Tag Archives: honey

Howard and Olive Giles– Clippings

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Howard and Olive Giles– Clippings
Adin Wesley Daigle Collection

Adin posted the photo of the can in his collection and today I began to put the story together. Give me a name and I will try and find their story..LOLOL

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Sep 1960, Fri  •  Page 2

1997, Wednesday May 7, The Almonte Gazette page B3
Howard P. Giles

A life-long area resident, Howard Giles, passed away peacefully in the Rosamond wing of the Almonte General Hospital April 5, 1997. He was in his 90th year. Born on Sept. 24, 1907, Mr Giles was raised on a farm on the Clayton Road by his parents, the late William Giles and his wife Margaret Pritchard. he received his education at Ramsay S.S. 6 and 7, Almonte High School and Guelph Agricultural College. During his life time, Mr Giles was a beekeeper and operated a honey-making business, was a linesman and installer for Bell Telephone and later, operated a business, Giles Auto Parts, on Mill Street in Almonte. He also served terms as property assessor for Almonte and building inspector for Ramsay Township. Always and active in the community, Mr Giles had particular involvement in the North Lanark Agricultural Society, the Ottawa Winter Fair, Almonte United Church, the Auld Kirk Cemetery Board, Almonte Lions Club, Almonte Business Association, Almonte Credit Union, Almonte Fish And Game Association, Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority, and the Department of Lands and Forests. In later years he particularly enjoyed his involvement with the Renfrew County Old-Time Fiddlers’ Association and various senior citizens’ groups. Mr Giles married the former Olive H. McKay in Arnprior Sept 4, 1935. They resided in homes on Martin Street in Almonte until 30 years ago, when they moved to their home that Mr Giles had built on the Clayton Road. Mr Giles will be fondly remembered and greatly missed by Olive, his wife of 61 years, his children, Beverly (Steve) Summers of Etobicoke, Harold (Rosalyn) Giles of William’s Lake, B.C., David (Diane) Giles of Dorchester, Ont., and Donald (Roxie) Giles of Vancouver, B.C. Also sharing in his loss are nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. A private family funeral service was conducted by Rev Ted Colwell at the Kerry Funeral Home in Almonte April 8, followed by cremation. Interment will take place late in the spring at the Auld Kirk Cemetery.

he Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 May 1965, Sat  •  Page 22
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jun 1972, Wed  •  Page 5
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Jun 1942, Thu  •  Page 23
The Windsor Star
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
27 Feb 1959, Fri  •  Page 20
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Nov 1968, Thu  •  Page 47

GILES, Olive H. (Nov. 23, 1908 – Dec. 19, 2004) Of Almonte Peacefully at Almonte Country Haven, Almonte, Ontario on Sunday, December 19th, 2004 at age 96. Olive H. McKay, beloved wife of the late Howard Giles. Dear mother of Beverley (Mrs. Steve Summers), Forest, Ontario; Harold (Rosalyn) Giles, Williams Lake, BC.; David (Diane) Giles, Dorchester, Ontario and Donald (Roxie) Giles, Vancouver, B.C. Also survived by 9 grandchildren and 6 great-grandchildren. Predeceased by one brother Thomas McKay and by two sisters Laura Baker and Ethel Duncan. Family and friends are invited to attend a Memorial Service in the Kerry Chapel on January 19th, 2005 at 2:00 p.m. with Rev. Barry Goodwin officiatinog. Cremation has taken place. Inurnment at Auld Kirk Cemetery, Almonte with Howard in the Spring. Donations made in memory of Olive to Almonte Country Haven or charity of your choice would be most appreciated by the Giles family.Published on December 21, 2004

Stuart McIntoshHoward and my dad were good friends.. have a good story for you about a hunting trip up the Little Blac Donald. Olive supplied teaching at ADHS when I attended. Sorry to learn of your mom’s passing.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 Sep 1934, Sat  •  Page 20
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Feb 1959, Fri  •  Page 17
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Oct 1958, Tue  •  Page 12
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 Aug 1966, Mon  •  Page 18
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 Aug 1966, Mon  •  Page 18

Kim Dean–My mom grew up in Almonte and I have many, many memories from there, have enjoyed following your page for a little while. Mom was known growing up as Beverley Giles, daughter of Howard and Olive. She passed away just about a year ago and in going through her belongings, there is an album with photos she kept from years past before meeting my dad (Allan Valkonen) and marrying. I thought I’d pass along these labelled ones to share if any other family might see here and enjoy. I do have more but will need to decipher the names first, if I can, as they are not so easy to read. Mom is not in these photos but in several of the others…

Karen LloydBob Morton was Stan Morton’s son, and went on to be a highly decorated and highly ranked RCAF officer.

Alan ClouthierI noticed Ken is wearing white buck shoes. The photo from 1957 takes me back to grade school and all the rage at the time was white buck shoes made popular by Pat Boone.

