Tag Archives: hawthorne mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

 

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Hawthorn Mill was spelled without an “e” by Thomas Code etc. so from now on I will spell it without an ‘e’. Letterhead sent to us by Joyce MacKenzie and is now at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

About the year 1818 John Code-– a cabinet maker by trade on the county Wexford, Ireland– became enthused over the inducement offered emigrants to select Canada with its free lands and all the glowing prospects pictured by the agents of the time, for a new home. Little did he know the troubles and trials that beset the way. With his small family at the time he sailed for Canada, and in Montreal the same year. He got employment in his trade in this city, and remained for about 2 years. During this time my father was born, early in 1820.

In this year my grandfather and his family joined a movement to the Lanark Settlement. Arriving in Perth he took up land in what was the Boyd Settlement. On reaching Innisville they crossed the river in a log canoe and journeyed about three miles further on to the land selected. After indifferent progress for a time, he bought a lot on the south bank of the Mississippi at the village of  Innisville. This afforded him a double chance, as he could ply his craft aside from farming. Being a peaceful law abiding, and industrious person of more than average ability, and conformable to local conditions ( I remember him before he passed away in 1860), after getting settled all went well in the primitive way.

The old log building stands yet with its open fireplace, swinging crane and fire dogs. It would puzzle the architect of the present day to figure out how such a large family could find lodging quarters in such limits, as the family numbered nine or eleven in all: Ann, John, George,Ellen, William, Richard, Thomas, Abraham and Elizabeth.

John Code was the farmer of the family. He and two sisters remained on the same farm or homestead during their lives. All of them remained unmarried.

Richard, after serving an apprenticeship carding, later started a carding mill in Perth at Haggart’s Mills, and continued up to about year 1870. After a few years of the livery business he left for Winnipeg, leaving his family consisting of: Thomas Mark, Richard, John A., and four daughters in Perth.

T. M. died many years after in the West. Richard had been in the employ of the Felt Mill for many years, and was still on the job in 1929.

Richard Senior came home and worked for the writer as a carder in 1876 at Locks Bridge Mill. He again drifted West, and passed out of the picture.

Abraham Code known as A.B. was apprenticed to James Rosamond of Carleton Place as a carder. The place was then known as Morphy’s Falls. Later James Rosamond moved to Shipton’s  Falls, afterwards known as Almonte. Innisville was then known as Freers Falls and Ferguson’s Falls was registered as Milford. It took the present name from one, Captain Ferguson.

On leaving Carleton Place Abraham and George Code formed a partnership know as  A & G Code doing custom work for a time. Later James Ennis Senior put up a building on the south side of the river and rented to them. They installed woollen machinery for the making of coarse cloth, mostly etoff. This had some reputation in the early days, but later the fancy of the people changed and etoff was little heard  of.

A.B. as he was called got ambitious and became a member of the County Council. Later in 1867 he ran against McNairn Shaw for the Ontario seat, and was defeated. On the death of Mr. Shaw which occurred in 1869, A.B. again contested the seat against John G. Haggart and John Doran, Liberal and succeeded. Again in 1871 he defeated John G. Haggart and the Honourable Malcolm Cameron, and in 1875 John Doran: but was defeated at the Conservative Convention in 1879 by William Lees. A. B. was a fair speaker while campaigning- but sometimes stretching the subject too far he was seldom heard in the House of Assembly. His successes in elections was to some extent due to a party A.B. had favoured at a critical time. He got a large Catholic vote notwithstanding he was an out and out Orangeman.

About this time he purchased the Ferguson Fall’s mill property, then owned by Robert Blair. This was an an unfortunate venture as the mills were burned down. The saw logs  were spiked owing– it is said– to the dam drowning land in the upper stretches of the river.

In the early 1870s A.B. built was is now known as the Hawthorn Mill in Carleton Place. The writer helped to draw some of the machinery from Frenchies Mills in New Edinburgh to Carleton Place. This took about two days a trip. R. J. Dial of Innisville and I would leave, load and return to Bells Corners the first day; start out for Carleton Place, unload and reach Innisville, or home that evening. Owing to the changed fancy of the people and conditions of the trade, however, this venture was a failure, and the same bad luck has followed this mill for at least 50 years (written in 1929). I notice the machinery is being sold at present time, which winds up a history of failure. Never was political ambition more destructive to business, destroying business application and initiative necessary to forestall the coming changes from years to years.

