Tag Archives: hotel

“Once it’s gone you can’t Replace it”- Co-Op Building 1985– Judith Hughes

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“Once it’s gone you can’t Replace it”- Co-Op Building 1985– Judith Hughes

Someone has made an offer to purchase the former Co-op building in Almonte before it is due to be demolished this week. “I am very busy with the Levine .building in Carleton Place,” Judith Hughes said last week, “ or personally, I wouldn’t have taken an interest. But when it comes to the last line,” she stated, she had to stop the building from being destroyed. (read-The Day The Moose in Carleton Place Burned Down)

“ Once it’s gone you can’t ‘replace it,” she said. “I like to put things back exactly as they were. That’s my business,” Mrs Hughes proposes to restore the outside of the structure to its original configuration, with a full-length front porch and balcony on the second floor. All of the bricked-in windows would be re-opened, and paint across the front of the building would be removed with a chemical wash.

The lookout tower would be rebuilt and opened to the public. The interior would see a new building constructed inside the existing shell. Her own engineers would determine the structural strengths and weaknesses, but sellers BAMP investments of Ottawa have stated that the building is “ structurally sound.”

Her plans call for the main floor to be a dining lounge. The upper two floors, with their impressive view, is being designed for a number of one bedroom apartments, “ suitable for couples or seniors,” she stated. “ I think there’s a need for a good dining lounge in Almonte.” The plans as outlined, “ would not conflict with planned zoning changes” slated for March 25 at the council chambers, which would change the back part of the property to “ residential,” for townhouse construction by Brylin Construction.

Clerk Des Houston said the lot line in the proposal is at the rear of the former Co-op building, and does not preclude the demolition of the building. Local Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee, (LA C A C ) members are ecstatic with the last minute development in status for the edifice, a life-long landmark in Almonte, built around 1860 as Riley’s Hotel. On July 1, 1865 it was advertised in the North Lanark Advance as “ The British Hotel, Queen Street, Almonte, Patrick Riley, Proprietor, The best boarding and lodging at reasonable rates. The best liquors always on hand. Good stabling attached to the house.” Jean Macpherson, chairperson of the Local Architectural Conservation Advisory Board said, “ LACAC supports any move to restore the building to its original condition.

Local historian John Dunn grew up across the road from The China Mission Society, which occupied the establishment briefly, as a site to train the first all-Canadian contingent of missionaries for the Orient. He felt it would be a difficult job, but was “ all for” seeing the original facade restored. Joan Rivington, a prominent businesswoman in Almonte said, “ I would do anything to see it saved.

There is a long battle ahead for Mrs Hughes, because her offer is contingent on many factors. Realtor Garth Teskey, acting for the present owners to sell the building, was not optimistic, but wished Mrs. Hughes luck in her efforts. “The building is not sold yet,” he stated Monday, “There are lots of hurdles and many conditions to be met. The demolition order has to be squashed and town council would have to change their direction.”

In the past, the council turned down a request from LACAC to have the building designated as a heritage site on the grounds that it would be more difficult to dispose of. Deputy reeve Herb Pragnell was active, in the movement at that time and is still interested in saving it from the demolishers, who are scheduled to start disassembling the building within days. Mr Teskey continued, “it would have to be inspected to see if it was structurally sound.”

Despite all the obstacles and last minute nature of the reprieve Mrs Hughes-was resolved, “I ’m a pretty determined person once I set my mind to something,”

1985

This was actually Reilly’s Hotel, also known as the Windsor House at one point I believe. It was built by Pat Reilly, who had previously operated the British Hotel. The Almonte House hotel was in the building currently occupied by Subway on Mill Street, and was originally Daniel Shipman’s home. The Almonte Hotel (also Hotel Almonte at one time) was at the corner of High and Bridge Streets. The building survives though no longer a hotel of course.– Brent Eades

In 1985 they began to tear down a 120 year old building in Almonte. To most of us it was known as the Co-Op on Queen Street.  Once upon a time in history it used to be a glamourous hotel in the height of the 1860’s called Reilly’s hotel. Photo- almonte.com
As the years progressed it became a deteriorating eyesore. Carleton Place resident Judith Hughes approached the Almonte council asking for the deadline of to be postponed until April 1 of that year allowing her time to buy the building for renovation. She wanted to construct an apartment building with an added dining lounge. The owner of the building declined Hughes purchase and decided to proceed with the demolition. Photo- almonte.com
The proposed conclusion was to build a smaller building on the property to use as a convenience store or for professional offices. The above photo shows exactly what stands in that very spot today. So does one value the building as a rundown place, or praise it for architectural and historic value?  LACAC recommended the building be designated as a heritage property, but the Almonte town council said it was beyond repair.

