Tag Archives: highway 29

The Lowry Barn on Highway 29

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The Lowry Barn on Highway 29

Crystal Stanton asked a question .

Yesterday at 7:04 PM  · Looking for some history information. Biked from Almonte to Carleton Place along the railway. Anyone have information about the farmhouse with the barn roof that says “Jesus died for our sins”. I feel like there is a powerful story there…..

Maryanne Ryan

You should see what the other side says. YE MUST BE BORN AGAIN. I do have to say every time I drive bye, I praise God and Thank Jesus.

Christine AnnHeidi Parsons Lowry I would love to hear the history as well. I have wondered for 30 years. It definitely is a huge piece of home

Jocelyn Penley Wright— I went to school with Heather and Glenn Lowry who grew up on the farm. Heather told me the story but it’s been so long ago I’ve forgotten. I was in Grade 7 with her. David Scott was our teacher.

Kim MelansonI’d be curious to know as well. I was always told a few different stories growing up.

Heidi Parsons LowryThis is Neil Lowry, my wife is Heidi Parsons Lowry(the one posting)I am a proud nephew of the land owners of the property. To the best of my knowledge it was painted to show their strength in the faith in Christian values and God‘s word.I have reached out to my cousins who grew up there to add more insight and possibly story.Glenn LowryHeather Lowry-Hoogeveen💛

Julie Phillips-BowdenHeidi Parsons Lowry I would also love to know the story behind the sayings on the barn–it makes me think everytime I drive by—

Joy NoelI’ve always noticed these words, wondered about the owners and the story. I guessed it was a reminder to live a Christian life. 🙏🏻

Diane Larocque NoonanAs an 80-yr-old local, I remember that being there on the roof when I was very young…but I see you have had feedback from the Lowry family, who owned the property then and may well do today!

Heidi Parsons LowryMy husband says it has held up really well over 41 years, it was painted in 1980 and never touched up

Paul LeBlanc

Heidi Parsons Lowry I moved to Almonte, 14 at time and I recall it being painted. Was the green steel roof put on before before the literature was painted

Heidi Parsons LowryPaul LeBlanc I only married into the family in 2007, I called it the Jesus barn. Once I knew the devotion and kindness of my family, I feel very blessed to know them. Their contribution to the community is unmatched in my humble opinion.💛

Wendy Lowry

Paul LeBlanc hi Paul! Hope you are well. The roof was green steel and then the white letters were painted on. I recall my father saying that he was told that the white would fade very quickly because of the dark colour underneath. My mother does not remember hearing that though.

Paul LeBlanc

Wendy Lowry hi Wendy, great hearing from you, I’m doing great, hoping you as well. Thank you for the clarification and history on the barn roof. To be honest, I knew Lowrys owned the farm, but did not know it was your family 😉. Thanks for the history lesson

Allison Kerry MacKinnonHeidi Parsons Lowry, my husband said that Mr. Lowry once told him it was “miracle” paint

Christine AnnAllison Kerry MacKinnon that’s amazing! It certainly is miracle paint. Still looks awesome

Lantern Hill Farm

The Lowrys are very strong Christians and not afraid of shouting it from the roof tops!!No pun intended.

Wendy Lowry

Crystal Stanton thank you for bringing up this subject. My father David Lowry was the owner of the barn and paid to have those words painted on the roof. Sadly he has since passed away but those words have remained as was mentioned since 1980 and it has never been repainted or touched up.My father said that God had given him a vision of how painting the scripture on that roof would reach many, many people as at that time it would be seen if you were driving past, were in a plane flying over or on a train.He was a Christian man and an evangelist of sorts. In that he wanted to share the gospel (the good news) of God with everyone. Basically he wanted everyone to know that God loves them. Loves them enough that Jesus died on the cross for them. Jesus died to pay the cost of all of our sins and he wants us to be with him forever.The words painted on that barn were not meant to be a threat but to tell of the gift that God offers and wants for all of us.He would be pleased to know that the vision God gave him all those years ago still stands true today just like the word of God.