A. B. then got a position as Inspector of Weights and Measures in Ottawa. He bemoaned his changed conditions, and passed out a few years later, leaving a large family : five boys, who are all dead, and four girls still living. A. B. and Elizabeth were twins and the latter married Jeremiah Dial.

 

Tomorrow Thomas Code and William Code

 

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Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

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In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

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How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed.

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon- see bio below–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

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The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

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What do You Know About the Hawthorne Cottage?

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What do You Know About the Hawthorne Cottage?

 

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South Shore Landing Inc. Photos –I was looking at houses on Charles Street today and came across this plaque on one of them. It says the Hawthorne cottage. It’s an old two-story brick house and the plaque is high up on the wall. Who can tell us about the plaque and if it’s connected to the Hawthorne Mill

 

Deb Bogaerts pm’d me on Facebook and said:

We lived  in The Hawthorne Cottage growing up, and I sure miss that house. There were two sets of stairs – front “formal” and kitchen stairs to the maids room that had the door to the full walk around in the massive attic. The kitchen and attic stairs were kind of spiral-y. Sooo much fun!

My parents built the rec room over the garage. You should be able to find the article in the Carleton Place newspaper (if on disc) about my parents building a steam house in the backyard. We got a lot of odd looks when rolling around in the snow in our bathing suits after being in there! My mom also sunk a bathtub in the garden for a water feature with goldfish – she was always ahead of her time.

My parents also built the wishing well (if it’s still there). Also, when my parents tore down the old kitchen porch to build the enclosed one there now (if it is) – my Dad pulled a rafter off the wall not realizing there was a robin nest there. One of the babies survived. My mom put it in a shoe box with a sock and kept it in the oven. We all dug for worms and she fed the baby. Grew up and flew away.

How can you not love this Carleton Place? Community social history is so important because every single generation writes its own history. Thank you Deb!! Thank you Roy Watson for pointing this out- I just can’t be everywhere..:)

 

What can you add?

Ray Paquette--Using Google Street view, I was able to identify the home. It was the home of Jim McAllister and his wife Linda, the parents of Jimmy and Krista, and was located across the street from the home of “Mick” and Ina McAllister, Jimmy’s grandparents. The suggestion that the question be directed to Jimmy might bear fruit. Another source might be Judy Lyons, Gary’s, a.k.a. “Butch”, wife who was Jim’s sister and Jimmy’s aunt.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Shenanigans at the Hawthorne Mill?

Hawthorne Mill–The Early Years– 1874 -1927

The Revolutions of the Hawthorne Mill

The Rencraft Fire Dept Photo Brings Back a Familiar Name

The Case of the Bell that Disappeared

So What Happened to The Findlay House Stone?

The Stanzel Homes of Carleton Place

Da Doo Ron Ron (When He Walked Me Home) —- Homes Before and After in Carleton Place

Rescuing the Money Pits —The Dunlop Homes

Was This the Architect of the Findlay Homes on High Street?

Before and After — Homes in Carleton Place

The Mystery Homes of Lanark County

The Brick Houses of Carleton Place

RELATED READING:

The John Shore House

The Appleton Chinchilla House

The Mysterious Riddell— H B Montgomery House

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Rescuing the Money Pits —The Other Dunlop Home with the Coffin Door

The Carleton Place House with the Coffin Door

Before and After in Carleton Place –The Doctor is in!

Heh Miss Wilsonnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn! Carleton Place Heroe

Was This the Architect of the Findlay Homes on High Street?

The Carleton Place House That Disappeared

The McCarten House of Carleton Place

Old McRostie Had a Farm in Carleton Place

Time Capsule in the ‘Hi Diddle Day’ House?

