Tag Archives: haunted heritage

Ed Fleming — The First Funeral Parlour in Carleton Place

Standard

flemm

Ed Fleming was more than a qualified mortician, and he thought all it would take to open a funeral parlour in Carleton Place was a hop, skip, and maybe a coffin or two. How hard could it be he asked himself? The man from Ashton knew just about everyone in town, and had a few degrees under his belt from Ottawa and Hamilton.  But in typical small town fashion some things never change. Word flew up and down the streets that a funeral parlour might dare open. The horrors! The general synopsis was: what did Carleton Place need a funeral parlour for?

Next thing he knew, a group of concerned citizens began a petition to stop the young mans dreams of opening his business in town. However, the powers to be finally gave Fleming the green light. In all honesty, there just wasn’t enough people complaining to warrant not allowing him to open his business. In June of 1939 Carleton Place’s first funeral parlour opened and the world didn’t end. At least there wasn’t anything in the newspapers about it, and the world was here when I woke up this morning.

fleming 2

You have to remember there were other undertakers in town like Patterson and Matthews, and everyone had family funerals in their homes in those days. Back in the days when funerals were held at home, the only outside help which a family needed was in supplying the coffin. Since it was made of wood, it was bought at the store that also sold wooden furniture. Some people even built their own coffins, if they had the time and talent. When the family home was not acceptable, Matthews Furniture store just moved everything over and ushered everyone into an open space between the couches and the end tables.

As funerals became more elaborate, the people who ran the furniture stores branched out, to supply a hearse or the other accouterments of Victorian mourning. Fleming had a horse drawn carriage until he purchased his first vehicle. Although undertakers’ records from the last century do exist, they are rare. We begin to hear more about them in the years before World War I, and by the 1920s they became common

Eventually the modern funeral home as we know it evolved and known as a mortuary or an undertaker’s, names which modern practitioners don’t like. Ed Fleming knew all along he could do a better job than the undertakers in town and he and his wife Doris succeeded with their first funeral parlour in their home on Frank Street.

I can’t imagine how his wife Doris got the family meals prepared knowing full well the body preparation room was next to the kitchen. That year they only had three funerals, and Doris pinch hit as a nurse at the Carleton Place Hospital to make ends meet,  But, as his good reputation spread, people knew they could count on him, and his business began to flourish.

flemong

Fleming Brothers’ Funeral Home eventually moved to 18 Lake Avenue West where Tubman’s once was. Everything that has a beginning eventually has a an end. When Fleming decided to retire, he struck a deal with John Kerry who operated in Almonte at the old Stafford house and they closed the Carleton Place deal in 1972. Today, the Tubman Funeral home on lake Ave. West is closed, and the only remaining funeral parlour is the Alan Barker funeral home on McArthur Street.

Don’t forget Haunted Heritage Thursday night at the museum!

Our Haunted Heritage Event Page- buy tickets soon! October 15th

hauntedheritage

St James Cemtery Ghost Walk Event Page- October 28th

Howls in the Night in Carleton Place — Our Haunted Heritage

The Devil You Say in Carleton Place? Our Haunted Heritage

Outside Looking in at The Eccentric Family of Henry Stafford — Our Haunted Heritage

The Funeral Train That Went Through Carleton Place — Our Haunted Heritage

Stairway to Heaven in a Cemetery? Our Haunted Heritage

Old Wives Tales of Death — Our Haunted Heritage

Funerals With Dignity in Carleton Place – Just a Surrey with a Fringe on Top —- Our Haunted Heritage

Death by Corset? Bring Out Your Dead and Other Notions! Our Haunted Heritage

Things You Just Don’t say at a Funeral— Even if you Are a Professional Mourner

The Non Kosher Grave — Our Haunted Heritage

Linda’s Dreadful Dark Tales – When Irish Eyes Aren’t Smiling — Our Haunted Heritage

 Could the Giant Pike of Carleton Place Have Turned Into the Lake Memphremagog Monster?

