Tag Archives: horses

War Horses — Between 500 and 1,000 Horses Were Shipped to Europe Everyday

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War Horses — Between 500 and 1,000 Horses Were Shipped to Europe Everyday
Bring your war horses January 26 to the Mississippi Hotel 1917- Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 22 Jan 1917, Mon, Page 10

What type of horses were used in ww1?

By 1917, Britain had over a million horses and mules in service, but harsh conditions, especially during winter, resulted in heavy losses, particularly amongst the Clydesdale horses, the main breed used to haul the guns.

How Many Canadian Horses were killed in World War 1

Col. Harry Baker, the only MP killed in action in the First World War. He was the member of Parliament for Brome, Que. Canada sent about 130,000 horses overseas during the First World War, according to Steve Harris, chief historian of the directorate of history and heritage at the Department of National Defence

How many horses were killed in the First World War?

Eight million horses, donkeys and mules died in World War I, three-quarters of them from the extreme conditions they worked in.

A war horse is often thought of as a huge cavalry charger or a smart officer’s mount. But during the First World War (1914-18), horses’ roles were much more varied. Their contribution included carrying and pulling supplies, ammunition, artillery and even the wounded. Without these hard-working animals, the Army could not have functioned.

The “pack horse was more important than the cavalry charger” in the First World War, noted Cook, pointing out that moving supplies of food and ammunition to the front lines was a constant need whereas waves of armed riders on galloping horses — both virtually defenceless against machine guns — had mostly become a thing of the past.

The film version of War Horse, he added, is sure to offer Canadians an informative glimpse of a little-remembered feature of the First World War.

Rick Robertsa day
My wife’s grandfather, Walter Darnbrough was attached to an ambulance unit during part of his WWI service in France. On the day that his quick thinking and determination earned him the Canadian Military Medal (MM) for bravery under fire, he was a mounted outrider accompanying a horse drawn ambulance taking wounded to the rear. The ambulance came under enemy machine gun fire, killing the horses that were pulling the ambulance plus the driver, and an officer seated next to the driver. With the crippled ambulance still under fire, Walter disconnected it from the dead horses, and used his surviving horse to pull it to safety. I haven’t been able to find records that indicate how many of the wounded that were on the ambulance that day survived. Walter recovered from his WWI wounds to marry his British war bride in Yorkshire and return to Canada to live out a long and productive life.

Because military vehicles were relatively new inventions and prone to problems, horses, and mules were more reliable — and cheaper — forms of transport.

Thousands of horses pulled field guns; six to 12 horses were required to pull each gun.

Eight million horses, donkeys and mules died in the First World War, three-quarters of them from the extreme conditions they worked in.

At the start of the war, the British Army had 25,000 horses. Another 115,000 were purchased compulsorily under the Horse Mobilization Scheme.

Over the course of the war, between 500 and 1,000 horses were shipped to Europe every day.

Dummy horses were sometimes used to deceive the enemy into misreading the location of troops.

Many horses were initially used as traditional cavalry horses but their vulnerability to modern machine gun and artillery fire meant their role changed to transporting troops and ammunition.

Veterinarians treated 2.5 million horses; two million recovered and returned to the battlefield.

The British Army Veterinary Corp hospitals in France cared for 725,000 horses and successfully treated three-quarters of them. A typical horse hospital could treat 2,000 animals at any one time.

Well-bred horses were more likely to suffer from shell shock and be affected by the sights and sounds of battle than less-refined compatriots.

Horses on the front line could be taught to lie down and take cover at the sound of artillery fire.

In muddy conditions, it could take up to 12 hours to clean a horse and the harness.

One-quarter of all deaths were due to gunfire and gas; exhaustion and disease claimed the rest.

Horse fodder was the single largest commodity shipped to the front by some countries, including Britain.

Fearing their horses would face terrible and terrifying conditions at war, some owners took the drastic measure of humanely putting their animals down before the army could seize them.

In a single day during the 1916 Battle of Verdun, 7,000 horses from both sides were killed by long-range shelling, including 97 killed by single shots from a French naval gun.

Losses were particularly heavy among Clydesdale horses, which were used to haul guns.

Britain lost over 484,000 horses — one horse for every two men.

Horses were considered so valuable that if a soldier’s horse was killed or died he was required to cut off a hoof and bring it back to his commanding officer to prove that the two had not simply become separated.