The Louis on Sarah Street for $43,500 — Before and After– Architecture in Carleton Place

Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

The Brick Houses of Carleton Place

So What Happened to The Findlay House Stone?

The Mysterious Riddell— H B Montgomery House

The Jinxed House of Crown Point

The House Across the Way- Dickson House

Shenanigans at the Hawthorne Mill?

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Heritage Carleton Place— Photo–May Cornell on Mississippi with Hawthorne Mill in Background

People are happy the Hawthorne Mill is being renovated and loved again. I really had to laugh when I saw these. Don’t forget to go visit the mill on Saturday– 

An Invitation to the Old Hawthorne Mill

 

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Photo by Robert McDonald Photography

Dale Costello– So happy the restoration of this timeless building will evolve into something which brings back vivid memories for those born and raised in Carleton Place. My heartfelt thanks and congratulations to Mr. Thorbjornsson and team in seeing through to successful completion. This historic building was on my path to the canoe club and passed by it thousands of times. Thank you sir.

Jeremy Stinson– If I recall correctly, that usually meant trespassing if that was on your path. Statute of limitations has surely passed, but I remember getting scolded for taking the direct (north side of the building) route.

 
Dale Costello–I pulled out my transit every time I walked by to be certain I wasn’t on mill property. You can’t be too careful. Chief Cornell complimented me for being a law abiding citizen.
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Dale Costello–Jeremy, ya gotta go to the top of the heap.
Ray Paquette– Gee, I never thought of it as trespassing! Wasn’t it an extension of Emily Street? I wish I had a nickle for every time I used that route on my way to the swimming pool.
Ray Paquette —Obvious, Herb didn’t see everything that was going on!?!?!?!
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Blaine Cornell- Careleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
Ray Paquette —One of my buds was the police chief’s sonson Blaine. May have interceded on occasion.
Joann Voyce More than one occasion if my memory serves me correctly….

 

Author’s note– You tell them Joanne!!! 

 

 - I Ur. W. H. Matthews, the retiring bead...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  20 Oct 1899, Fri,  Page 4

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

 

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

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Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors of Carleton Place?

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Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors of Carleton Place?

 

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The History of Doors Open Ontario

Every year, Doors Open Ontario attracts large crowds across Ontario. From April to October, residents and visitors are invited to discover first-hand Ontario’s hidden heritage treasures, some of which have never been open to the public.

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Photo– The Grand Hotel

September 16, 2017 – September 17, 2017

Join us for Doors Open Carleton Place!

Saturday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sunday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m

Canadian Co-operative Wool Growers Limited

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Carleton Place Town Hall

Masonic Temple

Grand Hotel, The

Hawthorne Mill – South Shore Landing Inc.

Keyes Block Apartments

 

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I will be doing a walking tour Saturday 16 beginning at 11 am at the Domino’s Parking Lot. I will stop for 10 minutes at:

Grand Hotel, The

Masonic Temple

Keyes Block Apartments

Carleton Place Town Hall (ending)

So come along for the informational and fun walk and I will stop at these above places for 10 minutes. If you want to stay longer than 10 minutes or even come back and visit them after the tour all good. It’s about about local history and open doors– so come have fun!!

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores.

This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

 

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Family Fun Day– Click here..

 

relatedreading

Have You Been to the Keyes Building? Here is Your Chance

Armchair Tourism in Carleton Place– Wooly Bully!!!! Part 6

Preserving the Past With Love Without Embalming It — Photos of the Carleton Place Museum 2011

What Didn’t You Know? The New Town Hall 1897

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel

Hawthorne Mill–The Early Years– 1874 -1927

Mysteries at the Carleton Place Masonic Lodge

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (US

 

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When Worlds Collide

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September 1899–Carleton Place Herald

 A fatal accident nearly happened on Monday, which we hope will be a warning to other boys not to go beyond their depth when bathing. Young William Way attempted to swim across the Mississippi river from the Hawthorne factory and back. When near the middle of the river on his return his strength gave out and he screamed for help.

When Mr. VanAllen heard his cries he hurried out to help him. He spoke encouragingly, and was relieved to see William make an effort to reach him. Before VanAllen was near enough to assist him the young boy had succeeded in touching a shallow place. Only for the timely encouragement of VanAllen the consequence might have been fatal. 

