Tag Archives: horse

Almonte’s Outlaw Horse — A Horse of a Tale

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 - TALES OF v By HARY. WALKER ' ! - This irthe...

 

This is the story of two race horses- a fast one from Almonte and a slow one from Renfrew that were expertly  retouched to look exactly alike. From that succesaful “operation”  they went on to make history in Canada and the United States and became the object of search in the two countries until they vanished completely after making their owner a fortune.

 

For this amazing episode in ‘the history of horse racing’ in the Ottawa Valley the writer has drawn on the records of Bob Boal, dean of Lanark County, politically and municipally on whose father’s farm at Pakenham these two famous horses were kept when not racing. The man who owned both was D. G. Macdonell popularily known as “DG” brilliant Almonte lawyer who rose to prominence in the Canadian political arena.

 

In the reckless nineties, horse racing and politics were absorbing preoccupations in the Ottawa Valley. “D.G.” excelled In both. He had his private paddock in Almonte alongside the CPR tracks and spent time “cleaning up” at all the fall fairs in the Valley. Macdonell, in partnership with John Kelley, decided to enter his horses in the “big” circuits In the United States.  While competing on the United States tracks, “D.G.” bought 5 branded horse which had been outlawed as a “ringer.”

 

He brought this horse, which had three horse shoes branded on its side, to skilled Almonte veterinary. Dr. Young.  After several months of expert work. Dr. Young succesfully removed the brands on MacDonald’s imported horse. There was no secret about it and all the racing fraternity In the district followed the ‘experiment’ with keen interest.  Thus disguised with the brands removed Macdonell took It across the border where it resumed its spectacular win on all tracks. However, the American Judge became suspicious and threatened to disqualify the horse if it was ever entered again.

 

So Macdonell and Kelley returned to Almonte with the horse. That year at the Renfrew Fair they were impressed by another horse that closely resembled their once branded winner except for its legs. The Renfrew horse was ‘ considerably slower but it would do. So they bought the Renfrew horse and painted its legs to match their racing marvel.

 

Then they returned to the race tracks of the United States with the two horses looking identical to each other. When they wanted to lose a race they ran the slow Renfrew horse, and when they wanted to win they entered the ex-branded horse. Finally the big sweepstakes race came up in Kentucky. Macdonell, after a succession of losses with his slow horse (to build up long-odds) entered his fast horse. Going all for broke, be bet his shirt on It and cleaned up $50,000.

 

But the jig was up, the American Judge with a long memory somehow identified identified the outlawed horse, seized it and put a guard over it. That night Macdonell bought off the guard and escaped with the horse. An American detective  followed hot on his trail across the border to the home pasture on the Boal farm outside of Pakenham. But they, or anybody else, never saw the famous horse again. They just disappeared.

 

Not only did D. G. Macdonell outsmart the American horse racing “sharpers” “D.G.” decided to enter the lists as North Lanark as a brash Liberal candidate in 1898. He was not the favored political son of Lanark –then and since – consistently Tory. But Macdonell had other potent assets. He was a native son of Glengarry and to the Scots of Beckwith, Ramsay and Dalhousie township that outweighed every other consideration.

 

Accordingly to the story “D C.” turned up unsupported at the nomination convention, wearing a Glengarry bonnet to thethe dismay of party line Liberals and Tories. His fiery election speech and “the Glengarry” captured the Scottish delegates from the concession. He won the nomination but not the election.

 

historicalnotes

 

Unexpected Almonte
September 14, 2019  · 

Almonte was featured in the Saturday, 4 January 1879 issue of the Canadian illustrated News.
The Canadian Illustrated News was a weekly Canadian illustrated magazine published in Montreal from 1869 to 1883. It was published by George Desbarats.
The magazine was notable for being the first in the world to consistently produce photographs at a successful rate. This was possible with the financial backing of Desbarats, as well as the invention of half-tone photo-engraving by William Leggo (Wikipedia)
Depicted above are:
St. Andrew’s Church, St. Paul’s Church & Parsonage, Daniel Galbraith Esq MP, The residence of Major Gemmill, The High School, St. John’s Church, The R.C. Church, School & Parsonage, The Rosamond Woollen Company’s Mill, Elm Glen (Residence of A. Elliott Esq), D.G. Macdonnell Esq, Reeve, Riley’s Hotel, Messrs, Elliott & Sheard’s Woollen Mill, Dr. Mostyn MPP, Residence of D.G. Macdonnell, Esq., Reeve.