Describing Photos- thanks to Cathy & Terry Machin

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Describing Photos- thanks to Cathy & Terry Machin
Photo-Thanks to Cathy and Terry Machin these are local photos in the Ottawa Valley–I am quite sure these are Dugald New from CP when he was working with the loggers in Ottawa and just outside with the Moore logging company– Circa 1907

A lot of rain had run into the furrows from the west side of the creek- it was a slop hole now. I’m counting on the cows wantin’ to get out and I guess it’s about time to let old … the western edge of the homestead, a place he’d concentrated the plowing. When they got to the plowed swath the horses were mired in the mud up over their grith straps. Two men were still stuck in the mud with the horses and the rest had fled into the trees“- Cracker Justice –By Janet Post

Related reading

Debunking a Postcard 1913 — Strange Ephemera

Photo-Thanks to Cathy and Terry Machin–these are local photos in the Ottawa Valley

During World War II, my dad junked out the steam engine this gear came from and sold it for scrap iron. He used this gear for a base for a mailbox stand. That’s how it was preserved.

Before they scrapped the engine, they used it to smoke meat. When they butchered, they hung the bacon and hams in front, and burned wood to smoke the meat. They would hang the country hams on a chain upstairs and my brother would use his jack knife to cut a chunk off the ham when he wanted a chew of ham.

As boys, my brother and I took the engine’s brass pieces to school and donated them to the war effort. I still have the engine’s original state inspector’s certificate; it was dated 1918.-Lawrence Torske, McIntosh, Minnesota

Related reading

Second Lieut. H. A. Powell, to Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Lowry, of Pakenham — Steam in WW1

Ernie Giles Steam Engine Man

Steam Engines– Clippings About Harold Richardson

Photos!! Who is With These Steam Engines?

Glory Days of Carleton Place–So What Happened to the Moore Steam Engine?

The Old Steam Engine Tractor on Mullet Street

James Miller Steam Engine Man from Perth

Hissing Steam, Parades and a 1930 Hearse–Pioneer Days Middleville

Shipman & Acme Engines Clippings and Notations

“Where Are They Now?” Des Moore’s Steam Engine

“Around the Local Fairs in 80 Days”? Lanark County Minor Steampunk Story

Let’s go Racing Boys — J. A. Brunton –Where was This Sign?

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Let’s go Racing Boys — J. A. Brunton –Where was This Sign?
Adin Wesley Daigle photo..

Adin found this old enamel sign and we would like to know about J. A. Brunton. Where was this sign? Two of his horses were called “Effective Scott” and “Effective Kevin”.

Nancy Giffin —-OK, that sign used to be placed on his truck when they went to the horse shows at the fall fairs. They never did the horse racing at the track, but they did show them at horse show competitions at the fairs. , they trained their horses using the bike ( sulky ). The horse show competitions have a buggy class and a bike class. They kept their horses at Millers stable on High street. Mostly the training and conditioning was done in a field on the town line across from where the Pet store was. There have been condos there for many years now.

Joann Voyce As a child in the 1940’s, I remember going to sulkie racing up High St where the new subdivision is now

Lynne Johnson The little park by High and Bridge is where the Bruntons used to train for sulky races, if I’m not mistaken?

Joann Voyce That was next to Miller’s Horse Stable. That is where the horses were boarded as well and were walked daily in the little park area, I lived on Thomas across from it for 8 years and then on High Street 2 doors from the Stable. The Miller’s are my relatives and I was in those stables many times

Penny Trafford There was a track up the end of High Street about where that housing development is going in. I’m sure it was for the horses, but I also know it was used as a go-cart track because my Dad belonged to that go-cart Club and practiced and raced up there.

Related reading:

Annie Bella Brunton & Adam Wesley Jones

What Happened to Bill Brunton’s Roof in Carleton Place?

When I Say Whoa–I Mean Whoa–The Dairy Horse

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When I Say Whoa–I Mean Whoa–The Dairy Horse



Lost Ottawa

· August 24, 2017 ·  

The Clark Dairy Man, delivering the milk somewhere in Ottawa in his horse-drawn wagon.

Unfortunately, no date on the picture. Going by the chassis, it would seem to be late 40s or early 50s.

I’ve heard that the horses would move along the street by themselves as the milkman went door to door, so the milkman didn’t have to return to the wagon again after every household. One of those ancient rhythms …

(CSTM CN-4986)

This week I posted about Dairy horses on Facebook and people loved the memories. No story of the Clark Dairy in Ottawa could be complete without reference to their very fine horses, which was the pride and job of Mr. Clark and every member of the staff in the Dairy.