 

historicalnotes

 

William Way was but 6 years old when he attempted his swim. Like Margaret Violet King he sadly died at the age of 14.–A Carleton Place Tale to Send Shivers Up Your Arm — The Sad Tale of Margaret Violet King

While doing research today I read in the Ottawa Journal that in 1898 Mr. VanAllen was one of the 6 witnesses in the Peter Blair Murder case– For the Love of Paris Green –Another Local Murdoch Mystery?

 

 

 

 

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Child 2 William Way Birth 17 Jul 1883 Carleton Place, Lanark, Ontario Death 9 Oct 1904 Carleton Place, Carleton, Ontario
Child 3 Annie Gertrude Way Birth Mar 1888 in Carleton Place, Lanark, Ontario Death 1978 in Ottawa, Carleton, Ontario She married Glyndon Vaughan Williams born abt 1885 30 Jun 1915 Carleton County. Her marriage record incorrectly gives her mother as Elechia Evoy
Child 4 Minnie Way Birth abt 1887/1888 probably in Carleton Place, Lanark, Ontario Death 8 May 1970 in Ottawa, Carleton, Ontario burial Beechwood Cemetery, Ottawa. Minnie married Arthur J Booth born abt 1874 son of James & Sarah on 14 Jul 1909 in Ottawa, Carleton. Her marriage record incorrectly gives her mother as Elchia Evoy

Marriage 3 27 May 1891 in Carleton Place, Lanark, Ontario to Elechia Evoy Green born Apr 1858 London, Ontario. She died 13 Dec 1918 Ottawa, Carleton, Ontario burial 19 May 1919 Beechwood Cemetery, Ottawa
One child Robert Hilton (Hilton) Way Birth 5 Sep 1898 Carleton Place, Ontario
He married Ethel May Smith Birth abt 1896 Arnprior, Lanark, Ontario daughter of Charles Smith and Mary Ann Cathcart on the 10 Dec 1919 inCarleton County

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (US

 relatedreading

For the Love of Paris Green –Another Local Murdoch Mystery?

Another Lanark Mystery– Paris Green

A Carleton Place Tale to Send Shivers Up Your Arm — The Sad Tale of Margaret Violet King

A Time of its Own– The Mystery Photo

Death from Corrosive Sublimate —Carleton Place’s Revere House

Bitten by the Kissing Bug — A Shocking Conclusion to the Life of Carleton Place’s Daniel E. Sheppard

The Strange Disappearance of Bertha Sumner of Carleton Place

So What Really Happened to Samuel Cram?

A Local Handmaids Tale? What Happened ?

 

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An Invitation to the Old Hawthorne Mill

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An Invitation to the Old Hawthorne Mill

Jennifer Irwin
Manager
Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
613-253-7013

 

 

 

Check out all the updates on the:

Hawthorne Mill–The Early Years– 1874 -1927

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 21 Feb 1948, Sat, –Colourful Spring plaids from the Renfrew Woolen Mill (Hawthorne) being displayed by Mrs Zephyr Bennett

The Case of the Bell that Disappeared

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The Case of the Bell that Disappeared

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The Old Hawthorne Renfrew Mill- Carleton Place–Photo from  Volundur Wally Thorbjornsson collection

 

Sometime around 1910, Colorado acquired a bell in 1894 by the C.S. Bell Company in Hillsboro, Ohio, and the historic bell weighed nearly 500 pounds. Its chiming could be heard across the tiny campus of Colorado Agricultural College and throughout most of Fort Collins, CO.

 

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The Old Hawthorne Renfrew Mill- Carleton Place–Photo from  Volundur Wally Thorbjornsson collection

 

The bell rang every morning to announce the start of classes, and as you might expect on a college campus, students often gave into the temptation to pull the bell’s rope in the middle of the night, angering nearby residents.