Julie-Ann MortonWendy Lowry thank you for sharing. God bless you as your godly heritage has blessed many throughout the years. No one this side of heaven will know the impact that barn has had on people

Tina BrianI remember as a kid driving past this on our trips up this way. I thought oh wow so nice that they keep it freshened up…. amazing that it’s never been touched up

Maureen EsserysHi before we emigrated to Canada we came on vacation many many times. When we saw that roof we knew we were going to land shortly. My son was 9 years old and used to say not long now mum xxx

2021

Almonte’s agricultural community remembers farming, community leader Allan Lowry

NEWS FEB 23, 2021 BY ASHLEY KULP  CARLETON PLACE ALMONTE CANADIAN GAZETTE

Allan Lowry

The Lanark County agricultural community is mourning the loss of Allan Lowry, who passed away Feb. 14 at the age of 67. – Lowry family photo

A kind and humble man with a passion for agriculture is how the Mississippi Mills community is remembering Allan Lowry.

The lifelong farmer passed away at age 67 on Feb. 14. In recognition of the community leader, flags at the Mississippi Mills administration office were lowered to half-mast Feb. 16.

Agriculture was in Allan’s blood, having grown up on Penlow Farms, the family’s 100-acre dairy operation just outside of Almonte. It was established by his parents, Dorothy (Penman) and Bert Lowry.

“Our dad did well in school and was involved in 4-H and Junior Farmers’ (Association of Ontario) in his youth,” noted daughter Christa and current Mayor of Mississippi Mills, as she spoke about her father at his Feb. 20 celebration of life at Almonte United Church. “He was at a 4-H event where he and our mom met, in fact.”

He married Donna (Sweeney) in 1974, and in 1978 began expanding their family with children, Christa, Julie, Brad (Lindsay Cavanagh) and Leanna. That same year, he and Donna became partners in Penlow Farms and helped add a cash crop operation to the farm.

“Our dad was devoted to Penlow Farms, building internationally recognized Holstein bloodlines, developing successful cash crop operations, expanding the farm acreage and constantly seeking new and progressive technologies, science or management techniques to improve,” Christa said.

Donna and Allan took over the farm in 1994, with the help of their children. Today, Brad and wife Lindsay are poised as the next generation to oversee it.

Almonte’s agricultural community remembers farming, community leader Allan Lowry

NEWS FEB 23, 2021 BY ASHLEY KULP  CARLETON PLACE ALMONTE CANADIAN GAZETTE

Allan Lowry

The Lanark County agricultural community is mourning the loss of Allan Lowry, who passed away Feb. 14 at the age of 67. – Lowry family photo

Penlow Farms earned a Master Breeder shield at the Holstein Canada convention in Manitoba in 2012.

A kind and humble man with a passion for agriculture is how the Mississippi Mills community is remembering Allan Lowry.

The lifelong farmer passed away at age 67 on Feb. 14. In recognition of the community leader, flags at the Mississippi Mills administration office were lowered to half-mast Feb. 16.

Agriculture was in Allan’s blood, having grown up on Penlow Farms, the family’s 100-acre dairy operation just outside of Almonte. It was established by his parents, Dorothy (Penman) and Bert Lowry.

“Our dad did well in school and was involved in 4-H and Junior Farmers’ (Association of Ontario) in his youth,” noted daughter Christa and current Mayor of Mississippi Mills, as she spoke about her father at his Feb. 20 celebration of life at Almonte United Church. “He was at a 4-H event where he and our mom met, in fact.”

He married Donna (Sweeney) in 1974, and in 1978 began expanding their family with children, Christa, Julie, Brad (Lindsay Cavanagh) and Leanna. That same year, he and Donna became partners in Penlow Farms and helped add a cash crop operation to the farm.

“Our dad was devoted to Penlow Farms, building internationally recognized Holstein bloodlines, developing successful cash crop operations, expanding the farm acreage and constantly seeking new and progressive technologies, science or management techniques to improve,” Christa said.

Donna and Allan took over the farm in 1994, with the help of their children. Today, Brad and wife Lindsay are poised as the next generation to oversee it.