Marilyn Lindhard-Would love to see more pictures of your Mom Bev.I think she and Ann may have been my classmates ,along with Bev Smithson.Marilyn Cox Lindhard.

The Robbing of the Honey Pot- Andrew Cochrane Ramsay Yuill

Honey and the Andersons of Hopetown

Inside the Old Honey Pot — The Henderson Apiaries Carleton Place

The Robbing of the Honey Pot- Andrew Cochrane Ramsay Yuill

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September 1875

At a late hour on Saturday evening last week three young men visited the premises of Mr. A. Cochrane of Ramsay, and carried off three bee-hives full of honey.

They were perceived by a son of Mr. Cochrane, who gave them chase and fired upon them, wounding one it is supposed, and causing them to drop the hives. 

One of the lads also dropped his cap, which was recognised as belonging to a young man in the neighbourhood, and who being accused, the next day, of hijacking the honeypots and fessed up as to being one of the thieves. The other three, fearing arrest, have cleared out for unknown parts it is said.

Bennie’s Corners Squirrel Hunt

A Bennie’s Corners story of 1875 may be recalled as telling of a recognized sport in some circles of the Ottawa Valley of those times, known as a squirrel hunt and featuring a reckless slaughter of the birds and animals of the summer woods.  An Almonte newspaper report told of the hunt on this occasion:

On Friday the 25th instant a squirrel hunt took place at Bennie’s Corners.  Eighteen competitors were chosen on each side, with Messrs. John Snedden and Robert McKenzie acting as captains.  In squirrel hunts, squirrels are not the only animals killed, but every furred and feathered denizen of the forest, each having a certain value attached.  The count runs as follows : squirrel 1, chipmunk 2, wood pecker 2, ground hog 3, crow 3, blackbird 1, skunk 5, fox 50, etc.  At the conclusion of the contest the game killed by both sides amounted to over 2,500.  Mr. James Cochrane bagged 164 squirrels, being the highest individual score, and Mr. Andrew Cochrane came next.  The affair wound up with a dance at the residence of Mr. James Snedden.

Born in Lanark Co., Ontario, Canada on 21 SEP 1848 to Andrew Cochrane and Isabella Erskine. Andrew William Cochrane had 6 children. He passed away on 01 AUG 1940 in Ramsay Twp., Lanark Co., Ontario, Canada.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
31 Aug 1929, Sat  •  Page 8

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Sep 1900, Thu  •  Page 3
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Jul 1898, Thu  •  Page 2
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 May 1936, Fri  •  Page 11
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 May 1936, Sat  •  Page 12

Honey and the Andersons of Hopetown

Inside the Old Honey Pot — The Henderson Apiaries Carleton Place

Honey and the Andersons of Hopetown

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Perth Courier, Oct. 24, 1884

Mr. Edmund Anderson of Hopetown has obtained from his apiary this year 6,344 pounds of honey, 23 packages of which he has sent to Montreal leaving 18 on hand yet.  He has sold a considerable quantity in small lots. He says the “Holy Land” bee has come out over all the others as a producer.

Local Bee Keeper Rescues Swarm of Bees

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Inside the Old Honey Pot — The Henderson Apiaries Carleton Place

 

Five of the Weirdest things about bees..

The Big Buzz at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market — Get Bee-autiful!

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Not only is Dunlop’s Honey a producer and supplier of local container honey, and bulk Honey– they are bee—ing very creative these days selling  100% Beeswax Candles, soap, chocolate, and you name it. They also have something that women are getting on the bandwagon for now all over the world called Bee Cream.

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After 12 years of research, Korean Doctors are now sharing their knowledge of the power of bees and face care loved by Victoria Beckham, Kylie Minogue and Michelle Pfeiffer. You don’t have to travel outside of Carleton Place to find it now. Dunlop’s Honey has it each week at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market for a fraction of the price.

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Scott Dunlop isn’t going to sell anything he does stand bee-hind, and tells me that it is amazing for the face improving skin tone and elasticity. Some even say it cures psoriasis. Bees are already responsible for other supposedly anti-ageing products from honey to royal jelly, a health supplement used by many celebrities.  It is also available at The Granary and Apple Cheeks Consignment in Carleton Place– and they it all year round too!

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Of course they now say that life without bees is life without chocolate. That’s right– Dunlop’s Honey carries Chocolate made from honey. No matter how you look at it– they have some sweet ideas all around!

Fact- Pollinators like bees bring us 75 per cent of the food we eat — including apples, chocolate, coffee and almonds. Without pollinators, we’d be stuck eating only wind-pollinated crops like wheat and corn.