In the the 1920s when the Clark Dairy began business they started in a very modest way. Their plant at the corner of Bronson Avenue and Imperial in Ottawa was small, but sufficient for the business they then enjoyed. Their delivery system consisted solely of two wagons.

In the 1930s, a handsome new two-storey building teemed with activity; and thirty-five wagons were needed to cover the city, with seven handsome streamlined motor wagons.

Bottles– Adin Wesley Daige-
Carleton Place Underground

The barns, situated many blocks from the Dairy plant, were just as fresh and spotless as busy hands could make them. There 34 splendid horses: Percherons and Clydesdales were as meticulously groomed as any local society beauty. They stood like sentinels as “the white stockings” gracing their legs were soaped and washed and hooves polished. Coats were combed and brushed until they glistened. The barn included five splendid prize winning animals and the famous Dark Secret, a prize winning champion of the Central Canada Exhibition, and four consecutive times a prize winner at the Royal Winter Fair, in Toronto.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Nov 1938, Sat  •  Page 27

Every day was a show day for the Clark Dairy horses, and the horses knew the route better than the drivers. The red and white delivery wagons were kept immaculate. Clark Dairy was a self sustaining concern, having its own staff of painters, horseshoers and mechanics, so that every necessary job was given attention. Mr. George J. Scandrett. the office manager, had a wide experience in the dairy business and was a former member of the Ontario Milk Board.

EQUESTRIA SPORT HORSESHOES REVERSIBLE 4-RING CURRY
how to curry hooves

The Clark Dairy horse handlers felt that horses were a lot like humans in feelings and habits. They knew when it was time for their feeding, they also know when it was time for them to return to the stable. The handlers also had to know what types of shoes the horses wore in the various seasons. A Dairy horse’s shoe was made of hard rubber around a steel form. Some horses wore their shoes longer than others and some wore their shoes out in two months. When the streets were icy in the winter time, the horse wore a special type shoe with prongs that dug into the ice for a firm hold. These kept the horse from falling. But, often times, the horse slipped even with these shoes on. They had to curry them each day to keep them looking nice and had to be extra careful about their shoes. Walking on pavement everyday of the week was hard on a horse until he they get used to it.

The Clark Dairy horses were said to be the best in the business, as they knew every stop on the route and it took them only two days to learn a new customer stop. They had one horse that apparently had too much fire for a Dairy horse and smashed up the first five wagons he was attached to. As a last resort they sent him to a mud clogged Ottawa Street usually handled by a two horse team. That horse was a good worker for the Clark Dairy and did his job for two horses and never lost a minute starting up just as the milkman returned from the porch. Horses of course could master terrible roads, which was a bane to the delivery service.

Photo- Adin Wesley Daigle-
Carleton Place Underground

The Dairy horses got bushels of presents every Christmas from the Clark Dairy customers. Lumps of sugar, carrots and apples and even when there was sugar rationing the horses were thought of first before family along the route. Bakeries were a great favourite of the delivery horses and sugar buns were fed to some every day. On Sundays these business were closed and some of these horses would not budge waiting for their treat and they would stamp their feet on the sidewalk demanding their sugary treat.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Jun 1939, Sat  •  Page 25

According to the Ottawa Citizen there was a Clark Dairy horse, back in 1946, who every day peered expectantly through the windows of the post office canteen in the basement of the Langevin Block, to the great amusement of civil servants. The horse had a reason for his Peeping Tom tactic. Seems the driver used to scoop up a handful of sugar cubes from a convenient bowl on the canteen counter, with which to treat his faithful horse. The animal nuzzled the window pane daily to remind him! 