Early Life

Donald Greenfield Macdonell was born in Morrisburg, Ontario, on July 2, 1849. His parents were Alexander Greenfield Macdonell (1817-1889) and Helen Sophia (“Ellen”) Doran (1826-1871). Alexander Macdonell was a lawyer.

Donald became a lawyer in 1874. He lived for a time in Almonte, Ontario, a town of textile mills on Canada’s Mississippi River, about 20 kilometres southwest of Ottawa.

Marriage to Margaret Rosamond

On June 30, 1875, in Almonte, he married Margaret Rosamond. She was born about 1858 in Carleton Place, Ontario. Her parents were Bennett Rosamond (1833-1910) and Adair Mary Roy. Bennett Rosamond was a prominent manufacturer and politician in Almonte.

Margaret died in Almonte on August 28, 1877. Read more here CLICK

An organization in Carleton Place with these newer ideas for the conservation of practically all main forms of wild life was formed in 1884.  Under the title of the Carleton Place Game, Fish and Insectivorous Birds Protective Society it continued to operate for some years.  Original officers of the group were William Pattie, president ; Jim Bothwell, vice president ; Walter Kibbee, secretary-treasurer, and committee members John Cavers, Tom Glover, John Moore, Jim Morphy and Jim Presley ; elected at a May meeting in the old fire hall on Bridge Street, when a constitution drawn up by Robert Bell was adopted.  Other members pledged to support the rules of this pioneering wild life protective society were William Beck, Peter Cram, Jim Dunlop, John Flett, David Gillies, Charlie Glover, Tom Hilliard, Archie Knox and Tom Leaver ; Hugh McCormick, William McDiarmid, Hiram McFadden, Jim McFadden, Jim McGregor, George McPherson, William Neelin, Robert Patterson and William Patterson ; Dr. Robert F. Preston, Alex Sibbitt, William Taylor, William Whalen, Will R. Williamson, Alex Wilson and Joe Wilson.  Out of town sportsmen among the first members were Duncan Campbell, John Gemmill, D. G. MacDonnell and Tom Mitcheson, all of Almonte ; Jim Rogers of Montreal and R. W. Stevens of Ottawa.

At this time fishing on Sundays was illegal here as well as hunting on Sundays.  Only about five of these men were said to be still living in 1928 when a story recalling the formation of the Carleton Place wild life protective society of 1884 was published.

Related Reading

War Horses — Between 500 and 1,000 Horses Were Shipped to Europe Everyday

The Ghost Horse of Tatlock — A Faerie Tale???

You’ve Got Trouble in Franktown-Dead Horses and Wives

A Horse is a Horse of Course– Of Course—Angus McFarlane

Buggies Horses and Accidents

Did you Know Old Burnside has a Ghostly Horse?

Let’s go Racing Boys — J. A. Brunton –Where was This Sign?

Let’s Go Racing Boys with Nellie Sharper and Alex Hunter from Carleton Place

Uncle Johnnie Erskine and Stewart Ferguson by Tom Edwards

More Notes about the Mysterious Arklan Farm

Ride a Horse Save a Cowboy

More Photos of the Hazwill Pony Farm… Larry Clark — Wylies– 1962-1963

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More Photos of the Hazwill Pony Farm… Larry Clark — Wylies– 1962-1963

LindaSaw some posts that referred to horses and another of some Wylies. Not sure if there is any connection, but there was a riding area (mostly for kids) at the Wylie property (I think) at the junction of hwys 7and 15/29. I believe the photos would be from the 62/63 era. Third photo: could be Cecil Hicks property in the background? –Larry Clark

Larry Clark

This is from when Doug Wylie’s mom had Hazwill Pony Club.. Doug in saddle..

Linda Gallipeau-Johnston First time I was on a horse was with Doug.Valerie Edwards That is not Big Sue is it? & there was another horse with a buzzcut mane?Beverley J Wylie Yes that is Sue. Have to jog my memory for buzzcut mane..maybe Butch or Stormie…will get back to you..

Community archaologist Adin Wesley Daigle

Related Reading

Beverley and Doug Wylie Photos

Let’s go Racing Boys — J. A. Brunton –Where was This Sign?

