council asking for the deadline of to be postponed until April 1 of that year allowing her time to buy the building for renovation. She wanted to construct an apartment building with an added dining lounge. The owner of the building declined Hughes purchase and decided to proceed with the demolition. Photo- almonte.com
The proposed conclusion was to build a smaller building on the property to use as a convenience store or for professional offices. The above photo shows exactly what stands in that very spot today. So does one value the building as a rundown place, or praise it for architectural and historic value?  LACAC recommended the building be designated as a heritage property, but the Almonte town council said it was beyond repair.

Nora Headley

It was also, at one time the “China Missions”, that upon moving from Almonte became known as “Scarborough Foreign Missions.”

Don Raycroft

Linda Eastman they didn’t have rules or guidance back then regarding heritage buildings and their preservation. We lost the train station building for that same reason. Definitely a shame but something that happens very seldom any more.

Kurt Hahn

Linda Eastman And even some buildings are too expensive for owners to maintain at some point, they weren’t necessarily built to last forever. The land itself becomes too valuable to keep an old relic alive, and don’t forget the difference in taxes on unoccupied lots. Sometimes, old means time’s up. Unless the government steps in, then we all pay for it, whether we want to or not.

Stuart McIntosh

I worked in the coop building cleaning and treating seed grain for local farmers at this time of year. Gerald Valentyne hired me to work the night shift and Russell Turner worked the day shift. We used to take a load of grist into there on occasions.

Margaret Porter Greene

Lived across from the Co-Op on Union St. they day the Co-Op came down we stood and watched all day. My kids were amazed.

Don Andrews
April 21, 2021  · 

Spittoon from the old hotel that was the coop

Joe Ryan

I worked there during summer holidays in 1965 and 1966. Heavy hard work!!!! Bill Andrews was there….Gerry Valentine ….Sandy Wright…..and one other guy. It had an elevator that you used a rope to raise and lower it from inside after you put some feed bags into it. Fire drills were scary. You had a harness to get into and a bar slid out and you had to lower yourself to the ground with a rope contraption. Lifting 100lb bags all day and no air back then!!!! Lots of fun. Big money @ 2.00/ hr.

Mary Hurdis

Stuart Hurdis and his sister helped serve food to people when his Grandmother owned the hotel… No alcohol was served.

Jeff Mills

At the time it was taken down the story was that major beams had been cut by the coop to install grain chutes and that it was unsafe. Seemed to be fine the whole time the co-op owned it. I lived across the street on Queen when it came down. I have a brick wall in my house from the brick. Wood shed from floor boards and a few keystones including the one from the front door.

A majestic building in its day.

Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

The Hugh Williams House– Judith Hughes

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

The Day The Moose in Carleton Place Burned Down

What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

Heritage Homes Disputes- Abner Nichols House

More History on the Murphy Morphy McEwen House — Karen Prytula

Larry Clark — Upper Bridge Street in Carleton Place

Documenting Franktown Road Before it Changes

Twenty Two Dollars a Week and Mississippi Hotel Clippings

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Twenty Two Dollars a Week and Mississippi Hotel Clippings
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
07 Dec 1910, Wed  •  Page 1

also read-David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

1920s photo–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Mississippi/ Grand Hotel

Napoleon Lavallee bought the property for $50 in 1869 and opened the hotel in 1872 after he sold the Leland Hotel/ Carleton House on Bridge Street.  The McIlquham family bought it 11 years later in 1883 and when Joe Belisle worked there from 1917-1920 it had ornate woodwork, a grand staircase and the stone facade had wooden white wrap-around verandas. The elegant dining room tables were covered in  fine lace linen and gleaming cutlery, and the Mississippi Hotel became known for its homemade food and attracted travelling salesman from far and wide. The salesmen set up trunks in their rooms offering everything from dishes to clothing that was scooped up by local merchants that came to buy at the hotel. The place was packed daily with fans from Stittsville, Smiths Falls and Perth–and if you talk to Gerald Hastie people came in early for the fresh baked pies, and by noon they were pretty well sold out.The only known photo of Napoleon Lavallee sits on my wall–read-The Napoleon of Carleton Place

