Tag Archives: hotel

The Almonte Hotel — 1990s More history

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The Almonte Hotel — 1990s More history

 

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1970s photos from the old Canadian and Almonte Gazette files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

 

I found this article in one of the old Amonte Gazette’s of Lucy Poaps and I believe it was from the 1990s.  Brent Eades and Toronto restaurateur Wolf Savcioglu were in the final stages of buying the Almonte Hotel from the then current owner Hap Peattie.

They hoped renovations would begin soon and an architect was drawing up the plans and estimates would be in the 100s of thousands. They wanted to preserve the old hotel such as interior woodworking and exterior clapboard. The hotel dates back to the 1800s but no one is really sure. Researchers figure the hotel which was originally called The David House Hotel was probably built in the 1870s.

A map from 1889 shows the structure with stables and driving sheds behind it on High Street back to the brick house around the corner. Carriages appear to have entered from Bridge Street between the hotel and a two-storey storage house which was connected by a second floor walkway. The storage house is in the same location as the present retail store but it is not known if it is the same building. 

Brent’s uncle, George Eades, owned a shoe store on Mill Street years ago and later moved to Carleton Place moved to Carleton Place to open Eades Home Hardware store which was located on Bridge Street.

 

Almonte Hotels

Almonte House

Hotels were built along Mill Street to serve the anticipated traffic from the new mills and railway. John Murphy’s hotel at the current site of 34, 36 and 38 Mill Street, later the North American Hotel, was destroyed by fire in 1877. After Shipman’s death in 1852, his daughter Catherine added a three-storey hotel to the north side of her father’s house (95 Mill Street) for a railway hotel known as “Almonte House”.

 

Stafford’s Hotel

When Stafford’s Hotel was destroyed in an 1877 fire, it was replaced by three, three-storey brick buildings, which were later also destroyed in a 1909 fire.

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Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Nov 1935, Sat  •  Page 18

 

Shipman House

Even the former Shipman house and hotel became a pool hall and tailor shop, with the rear addition converted to the Alma Apartments, managed by Alma Rooney.

 

Info

The 1889-1902 fire insurance plan for Almonte shows: Rosamond Mill on Coleman Island; a series of woollen mills, knitting mills and foundries along the river side of Mill street; the Post Office and Almonte House Hotel in the triangle of Bridge, Mill and Little Bridge; and the south side of Mill Street lined with wooden and brick storefronts

The Crown regranted the land to Daniel Shipman, who with several other settlers quickly developed the grist and sawmills, and in the next few years a blacksmith’s shop, school, hotel, distillery and other ventures. he first European settler here was a David Shepherd, who in 1819 obtained a Crown grant of land in the area of present-day Almonte, where he began.

 

 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jan 1943, Thu  •  Page 1

 

Temperance in Almonte

 

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Dec 1913, Sat  •  Page 13

 

Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

Meeting Your Neighbours — Paul Latour and The Almonte Hotel

What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

The Fight for Senior Housing in 1982 – Almonte History

Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

Susie’s Kitchen Band– Names Names Names

He Said-and– He Said! Oh Let the Song of Words Play!

The Fight for Senior Housing in 1982 – Almonte History

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The Fight for Senior Housing in 1982 – Almonte History

 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Jan 1982, Wed  •  Page 5

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Recognize the building in the back? The Old Co-Op formerly known as Reilly’s Hotel

 

What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

Susie’s Kitchen Band– Names Names Names

He Said-and– He Said! Oh Let the Song of Words Play!

The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

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The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

 

I have been asked for information about the Almonte Hotel on Bridge Street in Almonte so I am piecing some clippings here.. add comments any comments you remember.. and then put it all together as a community project. Thanks!!

What we know:

Daniel Shipman and Prudence Boyce had 15 children, most of whom lived and 

worked in Almonte, Sarah, Eliza 1812, Stephen Boyce 1814-1852, Sylvanus 

Keeler 1817, Millicent Boyce 1819-1854, Daniel Harvey 1821, Catherine 

1823-1897, Norman 1826-1863, Debora 1827, Samuel McLean 1828-1875, Rachel 

Alvina 1831-1901, Olive 1833, Unknown son 1834, Jehoida Boyce 1836 and Birdie 

  1. Sylvanus Keeler Shipman, my great great grandfather, ran  the saw mill, 

the lumber yard and a distillery in Almonte. He and his father Daniel were 

also principal shareholders in the Ramsay Woollen Cloth Manufacturing 

Company.  Norman Shipman ran the flour mill and was constable of Almonte in 

  1. Catherine Shipman, who was married to Henry Ryan Rose, turned the 

family home 79 Bridge Street  into the Almonte Hotel.Catherine Shipman married Henry Ryan Rose whose ancestors were Loyalists (UEL) from New York. Jehoida Boyce Shipman managed the Almonte 

Hotel and worked in the grist mill and the flour mill before moving to St. 