Nora Headley

It was also, at one time the “China Missions”, that upon moving from Almonte became known as “Scarborough Foreign Missions.”

Don Raycroft

Linda Eastman they didn’t have rules or guidance back then regarding heritage buildings and their preservation. We lost the train station building for that same reason. Definitely a shame but something that happens very seldom any more.

Kurt Hahn

Linda Eastman And even some buildings are too expensive for owners to maintain at some point, they weren’t necessarily built to last forever. The land itself becomes too valuable to keep an old relic alive, and don’t forget the difference in taxes on unoccupied lots. Sometimes, old means time’s up. Unless the government steps in, then we all pay for it, whether we want to or not.

Stuart McIntosh

I worked in the coop building cleaning and treating seed grain for local farmers at this time of year. Gerald Valentyne hired me to work the night shift and Russell Turner worked the day shift. We used to take a load of grist into there on occasions.

Margaret Porter Greene

Lived across from the Co-Op on Union St. they day the Co-Op came down we stood and watched all day. My kids were amazed.

Don Andrews
April 21, 2021  · 

Spittoon from the old hotel that was the coop

Joe Ryan

I worked there during summer holidays in 1965 and 1966. Heavy hard work!!!! Bill Andrews was there….Gerry Valentine ….Sandy Wright…..and one other guy. It had an elevator that you used a rope to raise and lower it from inside after you put some feed bags into it. Fire drills were scary. You had a harness to get into and a bar slid out and you had to lower yourself to the ground with a rope contraption. Lifting 100lb bags all day and no air back then!!!! Lots of fun. Big money @ 2.00/ hr.

Mary Hurdis

Stuart Hurdis and his sister helped serve food to people when his Grandmother owned the hotel… No alcohol was served.

Jeff Mills

At the time it was taken down the story was that major beams had been cut by the coop to install grain chutes and that it was unsafe. Seemed to be fine the whole time the co-op owned it. I lived across the street on Queen when it came down. I have a brick wall in my house from the brick. Wood shed from floor boards and a few keystones including the one from the front door.

A majestic building in its day.

Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

The Hugh Williams House– Judith Hughes

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

The Day The Moose in Carleton Place Burned Down

What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

Heritage Homes Disputes- Abner Nichols House

More History on the Murphy Morphy McEwen House — Karen Prytula

Larry Clark — Upper Bridge Street in Carleton Place

Documenting Franktown Road Before it Changes

Twenty Two Dollars a Week and Mississippi Hotel Clippings

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Twenty Two Dollars a Week and Mississippi Hotel Clippings
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
07 Dec 1910, Wed  •  Page 1

also read-David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

1920s photo–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Mississippi/ Grand Hotel

Napoleon Lavallee bought the property for $50 in 1869 and opened the hotel in 1872 after he sold the Leland Hotel/ Carleton House on Bridge Street.  The McIlquham family bought it 11 years later in 1883 and when Joe Belisle worked there from 1917-1920 it had ornate woodwork, a grand staircase and the stone facade had wooden white wrap-around verandas. The elegant dining room tables were covered in  fine lace linen and gleaming cutlery, and the Mississippi Hotel became known for its homemade food and attracted travelling salesman from far and wide. The salesmen set up trunks in their rooms offering everything from dishes to clothing that was scooped up by local merchants that came to buy at the hotel. The place was packed daily with fans from Stittsville, Smiths Falls and Perth–and if you talk to Gerald Hastie people came in early for the fresh baked pies, and by noon they were pretty well sold out.The only known photo of Napoleon Lavallee sits on my wall–read-The Napoleon of Carleton Place

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
13 Jan 1897, Wed  •  Page 1
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Sep 1919, Fri  •  Page 4
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Dec 1909, Mon  •  Page 3
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
26 Mar 1902, Wed  •  Page 5
Karen LloydIn the 1950s Buck Fraser lived at the Mississippi Hotel. He used to stand out at the front in a white dress shirt having a cigarette. I don’t know where he worked .
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 May 1913, Tue  •  Page 2

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Aug 1899, Thu  •  Page 7
Jennifer Fenwick Irwin–Carleton Place Museum This was taken the morning after the fire.
Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire- read-Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
24 Nov 1909, Wed  •  Page 1
Buffalo robe or Sasktchewan Robe

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 May 1899, Sat  •  Page 6
Former dinner plates from the old Mississippi Hotel/ Grand Hotel– **
Adin Wesley Daigle**

November 19 at 11:37 AM ·
📷
A recent addition to the collection , a couple plates from the Mississippi hotel in Carleton place 😍👍