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
13 Jan 1897, Wed  •  Page 1
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Sep 1919, Fri  •  Page 4
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Dec 1909, Mon  •  Page 3
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
26 Mar 1902, Wed  •  Page 5
Karen LloydIn the 1950s Buck Fraser lived at the Mississippi Hotel. He used to stand out at the front in a white dress shirt having a cigarette. I don’t know where he worked .
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 May 1913, Tue  •  Page 2

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Aug 1899, Thu  •  Page 7
Jennifer Fenwick Irwin–Carleton Place Museum This was taken the morning after the fire.
Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire- read-Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
24 Nov 1909, Wed  •  Page 1
Buffalo robe or Sasktchewan Robe

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 May 1899, Sat  •  Page 6
Former dinner plates from the old Mississippi Hotel/ Grand Hotel– **
Adin Wesley Daigle**

November 19 at 11:37 AM ·
📷
A recent addition to the collection , a couple plates from the Mississippi hotel in Carleton place 😍👍

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Sep 1912, Fri  •  Page 9
LIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Dec 1914, Sat  •  Page 12
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Jul 1899, Thu  •  Page 7
The Old Side Door of the Mississippi Hotel

David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel

Murders and Mysteries of the Mississippi Hotel

Thieves at the Mississippi Hotel–When Crime Began to Soar

All About Lorraine Lemay –Mississippi Hotel

Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

The Napoleon of Carleton Place

Grandma’s Butterscotch Pie

Mississippi Hotel Beer — Brading’s Beer

In the Mississippi Hotel Mood with Mrs. Glen Miller

The Mystery Murals of The Queen’s and Mississippi Hotel

Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel in 1961

Where Was Linda? A Necromancer Photo Blog -Victorian Seance at the Mississippi Hotel

Spooky Night at the Seccaspina Hotel

Ray Paquette’s Memories- McNeely and the Mississippi Hotel and Doughnuts?

CLIPPED FROMThe Daily StandardKingston, Ontario, Canada13 Jun 1919, Fri  •  Page 6

Letter from Davis House to Scotts in Pakenham- Adin Daigle Collection– Where Was Davis House?

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Letter from Davis House to Scotts in Pakenham- Adin Daigle Collection– Where Was Davis House?
Adin Daigle Collection letter 1890

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Jun 1889, Sat  •  Page 2

Some of the people who figured prominently in the business life of the community in the 1870s: Andrew Matthew, general merchant and issues of marriage licenses; F. H. Davis, proprietor of the Almonte House; 

ALMONTE Ontario The Belmont Hotel Corner Cover 1909–Mr. Eccles prop;

1909

The doors of Hotel Amonte formerly the Davis House have been thrown open to the public, and it seems likely to (ill a serious want that has existed in Almonte for some time. Beginning at the upper floor the building has been renovated, papered and painted and decorated, and when the work on the ground floor is completed, Almonte will be possessed of a hotel that can stand up alongside of any other in the Ottawa Valley. Sanitary drainage and water service will be installed and everything made comfortable tor the guests–

The Lanark Era

Lanark, Ontario, Canada16 Apr 1919, Wed  •  Page 4

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The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
12 Dec 1895, Thu  •  Page 5

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The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
28 Feb 1896, Fri  •  Page 2
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The Star-Chronicle
Merrickville, Ontario, Canada
03 Jun 1909, Thu  •  Page 1
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 Mar 1919, Sat  •  Page 10
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Sat, Dec 11, 1909 · Page 17

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
29 Apr 1914, Wed  •  Page 4
Come on down for surgery — one day only 1886 Almonte Gazette
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
09 Jun 1909, Wed  •  Page 4

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Jul 1898, Fri  •  Page 6
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Apr 1914, Tue  •  Page 13

More Almonte Hotel History — Michael Dixon

A Piece of Almonte History for Sale –A. H. Whitten- Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel — 1990s More history

Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

Meeting Your Neighbours — Paul Latour and The Almonte Hotel

What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

The Fight for Senior Housing in 1982 – Almonte History

Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

Susie’s Kitchen Band– Names Names Names

He Said-and– He Said! Oh Let the Song of Words Play!