Good delivery horses were scarce and eventually they disparaged the horse and saluted the automobile. The blacksmiths that worked for the Clark Dairy ended up changing oil and greasing trucks. Although the automobile certainly eliminated piles of manure that clogged some streets, it introduced a whole new set of global carbon complications. In the end the demise of horse power and the ascent of the automobile illustrated two characteristics of energy transitions: they don’t always solve problems and rarely perform as advertised.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Feb 1946, Wed  •  Page 13

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This horse’s name was very racist so I cut it off the photo. Champion of Clark’s Dairy-one of the string of Clark’s Dairy horses entered at the Ottawa Exhibition for competition this week. Retired from the regular routes, XXXX won trophies in last year’s stock show at the exhibition. (Photo by Little).The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 Aug 1948, Tue  •  Page 6

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Aug 1936, Tue  •  Page 14

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Apr 1941, Sat  •  Page 28

photo-Ross Dunn 1959
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 May 1938, Wed  •  Page 14
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Oct 1963, Sat  •  Page 5
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jun 1929, Fri  •  Page 12
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 May 1929, Thu  •  Page 1
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Sep 1950, Fri  •  Page 43
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Sep 1940, Tue  •  Page 3
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Nov 1909, Tue  •  Page 1


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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Aug 1935, Tue  •  Page 9



Carleton Place Dairy Horses
No photo description available.
Belle the horse driven by “CCB’ for the Maple Leaf Dairy- 1948-1951- Carleton Place and Beckwith Museum… many stories.. click and start here.. Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairyhttps://lindaseccaspina.wordpress.com/2016/03/25/treasured-memories-of-fred-and-the-maple-leaf-dairy/

Bill Crawford Harold Forbes & Flossie delivered our milk from the Carleton Place Dairy. I remember feeding her carrots from our garden, and apples from our neighbours tree.

Norma Ford Bill Crawford – your post brings back so many memories of Harold Forbes and his milk wagon. Holding onto the back bumper in winter and sliding with the ride. Harold stopping and chasing us away. He always gave us a ride first until he figured we were too far from home. Happy memories.

Jaan Kolk16 hrs · EditedEastern Ontario history has enough Clark’s Dairies to make your head spin. Linda.

In 1913, John Clark of Eastview took action to force Clark’s Dairy Ltd., which had taken over the business of Patrick Clark of Lake Deschenes to change it’s name (“Silver Springs Dairy Farms” was chosen.)

In 1919, H.J. Clark was manager of Clark’s Dairy, 185 Lyon Street, before he moved to Smith’s Falls to form Clark’s Sanitary Dairy there.

In 1920, Clark’s Dairy – said to have it’s origin in the 1850s – was merged into Producers Dairy and the Clark Dairy name disappeared from Ottawa until Harry J. Clark returned from Smiths Falls to start a new Clark’s Dairy in Ottawa. (According to Bruce Elliott, Harry’s brother Albert “Ab” Clark operated a separate firm from his farm at City View.)

I hope I’ve made that clear enough so someone can explain it to me 😉

Here is Citizen note from July26, 1920, on the old Clark’s Dairy merging into Producers. (E.W. Clark was Harry’s uncle.)

Cold Milk Ice Cream and Butter —- Carleton Place

What Did you Like Best about the Maple Leaf Dairy? Reader’s Comments..

Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Remembering Milk and Cookies –Metcalfe Dairy

No Milk Today–My Love has Gone Away

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk?

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

Allan Barratt– Pakenham– People of Lanark County

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Allan Barratt– Pakenham– People of Lanark County

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Pakenham residents, Toby and Al Barratt, will be recognized for their community-minded efforts during an appreciation ceremony Jan. 26 at the Stewart Community Centre. The event serves as part of the annual Pakenham Frost Festival festivities. – Submitted photo– read the rest here

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Toby and Al moved to Pakenham in 1972 on County Road 29, previously owned by Bill and Emma Hogarth. They had two children, Utta and Norman, and their youngest daughter, Natalie, was born a year later at Almonte General Hospital. At present, their family now totals three children with spouses and seven grandchildren.

During Al’s high school years, his family lived at the Pakenham CPR train station. His father, Sid, worked there as the station agent. Al knew Pakenham well, but it did not take Toby very long to fit into the life of the Pakenham Township. The couple were soon curling and having fun at the community dances, as well performing at Thora Pugh’s famous skits and plays.

The library held a special attraction for Toby, and she soon was helping with storytime and became a member of the board. This led to becoming the first paid part-time librarian. After she gave up the librarian’s position, she continued to be a board member and helped shape the library during the transition to the Mississippi Mills Pakenham branch. To this day, she still volunteers at her beloved library.

They renovated their house into a larger home and started a business venture in 1978. Al became a self-taught harness maker. He made mainly draft horse harnesses, but repaired any leather items, even suitcases and shoes that came in surreptitiously after dark. At this time, Al also volunteered at the fire department. He then became its chief for three years.

