Tag Archives: high street

An Update to the Kennedy House — Harold “Ozzie” McNeely

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An Update to the Kennedy House — Harold “Ozzie” McNeely

The former Kennedy House on High Street

As you know Thomas Quinn of Ferguson’s Falls led the four teams required to move this house down the frozen Mississippi River and Lake to its present site. Tragically there was a devasting fire that consumed a lot of this house in August of 2021. It is said at present that it is a complete tear down.

Firefighters with Ocean Wave Fire Company and the Mississippi Mills and Beckwith fire departments battled a fire that destroyed a home on High Street in Carleton Place Aug. 22. The home sustained over $500,000 in damage due to the fire, which originated in the basement.–READ HERE

Today I talked to Harold “Ozzie” McNeely and he told me when he was growing up the move of this house was always in conversation. They used to go up to Ferguson Falls for business (live stock) and he remembers being shown as a child where the house once existed in that village. One of his teachers in High School was a Kennedy who owned the house as they too often spoke about this house. Ozzie said the house that was moved was very small and unlike the size it was at present. The home had an addition built on to the main small house in later years.

He said it took awhile, about a week, to move down the ice with teams of horses and the house’s port of entry to Carleton Place and High Street was Nichol’s wharf which is now Centennial Park. From there teams of horses and sleighs pulled the house to its present location through the snow.

I would like to correct some misinformation regarding the Kennedy house. My Dad, Douglas Kennedy , did teach at CPHS until 1955 when he went to Lisgar Collegiate in Ottawa to teach.
There had not been any previous Kennedys in the house as he bought it from a Miss Campbell in the early 50’s.
My siblings and l grew up in that house and were saddened to hear of the fire and the possible demise of our childhood home.
Evelyn Kennedy Julian

Corrected thanks Evelyn!

Nichol’s Wharf-Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum — read-Before and After at Centennial Park

Thanks Ozzie, and he also told me there used to me a small tunnel under the RBC bank was and where the safe was. Also, the Queen’s Hotel had/ has two basements and there was one tunnel to bring the beer out to the back parking lot.

The rollers that moved the house-Findlay recorded the event of his findings and this actual document is at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

INTERESTING HISTORY

To read the stories click:

The Name of the Man that Moved the Kennedy House

The House that Skated to Carleton Place — Kennedy House

Back in 2015, Carleton Place Coun. Linda Seccaspina profiled the unique story behind the home on her blog.

Known as the Kennedy House, at the corner of Flora and High streets, the home wasn’t actually built in Carleton Place. It was moved down the frozen Mississippi River from Innisville to Carleton Place during winter around 1900 by a large group of horses and men.

“Thomas Quinn of Ferguson’s Falls led the four teams required to move this house down the frozen Mississippi River and lake to its present site,” she stated in her blog post.

Carleton Place was the home’s third location. It was originally built in 1845 on land in Ferguson’s Falls–.READ HERE

Putting Together Pieces About Historical Homes– John Moore’s House –Napoleon Street

The Derry Farm of Angus McDiarmid

The House on the Cliff and the Old Bridge

The Pakenham House—- Thomas Lowe House

Pearl Stuart Teacher McCreary’s School

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Pearl Stuart Teacher McCreary’s School
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Jul 1901, Fri  •  Page 2

So like it usually happens I found this clipping about Pearl Stuart from Carleton Place. Something made me want to go find out about Pearl and here is some of her story. In the 1891 Carleton Place census Pearl Stuart was 12 so she would have been 22 when she was a teacher at McCreary’s School and bought the horse. She had a brother Walton who was 5 years younger then her and her parents who lived in the family home on High Street were Jennie and NT ( whose real name was Hiram Trueman (N was a typo)) Stuart. They were staunch Methodists and her parents were born in Scotland. Hiram worked as a miller in Carleton Place.

Edith Pearl Stuart married Thomas McCann and had two sons. She named one of them after her father Hiram. She taught at McCreary’s and George H. Doucett was one of her pupils (represented the provincial and federal ridings of Lanark in eastern Ontario). McCreary School was located on Hwy. 7 just west of what used to be the Falcon Restaurant.–Read-Questions on the McCreary Settlement and the IXL Cheese Factory.