Joseph’s Island, Algoma, where he had a farm and a saw mill. Samuel McLean 

Shipman was a farmer in Almonte. Stephen Boyce Shipman was a merchant in 

Kingston and married the grandaughter of Benedict Arnold, Charlotte Montague 

Arnold. Bytown.net

Photo-Paul Latour-Almonte Hotel
It has been my practice since I was 16 (and part of my career) to always have a camera with me wherever I go, especially before they squeezed cameras into portable telephones everyone has these days.

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I am both a history/photography buff and I love the history that surrounds us here. I happen to have in my files a small number of Almonte street photos that might be of interest to those on The Tales of Almonte page that tell something of the Almonte of old, even some recent ones. I’d be happy to share with you and all if you would like.

For starters, attached is a photo of the old Almonte Hotel in nothing more than its scivies. Back in April/May of 1999, the hotel had been renovated from top to bottom. The old siding that had covered the building for Lord knows how many years had been completely removed and thus exposed what I would presume to be the original wooden structure.

It had remained like that for only a few days before the new siding was put on, once again hiding it’s original beauty.  Note, as well, both the “Hotel Almonte” painted sign along the top wall and the classic “Almonte Hotel” sign which was taken down during the reno work.

I felt compelled to visually document the old building as it used to be while I had the chance to do so before it got all covered up again. I did so with tripod and camera on the night of April 30, 1999. A full moon was a welcome photo bomb to boot.

If my memory serves me right, the work to cover the old hotel up with newer siding had begun just two days after I took the photo. I’m glad I got the shot before the building was re-covered.

Unfortunately, I have no historical information about the old hotel as to when it was built, how long it had remained as a hotel, stories of what might have gone on there over the years, what it became after the hotel closed, etc.

Paul Latour

Thank you Paul– we love sharing, so PM me or email me at sav_77@yahoo.com with your photos or stories.
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Mar 1913, Sat  •  Page 20
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Jul 1927, Sat  •  Page 2
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Mar 1988, Wed  •  Page 7
historicalnotes
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Jun 1951, Wed  •  Page 8
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1970s photos from the old Canadian and Almonte Gazette files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.
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he Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Jun 1939, Thu  •  Page 12
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Mar 1914, Tue  •  Page 1

 

 

 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Aug 1940, Sat  •  Page 6

 - The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 May 1905, Thu  •  Page 11

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 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Mar 1985, Thu  •  Page 4

 - The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Jul 1968, Sat  •  Page 3

The Copeland House Fires

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The Copeland House Fires

 

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 04 Aug 1928, Sat,
  3. Page 30

 

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 02 Apr 1910, Sat,
  3. Page 2

 

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 04 Jul 1958, Fri,
  3. Page 26

 

 

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 30 Jan 1975, Thu,
  3. Main Edition,

 

 

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 06 Dec 1948, Mon,
  3. Page 3 -

    Clipped from

    1. The Gazette,
    2. 07 Dec 1976, Tue,
    3. Page 22 -

      Clipped from

      1. The Ottawa Citizen,
      2. 01 Sep 1928, Sat,
      3. Page 3

         

        Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.relatedreading

        McCann’s Hotel Fire in Perth

      4. Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire

      5. Did the Germans Start the Fire at the Portland School in 1915?

      6. 1906 — Business Block is a Smouldering Block of Ruins– More Fires of Almonte

      7. Carleton Place 1913- A Fire in the China Shop and…

Every Foot of the House Was Crowded When the Teamsters Were Passing Through

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Every Foot of the House Was Crowded When the Teamsters Were Passing Through

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Mr. Joseph Halpenny  remembered a time when his father William and his uncle John Halpenny kept a hotel in Pembroke from the 1860s to the early 1870s when the hauling of supplies to the lumber shanties was in full swing. The Halpenny hotel at that period was headquarters for the teamsters from Lanark and Renfrew counties as they passed through Pembroke. Pembroke was an overnight stop. Though Mr. Halpenny was only a boy of about six in 1871 he has a vivW recollection of how at that time his father’s hotel would be crowded with teamsters. Every bed in the house would be occupied and every square foot of room would be occupied by men lying rolled up in their blankets on the floor. Mr. Halpenny recalls these teamsters as being big powerful men to whom the lifting of a barrel of pork was a mere trifle.