Al became a member of the Lanark County Plowman’s Association and became its president for two years. He then was instrumental in the bid to get the International Plowing Match to Lanark County in 2003. He organized the logistics and accommodations for all the horse plowing aspects of this match. read the rest here

 

 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Oct 1990, Tue  •  Page 31

 

 - The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 May 1964, Sat  •  Page 43

 

Findlay vs. Bailey in Carleton Place —Horses vs. Cars

The Horseshoe Sinkhole Bridge? Mysteries of Lanark County

Name These Lanark County Horseshoe Honeys!

Wild Horses Could Not Drag Me Away

You’ve Got Trouble in Franktown-Dead Horses and Wives

A Horse is a Horse of Course– Of Course—Angus McFarlane

Buggies Horses and Accidents

We’re Goin’ Racin’ Boys on High Street

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We’re Goin’ Racin’ Boys on High Street

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Photo-Rebecca Bolton Morris—Hi Linda, My mother was a Stanzel from Carleton Place, and her grandfather, Stephen Stanzel, was in the shoe & boot business in Carleton Place for many years. She told me that he was involved in horse racing, but I think she may have exaggerated a story she heard as a child. Do you know of any horse & buggy racing around Carleton Place, perhaps around 1890 – 1920?

Yes, Carleton Place had horse racing down below High Street and also the biggest horse show in the Ottawa Valley every year at Riverside Park. They also did ice racing too.

Joann Voyce As a child in the 1940’s, I remember going to sulkie racing up High St where the new subdivision is now

Donna Grierson Stu Ferguson used to race horse & buggy on High Street & they boarded horses there I think the place belonged to Millar’s I think there’s a playground there now

Dawn Jones Ivan Farr had horses and participated in racing. In the 70’s I think.

Tom Edwards Stu Ferguson, Jack Saunders, Bill Wylie, Gordie Ames, Ivan Farr, Lennie Richardson, Arnold Brunton, Doug Ferguson, Glen Millar, this was the Friday afternoon club in my Aunt Hilda’s house on Thomas Street. The stories were fascinating. I used to love listening to these guys. Uncle Stu was a lifetime member at Rideau Carleton Raceway.

Lynne Johnson The little park by High and Bridge is where the Bruntons used to train for sulky races, if I’m not mistaken?

Joann Voyce That was next to Miller’s Horse Stable. That is where the horses were boarded as well and were walked daily in the little park area, I lived on Thomas across from it for 8 years and then on High Street 2 doors from the Stable. The Miller’s are my relatives and I was in those stables many times

enny Trafford There was a track up the end of High Street about where that housing development is going in. I’m sure it was for the horses, but I also know it was used as a go-cart track because my Dad belonged to that go-cart Club and practiced and raced up there.

 

 

200 to watch Kart races on High Street.. Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 12 Aug 1960, Fri, Page 40

No photo description available.

Those horse shows in Carleton Place. Horse races at Lake Park and later on on High Street .. Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 11 Jun 1907, Tue, Page 6

 

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 May 1909, Mon  •  Page 2

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CLIPPED FROM

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Oct 1939, Sat  •  Page 10

 

relatedreading

Let’s Go Racing Boys with Nellie Sharper and Alex Hunter from Carleton Place

Findlay vs. Bailey in Carleton Place —Horses vs. Cars

Wild Horses Could Not Drag Me Away

You’ve Got Trouble in Franktown-Dead Horses and Wives

A Horse is a Horse of Course– Of Course—Angus McFarlane

Buggies Horses and Accidents

More on Stewart Ferguson by Tom Edwards

More on Stewart Ferguson by Tom Edwards

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More on Stewart Ferguson by Tom Edwards

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Photo- Tom Edwards

These were ribbons my Great Uncle Stu won over the years at different fairs with his horses. This picture was taken in 1974, and I think it was in the back porch on Thomas Street.

Photo- Tom Edwards

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relatedreading

Uncle Johnnie Erskine and Stewart Ferguson by Tom Edwards

The Oldest IGA Employee & Other Almonte Memories

A Horse is a Horse of Course– Of Course—Angus McFarlane

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Mr. Hollinger sold horses and cattle at the Queen’s Hotel every Tuesday in Carleton Place.  Local Carleton Place resident Angus McFarlane did some local dealing in horses, as his values were uncanny.  The local man always felt he needed the best, and wanted a  horse to rival his speedy new roadster.  On December 17th, 1914, McFarlane began to successfully negotiate with a well known farmer for the purchase of a nifty young driving horse. After he gave payment for the new steed he drove home with the new purchase following behind him. Angus put the animal in Mick Doyle’s stable when he suddenly spied a friend.