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Dec 1900, Wed  •  Page 6

Pearl died in Almonte on the 8th of May 1956.

1956, Thursday May 17, The Almonte Gazette page 4
Mrs T.B. McCann

The death occurred at her home, Ottawa Street, Tuesday, May 8th of Mrs Thomas B. McCann. She was in her 78th year and had been in failing health for two years. Mrs McCann was the former Edith Pearl Stuart, a daughter of the late Hiram T. Stuart and Jennie Morecroft of Carleton Place and originally from Fitzroy. Deceased, before her marriage, taught school, one of her charges being McCreary’s which is still operating. It was there that the youthful George H. Doucett began his educational career under the then Miss Stuart. She married Mr T.B.McCann who was a boilermakers’ foreman in the locomotive shops at Carleton Place in those days. He retired from the railway service 16 years ago, but worked at the big aluminium plant in Arvida, Que, for a few years during second world war. Mr and Mrs McCann came to live in Almonte some years ago. She leaves in addition to her husband, as son Hiram in New York City and a son, Harris in town. There are two grandchildren, Thomas and Emmett. Several sisters and one brother predeceased her. The funeral was held from the Comba Funeral Home on Thursday, may 10th, to the Auld Kirk Cemetery with Rev J Ray Anderson of the United Church, officiating at the services. Pallbearers were Messrs Wm Anderson, Wellington Hawkins, S. Geo Lowry, Nelson Simpson, John Brydges and Lloyd Watson

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Dec 1899, Fri  •  Page 6
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Dec 1899, Thu  •  Page 2

Thomas McCann Dies In Almonte ALMONTE (Special) The death occurred in Almonte of Thomas Beecher McCann. Born In Maniwaki, he was a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Andrew McCann. While a young man he learned the leather making trade and was employed with the CPR for 48 years. Prior to coming to Almonte in 1949 he lived in Ottawa and other places in the Ottawa Valley. In 1904 he married the former Edith Pearl Stuart of Carleton Place who died in 1956. Surviving are two sons, Hiram C. of New York City and Harris P. McCann of Almonte, also two grandchildren. Mr. McCann took an active Interest in the community and was a member of the Oddfellows. The funeral was held from the Comba Funeral Home to the Auld Kirk Cemetery for burial. The service was conducted by the Rev. J. R. Anderson, minister of the Almonte United Church. The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 Dec 1958, Mon  •  Page 36

Name:Edith Pearl Stuart
Age:24
Birth Year:abt 1880
Birth Place:Carleton Place, Ontario
Marriage Date:31 Aug 1904
Marriage Place:Canada, Lanark, Ontario
Father:Hiram T Stuart
Mother:Jennie Moorcroft Stuart
Spouse:Thos Brecher McCann
The Ottawa Citizen


May be an image of 14 people and people smiling

McCreary’s School –Photos from Doris Blackburn/ Karen Black Chenier and you can buy local school books from Archives Lanark.–http://archiveslanark.ca/index.php

May be an image of 11 people and people smiling




May be an image of 1 person

Doris Blackburn teacher-McCreary’s School –Photos from Doris Blackburn/ Karen Black Chenier and you can buy local school books from Archives Lanark.–http://archiveslanark.ca/index.php

The Old Fashioned Carleton Place Picnic Tackberry Hill? McCreary’s Creek?

Questions on the McCreary Settlement and the IXL Cheese Factory.

The Carleton Place Night Patrol: Aka Skin Dogging — Larry Clark

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The Carleton Place Night Patrol: Aka Skin Dogging  — Larry Clark

Don’t have any idea who came up with this terminology but it was something we used quite often; like in, “ what will we do tonight” and this was most often answered with, “lets go skin dogging” (although we used it as one word).I say “skin dogging” now, as that is how it is defined in GOOGLE although the drift of the language has changed somewhat.

skin doggingfrom the term skin dog. when you’re cruising around, or walking through somewheres ( mall, main street,bar, shopping plaza) looking for ladies. or looking for any skin anywheres.friend: where you’s to? me: ahh just going skin dogging, man.friend: nice. nice.by skindoggg October 22, 2009 – Larry Clark

THE CP NIGHT PATROL AKA SKIN DOGGING – Larry Clark

I find it awesome that this term has survived to this day as I figured that it would now be extinct and perhaps it really is, due to the advent of almost instant communication.