Mechanic Girl — Lanark County’s Pacer

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Mechanic Girl — Lanark County’s Pacer
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The Gazette
Montreal, Quebec, Quebec, Canada
08 Dec 1892, Thu  •  Page 8
The Gazette
Montreal, Quebec, Quebec, Canada
09 Mar 1893, Thu  •  Page 8
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The Gazette
Montreal, Quebec, Quebec, Canada
03 Feb 1893, Fri  •  Page 8

So I looked and looked for the Jacques Cartier thinking it was a race track.. and no it was a special race at Blue Bonnets.. DUH!.

The Blue Bonnets Raceway (later named Hippodrome de Montréal) was a horse racing track and casino in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. It closed on October 13, 2009, after 137 years of operation.
Demolition of the site began in mid-2018, after sitting abandoned and derelict for nearly a decade

In 1872, the Blue Bonnets Raceway for thoroughbred horse racing opened on the Jos. Decary farm in the easternmost part of the Blue Bonnets community, now Montreal West. In 1886, the Ontario and Quebec Railway (a company controlled by the Canadian Pacific Railway) cut the raceway in half. In 1905, John F. Ryan founded the Jockey Club of Montreal which on June 4, 1907, opened a new Blue Bonnets Raceway on Decarie Boulevard. In 1958, Jean-Louis Levesque built a multi-million-dollar clubhouse for the Blue Bonnets Raceway and by 1961, it began to challenge the preeminence of the Ontario racing industry. From 1961 and 1975, the Raceway was home to the Quebec Derby, an annual horse race conceived by Levesque.

 La maison Joseph-Décary, avenue de Vendôme in Dorval

So what happened to Mechanic Girl? You would not believe this, but the pacer horse that was bought by Mr. Kelly of Almonte ( actually it was Dr. Kelly) The Doctors of Almonte … In the First Half of the Century – John King Kelly — Almonte Gazette — John Dunn made her way back to Lanark County. Mechanic Girl was bought back to one of the Carleton Place horse enthusiasts–Dr. Preston and George Burgess as Dr. Kelly and Dr. Preston were friends. She ended her days in Carleton Place. –

More Notes about the Mysterious Arklan Farm

Let’s Go Racing Boys with Nellie Sharper and Alex Hunter from Carleton Place

We’re Goin’ Racin’ Boys on High Street

Tippins — Perth– Just Wanted to Keep His Horse Warm?

Let’s go Racing Boys — J. A. Brunton –Where was This Sign?

More Notes about the Mysterious Arklan Farm

When I Say Whoa–I Mean Whoa–The Dairy Horse

Uncle Johnnie Erskine and Stewart Ferguson by Tom Edwards

The Horses of Carleton Place– Wonder if they ever had a Merlin?

Ride a Horse Save a Cowboy

Findlay vs. Bailey in Carleton Place —Horses vs. Cars

The Horseshoe Sinkhole Bridge? Mysteries of Lanark County

Name These Lanark County Horseshoe Honeys!

Wild Horses Could Not Drag Me Away

You’ve Got Trouble in Franktown-Dead Horses and Wives

A Horse is a Horse of Course– Of Course—Angus McFarlane

Buggies Horses and Accidents

Let’s go Racing Boys — J. A. Brunton –Where was This Sign?

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Let’s go Racing Boys — J. A. Brunton –Where was This Sign?
Adin Wesley Daigle photo..

Adin found this old enamel sign and we would like to know about J. A. Brunton. Where was this sign? Two of his horses were called “Effective Scott” and “Effective Kevin”.

Nancy Giffin —-OK, that sign used to be placed on his truck when they went to the horse shows at the fall fairs. They never did the horse racing at the track, but they did show them at horse show competitions at the fairs. , they trained their horses using the bike ( sulky ). The horse show competitions have a buggy class and a bike class. They kept their horses at Millers stable on High street. Mostly the training and conditioning was done in a field on the town line across from where the Pet store was. There have been condos there for many years now.

Joann Voyce As a child in the 1940’s, I remember going to sulkie racing up High St where the new subdivision is now

Lynne Johnson The little park by High and Bridge is where the Bruntons used to train for sulky races, if I’m not mistaken?

Joann Voyce That was next to Miller’s Horse Stable. That is where the horses were boarded as well and were walked daily in the little park area, I lived on Thomas across from it for 8 years and then on High Street 2 doors from the Stable. The Miller’s are my relatives and I was in those stables many times

Penny Trafford There was a track up the end of High Street about where that housing development is going in. I’m sure it was for the horses, but I also know it was used as a go-cart track because my Dad belonged to that go-cart Club and practiced and raced up there.