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Pictured, back row, from left: Brad, Christa, Leanna and Julie. Middle row: Donna and Allan Lowry. Front row: Dorothy and Bert Lowry. – Lowry family photo

She looked back fondly on a 2012 family trip to Brandon, Man. where Penlow Farms was recognized with a Master Breeder shield at the Holstein Canada convention.

“What a true testament to the breeding program our dad encouraged, balancing production and type,” Christa said.

A new barn with a state-of-the-art robotic milker, one of the area’s first, was added in 2015.

Allan served on countless boards and committees, including Lanark Mutual Insurance, Auld Kirk Cemetery, Mississippi Mills’ economic development and agricultural committees, to name a few. He also invested a great deal of time as a member of the Ontario Federation of Agriculture, Ontario Soil and Crops Association and Lanark Holstein Club.

He was known for his practicality, sharp mind, big heart and graciousness. Those are attributes his lifelong friend Merv Hilliard, says fit him to a T.

“He always said you have to love what you do or you shouldn’t do it,” he said. “He was always willing to talk to new people and he made new friendships wherever he went. He was very involved in a lot of organizations and he thrived in it.”

He last spoke with his friend on the morning he went into hospital, Feb. 13.

“I knew he wasn’t well, but he was looking forward to spring coming and to being able to get out and have a visit on the front porch,” he said. “There are friendships and then there are loyal friendships and I would put Allan in that category. He’ll be sadly missed.” Ashley Kulp click

Related reading

So What are the Mysterious “diamond cross” cut-outs seen on barns in Lanark County?

Donald Lowry 1976

Second Lieut. H. A. Powell, to Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Lowry, of Pakenham — Steam in WW1

A Beckwith Poem — Beckwith in the Bushes — J.W.S. Lowry 1918

Things About Bill Lowry 1998

The Wilkie Lowry House on Highway 29

Memories and Poetry of George Lowry

Remembering Homes — The Wood Home

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Remembering Homes — The Wood Home
ll Photos from-Celeste Reisinger from Abandoned – Ottawa/Gatineau & The Valley
ll Photos from-Celeste Reisinger from Abandoned – Ottawa/Gatineau & The Valley
ll Photos from-Celeste Reisinger from Abandoned – Ottawa/Gatineau & The Valley

All Photos from-Celeste Reisinger from Abandoned – Ottawa/Gatineau & The Valley

So what can we find out about the house? Every house needs to be remembered.

Gail BarrDan Grace purchased it last year – uses the farm land. This farm was the Woods family homestead. Was burnt several years ago when we had a fire arsonist. Read-Fires of Lanark County 2002

Joan Armstrong-Mary Young born June 11, 1809 married Walter Wood June 18, 1832 and in 4 days they immigrated to Canada from Lanarkshire, Scotland and settled on Lot 2, Conc. 9 ,(Hwy 29) in Pakenham Township.Their 4 children were born here.My mother’s notes say that her Grandmother Margaret must’ve been the oldest as her year of birth was 1833. There were 5 girls and 1 boy William who stayed on the farm. There’s no mention of the girls names.Looking through the names I didn’t see Rita.

Jenny DunslowJoan Armstrong ok. I’m not sure Rita’s name was Wood. That arsonist did burn her family home. When she went to visit, strangely enough, she showed me what she found in the yard. It was burnt pages from the book Faces of Fire. I always thought that was the house she was referring to. She was a very sweet lady who lived in Constance Bay and married to Don Dolan. She unfortunately passed away in 2004 I believe was the year. Since then, Don also passed.

Joan ArmstrongJenny Dunslow I’m sorry to hear that. Yes, that was the house the guy tried to burn , sad to say.

Catherine CochranYes, but Don Dolan was her second husband. She was married to Gerry Timmons first but he died in a car a car accident when their four children were fairly young

Catherine CochranThis is where William and Claire Wood raised their family. My former mother in law , Jean Cochran, (Robert Cochran) was born and raised here. Jean’s brother, Edward (Ted) took over the farm after William .There were four children in Claire and William’s family. They were William (Bill, Jean, Edward (Ted) and Rita.Jim Wood took over the farm after his dad, Ted, and subsequently sold it a few years ago.