Anyway back to Brundage’s BA station, corner of Lake Ave. and Bridge St.; early evening, a group of us in one or more cars would discuss the evenings activities, settle on the above and head out, -north on Bridge St., paying particular attention to the steps at the bank (you know which one) all the way to the town line. Here a decision had to be made,-West to the intersection with High St. (destination diner???) or East to the intersection with Bell to check out Curb Service.

With no luck; back to Brundage’s to swing west on Lake Ave to pass the riverfront, Canoe Club and beyond the high school to reverse course. We must have found this occupation amusing and interesting because we did this circuit many times without (for the most part) or (never having) any “luck”? To break the pattern, a 180 at the town line would suffice, or if something of interest was spotted (seldom), a 180 would be performed at that point.

Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
Howard McLinton’s Gas Station. Was it was up at the end of High Street on the left as you are going toward Highway 7. Now it is a private home — read Looking for Memories of Harold Linton’s Gas Station

At times we must have peaked the interest of the local gendarmes, for-on one of the many occasions when two (or more) cars were racing down the town line, the race ends at the Hwy 7 junction with a 3 car formation. When the dust settled, it was determined that the third car was occupied by Chief Cornell. A little chagrined (and soon out of pocket), they answered to the ensuing charges with an amount almost equal to a weeks wages.

Peter Bradley
Sat with Herb Cornell on High Street outside our gate manning the speed trap many times. When he went hunting he would often drop off some moose meat to eat. Wonderful Chief! Photo-Vintage Carleton Place & Beckwith
February 1, 2020  · 

It seemed a little ludicrous as these jalopies could barely attain  a speed of 50mph but they were dangerous in other respects. Two cars racing down the Town Line neck and neck, approaching highway 7; whether it was late braking or no braking; the driver one of the vehicles failed to stop and careened through the intersection and crashed the embankment on the other side, crushing his car and a portion of himself-his upper arm broken in several places.

The remedy was a complete arm cast (screws and rods) that he wore for several (6) months and the good news:- he became the best one armed pool player in CP. In order to keep these cars on the road, we all had to become back yard mechanics with varying degrees of competency-some much better than others. Take for instance, an evening drive to Perth and we are all commenting to the driver about his inability to properly steer the car . His solution was to apparently let the car drift to one side and then counter that with the encouragement of a drift in the opposite direction. Worked well for the most part as he only clipped two opposite direction cars. They were barely “grazings” so no stop was made by either party-especially since we would be long gone by the time anyone could turn around. I believe someone else took over the driving for the remainder of the outing.  The drifting tactic was discarded and replaced by good concentrated driving which was needed to overcome the erratic tendencies of the steering/front end wanderings. (I was not either driver).

The old Carleton Place icehouse at the end of High Street past the Supertest Garage on the left taken about 1972–Peter Bradley

We’re Goin’ Racin’ Boys on High Street

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We’re Goin’ Racin’ Boys on High Street

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Photo-Rebecca Bolton Morris—Hi Linda, My mother was a Stanzel from Carleton Place, and her grandfather, Stephen Stanzel, was in the shoe & boot business in Carleton Place for many years. She told me that he was involved in horse racing, but I think she may have exaggerated a story she heard as a child. Do you know of any horse & buggy racing around Carleton Place, perhaps around 1890 – 1920?

Yes, Carleton Place had horse racing down below High Street and also the biggest horse show in the Ottawa Valley every year at Riverside Park. They also did ice racing too.

Joann Voyce As a child in the 1940’s, I remember going to sulkie racing up High St where the new subdivision is now

Donna Grierson Stu Ferguson used to race horse & buggy on High Street & they boarded horses there I think the place belonged to Millar’s I think there’s a playground there now

Dawn Jones Ivan Farr had horses and participated in racing. In the 70’s I think.