Related reading:

Annie Bella Brunton & Adam Wesley Jones

What Happened to Bill Brunton’s Roof in Carleton Place?

When I Say Whoa–I Mean Whoa–The Dairy Horse

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When I Say Whoa–I Mean Whoa–The Dairy Horse



Lost Ottawa

· August 24, 2017 ·  

The Clark Dairy Man, delivering the milk somewhere in Ottawa in his horse-drawn wagon.

Unfortunately, no date on the picture. Going by the chassis, it would seem to be late 40s or early 50s.

I’ve heard that the horses would move along the street by themselves as the milkman went door to door, so the milkman didn’t have to return to the wagon again after every household. One of those ancient rhythms …

(CSTM CN-4986)

This week I posted about Dairy horses on Facebook and people loved the memories. No story of the Clark Dairy in Ottawa could be complete without reference to their very fine horses, which was the pride and job of Mr. Clark and every member of the staff in the Dairy.

In the the 1920s when the Clark Dairy began business they started in a very modest way. Their plant at the corner of Bronson Avenue and Imperial in Ottawa was small, but sufficient for the business they then enjoyed. Their delivery system consisted solely of two wagons.

In the 1930s, a handsome new two-storey building teemed with activity; and thirty-five wagons were needed to cover the city, with seven handsome streamlined motor wagons.

Bottles– Adin Wesley Daige-
Carleton Place Underground

The barns, situated many blocks from the Dairy plant, were just as fresh and spotless as busy hands could make them. There 34 splendid horses: Percherons and Clydesdales were as meticulously groomed as any local society beauty. They stood like sentinels as “the white stockings” gracing their legs were soaped and washed and hooves polished. Coats were combed and brushed until they glistened. The barn included five splendid prize winning animals and the famous Dark Secret, a prize winning champion of the Central Canada Exhibition, and four consecutive times a prize winner at the Royal Winter Fair, in Toronto.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Nov 1938, Sat  •  Page 27

Every day was a show day for the Clark Dairy horses, and the horses knew the route better than the drivers. The red and white delivery wagons were kept immaculate. Clark Dairy was a self sustaining concern, having its own staff of painters, horseshoers and mechanics, so that every necessary job was given attention. Mr. George J. Scandrett. the office manager, had a wide experience in the dairy business and was a former member of the Ontario Milk Board.

EQUESTRIA SPORT HORSESHOES REVERSIBLE 4-RING CURRY
how to curry hooves

The Clark Dairy horse handlers felt that horses were a lot like humans in feelings and habits. They knew when it was time for their feeding, they also know when it was time for them to return to the stable. The handlers also had to know what types of shoes the horses wore in the various seasons. A Dairy horse’s shoe was made of hard rubber around a steel form. Some horses wore their shoes longer than others and some wore their shoes out in two months. When the streets were icy in the winter time, the horse wore a special type shoe with prongs that dug into the ice for a firm hold. These kept the horse from falling. But, often times, the horse slipped even with these shoes on. They had to curry them each day to keep them looking nice and had to be extra careful about their shoes. Walking on pavement everyday of the week was hard on a horse until he they get used to it.

The Clark Dairy horses were said to be the best in the business, as they knew every stop on the route and it took them only two days to learn a new customer stop. They had one horse that apparently had too much fire for a Dairy horse and smashed up the first five wagons he was attached to. As a last resort they sent him to a mud clogged Ottawa Street usually handled by a two horse team. That horse was a good worker for the Clark Dairy and did his job for two horses and never lost a minute starting up just as the milkman returned from the porch. Horses of course could master terrible roads, which was a bane to the delivery service.

Photo- Adin Wesley Daigle-
Carleton Place Underground

The Dairy horses got bushels of presents every Christmas from the Clark Dairy customers. Lumps of sugar, carrots and apples and even when there was sugar rationing the horses were thought of first before family along the route. Bakeries were a great favourite of the delivery horses and sugar buns were fed to some every day. On Sundays these business were closed and some of these horses would not budge waiting for their treat and they would stamp their feet on the sidewalk demanding their sugary treat.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Jun 1939, Sat  •  Page 25

According to the Ottawa Citizen there was a Clark Dairy horse, back in 1946, who every day peered expectantly through the windows of the post office canteen in the basement of the Langevin Block, to the great amusement of civil servants. The horse had a reason for his Peeping Tom tactic. Seems the driver used to scoop up a handful of sugar cubes from a convenient bowl on the canteen counter, with which to treat his faithful horse. The animal nuzzled the window pane daily to remind him! 