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HONEY BEE CAKE by Nigella Lawson

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Ingredients
Cake:
4 ounces semisweet chocolate, broken into pieces
1 1/3 cups soft light brown sugar
2 sticks soft butter
1/2 cup honey
2 eggs
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon bicarbonate soda (baking soda)
1 tablespoon cocoa
1 cup boiling water
Sticky Honey Glaze:
1/4 cup water
1/2 cup honey
6 ounces semisweet chocolate, finely chopped
1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
Bees:
1 ounce yellow marzipan
12 flaked almonds
Special equipment: 9-inch springform tin
Directions
Take whatever you need out of the refrigerator so that all ingredients can come to room temperature, and while that’s happening, melt the chocolate from the cake part of the ingredients list in a good-sized bowl, either in the microwave or suspended over a pan of simmering water. Set aside to cool slightly.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F, and butter and line a 9-inch springform tin.

Beat together the sugar and soft butter until airy and creamy, and then add the honey.

Add 1 of the eggs, beating it in with a tablespoon of the flour, and then the other egg with another tablespoon of flour. Fold in the melted chocolate, and then the rest of the flour and baking soda. Add the cocoa pushed through a tea strainer to ensure you have no lumps, and last of all, beat in the boiling water. Mix everything well to make a smooth batter and pour into the prepared tin. Cook for up to 1 1/2 hours, though check the cake after 45 minutes and if it is getting too dark, cover the top lightly with aluminium foil and keep checking every 15 minutes.

Let the cake cool completely in the tin on a rack.

To make the glaze, bring the water and honey to a boil in a saucepan, then turn off the heat and add the finely chopped chocolate, swirling it around to melt in the hot liquid. Leave it for a few minutes, then whisk together. Add the sugar through a sieve and whisk again until smooth.

Choose your plate or stand, and cut out 4 strips of baking paper and form a square outline on the plate. This is so that when you sit the cake on and ice it, the icing will not run out all over the plate. Unclip the tin and set the thoroughly cooled cake on the prepared plate. Pour the glaze over the cold honey bee cake; it might dribble a bit down the edges, but don’t worry too much about that. The glaze stays tacky for ages (this is what gives it its lovely melting gooiness) so ice in time for the glaze to harden a little, say at least an hour before you want to serve it. Keep the pan of glaze, (don’t wash it up), as you will need it to make the stripes on the bees.

Divide the marzipan into 6 even pieces and shape them into fat, sausage-like bees’ bodies, slightly tapered at the ends.

Using a wooden skewer, paint stripes with the sticky honey glaze left in the pan from icing the cake. About 3 stripes look best, and then very carefully attach the flaked almonds at an angle to make the bees’ wings, 2 on each one. They might snap as you dig them into the marzipan bodies, so have some spare. I’m afraid to admit, I also like to give them eyes by dipping the point of the skewer in the glaze and thence on the bees: they look more loveable with an expression, which is somehow what the eyes give them, but then this is where the Disney effect comes in. If a more imperial dignity is required, forgo the dotting of the eyes and present this as your Napoleonic Chocolate Cake.

Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

7 Beckwith St.
Carleton Place, Ontario
 
(613) 809-0660

830 am to 1230 am

Carleton Place Farmer’s Market Re-Invents the McGriddle

Are You Stuck in a Vegetable Rut? The Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Before and After Swagger Snacks from The Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

It’s Strawberry Time at The Farmer’s Market

A Fiesta in the Strawberry Patch at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Baby, I’m a Wantin’ Some Brown Dog Bakery — Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

A Fiesta in the Strawberry Patch at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Visit the Drama Free Zone Wall at The Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Where to Go When You Don’t Have a Green Thumb — Two Fields Over at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Put Your Chutney Where Your Mouth Is! — Carleton Place Farmers Market

Missy Moo’s Magical Hand Cream – Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Inside the Old Honey Pot — The Henderson Apiaries Carleton Place

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Photos of the old Henderson Apiary. Once upon a time the building was closed forever, and the building sat neglected on the most prestigious street in town– High Street. It is no longer there, and now just a memory.

What is an apiary?  An apiary (also known as a bee yard) is a place where honey bees are kept. Traditionally beekeepers (also known as apiarists) paid land rent in honey for the use of small parcels. Some farmers will provide free apiary sites, because they need pollination, and farmers who need many hives often pay for them to be moved to the crops when they bloom. 

Photos from an Anonymous Photographer from years gone by. 

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Time Waits for No Man 1965

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The building was for sale for $220,000, but it was always zoned residential.

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comments

Hi Linda. Saw your photos of Henderson Apiaries. I worked as a beekeeper for Cecil and Kay Henderson in 1965. My package included room and board in their home next door (it was also a Guest House for overnight visitors but not a B&B, just accommodation). Photos brought back memories! thanks–Mark Hopkins

July-August 1952

My Food Love Affair with Dave Nichols – Zoomer

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My Food Love Affair with Dave Nichols – Zoomer.