Tom Edwards Stu Ferguson, Jack Saunders, Bill Wylie, Gordie Ames, Ivan Farr, Lennie Richardson, Arnold Brunton, Doug Ferguson, Glen Millar, this was the Friday afternoon club in my Aunt Hilda’s house on Thomas Street. The stories were fascinating. I used to love listening to these guys. Uncle Stu was a lifetime member at Rideau Carleton Raceway.

Lynne Johnson The little park by High and Bridge is where the Bruntons used to train for sulky races, if I’m not mistaken?

Joann Voyce That was next to Miller’s Horse Stable. That is where the horses were boarded as well and were walked daily in the little park area, I lived on Thomas across from it for 8 years and then on High Street 2 doors from the Stable. The Miller’s are my relatives and I was in those stables many times

enny Trafford There was a track up the end of High Street about where that housing development is going in. I’m sure it was for the horses, but I also know it was used as a go-cart track because my Dad belonged to that go-cart Club and practiced and raced up there.

 

 

200 to watch Kart races on High Street.. Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 12 Aug 1960, Fri, Page 40

No photo description available.

Those horse shows in Carleton Place. Horse races at Lake Park and later on on High Street .. Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 11 Jun 1907, Tue, Page 6

 

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 May 1909, Mon  •  Page 2

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CLIPPED FROM

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Oct 1939, Sat  •  Page 10

 

relatedreading

Let’s Go Racing Boys with Nellie Sharper and Alex Hunter from Carleton Place

Findlay vs. Bailey in Carleton Place —Horses vs. Cars

Wild Horses Could Not Drag Me Away

You’ve Got Trouble in Franktown-Dead Horses and Wives

A Horse is a Horse of Course– Of Course—Angus McFarlane

Buggies Horses and Accidents

More on Stewart Ferguson by Tom Edwards

What You Didn’t Know About the House on High Street

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What You Didn’t Know About the House on High Street

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The house on High Street that is called one of the Findlay homes today was originally built by James Patterson who resided there. Before Mayor Patterson built the house James McDiarmid married Jane Morphy, daughter of William Morphy who was a son of the original Edmund. Their home was on High Street on the same lot where James Patterson built his home. They had two daughters, Mrs. McGuiness and Mrs. George Willis- also three sons, William, Duncan(Shake) and Robert. Robert is the one that gave this information to Mrs. F. C. McDiarmid who recorded it.

historicalnotes

Other High Street Homes

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Last night I was watching Clara’s Deadly Secret on W and I thought I recognized landmarks in the beginning and then at the end I was sure– so I went to Youtube and clicked on the movie–and sure enough it was the Findlay homes in Carleton Place– then I googled it and found the Millstone article.. no mention of the Findlay homes– but there is no doubt and Pinehurst in Almonte was used for the interior shots. http://millstonenews.com/2013/05/what-is-claras-deadly-secret.html 

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Jean Isabel Galbraith Findlay Home

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Findlay Home on Joseph Street and High Street

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A View Of The Residence Of A. Dulmage, Carleton Place . Where is this? This used to be the old Iveson–Peter Iveson home on Joseph and High Street–

Peter Iveson- My grandfather EH Ritchie bought it in 1920,my mother Agnes Iveson Inherited it in 1974,and we had to sell it after she died in 2003. You can see the barn behind,the front was a farm house built in 1875 which was gentrification at the turn of the 20th century,the back kitchen and outside kitchen with the maids room and bathroom and back stairs was added in 1910. It was called “the Willows” because of the willow trees which were removed as they conflicted with the town’s waterworks which were constructed during the Great War. The house sat on three lots and was surrounded by spacious grounds and flower gardens

  1. relatedreading

The Evolution of a Findlay Home –Is That All There Is?

The Carleton Place House That Disappeared

So What Happened to The Findlay House Stone?

Was This the Architect of the Findlay Homes on High Street?

207 High street during the 2000’s by Sara Allen–

The Evolution of a Findlay Home –Is That All There Is?

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The Evolution of a Findlay Home –Is That All There Is?