Good delivery horses were scarce and eventually they disparaged the horse and saluted the automobile. The blacksmiths that worked for the Clark Dairy ended up changing oil and greasing trucks. Although the automobile certainly eliminated piles of manure that clogged some streets, it introduced a whole new set of global carbon complications. In the end the demise of horse power and the ascent of the automobile illustrated two characteristics of energy transitions: they don’t always solve problems and rarely perform as advertised.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Feb 1946, Wed  •  Page 13

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This horse’s name was very racist so I cut it off the photo. Champion of Clark’s Dairy-one of the string of Clark’s Dairy horses entered at the Ottawa Exhibition for competition this week. Retired from the regular routes, XXXX won trophies in last year’s stock show at the exhibition. (Photo by Little).The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 Aug 1948, Tue  •  Page 6

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Aug 1936, Tue  •  Page 14

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Apr 1941, Sat  •  Page 28

photo-Ross Dunn 1959
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 May 1938, Wed  •  Page 14
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Oct 1963, Sat  •  Page 5
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jun 1929, Fri  •  Page 12
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 May 1929, Thu  •  Page 1
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Sep 1950, Fri  •  Page 43
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Sep 1940, Tue  •  Page 3
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Nov 1909, Tue  •  Page 1


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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Aug 1935, Tue  •  Page 9



Carleton Place Dairy Horses
No photo description available.
Belle the horse driven by “CCB’ for the Maple Leaf Dairy- 1948-1951- Carleton Place and Beckwith Museum… many stories.. click and start here.. Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairyhttps://lindaseccaspina.wordpress.com/2016/03/25/treasured-memories-of-fred-and-the-maple-leaf-dairy/

Bill Crawford Harold Forbes & Flossie delivered our milk from the Carleton Place Dairy. I remember feeding her carrots from our garden, and apples from our neighbours tree.

Norma Ford Bill Crawford – your post brings back so many memories of Harold Forbes and his milk wagon. Holding onto the back bumper in winter and sliding with the ride. Harold stopping and chasing us away. He always gave us a ride first until he figured we were too far from home. Happy memories.

Jaan Kolk16 hrs · EditedEastern Ontario history has enough Clark’s Dairies to make your head spin. Linda.

In 1913, John Clark of Eastview took action to force Clark’s Dairy Ltd., which had taken over the business of Patrick Clark of Lake Deschenes to change it’s name (“Silver Springs Dairy Farms” was chosen.)

In 1919, H.J. Clark was manager of Clark’s Dairy, 185 Lyon Street, before he moved to Smith’s Falls to form Clark’s Sanitary Dairy there.

In 1920, Clark’s Dairy – said to have it’s origin in the 1850s – was merged into Producers Dairy and the Clark Dairy name disappeared from Ottawa until Harry J. Clark returned from Smiths Falls to start a new Clark’s Dairy in Ottawa. (According to Bruce Elliott, Harry’s brother Albert “Ab” Clark operated a separate firm from his farm at City View.)

I hope I’ve made that clear enough so someone can explain it to me 😉

Here is Citizen note from July26, 1920, on the old Clark’s Dairy merging into Producers. (E.W. Clark was Harry’s uncle.)

Cold Milk Ice Cream and Butter —- Carleton Place

What Did you Like Best about the Maple Leaf Dairy? Reader’s Comments..

Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Remembering Milk and Cookies –Metcalfe Dairy

No Milk Today–My Love has Gone Away

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk?

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

Allan Barratt– Pakenham– People of Lanark County

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Allan Barratt– Pakenham– People of Lanark County

CPMM_frost_festival_barratts___Super_Portrait

Pakenham residents, Toby and Al Barratt, will be recognized for their community-minded efforts during an appreciation ceremony Jan. 26 at the Stewart Community Centre. The event serves as part of the annual Pakenham Frost Festival festivities. – Submitted photo– read the rest here

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Toby and Al moved to Pakenham in 1972 on County Road 29, previously owned by Bill and Emma Hogarth. They had two children, Utta and Norman, and their youngest daughter, Natalie, was born a year later at Almonte General Hospital. At present, their family now totals three children with spouses and seven grandchildren.