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Sep 1912, Fri  •  Page 9
LIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Dec 1914, Sat  •  Page 12
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Jul 1899, Thu  •  Page 7
The Old Side Door of the Mississippi Hotel

David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel

Murders and Mysteries of the Mississippi Hotel

Thieves at the Mississippi Hotel–When Crime Began to Soar

All About Lorraine Lemay –Mississippi Hotel

Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

The Napoleon of Carleton Place

Grandma’s Butterscotch Pie

Mississippi Hotel Beer — Brading’s Beer

In the Mississippi Hotel Mood with Mrs. Glen Miller

The Mystery Murals of The Queen’s and Mississippi Hotel

Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel in 1961

Where Was Linda? A Necromancer Photo Blog -Victorian Seance at the Mississippi Hotel

Spooky Night at the Seccaspina Hotel

Ray Paquette’s Memories- McNeely and the Mississippi Hotel and Doughnuts?

Letter from Davis House to Scotts in Pakenham- Adin Daigle Collection– Where Was Davis House?

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Letter from Davis House to Scotts in Pakenham- Adin Daigle Collection– Where Was Davis House?
Adin Daigle Collection letter 1890

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Jun 1889, Sat  •  Page 2

Some of the people who figured prominently in the business life of the community in the 1870s: Andrew Matthew, general merchant and issues of marriage licenses; F. H. Davis, proprietor of the Almonte House; 

ALMONTE Ontario The Belmont Hotel Corner Cover 1909–Mr. Eccles prop;

1909

The doors of Hotel Amonte formerly the Davis House have been thrown open to the public, and it seems likely to (ill a serious want that has existed in Almonte for some time. Beginning at the upper floor the building has been renovated, papered and painted and decorated, and when the work on the ground floor is completed, Almonte will be possessed of a hotel that can stand up alongside of any other in the Ottawa Valley. Sanitary drainage and water service will be installed and everything made comfortable tor the guests–

The Lanark Era

Lanark, Ontario, Canada16 Apr 1919, Wed  •  Page 4

CLIPPED FROM
The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
12 Dec 1895, Thu  •  Page 5

CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
28 Feb 1896, Fri  •  Page 2
CLIPPED FROM
The Star-Chronicle
Merrickville, Ontario, Canada
03 Jun 1909, Thu  •  Page 1
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 Mar 1919, Sat  •  Page 10
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Sat, Dec 11, 1909 · Page 17

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
29 Apr 1914, Wed  •  Page 4
Come on down for surgery — one day only 1886 Almonte Gazette
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
09 Jun 1909, Wed  •  Page 4

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Jul 1898, Fri  •  Page 6
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Apr 1914, Tue  •  Page 13

More Almonte Hotel History — Michael Dixon

A Piece of Almonte History for Sale –A. H. Whitten- Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel — 1990s More history

Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

Meeting Your Neighbours — Paul Latour and The Almonte Hotel

What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

The Fight for Senior Housing in 1982 – Almonte History

Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

Susie’s Kitchen Band– Names Names Names

He Said-and– He Said! Oh Let the Song of Words Play!

 When the Circus Shut the Town Down

Before Rooney’s Pool House There Was.

The ‘Deer-Cow hybrid’ of Carleton Place Entertains the Councillors of Almonte — ORR Genealogy

Clippings from the Lord Elgin Hotel — Babysitting and The Iron Curtain

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Clippings from the Lord Elgin Hotel — Babysitting and The Iron Curtain
Almonte Gazette 1955

I found this in a 1955 newspaper and did you know they still offer child care services?? Amazing!

So I decided to see if there were other things we did not know.

Lost Ottawa
April 20, 2020  · 

If you are running out of movies to watch while isolating your self, Glenn Clark has a Lost Ottawa suggestion for you, and here is a screen grab.
Explains Glenn:
“This is a shot extracted from the movie ‘The Iron Curtain’ at 8 minutes and 15 seconds showing a bit of Lost Ottawa. The two stars Dana Andrews and Gene Tierney arrived in Ottawa for filming on November 26, 1947 and left on December 6th and December 2nd respectively. Gene Tierney had stayed at the Roxborough Apartments while Dana Andrews had stayed at the Lord Elgin Hotel.
Many may remember that Hull Electric had a streetcar terminus at the Chateau Laurier. There were two stairways descending from the bridge immediately west of the Chateau Laurier. On March 29,1946, a fire at E.B. Eddy seriously damaged the north end of the Interprovincial bridge and permanently ended Hull Electric streetcar service to Ottawa and the Chateau Laurier.
This picture captures the recently lost entrance to the Hull Electric terminus, boarded up and marked ‘CLOSED’ and between the two actors, the stone pillar reads ‘Hull Electric’. The actress had just previously walked by the other entrance.”
Lost Ottawa
August 28, 2019  · 
Gord Mills shares a picture of the last time Ottawa’s Chateau Laurier got a new wing …. way back in 1927. It matched!
If I remember correctly, the new wing didn’t actually open until 1929.The limestone came from the Ritchie Cut Stone company.
Lost Ottawa
July 20, 2014  · 