 When the Circus Shut the Town Down

Before Rooney’s Pool House There Was.

The ‘Deer-Cow hybrid’ of Carleton Place Entertains the Councillors of Almonte — ORR Genealogy

Clippings from the Lord Elgin Hotel — Babysitting and The Iron Curtain

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Clippings from the Lord Elgin Hotel — Babysitting and The Iron Curtain
Almonte Gazette 1955

I found this in a 1955 newspaper and did you know they still offer child care services?? Amazing!

So I decided to see if there were other things we did not know.

Lost Ottawa
April 20, 2020  · 

If you are running out of movies to watch while isolating your self, Glenn Clark has a Lost Ottawa suggestion for you, and here is a screen grab.
Explains Glenn:
“This is a shot extracted from the movie ‘The Iron Curtain’ at 8 minutes and 15 seconds showing a bit of Lost Ottawa. The two stars Dana Andrews and Gene Tierney arrived in Ottawa for filming on November 26, 1947 and left on December 6th and December 2nd respectively. Gene Tierney had stayed at the Roxborough Apartments while Dana Andrews had stayed at the Lord Elgin Hotel.
Many may remember that Hull Electric had a streetcar terminus at the Chateau Laurier. There were two stairways descending from the bridge immediately west of the Chateau Laurier. On March 29,1946, a fire at E.B. Eddy seriously damaged the north end of the Interprovincial bridge and permanently ended Hull Electric streetcar service to Ottawa and the Chateau Laurier.
This picture captures the recently lost entrance to the Hull Electric terminus, boarded up and marked ‘CLOSED’ and between the two actors, the stone pillar reads ‘Hull Electric’. The actress had just previously walked by the other entrance.”
Lost Ottawa
August 28, 2019  · 
Gord Mills shares a picture of the last time Ottawa’s Chateau Laurier got a new wing …. way back in 1927. It matched!
If I remember correctly, the new wing didn’t actually open until 1929.The limestone came from the Ritchie Cut Stone company.
Lost Ottawa
July 20, 2014  · 

Bar list for Ottawa’s Lord Elgin Hotel, which opened in 1941.
Some interesting drinks on this list — although I’m not sure I remember the Laurel Lounge — and what a “Flip?” For 70 cents, however, I might just stay with Scotch.
Teacher’s was my Grandfather’s favorite. But then he was Scottish.
Lost Ottawa
February 6, 2016  · 
Ottawa’s other “railway hotel” the Lord Elgin under construction in 1941. It was originally built by the Ford Hotel chain (no relation to the car company) in response to the shortage of hotel rooms in the city.
Read the early history at: http://lordelginhotel.ca/lord-elgin-hotel-celebrates-75…/
Lost Ottawa
July 20, 2014  · 
Joel shares a fact sheet for the Lord Elgin Hotel, dated 1975.
It appears to say the room rates for downtown Ottawa were an outrageous $18.90 for a double bed! On the other hand … you could walk to a church of any denomination.
The National Tourist Brokers Association no longer seems to exist according to a quick check of Google.
Peter Clark
February 5, 2014  · 
Here’s an old newspaper ad from the Ottawa Journal on December 2, 1940.

alosread

Humans Of The Lord Elgin – part 1

Clippings of the Old Albion Hotel

Not Hogwarth’s —- It’s Hoggards of Ottawa! Besserer Street History

The Brunswick Hotel — The “dollar-a-day” Huckell Hotel — (Murphy-Gamble Limited)

From Carleton Place to “the Laff” — The Life and Times of Peter Prosser Salter

British Hotel Pakenham –Mrs. McFarlane

Hotels of Early Carleton Place

Did You Know we Once Had a Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel

A Piece of Almonte History for Sale –A. H. Whitten- Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel — 1990s More history

Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

Meeting Your Neighbours — Paul Latour and The Almonte Hotel

Food Review of the Smorgasbord at The Queen’s Royal Hotel 1947

What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

Documenting Some Queen’s Hotel Photos

No to Hotel Licenses in Carleton Place –1952

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No to Hotel Licenses in Carleton Place –1952

November 1952- Almonte Gazette

The plebiscite on granting hotel licenses in Carleton Place resulted in a negative answer on the part of the electors when almost 80 per cent of those eligible to vote went to the polls on Wednesday. Not only for those who favored the change, and a fail to get the necessary 60 per cent, but none of the three questions was accorded a straight affirmative majority. For some strange reason, those who framed the vote chose to submit three questions instead of one direct query.

The ballots asked the electors if they were in favor of men’s beverage rooms; in favor of women’s beverage rooms; in favor of the sale of beer in licensed hotel dining rooms. The vote stood as follows on these three questions: Men’s beverage rooms: for 1,123, against 1,- 263; women’s beverage rooms: for 1,126, against 1,283; dining room, sale, for 1,185, against 1,196.

In 1944, the town voted by more than the necessary 60 per cent majority for a retail liquor store and beer warehouse. Some 900 people entitled to exercise the franchise signed the petition for the vote, that took place yesterday. Figures show that only a couple of hundred more than signed the document voted for the change. Those opposed to beverage rooms were more active than those in favor of them.

Some business people who would have liked to come out actively for the change were afraid to do so because they claimed the so-called temperance forces were so bitter they would indulge in business reprisals. It is expected now that those who lost, and are really angry, will indulge in business reprisals against some of those who made themselves openly busy on the other side. They argue that what is sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander. Those opposed to the beverage rooms bought up space in the Carleton Place paper and waged the usual campaign with the old fashioned Carrie Nation slogans about the Demon Rum. The other side apparently wras less active, only ran one advertisement. Both sides got out last minute pamphlets.

Carleton Place has three hotels, none of which is making money in a way that would permit improvement or adequate taxes for the municipality.

Blackhawk’s B & B Tonic Carleton Place — The Great Tonic Laxative

The Rules of the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

The Sultans of Swing at The Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

The Liquor Inspectors that Not Ought to Be

Did You Ever Hear About the Hole in the Wall? Prohibition 1920s

Johnny J. McGregor — Still Buster and Mayor

Hotels of Early Carleton Place

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Hotels of Early Carleton Place
A closer look at the Queen’s Hotel and the King’s Cafe.. In front of the Queen’s Hotel with the King’s Cafe- Photo- Tom Edwards 1920s

In the mid 1860’s you probably would grab a drink in Carleton Place:

The Beckwith House owned by William Faust

The British Hotel- William Kelly

The Carleton

The Metcalfe

Willima Moore’s Hotel

Then there was the Carleton, which was built by the Bells as a hotel in the 1830s, then bought and reopened as The Carleton by Napoleon Lavalee in 1846. Peter Salter renamed it The Leland Hotel in 1900 and then it was operated by the Doyles from 1904 on until converted in 1955.

Also well known was The British Hotel which was owned by William Kelly and then became Vic Bennett’s Garage which was at the corner of Bridge and High Street. There was also the Ottawa Hotel, the Ontario Hotel and Lee’s Hotel which was the South East corner of Moore Street railway crossing. Absolam also had a small tavern on the north side of Bell Street from 1863-1870. There were six livery stables which furnished horses and all kinds of first-class rigs for business or pleasure.