Most of the teamsters ate their meals in the Halpenny dining room, but on the other hand, many of them carried their own grub with them in boxes, and ate their meals wherever they could around the hotel. Mr. Halpenny’s greatest delight at that period of his life was to eat with the teamsters out of their boxes and to share their home-made bread, their cold fat pork, and the dainties which their wives had packed in the boxes for them.

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Mr. Halpenny recalls an elderly teamster whom he called “Uncle” Robert Livingston, whose box meal he usually shared. “Uncle” Livingston always had doughnuts in his box and these he shared liberally with the boy. Mr. Halpenny says that as many as 150 teamsters have been in his father’s hotel over night. His father had two large sheds and they could accommodate some 50 teams under cover.

 

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Prior to opening the hotel in Pembroke, Willaim Halpenny had kept a “stopping place” two miles from Forester’s Falls in Ross township. The stop of the shanty teams there was a noon stop, Grandfather John Halpenny had gone into Ross township as a farmer in the pioneer days back in the late 1840s.

William Halpenny did not live long after moving to Pembroke, In 1865. He died in 1871, the result of a cold sustained in 1869, when Prince Arthur visited Pembroke. After the death of Mr. Halpenny the Halpenny hotel was sold and became the Munroe House

 

 

historicalnotes

Pembroke was incorporated as a town in 1878 and as a city in 1971. It was named seat for Renfrew County in 1861. This set the stage for construction shortly thereafter on the Renfrew County Courthouse, which finished in 1867, and the arrival of many civil servants, much wealth and much construction. In the 20-year period following 1861, Pembroke basically became the city it is today in terms of layout and buildings, although many homes and other structures have been lost to time. A fire in 1918 destroyed much of Pembroke’s downtown.

Other historic buildings that survive in Pembroke include a historic synagogue, two original hospitals, the Dunlop mansion (Grey Gables Manor Bed & Breakfast), the ‘Munroe Block’ downtown, and two houses belonging to the White family. A fire in 1918 downtown destroyed many buildings, including the Pembroke Opera House

As shown by the quotation below, which is perhaps equal parts promotion and fact, the economic atmosphere of Pembroke during the period when our fashions graced its streets and hotels, attracted many people to set up residence here.

“Both for business purposes and residential purposes Pembroke is a most desirable town. Because of its advantageous surroundings, its commercial facilities, its advantages as a shipping and distributing point, its excellent sanitary conditions, and the thousand and one things that make the town a desirable place in which to live, it has attracted, during the past few years, capitalists and business men from afar.
The district surrounding Pembroke is one of the richest agricultural districts in Eastern Canada. The farmers are all well-to-do, while many of them have accumulated fortunes.

Ompah! Ompah! The Trout Lake Hotel

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Ompah! Ompah! The Trout Lake Hotel

 

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From Trout Lake Facebook page-Thanks Tammy Marion for sending this to me

 

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From–Clarendon and Miller Community Archives

From Trout Lake Facebook page

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From–Clarendon and Miller Community Archives

The hotel was built in the late 1800’s by a Card for Henry Dunham. It was operated for a time by Mrs. Briscoe, a daughter of Henry Dunham, who then sold it to Jim Johnson from Palmer Rapids. The next owner was Jim Watson, father of Mrs. Carrie Dunham, followed by Robert Eadie who operated it for 9 years. Wm. McCullough owned it for a brief period, then Charlie Dunham took over and was there for 33 years. Reg Elkington and Bill Cameron were the next owners but operated for a short time only. They sold to Jim McCurdy and it was while he was operating it that the liquor license was obtained and the area for the bar was added to the front of the building. Upon McCurdy’s death his widow Grace remarried Gilbert Dunham and they operated it until they sold the hotel to Don Dunne. He operated for a few years and then sold to Wayne and Val Kearney.–From–Clarendon and Miller Community Archives

 

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Photo from the collection of Wanda Jane–Check out her dad’s styling socks! 