Bar list for Ottawa’s Lord Elgin Hotel, which opened in 1941.
Some interesting drinks on this list — although I’m not sure I remember the Laurel Lounge — and what a “Flip?” For 70 cents, however, I might just stay with Scotch.
Teacher’s was my Grandfather’s favorite. But then he was Scottish.
Lost Ottawa
February 6, 2016  · 
Ottawa’s other “railway hotel” the Lord Elgin under construction in 1941. It was originally built by the Ford Hotel chain (no relation to the car company) in response to the shortage of hotel rooms in the city.
Read the early history at: http://lordelginhotel.ca/lord-elgin-hotel-celebrates-75…/
Lost Ottawa
July 20, 2014  · 
Joel shares a fact sheet for the Lord Elgin Hotel, dated 1975.
It appears to say the room rates for downtown Ottawa were an outrageous $18.90 for a double bed! On the other hand … you could walk to a church of any denomination.
The National Tourist Brokers Association no longer seems to exist according to a quick check of Google.
Peter Clark
February 5, 2014  · 
Here’s an old newspaper ad from the Ottawa Journal on December 2, 1940.

alosread

Humans Of The Lord Elgin – part 1

Clippings of the Old Albion Hotel

Not Hogwarth’s —- It’s Hoggards of Ottawa! Besserer Street History

The Brunswick Hotel — The “dollar-a-day” Huckell Hotel — (Murphy-Gamble Limited)

From Carleton Place to “the Laff” — The Life and Times of Peter Prosser Salter

British Hotel Pakenham –Mrs. McFarlane

Hotels of Early Carleton Place

Did You Know we Once Had a Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel

A Piece of Almonte History for Sale –A. H. Whitten- Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel — 1990s More history

Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

Meeting Your Neighbours — Paul Latour and The Almonte Hotel

Food Review of the Smorgasbord at The Queen’s Royal Hotel 1947

What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

Documenting Some Queen’s Hotel Photos

No to Hotel Licenses in Carleton Place –1952

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No to Hotel Licenses in Carleton Place –1952

November 1952- Almonte Gazette

The plebiscite on granting hotel licenses in Carleton Place resulted in a negative answer on the part of the electors when almost 80 per cent of those eligible to vote went to the polls on Wednesday. Not only for those who favored the change, and a fail to get the necessary 60 per cent, but none of the three questions was accorded a straight affirmative majority. For some strange reason, those who framed the vote chose to submit three questions instead of one direct query.

The ballots asked the electors if they were in favor of men’s beverage rooms; in favor of women’s beverage rooms; in favor of the sale of beer in licensed hotel dining rooms. The vote stood as follows on these three questions: Men’s beverage rooms: for 1,123, against 1,- 263; women’s beverage rooms: for 1,126, against 1,283; dining room, sale, for 1,185, against 1,196.

In 1944, the town voted by more than the necessary 60 per cent majority for a retail liquor store and beer warehouse. Some 900 people entitled to exercise the franchise signed the petition for the vote, that took place yesterday. Figures show that only a couple of hundred more than signed the document voted for the change. Those opposed to beverage rooms were more active than those in favor of them.

Some business people who would have liked to come out actively for the change were afraid to do so because they claimed the so-called temperance forces were so bitter they would indulge in business reprisals. It is expected now that those who lost, and are really angry, will indulge in business reprisals against some of those who made themselves openly busy on the other side. They argue that what is sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander. Those opposed to the beverage rooms bought up space in the Carleton Place paper and waged the usual campaign with the old fashioned Carrie Nation slogans about the Demon Rum. The other side apparently wras less active, only ran one advertisement. Both sides got out last minute pamphlets.

Carleton Place has three hotels, none of which is making money in a way that would permit improvement or adequate taxes for the municipality.