In 1904 Carleton Place’s eight hotels were:

James Lee’s The Leland

Walter McIlquham’s The Mississippi Hotel

Albert Salter’s Queens Hotel

The Revere House- formerly The British Hotel

J. E. Rathwell’s Royal Hotel, formerly the Wilson House

D. B. Snedden’s

P. J. O’Briens

Victoria House

P. Salter’s Queen’s Royal at Lake Park

With files from Howard Morton Brown

This is a photograph of Bell Street heading towards Bridge Street c.1870. The photograph features some of our first hotels in Carleton Place! On Bridge Street facing the camera is the “Waterloo Hotel”, which was built in the late 1830s for innkeepers Robert and James Bell. Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum photo
Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum photo The Queen’s Royal Hotel

The Gazette
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
18 Nov 1886, Thu  •  Page 2
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Aug 1899, Sat  •  Page 10
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Aug 1899, Tue  •  Page 2
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Nov 1900, Wed  •  Page 6
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 May 1898, Thu  •  Page 7
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jul 1900, Sat  •  Page 8
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Sep 1899, Fri  •  Page 3
Did You Know we Once Had a Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel
From the picture it looked like quite a grand hotel, but sadly it closed and remained vacant for years. The Drader family moved to Carleton Place around 1932 where Simeon worked as a carpenter. In 1953 he purchased the old Rathwell hotel which by then was in  very bad way and falling apart.
Drader renovated the building and constructed nine apartments in the building that was known as the Drader Block. In 1954 Simeon and Mary Drader celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary. The Rathwell Hotel was demolished in 1956 and Simeon Draper also died in 1956.

More Almonte Hotel History — Michael Dixon

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More Almonte Hotel History — Michael Dixon
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Jul 1935, Mon  •  Page 3

Michael Dixon, well-known Ottawa Valley hotelman, died at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Kennedy, Ramsay, Sunday evening. Born at Eganville 86 years ago, a son of the late Michael R. Dixon, he served his time as a blacksmith at Glen Tay, Ont., later serving in the same capacity with the Ackland Carriage Work, Almonte.

A few years later he took over the butcher business now owned by M. J . McCabe. In 1890, he bought the old Almonte Hotel, which he operated for 14 years. He later operated the Windsor Hotel. Mr. Dixon was married 64 years ago to Miss Bridget Conlon, a daughter of the late Jas. Conlon of Glen Tay. Mrs. Dixon died 11 years ago. 

Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. Edward Kennedy and four sons, Joseph M. Dixon of Stewartville, Minn.; Dr, J . A. and F. L. Dixon of Sudbury and A, B. Dixon of Windsor. Long identified with the commercial life of the Ottawa Valley, his passing, will be noted with regret by many citizens. 

The funeral was held at St. Mary’s church and cemetery on Tuesday morning. Requiem Mass being chanted by Rev. Geo. W. O’Toole, P.P. The pallbearers were: Dr. Bert Dixon, and Frank Dixon of Sudbury; P. J . Carroll, J. J. Hourigan, Michael Ryan and Robert Little. 

Among the relatives attending the funeral from a distance were: E. P. Furlong, Miss Annie Furlong, Miss Edna Furlong, Mrs. John Noonan, Mr. Jack Cooper, W illiam McCabe, Michael Conlon, Mr. and Mrs. Willard Conlon, Mr. and Mrs. Leo Conlon, Mrs. Fred’Q uarterm aine, Mrs. Thomas Leonard, Mrs. Fred Ferguson Mrs D an Lee, all of Perth; Mr. Frank Letang, Sr., Miss Gertrude Letang, Mr. and Mrs. Herb Letang of Renfrew; Rev. J. R. O’Gorman of Tim ­ mins; Mrs. Frank Dixon of Sudbury; Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Kennedy of Nepean, and John Walsh of Carleton Place

He had 4 children that left this world very early.

Family Members

Spouse

Children

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jan 1943, Thu  •  Page 1
gail Barr photo–

read

A Piece of Almonte History for Sale –A. H. Whitten- Almonte Hotel

Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

Meeting Your Neighbours — Paul Latour and The Almonte Hotel

What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

The Fight for Senior Housing in 1982 – Almonte History

Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

Susie’s Kitchen Band– Names Names Names

He Said-and– He Said! Oh Let the Song of Words Play!