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1911 Postcard– Findlay home on High Street that was demolished in the 2000’s.

The home really wasn’t that old having been built in 1910. It was built of Newfoundland Stone and the few skids of stone that were supposed to be saved were tossed away like old shoes on McArthur Island according to Irma Willowby. The land remains empty and last night when I saw the postcard above I knew I had to do a timeline series so this never happens again. I swear if I see this happen again I will personally stand in front of the building to stop it– and that is a promise.

 

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1920s– Photo Tom Edwards– the small fir trees in the front and the Mississippi River in the back. One verandah has been screened off

 

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Linda Secccaspina Photo- Mid 1980s

 

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Photo Judy Pallister 1990s — The place is a horror story and condemned.

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Interior in its glory from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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Interior being demolished- photo by Shane Wm. Edwards 2006

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photo by Shane Wm. Edwards 2006

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photo by Shane Wm. Edwards 2006

 

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The End-photo by Shane Wm. Edwards

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Linda Secccaspina Photo– 2016

The story here–The Carleton Place House That Disappeared

 

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

O Brothers Kane in Carleton Place- Where Art Thou?

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O Brothers Kane in Carleton Place-  Where Art Thou?
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Photo- Linda Seccaspina 1982
Hi Linda

It would also be pretty neat if you have any pics or info on the rink we all played on years ago. They were the Brothers Kane, and a lot of us played minor hockey on the outdoor rink up there on High Street.

 

old findaly

 

It would have been in behind Stonebridge Manor to the right. That’s likely 45-50 years ago, before we all walked to raise money for the arena that we have now. I have an old newspaper clipping that says I played for Armours, and I think Parkman and Taylor was another sponsor.

Tom Edwards

So what say you? Please leave comments so we can document this.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

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The Carleton Place House That Disappeared

Where Was One of the Open Air Rinks in Carleton Place?

 

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The Old Stone Home on High Street–Memories

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The Old Stone Home on High Street–Memories

 

 

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Joann Voyce—Corner of High St and Water St—This shows the stone house that stood on that corner opposite Findlay’s loading dock 1950s

 

Keith Giffin –Our family lived in that stone house, for a number years in the late 40,s. The float that you see was from the optimist club of Carleton Place ,they sponsored a boys camp on Graham Lake as well as the Smith falls and Ottawa club

 


Joann Voyce-– The building between Stalwart ( part of Vic Bennett Motors ) and the stone house on the corner was Hugh Devlins Barber Shop on the left and a family residence on the

Ray Paquette– Didn’t Bob Francis and his family live in the residence when your family was on High Street?

Joann Voyce– Not sure but Alan and Connie Bennett lived on the right side of the stone one when Mike was born

Ray Paquette –-Connie was a good friend of my mother while my son Scott was in school with Matt, Mike’s son. I remember when they lived down the hill on Allan Street. Alan was in the Air Force and so the family was somewhat nomadic…

Joann Voyce– Hugh Devlin and his wife lived over the Barber Shop and his daughter Doreen and her husband lived on the right of her parents

 

Stephen Giles— My Mother and her parents moved to Carleton Place in 1946. Their first residence was an apartment in this house

Blaine Cornell-Yes, Robert Francis and family lived in this old stone house.in the 50’s If i remember correctly his father’s name was Fred. I remember a family by the name of Monday operating the barbershop also in the mid 50’s.

 

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Joann Voyce
12 hrs
Yes Deborah Devlin-Adams I pushed you in Marg’s doll carriage and I have a picture of it

Linda says “look at the buildings you can see beside Findlays”

historicalnotes

On the Perth road, now High Street, a dozen of the village’s buildings of 1863 extended from Bridge Street along the north side of the road for a distance of about two blocks.  There was only one building on its south side, the large stone house torn down several years ago, at the corner of Water Street.  It was built in 1861 by John Sumner, merchant, who earlier at Ashton had been also a magistrate and Lieutenant Colonel of the 3rd Battalion.  Carleton Militia.  Beyond this short section of High Street was farm land, including the farms of John McRostie, Peter Cram, the Manny Nowlan estate and David Moffatt.  The stone farm houses of John McRostie and David Moffatt are now the J. H. Dack and Chamney Cook residences