Blackhawk’s B & B Tonic Carleton Place — The Great Tonic Laxative

The Rules of the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

The Sultans of Swing at The Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

The Liquor Inspectors that Not Ought to Be

Did You Ever Hear About the Hole in the Wall? Prohibition 1920s

Johnny J. McGregor — Still Buster and Mayor

Hotels of Early Carleton Place

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Hotels of Early Carleton Place
A closer look at the Queen’s Hotel and the King’s Cafe.. In front of the Queen’s Hotel with the King’s Cafe- Photo- Tom Edwards 1920s

In the mid 1860’s you probably would grab a drink in Carleton Place:

The Beckwith House owned by William Faust

The British Hotel- William Kelly

The Carleton

The Metcalfe

Willima Moore’s Hotel

Then there was the Carleton, which was built by the Bells as a hotel in the 1830s, then bought and reopened as The Carleton by Napoleon Lavalee in 1846. Peter Salter renamed it The Leland Hotel in 1900 and then it was operated by the Doyles from 1904 on until converted in 1955.

Also well known was The British Hotel which was owned by William Kelly and then became Vic Bennett’s Garage which was at the corner of Bridge and High Street. There was also the Ottawa Hotel, the Ontario Hotel and Lee’s Hotel which was the South East corner of Moore Street railway crossing. Absolam also had a small tavern on the north side of Bell Street from 1863-1870. There were six livery stables which furnished horses and all kinds of first-class rigs for business or pleasure.

In 1904 Carleton Place’s eight hotels were:

James Lee’s The Leland

Walter McIlquham’s The Mississippi Hotel

Albert Salter’s Queens Hotel

The Revere House- formerly The British Hotel

J. E. Rathwell’s Royal Hotel, formerly the Wilson House

D. B. Snedden’s

P. J. O’Briens

Victoria House

P. Salter’s Queen’s Royal at Lake Park

With files from Howard Morton Brown

This is a photograph of Bell Street heading towards Bridge Street c.1870. The photograph features some of our first hotels in Carleton Place! On Bridge Street facing the camera is the “Waterloo Hotel”, which was built in the late 1830s for innkeepers Robert and James Bell. Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum photo
Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum photo The Queen’s Royal Hotel

The Gazette
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
18 Nov 1886, Thu  •  Page 2
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Aug 1899, Sat  •  Page 10
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Aug 1899, Tue  •  Page 2
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Nov 1900, Wed  •  Page 6
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 May 1898, Thu  •  Page 7
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jul 1900, Sat  •  Page 8
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Sep 1899, Fri  •  Page 3
Did You Know we Once Had a Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel
From the picture it looked like quite a grand hotel, but sadly it closed and remained vacant for years. The Drader family moved to Carleton Place around 1932 where Simeon worked as a carpenter. In 1953 he purchased the old Rathwell hotel which by then was in  very bad way and falling apart.
Drader renovated the building and constructed nine apartments in the building that was known as the Drader Block. In 1954 Simeon and Mary Drader celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary. The Rathwell Hotel was demolished in 1956 and Simeon Draper also died in 1956.

More Almonte Hotel History — Michael Dixon

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More Almonte Hotel History — Michael Dixon
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Jul 1935, Mon  •  Page 3

Michael Dixon, well-known Ottawa Valley hotelman, died at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Kennedy, Ramsay, Sunday evening. Born at Eganville 86 years ago, a son of the late Michael R. Dixon, he served his time as a blacksmith at Glen Tay, Ont., later serving in the same capacity with the Ackland Carriage Work, Almonte.

A few years later he took over the butcher business now owned by M. J . McCabe. In 1890, he bought the old Almonte Hotel, which he operated for 14 years. He later operated the Windsor Hotel. Mr. Dixon was married 64 years ago to Miss Bridget Conlon, a daughter of the late Jas. Conlon of Glen Tay. Mrs. Dixon died 11 years ago. 

Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. Edward Kennedy and four sons, Joseph M. Dixon of Stewartville, Minn.; Dr, J . A. and F. L. Dixon of Sudbury and A, B. Dixon of Windsor. Long identified with the commercial life of the Ottawa Valley, his passing, will be noted with regret by many citizens. 

The funeral was held at St. Mary’s church and cemetery on Tuesday morning. Requiem Mass being chanted by Rev. Geo. W. O’Toole, P.P. The pallbearers were: Dr. Bert Dixon, and Frank Dixon of Sudbury; P. J . Carroll, J. J. Hourigan, Michael Ryan and Robert Little. 

Among the relatives attending the funeral from a distance were: E. P. Furlong, Miss Annie Furlong, Miss Edna Furlong, Mrs. John Noonan, Mr. Jack Cooper, W illiam McCabe, Michael Conlon, Mr. and Mrs. Willard Conlon, Mr. and Mrs. Leo Conlon, Mrs. Fred’Q uarterm aine, Mrs. Thomas Leonard, Mrs. Fred Ferguson Mrs D an Lee, all of Perth; Mr. Frank Letang, Sr., Miss Gertrude Letang, Mr. and Mrs. Herb Letang of Renfrew; Rev. J. R. O’Gorman of Tim ­ mins; Mrs. Frank Dixon of Sudbury; Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Kennedy of Nepean, and John Walsh of Carleton Place

He had 4 children that left this world very early.