Joan ArmstrongThis was my Great Grandmother’s home, Margaret (Wood) Buchanan.

Helen N LeviDelightful happy family lived there when I was first introduced to that beautiful old home

Walter Wood– thanks to Rose Mary Sarsfield

BIRTH1801Airdrie, North Lanarkshire, Scotland
DEATH20 Aug 1894 (aged 92–93)Pakenham, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
BURIALAuld Kirk CemeteryMississippi Mills, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
MEMORIAL ID204059982 · View Source

1894, Friday August 24, The Almonte Gazette front page
Almost a Centenarian

Another of the early settlers of Lanark County passed quietly out of life on Monday last, when Mr Walter Wood, of Upper Pakenham, was summoned across the mysterious bourne whence none return. He had been ill but a week, though bedfast for a year prior to his death, and blind for the past six years. He was clearheaded to the last. Before he reached the closing decade of the century he had always been hale and vigorous. The late Mr Wood was born in Dundivan, near Airdrie, Scotland, in the year 1796, and therefore attended the great age of 98 years. In 1832 he married Mary Young, sister of the late Peter, Robert, and William Young, of Ramsay, and four days after the marriage they sailed from Scotland for Canada. A few months after their arrival they settled on the farm on the ninth line of Pakenham on which they lived the balance of their long lives, doing their full share of the pioneer work and enduring hardships incident to life in Lanark County in the thirties and forties. Mrs Wood died seven years ago. Seven children were born to them, viz.: Mrs Buchanan, Miss Janet Wood, W.Y. Wood, on the homestead; Mrs James Barker, Ramsay; Mrs Taylor, Mrs Edwards and Miss Jane Wood, of Ottawa. Fourteen grandchildren and five great-grandchildren also mourn the loss of the venerable gentleman. Deceased possessed qualities that won for him the warm friendship of all who knew him, and he will be long and favourably remembered in the neighbourhood. His was a quiet disposition. He never sought public office. To the last he had a good memory, and was fond of relating incidents of life in these parts in the early days. He was an ardent Reformer, and a Presbyterian. The funeral took place on Wednesday afternoon, to the eighth line cemetery, when a very large procession followed the remains to their resting place – a fitting testimony to the worth of the departed.

January 29, 1969 — Railroad Crash Highway 29

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January 29, 1969 — Railroad Crash Highway 29

Ottawa Citizen 23 January 1969

Ottawa Citizen 22 January 1969 – HIghway 29 between Carleton Place and Almonte

CARLETON PLACE  Attempts to clear the $500,000 wreckage of 34 freight cars piled up at a level crossing near here Tuesday continued this morning under the threat of an explosion from two overturned propane gas tankers.

Provincial police kept guard over the area, about three miles north of here on Highway 29 at the CPR crossing, as about 50 men and two giant cranes hauled twisted box cars from the clogged line.

The highway remained closed to traffic today while other trains were rerouted.

The two tankers were not ruptured in the massive 3.30 p.m. derailment, but police kept hundreds of curious spectators well back from the scene in the event leaking gas might explode.

Both police and railway officials were astonished that there had been no injuries.

One of the first cars to derail left the tracks just before the level crossing and sliced across the highway only a few feet in front of a waiting school bus. Box  cars stacked up.

Other cars ripped up sections of the highway, railway lines and wooden ties as they piled up, and in some cases, landed on top of one another. One freight car landed with its steel wheels on top of a tanker.Two hydro poles were sliced through by other cars. The top section of some pole was left dangling over the line supported only by the high-voltage cables.Complete wheel assemblies of many cars were torn off as they piled into one another and lay strewn along the tracks among sections of line, twisted cars and splintered ties.

Ottawa Citizen 23 January 1969

Train Crash Theory – Wheel is Blamed

A crack which caused the leading wheel of either the fourth or fifth car to come off is believed to be to blame for the $500,000 freight train crash near Carleton Place yesterday.