John Toshack, who came to Ramsay with his wife, seven sons and two daughters, was a man of strong religious tendencies.  He had been a deacon in the Congregational Church under the Rev. Mr. Ewing in Glasgow, and preached in the first shanties of settlers in Ramsay before there was an ordained clergyman in the township.  His younger daughter, eleven years old at the time of the 1821 migration, became the wife of the first Peter Cram of Carleton Place.  Surviving her husband on the Cram farm homestead on High Street which later was acquired in the eighteen eighties by her nephew Peter Cram (1831-1920) of Carleton Place, she died in 1890 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. James Thom in Ramsay.

The buildings on the north side of High Street were rented houses owned by John McEwen, William Neelin, William Moore and Henry Wilson; and the homes of Mrs. John Bell, Arthur Moore and James McDiarmid; together with Joseph Pittard’s wagon shop, and two doors west of it near the future Thomas Street corner, the new foundry enterprise of David Findlay. —Howard Morton Brown

In 1914- A resident was awarded damages for injury to a horse frightened by an unattended and unlighted automobile parked on High Street.

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  29 May 1971, Sat,  Page 36

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Jean Isabel Galbraith Findlay , 207 High Street, Carleton Place (Findlay home).

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

 

The Carleton Place House with the Coffin Door

Looking for Memories of Harold Linton’s Gas Station

Peter Cram of Beckwith Perth and High Street in Carleton Place

Before and After – Old High Street Barn

Was This the Architect of the Findlay Homes on High Street?

Can Nancy Drew Solve the Case of Carleton Place’s Hardy Boys on High Street?

The Hardy Boys in Carleton Place

Ken Findlay Fatally Shot on High Street

One of the 7 Wonders in Carleton Place

 

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

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How Did A Carleton Place Photo End Up at the Victoria Archives?

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How Did A Carleton Place Photo End Up at the Victoria Archives?

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Photo–Vintage Carleton Place & Beckwith This clipping is from a school scribbler that was kept by Louella Edith Drynan (nee Shail).-

 

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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Mrs. Alex Sibbitt- The back says Mrs. Alex Sibbitt. I believe that this must be a picture of Mary Morphy– Joyce Sibbitt Photo

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Bridge and High Street 1875 before the grocery store re-model (corner white frame house)–3230883 Public Archives.Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Years ago Mayor Eldon Henderson received this photo (news clipping) from the Victoria Archives in British Columbia that had been in their files for many years. As it was a Carleton Place, Ontario photo the archives felt it should be in our local photo collection.

He was confused at first, but after finding out where the store had been located Mayor Henderson began a contest for the general public. The winning location answer received a free one year subscription to The Review. Do you know where it was in Carleton Place? It was on the corner of High and Bridge Street where Mr. Campbell once had his store. I have sat here examining the buildings to the side and amazed how this building transpired over the years today. Who would have known? How did the photo end up in British Columbia? Keep reading…

Marj Whyte wrote:

Across High Street was a brick building once known as The Sibbett’s Summit Store (Sibbet’s Grocery & Liquor Store–Lloyd Hughes). Later it was ran by Lorne J. Campbell and then D.A. Roe became the owner and it was also Baird’s Food.

Photos below by Shane Wm. Edwards– thank you for all the photos you take so we can put these mysteries together,

 

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All photos- Shane Wm. Edwards after all the bricks were removed.

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All photos- Shane Wm. Edwards

 

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Still has the log ceiling beams–2017

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Food Costs– The Herald– – May 1884.

The Summit Store is the Spot.  Your choice for #1.00: 6 cans Salmon, 6 cans Lobster, 8 boxes Sardines, 11 lbs Prunes, 12 lbs. new Valencia Raisins, 13 lbs. Bright Sugar, 4 lbs. choice Japan Tea.  Five dozen Labrador Herring for $1.00, or $3.00 per half barrel.  Also Fresh Halibut, Mess Pork, Fresh Herring, Tommy-Cods, etc.  Early Rose Potatoes.  Green Apples – Glassware and Crockery, Boots and Shoes. –Howard Morton Brown

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  20 Jan 1903, Tue,  Page 5

 

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Ed Sibbitt- Photo Joyce Sibbitt

 

Barely one year later Edward left town…

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Dec 1903, Fri,  Page 4

And this is why the above photo from the Victoria Archives in British Columbia that had been in their files for many years ended up there. Edgar Sibbett moved West and that is where his memories ended up.