This is probably 1962 (age 3) at Trout Lake, Ontario.
 - ZONE 4. Ontario" Federa- Federa- tion of Angler...

 

 

historicalnotes

 - By GUNNAR ANGUN t - .. THE LAKE TROUT . HAVE...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  05 Jun 1964, Fri,  Page 14

 

 - MATURE WOMAN, 21 TO 45 0RMAN and wife for work...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Jul 1970, Sat,  Page 25

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Stomping in Ompah! by Arlene Stafford Wilson

Queen’s Royal Hotel 1899 Guest List- Names Names Names

Sam of the Russell Hotel in Smiths Falls

Did You Know we Once Had a Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel

The Rules of the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

 

“You Fight Your Own Battles- I will Fight Mine”– Dan Miller of the Queen’s Hotel

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“You Fight Your Own Battles- I will Fight Mine”– Dan Miller of the Queen’s Hotel

 

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Saturday afternoon I scoured newspaper archives while watching Christmas movies on the W channel reading all about the fight between Dan Miller who owned the Queen’s Hotel and the town of Carleton Place.  I had written briefly about it before-(Dan Miller of the Queen’s Hotel vs the Town of Carleton Place), but had no idea that it went back and forth the way it did until I saw it in print.

It was basically a story about a stubborn man who thought he was right, and just felt more tax money would equal higher prices and less business. Being a former business owner I get it, but it just reminded me that things don’t change no matter what year it is.

There was no doubt in my mind that both sides attempted to draw in their fair share of the townsfolk’s opinions into their squabble and a vicious “he said, she said” ensued. Instead of working together they fought viciously against each other, and really who won? These back and forth newspaper clippings are worth reading, if not to instill in us that we need not to “threaten old widows” nor “board up our buildings” but all just try and get along. Dan Miller died 8 years later  on the 19th of June 1957 in a farm field in Ramsay Township at the age of 74. He is still a person on my list I would have liked to meet as I will always admire people with convictions.

 

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  06 Aug 1949, Sat,  Page 1

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  31 Aug 1949, Wed,  Page 1

 

Clipped from The Winnipeg Tribune,  01 Sep 1949, Thu,  Page 8

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  01 Nov 1949, Tue,  Page 14

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  03 Nov 1949, Thu,  Page 38

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

Dan Miller of the Queen’s Hotel vs the Town of Carleton Place

Carleton Place Folk Art from the Queen’s Hotel –The Millers

 

Part 1- Tales of the Chatteron House Corset — Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place- can be found here.

Part 2- Hell on Wheels at Lady Chatterton’s Hotel in Carleton Place– can be found here.

Part 3- I Will Take Some Opium to Go Please —The “Drug Dispensary” at the Chatterton House Hotel

Part 4- Chatterton House Hotel Registrar- George Hurdis -1884

Part 5-What the Heck was Electric Soap? Chatterton House Hotel Registrar

Part 6-The First Mosh Pits in Carleton Place — The Opera House of the Chatterton House Hotel

Part 7-All the President’s Men — Backroom Dealings in Carleton Place?

Part 8- Who Was John Boland? Chatterton House/Queen’s Hotel Registry — The Burgess Family Dynasty

Part 9-What Happens Behind The Queen’s Hotel Stays Behind the Queen’s Hotel

part 10-John Sparrow’s Royal Parilion – Chatterton House Hotel Carleton Place

part 11-The Rules of the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

part 12 –He Did What? Tales of the Queen’s Hotel

The Sultans of Swing at The Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

Things That Disappear in Carleton Place — Elgin Street and The Queen’s Hotel Sign

The Mystery Murals of The Queen’s and Mississippi Hotel

 

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Sam of the Russell Hotel in Smiths Falls

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Sam of the Russell Hotel in Smiths Falls

Screenshot 2017-11-13 at 16.jpgPhoto by HeritageHouse on Twitter

 

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Photo by HeritageHouse on Twitter

It seems in the 1970’s the best known character in Smiths Falls was a 3 year-old Labrador Retriever named Sam. He wasn’t ‘no ordinary dog’ as they say,  and the Retriever was actually the nightwatchman of the Russell Hotel on Beckwith Street in Smiths Falls. Like everyone, he had a boss named Don Twible who had owned the hotel for a few years. Not even Don had to explain to Sam what his jobs were as Sam had everything down pat– and not one soul questioned him.