Family Members

Spouse

Children

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jan 1943, Thu  •  Page 1
gail Barr photo–

read

A Piece of Almonte History for Sale –A. H. Whitten- Almonte Hotel

Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

Meeting Your Neighbours — Paul Latour and The Almonte Hotel

What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

The Fight for Senior Housing in 1982 – Almonte History

Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

Susie’s Kitchen Band– Names Names Names

He Said-and– He Said! Oh Let the Song of Words Play!

Falling out of Windows — There’s Always a Story

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Falling out of Windows — There’s Always a Story

‘The Campbell House, Arnprior, Ont. G. Lodge, Prop.’

Date: 
1900
Location: 
John Street, Arnprior, Ontario, Canada-Arnprior and District Museum
Arnprior, Ontario

l I was doing some research today and found quite the interesting clipping. Seems a Mrs. Campbell of Arnprior while closing the shutters on the second floor on September of 1906 leaned out too far and took a nosedive to the ground. There were no hydrangea bushes to stop her fall and she passed away with a fractured skull 12 hours later.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 Feb 1906, Thu  •  Page 9

She was the wife of the proprietor Dr. W. A. Campbell of the Campbell House in Arnprior. Everything has a story no matter what it is so I decided to dig deeper. Her husband probably torn by grief retired a year later having Mr. Lodge take over the Arnprior Hotel, who previously ran the Commercial Hotel in Pakenham.

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Dec 1907, Sat  •  Page 11

The Campbell House Hotel was one of the main hotels in Arnprior until it burned down in September of 1923. It was situated on the north side of the intersection of John and Elgin streets, right in the heart of the business section of Arnprior. Campbell Hotel was an old frame building and was owned by the estate of the late Dr. W. A. Cameron, of Arnprior, but Mr. Joseph Campbell, son of the late A. Campbell, managed the place.

On Sept. 30, 1923 Ivan Leblanc, single, and 33 years of age, of Richibucto, N.B., a lumberman, was burned to death in the biggest fire Arnprior had ever experienced in years. The Campbell House was completely destroyed and the losses were estimated at $150.000, only partly covered by insurance.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Jun 1918, Sat  •  Page 4

Leblanc had come to Arnprior and rented a room in the hotel. During the fire it was thought everyone was out but Leblanc’s friend, Romeo Papineau, missed him and a search was made in the ruins of the hotel. The result was that a charred body was found. Apparently, the unfortunate man was in bed and never woke up.

The fire was discovered about 1.15 a.m. in the barber shop of Mr. A. Carswell, in the ground floor of the building. The cause was unknown, but in the barber shop there was an appliance for heating water and the opinion was expressed that this may have caused the fire. When discovered the fire had a strong hold and although the Arnprior fire department made a prompt response the fire was beyond control. A hurried call had been sent through the hotel by Mr. Joseph Campbell, manager of the hotel, and the guests and occupants of other portions of the building were able to get out, although it was a close shave for many.

Shortly after the commencement of the blaze, the explosion of a quantity of dynamite that had been stored in a shed at the back caused considerable excitement attracting a big crowd and the flames were visible twelve miles away.

Some left the hotel with only a few clothes on and they were given shelter by citizens of the town. A brisk north wind served to fan the flames into a furious pace; but the same wind proved to be a blessing in disguise as it also served to beep the flames off the rest of the town. At its height the fire made a spectacle of awe and practically everybody in Arnprior was awake and watching the blaze.

If the wind had veered around, the flames would undoubtedly have wiped out the largest part of the town. The Arnprior fire department although pitifully handicapped against such a fire, did excellent work in protecting surrounding buildings. The “Chronicle” office next door was saved by a brick wall and the Harvey block, on the east side, was slightly damaged by water but was saved, mainly owing to the efforts of the firemen and the many citizens of the town who volunteered for service.

The building became a total loss, the fire having burned until a late hour the next day. The hotel contained on the ground floor a number of shops and other establishments, all of which lost practically everything. A Chinese laundry of which, Laung Lee was the proprietor, was valued at $1,100, with no insurance. Mr. A. Carswell, in whose barber shop the fire started lost everything in his barber shop, but could place no estimate on his loss. He had no insurance.

Mr. W. W. Handrord. photographer, lost everything in his photo shop. He could not estimate his losses. Mr. Pierre Clouthier, lost everything in restaurant and his apartments above the place was a total loss. He placed his loss at $1,000 with no insurance. T. P. O’Toole, druggist, was completely burned out for a total loss. His loss was partly covered by insurance, but Mr. O’Toole could place no estimate on his loss.