During Al’s high school years, his family lived at the Pakenham CPR train station. His father, Sid, worked there as the station agent. Al knew Pakenham well, but it did not take Toby very long to fit into the life of the Pakenham Township. The couple were soon curling and having fun at the community dances, as well performing at Thora Pugh’s famous skits and plays.

The library held a special attraction for Toby, and she soon was helping with storytime and became a member of the board. This led to becoming the first paid part-time librarian. After she gave up the librarian’s position, she continued to be a board member and helped shape the library during the transition to the Mississippi Mills Pakenham branch. To this day, she still volunteers at her beloved library.

They renovated their house into a larger home and started a business venture in 1978. Al became a self-taught harness maker. He made mainly draft horse harnesses, but repaired any leather items, even suitcases and shoes that came in surreptitiously after dark. At this time, Al also volunteered at the fire department. He then became its chief for three years.

Al became a member of the Lanark County Plowman’s Association and became its president for two years. He then was instrumental in the bid to get the International Plowing Match to Lanark County in 2003. He organized the logistics and accommodations for all the horse plowing aspects of this match. read the rest here

 

 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Oct 1990, Tue  •  Page 31

 

 - The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 May 1964, Sat  •  Page 43

 

Findlay vs. Bailey in Carleton Place —Horses vs. Cars

The Horseshoe Sinkhole Bridge? Mysteries of Lanark County

Name These Lanark County Horseshoe Honeys!

Wild Horses Could Not Drag Me Away

You’ve Got Trouble in Franktown-Dead Horses and Wives

A Horse is a Horse of Course– Of Course—Angus McFarlane

Buggies Horses and Accidents

What Happens Behind The Queen’s Hotel Stays Behind the Queen’s Hotel

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Once a month two well known citizens from Lanark used to drive a nifty horse hitched up to a spic and span buggy into   Carleton Place on business. They always pulled up at the back door of the Queen’s Hotel, and there the horse, not the gents, was given a much needed stimulant of a shot of liquor fed to him from a tin dish.

The horse always seemed to smack his lips as if to say,

“That touched the spot.”

In Ireland and England, racehorses are given Guiness as part of their daily diet. In the normal digestive process the bacteria and protozoa in the horse’s gut ferment the whole grains and fiber in order to aid the digestive process. This is why they can eat hay or raw grains and we cannot–we do not have a fermentation vat in our cecum (actually we do not have a cecum, all we have is an appendix). So, we prefer the grains to be fermented in a vat, then poured into a bottle before we partake of it. Also, we have to look at body weight here as that has an effect on the amount of alcohol one can take in before becoming drunk. An average small horse weighs 1000 pounds, while many of our warmbloods and heavier horses weigh in at 1500 pounds or more, with draft horses in the one ton range. So a bottle or two or three of beer or wine and even of hard liquor would be distributed through a large body mass. Many horses will drink wine or beer happily but I doubt there are very many that will get through a bottle of vodka.The reality is you will go broke buying beer or wine long before you will get your horse drunk or hooked on alcohol. Many of the dark beers have high mineral contents and are fairly nutritious, especially Guinness.

No word on what the horse behind the Queen’s hotel was given.

I have written a few stories on the Queen’s Hotel but– these are are a  series of stories I continue to write from the Desk Book of The Chatterton House Hotel (Queen’s Hotel) Carleton Place from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Part 1- Tales of the Chatteron House Corset — Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place- can be found here.

Part 2- Hell on Wheels at Lady Chatterton’s Hotel in Carleton Place– can be found here.

Part 3- I Will Take Some Opium to Go Please —The “Drug Dispensary” at the Chatterton House Hotel

Part 4- Chatterton House Hotel Registrar- George Hurdis -1884

Part 5-What the Heck was Electric Soap? Chatterton House Hotel Registrar

Part 6-The First Mosh Pits in Carleton Place — The Opera House of the Chatterton House Hotel

Part 7-All the President’s Men — Backroom Dealings in Carleton Place?

Part 8- Who Was John Boland? Chatterton House/Queen’s Hotel Registry — The Burgess Family Dynasty

Buy Linda Secaspina’s Books— Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac– Tillting the Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place and 4 others on Amazon or Amazon Canada or Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street in Carleton Place