The minute the hotel closed down for the night Sam took over and so did his personality. When the stars twinkled in the Smiths Falls night sky man’s best friend became downright ugly. If you wanted to get in and out of that hotel you had to deal with Sam– if you dared. Word was if you ever wondered if there was life after death you might try a little trespassing at the Russell Hotel and find out.

Now Twible was much obliged to Sam’s devotion, but the thing that irked him the most was that more people knew and respected Sam than the owner of the hotel.  By night he patrolled the hotel looking for “ruff trade” and by day he became Mr. Personality making the rounds among the hotel customers. Everyone knows the best therapist has fur and four legs right? Every single day he picked one person at that hotel and they were chosen for a reason– to take him down to the Rideau River for a quick swim.

Former Smiths Falls councilman Neil Adler was a favourite of his as Neil knew how to throw a ball. Sam loved him because he was very clever telling Sam to invest in tennis balls as they had a high rate of return. Okay, maybe he didn’t say that but, he was never sure which ball Adler threw so he brought them all back. Sam was an honest dog, and he and the councilman were the only ones that knew where those balls were located so the dog never pressed his luck.

You would think with all that exercise Sam would have been a svelte dog– but nope- he was actually a kind of a “chunker”. That dog still had “Spring rolls” on him even after the Winter fat was gone because he truly believed that potatoe chips were like cats: you just can’t have one.

It’s 2017 now, and I’m sure Sam has long gone to the Rainbow Bridge on the Rideau River. Somewhere late at night in that old hotel in Smiths Falls you can probably still hear the pitter patter of small feet scaring the crap out of people and hiding potatoe chips– because in all honesty– we are all just stories in the end.

 

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

 

Lots of Laundry– Lassie Come Home!!!!

The Dogs of Lanark County–Alex Cram

 

 

 

 

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Did You Know we Once Had a Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel

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Did You Know we Once Had a  Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel

 

 

 

 

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The Grand Hotel has opened in Carleton Place, and today I found out we once had a Grand Hotel here in the late 1800s. It was actually called The Grand Central Hotel and it was first owned by David Dowlin. When he headed west to Minnesota he leased the hotel to his nephew Thomas Doyle from Drummond.

After doing research for a few hours I failed to come up with the location so I called Jennifer Fenwick Irwin at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum to see if she knew. She had never heard of it either, but we both assumed it had to be near the train station as it kind of went with the Grand Trunk Railroad that went through town– and maybe it wasn’t.

 

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The Grand Hotel

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Thanks to Jaan Kolk–Hey Linda, the 1888-9 Ontario Gazetteer you referenced actually has an ad for the Grand Central Hotel on the page following the listing (p.225) with a drawing – and it gives the location as directly opposite CPR station

 

 

In 1905 Thomas went to visit his uncle David Dowlan and was injured in a Great Northern train wreck. I don’t think the Carleton Place hotel lasted too long as Thomas Doyle went to Ottawa and opened the Strathcona Hotel on York Street. I can’t seem to find anything on that hotel either, but it is nice to see that the New Grand Hotel name in Carleton Place has a wee bit of reference to days gone by.

 

 

 

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Shane Wm Edwards  family photo On Franktown Road Carleton Place. Notice the carriages at the old station.

 

 

historicalnotes

 

Perth Courier, April 12, 1895–Mr. Thomas Doyle of Drummond has gone to Carleton Place to take charge of the Grand Central Hotel there having leased it from his uncle D. Dowlin.

Grand Central Hotel- Carleton Place-David Dowlan— Ontario Gazetteer and Business Directory (late 1800s)

 

Perth Courier, Jan. 24, 1896

The Carleton Place Herald of Jan. 14 says:  “Last Tuesday morning William Earle of Carson and Earle of this town and Annie Doyle of Drummond were united in marriage.  The ceremony was performed in St. John’s Church, Perth, by Rev. Father Duffus after which the party drove out to the residence of the bride’s parents where the marriage festivities were observed.  Miss Hattie Doyle, cousin of the bride, was maid of honor and Thomas Doyle, proprietor of the Grand Central Hotel was best man.  The guests were many and a pleasant evening was spent. The presents were numerous and handsome and useful.”