It is known that at least eight rails between Almonte and the accident scene were broken.

This could have been caused by the faulty wheel running out of line and pounding against the rail as the east bound train headed for Carleton Place, said one railway employee.

The 60-car freight train left Chalk River several hours before. Its speed at the time of the accident was estimated to be about 45 m.p.h.

George G. Sayer, assistant superintendent for the Smiths Falls division of CPR, said work crews were concentrating their efforts to pulling cars away from the tracks and repairing breaks so regular traffic, which had been diverted to other lines, could again travel the main line.

Mr. Sayer said he hoped the two cranes, one brought in from Smiths Falls and the other from Sudbury, could pull the two tankers back on to the tracks and pull them away by sometime this afternoon.

One eye-witness, Bill Ritchie, 32, a Bell Telephone employee from Almonte, was driving north toward the level crossing when he saw the red signal lights begin flashing.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 Jan 1969, Thu  •  Page 10

“I saw the train swaying so I stopped about 500 feet from the tracks,” he said. “The next thing I saw were freight cars flying through the air like cardboard boxes in a high wind. It was terrifying.”

He said a couple of cars shot across the highway “while the others piled up on the north side like magazines thrown on the floor.”

“There was a hell of a crash and snow flying in the air. A lot landed on my truck so I jumped out and after a minute or two ran up to the tracks. I thought people would be hurt,” said Mr.Ritchie.

He said that by the time he got there, people from the locomotive, that had shot through the crossing pulling three cars and dragging a fourth without wheels, met him.

“One box car just missed the school bus, which luckily didn’t have any children aboard, and another cut into the hydro poles and the warning flashers,” said Mr. Richie.

“There was a ball of fire in the sky when one hydro pole was cut off,” said Mr. Ritchie, who added that he and a work-mate then flagged down cars until police arrive.

Almonte Gazette January 1969

The remains of five torn and twisted box cars stall lie scattered about at the scene of the spectacular train wreck which occurred at tile half-way crossing between Almonte and Carleton Place on Tuesday. Clean-up crews of the C.P.R. Mechanical Department estimates it will take another week to clear the area of the remaining debris. They are now in the process of burning out the wooden interiors of the boxcars, following which they will be cut up with torches and hauled away.

A broken wheel apparently spread the track at about eight foot intervals for the entire distance and trains have been on a go-slow order along that stretch since rail traffic was resumed the day following the accident. A telegraph pole beside the crossing which had the bottom portion sheared off leaving the top dangling on its wares has yet to be replaced. Traffic on Highway 29 was disrupted for several days while heavy cranes removed most of the 30 cars which left the rails during the pileup and had to be rerouted along the 8th line and the Appleton road. Marks are clearly visible where derailed box cars rolled across the highway adjacent to the crossing gouging deep ruts in the asphalt. Some are even evident several feet back of the white line on the south side of the track where vehicle traffic is required to stop. Occupants of a car and a Bell Telephone truck who witnessed the derailment from that location were fortunate they had stopped well short of the crossing

Related reading

Did You Know About These Local Train Wrecks?

James Fanning– Robert Nolan– Train Accident

When Trains Crash —Ashton Train Accident 1950

Clippings of The Old Perth Train Station

The Glen Tay Train Wrecks of Lanark County

Fred McNeil’s Service Station 1955

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Fred McNeil’s Service Station 1955

 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Dec 1955,

 

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relatedreading

The Wilkie Lowry House on Highway 29

Comments About The Pine Room — Highway 15

The Wilkie Lowry House on Highway 29

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 - The Wilkie ALMONTE, Ont. We, of the cities, are...