He smiled and told the gent,

“Come here and I will show you what I bought.”

Angus walked into the stall, untied the horse with the command,“Back Up!”

Instead of backing up as per instructions, the animal surprisingly sat down. Angus began to review the facts and wondered what to do about the situation. His new purchase was still seated complacently munching on some of Mick’s excellent hay. Angus wasn’t having none of that and left at great speed for the Bank of Ottawa to have payment of his cheque stopped.

Upon arrival at the bank the manger told him the cheque had already been presented and paid ten minutes previously. Leaving the bank slower than he had arrived, he ruefully reflected that he did indeed have the fastest car in Carleton Place, but now he possessed a horse with no reverse gear.

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December 16, 1937

 

Buy Linda Secaspina’s Books— Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac– Tilting the Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place and 4 others on Amazon or Amazon Canada or Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street in Carleton Place

 

What Happens Behind The Queen’s Hotel Stays Behind the Queen’s Hotel

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Once a month two well known citizens from Lanark used to drive a nifty horse hitched up to a spic and span buggy into   Carleton Place on business. They always pulled up at the back door of the Queen’s Hotel, and there the horse, not the gents, was given a much needed stimulant of a shot of liquor fed to him from a tin dish.

The horse always seemed to smack his lips as if to say,

“That touched the spot.”

In Ireland and England, racehorses are given Guiness as part of their daily diet. In the normal digestive process the bacteria and protozoa in the horse’s gut ferment the whole grains and fiber in order to aid the digestive process. This is why they can eat hay or raw grains and we cannot–we do not have a fermentation vat in our cecum (actually we do not have a cecum, all we have is an appendix). So, we prefer the grains to be fermented in a vat, then poured into a bottle before we partake of it. Also, we have to look at body weight here as that has an effect on the amount of alcohol one can take in before becoming drunk. An average small horse weighs 1000 pounds, while many of our warmbloods and heavier horses weigh in at 1500 pounds or more, with draft horses in the one ton range. So a bottle or two or three of beer or wine and even of hard liquor would be distributed through a large body mass. Many horses will drink wine or beer happily but I doubt there are very many that will get through a bottle of vodka.The reality is you will go broke buying beer or wine long before you will get your horse drunk or hooked on alcohol. Many of the dark beers have high mineral contents and are fairly nutritious, especially Guinness.

No word on what the horse behind the Queen’s hotel was given.

I have written a few stories on the Queen’s Hotel but– these are are a  series of stories I continue to write from the Desk Book of The Chatterton House Hotel (Queen’s Hotel) Carleton Place from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Part 1- Tales of the Chatteron House Corset — Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place- can be found here.

Part 2- Hell on Wheels at Lady Chatterton’s Hotel in Carleton Place– can be found here.

Part 3- I Will Take Some Opium to Go Please —The “Drug Dispensary” at the Chatterton House Hotel

Part 4- Chatterton House Hotel Registrar- George Hurdis -1884

Part 5-What the Heck was Electric Soap? Chatterton House Hotel Registrar

Part 6-The First Mosh Pits in Carleton Place — The Opera House of the Chatterton House Hotel

Part 7-All the President’s Men — Backroom Dealings in Carleton Place?

Part 8- Who Was John Boland? Chatterton House/Queen’s Hotel Registry — The Burgess Family Dynasty

Buy Linda Secaspina’s Books— Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac– Tillting the Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place and 4 others on Amazon or Amazon Canada or Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street in Carleton Place

Do You Know What This Is ???

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This is on Bridge Street across from The Floral Boutique.

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It wasn’t just the people of Carleton Place who left their mark on the town. The many horses that once frequented Carleton Place with their owners also left behind evidence of their importance with public water troughs.
Do you know where the last two water troughs are today?

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One is on Bridge Street and there is another one in the gorgeous oasis maintained by the Horticultural Society right next to the Museum and the Labyrinth. Great place for a coffee break or lunch. More about that this week!

Did you know that we had fantastic horse shows in Riverside Park every year? People came for miles!

Top photo Linda Seccaspina
Bottom photo and information from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

Buy Linda Secaspina’s Books— Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac– Tilting the Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place and 4 others on Amazon or Amazon Canada or Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street in Carleton Place