 

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Doug B. McCarten— This building was across from our house and when I was growing up it belonged to Ellard (sp?)and Beulla (sp?) Gordon who ran her beauty parlour in the front! They raised two boys Dale and Jimmy who married Judy Houston and Robert who was my boyhood friend! They had a TV 📺 before we did and I can remember going over to watch!

Robert and I decided to move the Neilsons Ice Cream sign from the front of the dairy (it was on legs with feet) to the middle of Bridge Street one Halloween 👻 and then hid in his Mom’s beauty parlour to see what happened! The police came by and moved it back to the dairy! This was fun so we did it a number of times until the Police 👮arrived at the sign at the same time as my father coming the other way.

My dad stopped and had a discussion with the officer no doubt inquiring if they had seen me…… It was probably 3 or 4 a.m. and seeing my dad with the cop I made the prudent decision to sneak home, get in bed and pretend I had been there the whole time! I snuck in the back door, tiptoed across the kitchen and was just starting my quiet climb when I looked up and there was my mom at top of the stairs waiting for me…… I don’t remember the punishment but they never did find out about our participation in the sign scandal! I remember how funny we thought it was at the time and we laughed so hard my sides ached…… What great fun we had growing up!!

Corry Turner-Perkins– Ellard and Buella were my neighbours on Towline Rd in their later years and they were both beautiful people.I was just a teenager and “Mr.G” as I called him and I would talk for hours over the fence or in the driveway.I still have a small broach he brought me back when him and Buella went to Graceland. Buella would wave me over and send me home with treats or fresh picked rhubarb.! If I recall correctly they were married for 70 years!
Kenneth Jackson yes i remember when Bulah had the salon . it was around this time that i helped to renovate the building into apartments.
Joann Voyce I vaguely remember shopping in there with my mother when we first moved to High St 1948. Who remembers the fire in the second floor of the building right beside Gordon’s? When you look at it now with one story and a flat roof, people must wonder why it looks like it doesn’t fit in with the rest of the street

historicalnotes

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  03 Sep 1897, Fri,  Page 8

Perth Courier, May 19, 1899

Lewis Sibbett, second son of Alexander Sibbett, Carleton Place, died at Evaleth(?), Minn., on May 12(?) 13(?), aged 28.  The complaint was an abscess of the abdominal cavity.  The body was brought to Carleton Place and interred in the Cram Cemetery, Rev. A.A. Scott of Zion Church, conducted the services.  His wife was a Miss Whitton.

 

Need Apricots in Carleton Place? –1899

Full text of “Evaporated fruit and vegetables [microform]” 1899

 

*70550 Wm. Jenkins, Carleton Place.

70560 Alex. Sibbett, Carleton Place-Sibbitt Alexander, grocer

Wines and Liquors—Sibbett Grocers Carleton Place

 

 

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Dale Gordon and his Great Uncle Jack Howard, taken on Bridge Street in front of the store in 1955 or 1956. Dale writes: “My parents moved from Sudbury in Dec of 1947 to help my great Uncle Jack Howard operate the store ,He apparently ran the store with his wife who had passed away . I notice on the building it is called the Howard Block so it may be that he owned the building and someone else ran the store My parents ran the store and my mother opened her hair salon in part of it .My great Uncle passed away in the late 50,s and my mother moved her salon to the small unit just to the north of the store .you can see the entrance door and window in the picture. The store was operated as an antique store by Charlie Rintoul..I remember hanging out in it as a kid .