Another barber in the building, M. J. Lindy lost $400 and was covered by insurance. Another total loss was suffered by Adam Andrews, plumber and tinsmith. The heat of the fire was terrific and plate glass in practically all the buildings around the fire was destroyed. The plate glass loss was estimated at about $7,000, covered by insurance.

When dawn came not a structure of any kind stood in the area bounded by John street as far as the printing office of the Arnprior Chronicle, and by Elgin street to the Dominion Cafe. The rear of which was badly damaged and a large quantity of poultry and a cow were burned. Leblanc and a friend, Papineau, were employees of McLachlin Brothers, Ltd. They had come down yesterday morning from the Kipawa limit to draw their pay, and had intended returning the net day. The two men had obtained a room over Clouthier’s restaurant, which was in the lower part of a two-storey extension of the main four-storey hotel. Leblanc was fast asleep while his roommate and friend Papineau was dining downstairs at the restaurant.

This was the second disastrous fire within a few years on the Campbell block. Campbell House had suffered a similar fate a few years previous and Mr. A. J. Campbell had built an extension adding a few stores becoming a prominent place in town. Now it was just a mass of ruin and left a bare space in town.

 

Date
1922
Format
photographic
Collection/Fonds
W.G. Davies fonds
Description Level
Item
Reference No.
P-94-208
Reproduction Location
Binder 4A P0345a.
Scope and Content
Photograph of burned out Campbell House taken from John Street looking towards Elgin after a fire. See also, Photocopy number 344.
Notes
Campbell House burned January 15 1922
Accession No.
1993-0017

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The Windsor Star
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
01 Oct 1923, Mon  •  Page 5
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Feb 1948, Wed  •  Page 14-Former Hotelman G. Lodge Passes
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Dec 1907, Sat  •  Page 11

McCann’s Hotel Fire in Perth

Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire

relatedreading

The House at Sand Point

Photos: Sand Point flood

The Jinxed House of Crown Point

Arnprior The Saw Mill Town 1900

The Story of Andrew Waugh — Almost a Cannon Ball Run!

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The Story of Andrew Waugh — Almost a Cannon Ball Run!

Among other less typical and therefore newsworthy incidents of the liquor trade, a classic barroom news item is one recorded in the July 12th Carleton Place Herald of the summer of 1860, reported from the village of Clayton:

“An accident happened at Clayton on Monday last by which a young man named Andrew Waugh came near losing his life, and may serve as a caution against similar occurrences.  Accident happened at the Hotel of Mrs. Sutherland in the village of Clayton.  A newly emptied high-wines barrel was turned out in the morning and stood on end outside the barroom door. 

In the afternoon the young man, who is the bar-keeper in the hotel was sitting on it and took out a match to light a pipe for another individual.  The fire ignited with the gas or steam of the alcohol escaping out of the tap-hole of the barrel and caused it to explode with a terrible cannon-like report, pitching the young man and the barrel a considerable distance out on the street and severely burning one of his hands.  Had not the lower end of the barrel burst out the consequences might have been serious.”

Andrew Waugh–The picture was sent to Darlene Page from her cousin Kerri-Ann Doe O’Rourke. and that it hangs in her home

So why did the name Andrew Waugh seem so familiar when I found the above story? Because, we were looking for more information on him in 2016. This is what Darlene Page had sent me then.

The photo above was done in metal–there were a lot of photos done in metal around 1870 until the late 1880’s when a carnival use to come to the local towns in the fall.

It is actually called a tintype and it was patented in 1856. Tintypes were seen as an improvement upon unstable, paper daguerreotypes and fragile, glass ambrotypes. In contrast, tintype photographs were exposed on a sheet of thin iron coated with collodion, which required less time to expose than albumen, but was still inconvenient inasmuch as the photograph had to be taken with the wet material on the plate.

Darlene had the Carleton Place Library help her out with dating the photo a few years ago and they are 99% sure that this man is Andrew Waugh, father of Samuel Waugh.  

Photo- Darlene Page- Andrew Waugh with Elizabeth Cram

Darlene also thought also there was an article in one of the past Carleton Place Herald newspapers about “an Andrew Waugh” working in a local pub and a barrel getting blown up. He either lost his hand, or it was burned badly. The Waugh’s were living out near Innisville  she thinks  at the time before they moved to Carleton Place with his parents Alexander and Jane Waugh. She also thinks there may have been a family farm out in Drummond. but  she hasn’t a clue where to find that info—if she could find that out—a lot of questions would be answered! So we found the story and hope to find more. You just never know until you are looking for something else I tell you and boom! it appears..

Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Fri, Oct 03, 1879 · Page 1

So who was Mrs. Sutherland?? Thanks to Rose Mary Sarsfield

Hi Linda:Mrs. John Sutherland was born Catherine Coulter in 1832. She was the daughter of James Coulter and Elizabeth Waugh. She married John Sutherland in 1854. He was the tanner in Clayton. I expect that they lived in the house beside the tannery. They had one daughter, Elizabeth. John Sutherland died in 1858. When he died he left all his worldly belongings to his daughter. Her affairs were to be managed by Timothy Blair, Thomas Coulter, (Catherine’s brother,) and Catherine. He appointed James Coulter her grandfather as her guardian and he was directed to rent out the property and the money collected was to be used to support his daughter until she came of age.

I expect the “hotel” mentioned would be the family home where it is known that she took in boarders. Then a single man, Ozias Banning arrived in the village in 1858. He bought the small store that was beside the present store and set up a business. In 1861 he married Catherine Coulter Sutherland. In 1864 they purchased the store across the river (later Halpenny’s) and spent the rest of their lives there. In 1866 James Coulter sold the tannery property to George McNeil and his son Charles. Catherine and Ozias Banning had four other children besides Elizabeth. Elizabeth grew up and married Abraham Code and they went to North Dakota. Rose Mary–author–Photo from Whispers from the Past by Rose Mary Sarsfield- available at the Clayton General Store, Mill Street Books in Almonte or email rose@sarsfield.ca

Story of a Locket- Waugh Family

Searching for Elizabeth Cram–Updates on Andrew Waugh

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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Oct 1894, Wed  •  Page 5

The Almonte Hotel — 1990s More history

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The Almonte Hotel — 1990s More history

 

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1970s photos from the old Canadian and Almonte Gazette files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

 

I found this article in one of the old Amonte Gazette’s of Lucy Poaps and I believe it was from the 1990s.  Brent Eades and Toronto restaurateur Wolf Savcioglu were in the final stages of buying the Almonte Hotel from the then current owner Hap Peattie.

They hoped renovations would begin soon and an architect was drawing up the plans and estimates would be in the 100s of thousands. They wanted to preserve the old hotel such as interior woodworking and exterior clapboard. The hotel dates back to the 1800s but no one is really sure. Researchers figure the hotel which was originally called The David House Hotel was probably built in the 1870s.

A map from 1889 shows the structure with stables and driving sheds behind it on High Street back to the brick house around the corner. Carriages appear to have entered from Bridge Street between the hotel and a two-storey storage house which was connected by a second floor walkway. The storage house is in the same location as the present retail store but it is not known if it is the same building. 

Brent’s uncle, George Eades, owned a shoe store on Mill Street years ago and later moved to Carleton Place moved to Carleton Place to open Eades Home Hardware store which was located on Bridge Street.

 

Almonte Hotels

Almonte House

Hotels were built along Mill Street to serve the anticipated traffic from the new mills and railway. John Murphy’s hotel at the current site of 34, 36 and 38 Mill Street, later the North American Hotel, was destroyed by fire in 1877. After Shipman’s death in 1852, his daughter Catherine added a three-storey hotel to the north side of her father’s house (95 Mill Street) for a railway hotel known as “Almonte House”.

 

Stafford’s Hotel

When Stafford’s Hotel was destroyed in an 1877 fire, it was replaced by three, three-storey brick buildings, which were later also destroyed in a 1909 fire.

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Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Nov 1935, Sat  •  Page 18

 

Shipman House

Even the former Shipman house and hotel became a pool hall and tailor shop, with the rear addition converted to the Alma Apartments, managed by Alma Rooney.

 

Info

The 1889-1902 fire insurance plan for Almonte shows: Rosamond Mill on Coleman Island; a series of woollen mills, knitting mills and foundries along the river side of Mill street; the Post Office and Almonte House Hotel in the triangle of Bridge, Mill and Little Bridge; and the south side of Mill Street lined with wooden and brick storefronts

The Crown regranted the land to Daniel Shipman, who with several other settlers quickly developed the grist and sawmills, and in the next few years a blacksmith’s shop, school, hotel, distillery and other ventures. he first European settler here was a David Shepherd, who in 1819 obtained a Crown grant of land in the area of present-day Almonte, where he began.

 

 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jan 1943, Thu  •  Page 1

 

Temperance in Almonte

 

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Dec 1913, Sat  •  Page 13

 

Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

Meeting Your Neighbours — Paul Latour and The Almonte Hotel

What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

The Fight for Senior Housing in 1982 – Almonte History

Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

Susie’s Kitchen Band– Names Names Names

He Said-and– He Said! Oh Let the Song of Words Play!