Sometime around 1915 it was reported in the Rocky Mountain Collegian that the bell’s clapper had been stolen – perhaps by residents who had grown weary of the frequent and very loud noise. Students weren’t about to stop ringing the bell, however, and used sledge hammers and even an axe to make it chime. The Collegian reported in 1919 that the bell was permanently silenced when cracked by overzealous students and their hammers. The ruined bell, legend has it, remained in the Old Main Tower for years.

One night – likely in 1919 – a group of at least four men climbed the tower and removed the bell. They managed to slip away unseen, but that is where their planning had ended. They didn’t know what to do with their prize and, scared of being caught, they moved the instrument to a nearby farm and buried it. That’s where it remained for the next 50 years.

 

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The Old Hawthorne Renfrew Mill- Carleton Place–Photo from  Volundur Wally Thorbjornsson collection

 

By the early 1970s, the original bell had been all but forgotten. A select few members of a fraternity and its alumni were aware of the story but were sworn to secrecy. But when it was revealed that the farm where the bell was buried was on the market, action was required. The bell was exhumed and – for the first time in five decades – moved back to an off-campus fraternity house in Fort Collins. There it remained, hidden, for a number of years.


In an effort to keep the bell safe, it was decided to move it again – this time out of state. The bell was no longer in prime form and although in still decent form it had a broken yoke. It needed to be refurbished and restored, but it was determined the bell could be rung again without fear of damage.

 

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The Old Hawthorne Renfrew Mill- Carleton Place–Photo from  Volundur Wally Thorbjornsson collection

 

The bell will reside in a tower outside the Iris and Michael Smith Alumni Centre, which is connected to the new stadium. So all bell that ends bell. So what about one of our bells? Yes, in Carleton Place we had many bells that rang throughout town. The Town Hall bell, the MacArthur Mill bell and the many school bells that rang each day.

At the open house to the Hawthorne Mill yesterday there was a gentleman that brought Volundur Wally Thorbjornsson pictures from the removal of the bell tower from the building. Unfortunately he did not get his name or contact info as it was in the midst of giving the people that had lined up for access. Wally has decided to restore the tower to it’s former glory and would love to get information on where the bell is located today. Any and all leads are welcome.

It’s not the honour that you take with you but the heritage you leave behind.

 

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The Old Hawthorne Renfrew Mill- Carleton Place–Photo from  Volundur Wally Thorbjornsson collection

It would be fantastic if it was found but, like our missing Ballygiblin sign that should be replaced I hope it has not been melted down. So if you know anything and would like to hear it ring again like the Renfrew Mill/Rencraft Fire Dept once did then drop Wally a line.

 

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This photo appears to have been taken in the CP Council Chamber- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum. see the rest here–The Rencraft Fire Dept Photo Brings Back a Familiar Name

 

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comments

 

John Armour– I hope that they found my kite that I got wrapped around the bell, when I was 12 years old, (with Greg Wilson)

Ray Paquette– One of the “jobs” I had in the early ’60’s was a two or three day job I got to work for Charlie Baker of Almonte who had a contract to clear out the building pictured of all the abandoned but salvageable material that remained in the building from when it was a functioning woolen mill. Leigh Instruments which was expanding rapidly and which was housed in the former office wing of the plant was preparing to take over the remainder of the mill. It was this time of year and it was hot, dirty labour and I believe that Milt Phillips, my neighbour at the time, might have been behind Mr. Baker hiring me.

Llew Lloyd– I worked for my Dad that summer cleaning an degreasing all the beams . We then spray painted them and painted the floors . It sure brightened the place up . Ted Lemaistre told me he worked as a joe boy there all summer too . When it came time to get paid he was asked if he’d rather be paid in stock options . He and every kid at that time took the money . Mrs. Robertson was smarter.

Ray Paquette And your final comment on the stock option probably explains why we are not independently wealthy and spending the summer following our favourite baseball team around the league circuit!!

 

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Llew Lloyd--Now you’ve got me working again . I knew I had this photo tucked away somewhere . That’s my father , Llewellyn Wescott Lloyd in the foreground of a good pic of the Hawthorne Mill in the mid 30’s . The fourth floor and bell tower are still there , but when I zoom in I’m not sure if the Bell is . As I’ve explained in other posts, even though my name is David Llewellyn Lloyd I am known by both David and Llew because of a nickname ritual that goes back to my public school days . ” Ossie ” McNeely is the best example of this as all the McNeely boys ended up being called Ossie . Dot Smith somehow was ” overlooked ” .