I think it was around 1960 my parents renovated the building into the 8 unit apartment building . We lived in one of the apartments and my mother ran her salon in the portion at the front .I believe in 1966 my parents sold the building and moved to the town line
Hope all this helps
Dale–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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 Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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Lorne J. Campbell owned the business when this ad was printed in 1936. Note the reference to the “Howard Block” as well as the different street address. Building numbers have changed several times over the years

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

 

 

Robberies in Carleton Place — Mr. Ed Campbell of High Street

*Bill Jenkins- Riverman and Wedding Cake Maker?

*Before and After in Carleton Place–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Posting

 

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

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Peter Cram of Beckwith Perth and High Street in Carleton Place

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Peter Cram of Beckwith Perth and High Street in Carleton Place

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1920-02-27-01-Almonte Gazette

Brief mention was made last, week of the death of Mr. Peter Cram, one of our oldest and -most prominent citizens, which sad event occurred on the 18th instant, after a brief illness, of heart failure, although he had never fully recovered from the effects of a stroke that he sustained some 18 months previous.

Mr. Cram was born in Beckwith, in January, 1831, being a son of the the late James Cram, whose farm was that at present owned by Mr. Fred M. Cram, and who was a son of one of the earliest of the township’s settlers. The subject of our sketchsipent his early days upon the land, and shortly after the gold find in California joined a party of some half dozen young men from this locality– the Teskeys and Moffatts being of the party—and in 1852 travelled across the continent to the golden state.

A couple of years later he returned and in company with his brother, the late John F Cram built a tannery at Appleton, and made a success of it, later on adding wool-pulling as a branch of their business. While living at Appleton Mr. Cram was married, his wife being Margaret Campbell of Drummond, their marriage taking place in April, 1857.

Five children blessed their fireside, two sons and three daughters. One of the latter died in Perth, at the age of 14 years. The others survive—J. A. C., at home; John W., assistant king’s printer, Regina; Mrs. George Watters (Mary) and Mrs. Wm. Findlay. (Annie)

Mrs. Cram predeceased her husband, passing away in 1909, two years after celebrating their golden wedding. The business partnership at Appleton was dissolved by Mr. J. F. Cram withdrawing and coming to Carleton Place, and some years later Peter sold out and removed with his family to Perth, where they resided for some years, coming to Carleton Place in 1882, and a couple of years later purchasing the property on High Street, on the top of the hill, where his home has since been until the last.

He was a great reader, possessed a wonderful memory and could quote whole sections of history or chapters of the Bible at will He was a versatile writer, and on occasion could use this faculty in a masterly fashion. He always took a keen interest in public affairs, and for many years was a member of the Board of Education and also a member of the town council.

In religion, he was a Presbyterian, and the services at the funeral, which took place on Saturday afternoon were conducted by Rev. Mr. Monds assisted by Rev. Mr. Forsythe.  The pallbearers were four nephews, Messrs. Ro’bt. Cram Westboro; Colin McIntosh, A. E. Cram and F. ‘M. Cram, and Messrs. Ro&t. Patterson and Wm. Baird. Interment w as made in Pine Grove cemetery.

Mr. J. W. Cram arrived from Regina on Saturday morning in time for the obsequies. We will miss the kindly smile and friendly greeting and long in vain to hear the ring of jovial laughter and to feel again his genial presence but with the poet can say

“Cold in dust the perished heart may die, But that which warmed it once can never die.”— From C.C.

historicalnotes

A Cyclopaedia of Canadian Biography: Being Chiefly Men of the Time …, Volume 2

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Read the rest at A Cyclopaedia of Canadian Biography: Being Chiefly Men of the Time …, Volume 2

The new fire engine was unable to save the inflammable new tannery and wool pulling plant of John F. Cram and Donald Munro, burned in 1886 with a fire loss of $10,000.

By 1840 Cram families owned seven different lots on Beckwith concessions 10, 11 and 12.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal11 Jan 1900, ThuPage 2

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal22 Mar 1900, ThuPage 7

 

May 27 1892

Somebody in Carleton Place discharged
a rifle at random, and the ball
whizzed between Mr. and Mrs. Peter
Cram, who were standing in front of their
house. The ball ploughed up the ground
for quite a distance.

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Searching for Elizabeth Cram–Updates on Andrew Waugh