 - al-, -post -with butternutstatr rail-lend a...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 09 Dec 1972, Sat,
  3. Page 39

The Wilkie Lowry house was owned by my great grandfather, John Fairbairrn Greig, in the 1860s

My great r\andfather, Thomas Campbell Arthur (not MCArthur), married J F Greig’s daughter

Frances Josephine Greig. My grandmother,Jessie Miller Arthur,(Hamilton) was born and grew up in the house as did her eight brothers and sisters. TC. Arthur also ran the Appleton store as dd his uncle Thomas Arthur. Granny was a friend if Mrs Hollie Lowry. I believe they were both members of the ROCKY RIDGE WI. When the Arthurs left the farm they carved there initials on an upstairs window. 2021 marks 200 years since the first of my family arrived in Ramsay. )Robert and Thomas Mansell. Enjoy all your articles,Linda. Thanks so much

Judith Salley

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The Young Family Funeral Home Lanark County

Things You Don’t Know About Carlow Lodge and the Kidds

More Memories of The Beckwith McTavish House

Home and Garden Before Home and Garden Magazine

The James Black Homestead

Thomas Leach House- Donna Mcfarlane– Lot 12 conc 9 Beckwith

History Still Lives on at The McEwen House in Beckwith

The House on a Beckwith Hill–The McTavish House and Ceiling Medallions

The House of Daughters –Stonecroft House

Update on The Manse in Beckwith

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Home and Garden Before Home and Garden Magazine

The James Black Homestead

The Mysterious Riddell— H B Montgomery House

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Rescuing the Money Pits —The Other Dunlop Home with the Coffin Door

The Carleton Place House with the Coffin Door

Before and After in Carleton Place –The Doctor is in!

Heh Miss Wilsonnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn! Carleton Place Heroe

Was This the Architect of the Findlay Homes on High Street?

The Carleton Place House That Disappeared

The McCarten House of Carleton Place

Old McRostie Had a Farm in Carleton Place

Time Capsule in the ‘Hi Diddle Day’ House?

The Louis on Sarah Street for $43,500 — Before and After– Architecture in Carleton Place

Memories of Mississippi Manor

Day in the Life of a 70’s Pattie Drive Home – The Stay at Home Mom Era

Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

The Brick Houses of Carleton Place

So What Happened to The Findlay House Stone?

The Stanzel Homes of Carleton Place

The Appleton Chinchilla House

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Comments About The Pine Room — Highway 15

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Comments About The Pine Room — Highway 15

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Ted Hurdis –-Pretty sure this was at the corner of Hwy #15 and the 10th line. There’s a chip wagon there now.

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Photo of the present building where The Pine Room once was.. Photo-The Crispy Spud

Andrea McCoy Yes it was right where the chip wagon is. I believe it burnt down– I worked there my first paying job–There was the dining room with the stucco walls. Then a more casual eating area with a counter and stools and tables and then the store.
I cannot remember the cooks name….nice guy. Worked there with Bud, June and their daughter Leslie. There is a son too. I am sure there are a few of us with stories to tell.

Janice Tennant Campbell— Hwy 15 and 10th Line was Brook’s Store when I was younger.

Lorelei Brunton Worked there as cook summer 1980.

Maureen Myhers My aunt and uncle Bud and June Savage along with their son Paddy and daughter Les owned it and I also worked there, great place to eat,drink and socialize. Maureen McGrath

Janice Tennant Campbell Linda Seccaspina it was a grocery / variety store then as far as I remember. I’ll have to ask Mom Bob Brooks owned it. We used to stop there or at Shackleton’s at Blacks Corners on the way to the Cottage.

Debbie Roy I remember that place. My Aunt Helen and Uncle Howard owned it and ran it as a grocery store during the 1970’s. But I can’t remember who bought it from them

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Tammy Marion  – This is a picture I took in the kitchen of the Pine Room some time between 1976 and 1980..My brother had just started working there as a cook ( in the plaid shirt ). He loved to cook.. I can’t remember the man’s name on the right and I don’t know who the girl is in the background. Other’s may know..

Ted Hurdis  Farook Assada ran it.

Tracy Diane Cindy Dakers Regimbald you used to work there!

Ann Stearns Rawson There was also an oil delivery service there but later torn down. At one point someone named Savage ran the restaurant.