 

Obituary of Thomas Doyle

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  30 Nov 1935, Sat,  Page 9

 

 

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Jaan Kolk–Linda, you mentioned relatives moved west. Thomas M. Doyle, age 24, died in Anaconda, Montana. (Ottawa Journal, June 11, 1903)
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Jaan Kolk–I had trouble finding anything on the the Strathcona Hotel, York St. too, until I found this June 13, 1903 Ottawa Journal obituary for Thomas M. Doyle, which gave me the address 32 York St., and a year. The 1901 Might directory lists the Strathcona Hotel, 32 York St., Thomas Doyle prop. The 1890-91 Woddburn directory lists it as the Lynott House (Wm. & David Lynott) and the year before it was the Davidson House. The Strathcona was short-lived – by 1906 or earlier it was the Farmers’ Hotel, H.R Boyd prop.

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Jaan Kolk–And here is a June 6, 1906 Journal notice of transfer of tavern license for 32 York St., already the Farmers’ Hotel from the Strathcona in Ottawa. I had trouble finding anything on the the Strathcona Hotel, York St. too, until I found this June 13, 1903 Ottawa Journal obituary for Thomas M. Doyle, which gave me the address 32 York St., and a year.
The 1901 Might directory lists the Strathcona Hotel, 32 York St., Thomas Doyle prop. The 1890-91 Woddburn directory lists it as the Lynott House (Wm. & David Lynott) and the year before it was the Davidson House. The Strathcona was short-lived – by 1906 or earlier it was the Farmers’ Hotel, H.R Boyd prop.

 

Clipped from The Minneapolis Journal,  06 Jul 1905, Thu,  Page 2

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel

Carleton Place Folk Art from the Queen’s Hotel –The Millers

The Leland and Rathwell Hotels on Bridge Street

Leo Doyle of the Leland Hotel in Carleton Place –Calling All Doyles

The Rules of the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

Death from Corrosive Sublimate —Carleton Place’s Revere House

Jules “Julie” Pilon of the Leland Hotel– Weather Man

The Mystery Murals of The Queen’s and Mississippi Hotel

Lake Park Lodge – Queen’s Royal Hotel- Mississippi Lake Carleton Place Ontario

So Who Painted Those Wall Murals at our Carleton Place Hotels?

 

 

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

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Where was Bay View House in Appleton?

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Where was Bay View House in Appleton?

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  20 Nov 1897, Sat,  Page 2

 

 

The history of Appleton’s hotels in not well documented. It appears that Appleton had at least two hotels on the East side of the River. One was opposite the cheese factory and the other was opposite the general store. The hotels provided a place for the mill owners to entertain salesmen, a place for travellers to sleep, and served as the local watering hole.

In his book, Historical Sketches of Appleton, Jack Brown makes several mentions of Appleton hotels included:

In 1871 a Mr. Michael Brennan was Appleton’s hotel keeper.
In 1897 Mr. Baker changed the name of his hotel from Appleton House to Bay View House.
In 1904 Mr. Thomas C. Arthur sold the hotel to a Mr. Wellington Spearman.–North Lanark Regional Museum

Divided down the centre by the Mississippi River, the community of Appleton has always depended on a bridge to fully connect the community. Over the years a variety of bridges have been constructed in Appleton.

 

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Credits:North Lanark Regional Museum (2012.87.2)

 

In 1899 tragedy struck when the bridge gave way and killed two men (see related reading). By 1900 a new bridge had been constructed and was in use. Appleton’s current bridge was built in the 1950s and is almost unanimously considered an eyesore among the local residents.-North Lanark Regional Museum

 

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Credits:North Lanark Regional Museum (2012.88.13) Donated by Communications Canada, Government of Canada

 

Just a short walk away from the Appleton Boat Launch one comes across a cement table and chairs looking out on the Mississippi River. This quiet retreat was constructed in memory of Brian Cole (Sept. 02 1990 to Jan 10, 2003) Grandson of Delbert & Vera Cole, Appleton Village, by the Appleton Community Association and Friends.

Several community hall buildings stood at this location over the years. The community hall was an important part of Appleton’s social life. The hall was host to 4-H meetings, films, dances, junior farmers, women’s institute, and school plays among other things. The community hall also held the WWII Honor Roll which commemorated all those who had served and those who had died from Appleton during WWII.–North Lanark Regional Museum

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Feb 1897, Wed,  Page 2

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  11 Nov 1899, Sat,  Page 12

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

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Why the Appleton Bridge Collapsed…

The Day the Appleton Bridge Collapsed

Lawsuits in Carleton Place — The Collapse of the Appleton Bridge

 

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