 

historicalnotes

 

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Photo by Robert McDonald Photography

 

1872– Carleton Place

Another Bell ~ By far the most pleasant feature in our busy town of Carleton Place is the number of bells, which at stated periods, ring out their various calls. A new one was this week placed in the steeple of Mr. Wm. H. Wylie’s woolen mill by. Mr. Bond, of Carleton Place.

Bell found from InsideValley.com

Thorbjornsson is happy to announce the missing Hawthorne Mill bell has been located. It will be on display during Saturday’s open house.

The Hawthorne Mill tower is missing two stories, which came off in the late ’80s. Everything was taken to the dump except the bell.

“I had no idea there was a bell tower on the Hawthorne Mill building, until a gentleman came to our first open house and dropped off some pictures.” Thorbjornsson said.

The developer managed to connect with the fellow later on on Facebook, and “that family has been very active in doing research and giving me support in the search for the bell.”

Thorbjornsson said he immediately made the decision to rebuild the mill’s tower when he saw the pictures, which belonged to Bill and Carole Flint.

“Carole worked for Leigh Instruments for years and Bill worked for them as well,” Irwin explained. “That is why he was on site (in Carleton Place) the day they took the tower down.”

“I set myself on a mission that I wanted to find the original bell,” Thorbjornsson said. “I put a call out on social media, and I called a lot of connected people in town that I knew might have some information.”

He managed to piece enough information together to get on the trail of the bell, and it was not long until he found out Cameron McGregor was the contractor who removed the bell.

“I called him up, and he was a little guarded when I brought up the bell,” Thorbjornsson said. “However, I explained to him why I wanted to know and what my intentions were.”

It turns out DRS Technologies’ general manager at the time hired McGregor to take the structure down because it was not in good shape anymore.

“A lot of people and organizations were in touch with him and wanted the bell,” Thorbjornsson said. “So, he told Cameron to take the bell and hide it.”

The bell eventually found its way to McGregor’s hunting camp.

“Someone eventually recognized it,” Thorbjornsson said. “Cameron called up the general manager and asked what to do with the bell.”

“He was told to donate it to the local museum, which he did in the mid ’90s,” the developer added.

Unfortunately, the item was not catalogued until 2008.

All this time it has been in storage at the Neelin Street Community Centre (arena).

“The museum has a storage area at the community centre for big stuff,” Irwin said. “It was sitting there as an unidentified bell.”

“We pieced everything together relatively quick, and it was a huge relief for me to hear the bell was safe,” Thorbjornsson said.

“Jennifer and I started talking and we have come to an understanding,” he continued. “Lawyer Ken Bennett is working on the agreement.”

The bell will go back in the tower once it is reconstructed – on a long-term loan. However, it is still protected as the museum’s property.

“It is very heartwarming to see it put back,” Irwin said.

 

 

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Photo by Robert McDonald Photography

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Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

historicalnotes

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From Joyce MacKenzie

relatedreading

Hawthorne Mill–The Early Years– 1874 -1927

The Revolutions of the Hawthorne Mill

The Rencraft Fire Dept Photo Brings Back a Familiar Name

Photo Memories — The Hawthorne Mill

Ring Those Bells in Carleton Place– Wylie’s Woolen Mill

The Dacks and the Mysterious Old Anchor

The Floating Bridge of Carleton Place — Found!

Chimneys and Black Boxes —Leigh Instruments

Remembering Industry in Carleton Place- Digital and Leigh Instruments

Bomb Scare in Carleton Place

Saved By The Bell in Carleton Place? What Does the Photo Say?

 

 

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Things that have disappeared in Carleton Place

What do you Know about the Prince of Wales Cairn?

So About that Ballygiblin Sign…. Fourteen Years Later!

So What Happened to The Findlay House Stone?

 

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