Sandra Rattray It was Bob Brooks gas station and grocery store

Wendy Healey Went there for dinner Prom Night one year

Donna Mcfarlane Jim Murray had the first store there .. He moved a cabin from the 11th line there and opened a wee store late 40s i think cant remember the ones who owned it in 54 but I remember they were held up

Mike Dakers Before it was a restaurant, it was Bob Brooks BA gas and service and our local store and hangout. I worked there at nights and weekends pumping gas and cutting grass. With a push mower O might add. It took 2-3 days to cut lol. Think i made .50 cents and an abundance of glass bottle coke and chocolate bars. Bob was also the first fire chief of Beckwith fire co. And my father Duncan was Deputy Chief. That was in the mid sixties for me. And after that, it was turned into the pine room restaurant, owner was a man named Bud Savage, and later on his son took over. I might add also, my sister worked as a server there also. We did just live right across the road. Good memories.

Paul Todd Gloria’s Father and I frequent the Pine Room at lunch time when we built at the corner of 15 & 10th line

Linda Gallipeau-Johnston OMG Yes – as teenagers we used to go to that station and I remember being in the Pine Room too. There’s 2 things that weren’t even on my radar!

Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown Jeff Dezell we went there for our Grade 8 graduation!

Sylvia Giles–Use to go into the dining room for dinner with my Mom and Dad!!

Patti Ann Giles-When we lived on Doe Rd. 1975, I used to bike there with my 2 year old son to get him a popsicle. Owners were great people.

Jeremy Stinson It had stucco walls in the 60s/70s style with the tops of barrels with xxx on them. Ate there when I was a kid. Shanna Willis, there is an infamous story about your mother working there. The story involved swinging doors to the kitchen.

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Photos Donna McFarlane

Donna McFarlane–The Pine Room– here is a couple shots of the interior at a hockey banquet.. the one after fire was taken about 2 weeks after. It was added on to so many times I remember when Jim Murray moved one of the cabins from what was then the 11th line but is now near junction of 7 and 15..It was very small then-John and I had left the annual fire dept dance a bit early to go down east.. there was a lot of static on his pager as we were on Queensway but without cell phones..did not realize it was a call.. That was the night of the annual dance that someone torched the pine room.

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Fire at the Pine Room- Photo donna Mcfarlane

Hi Linda. Hope all is well with you and down at your end. I just wanted to mention to you that one of the old owners of the old Pine Room Tavern ( where the now Crispy Spud chip truck sits on 15 highway} recently passed away..Lanny Steele. He is in that picture I posted/sent to you way ack of my brother Gord working in the kitchen there and Lanny is in it as well. Just thought I’d let you know since you have written and posted about that place before….https://ottawacitizen.remembering.ca/obituary/franklin-steele-1082721931

Thanks to Tammy Marion

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte
relatedreading

The Ballad of Carleton Place’s Killer Junction

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In the 60s the newspapers were full of articles related to Carleton Place’s “Killer Junction”. “Killer Junction” was located at the intersection of Highway 7 and 29. In the 60s a decision was finally made to install red and green traffic lights which would control the traffic coming from all directions.

Highway 7 had always been the nemesis for scores of people involved in traffic fatalities and injuries. One of the biggest weaknesses was the overpass above the CPR line on the west side. Motorists proceeding east, although warned by traffic signs at one point, had no idea of the danger lying ahead– even after they topped the overpass rise. The problem was that too many motorists did not observe the warnings placed on all four sides to slow down because of the intersection ahead.

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Before the traffic lights were installed, the motorists only had flashing lights posted for several hundred yards in all directions. There was also a red lighted STOP sign indicating to motorists that they should come to a full stop. Over the years many changes had been implemented, but nevertheless the extreme dangers still existed as attested to the fatalities cause by those that did not observe the rules.

Most of the fatalities occurred during the fall month as the setting sun from the west completely obliterated vision for drivers proceeding north or south on Highway 29. The proposed green and red lights were to be given a fair trial to ascertain if this was to be adequate. The only other solution would to build a cloverleaf but that would entail great acquisitions of land.

With files from The Carleton Place Canadian from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Buy Linda Secaspina’s Books— Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac– Tilting the Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place and 4 others on Amazon or Amazon Canada or Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street in Carleton Place