Carleton Place Was Once Featured in Ripley’s Believe it or Not! Our Haunted Heritage

Young Hearts Run Free — Warning– Story Could be Upsetting to Some

Twitching or Grave Dousing– Our Haunted Heritage

Howls in the Night in Carleton Place — Our Haunted Heritage

Standard

Nomadic native Indians used to hunt, trap and fish at some of their favoured sites in the neighbourhood among the early settlers of Carleton Place. Later generations of Indians camped nearby from time to time as sellers of their furs or handicraft products.

The nightly howling of wolves or of an occasional prowling lynx could be heard at times near farm clearings or at the village borders, providing a disturbing serenade for timid persons and owners of unprotected young livestock. Some have said they still hear howlings coming from somewhere called “the dead grounds” near the St. James Cemetery.

wolfff

One summer night in the 60s two young Carleton Place boys took their flashlights and went down to the woods that circle the St. James cemetery. Suddenly they began to hear a distant howling and saw a wolf standing on a rock looking at them with yellow eyes that actually looked like flashlights themselves. It kept staring at them for long time and they both stood there unable to move. Finally they pointed the light right at it and it disappeared, but they heard the howling once again.
.
At that point in time they decided it was time to go home. When they were walking back they looked behind them and saw the same wolf standing on the same rock looking right at them. Back at their Grandmother’s farm house one of the boys asked his grandmother if there are any wolves around there. She told him that she never saw any wolf there, but she had heard many stories about a wolf who kept coming around the area. One of the farmers had caught a wolf trying to eat one of the horses, so he chased him down to the woods and shot him there. Was the wolf reliving his past, or was he now a guardian over the wooded area of St. James cemetery?

One of the monument installers came one day to do a job at the cemetery and he saw a dog run past him and stop dead in his tracks near the woods. The dog backed up and attempted his journey again. Once again he stopped, and his ears went up. No wanting to see what he was seeing again the dog quickly turned around and went in the other direction. The man said he had never ever seen anything like that in his life, and it shook his soul  Was it the wolf protecting the children of the cemetery as their personal guardian?

Our Haunted Heritage Event Page- but tickets soon! October 15th

St James Cemtery Ghost Walk Event Page- October 28th

collage1

The Devil You Say in Carleton Place? Our Haunted Heritage

Outside Looking in at The Eccentric Family of Henry Stafford — Our Haunted Heritage

The Funeral Train That Went Through Carleton Place — Our Haunted Heritage

Stairway to Heaven in a Cemetery? Our Haunted Heritage

Old Wives Tales of Death — Our Haunted Heritage

Funerals With Dignity in Carleton Place – Just a Surrey with a Fringe on Top —- Our Haunted Heritage

Death by Corset? Bring Out Your Dead and Other Notions! Our Haunted Heritage

Things You Just Don’t say at a Funeral— Even if you Are a Professional Mourner

The Non Kosher Grave — Our Haunted Heritage

The Devil You Say in Carleton Place? Updates!

Standard
The Devil You Say in Carleton Place? Updates!

exor

In 2011 the archdiocese of Ottawa, which has one official exorcist on hand,  reported seeing an average of four major exorcisms per year over the past five years. A Quebec Catholic priest said in 2010 that he has performed roughly a dozen exorcisms since he was ordained nearly five years ago.

Indeed, exorcisms have been carried out in Canada for generations — albeit quietly, and in relatively small numbers as compared to countries such as Italy, where the belief in demons is more widespread. In Canada the church has a handful of official exorcists, and additional priests whose role it is to investigate cases of alleged demonic activity as reported by the public. Of course we all remember the film The Exorcist. The day after the film debut all hell broke loose with local Catholic priests telling their congregation that the film would nauseate you and violate many of your religious sensibilities.

In March of 1903 a shocking affair occurred in Carleton Place at about 4 pm in the afternoon. Nelson McWilliams was stabbed in the right lung by his step-father Alden Mathers at the house of the latter on the north end of town. It seems the younger man who was *married to Ida Amanda Coleman also of Carleton Place was extremely worried about his mother. As he lived close to his stepfather had gone over to see his mother who was quite ill. He believed the evil had control of her and insisted she summon the good Baptist Reverend- Reverend Hagen to help her.

Mrs. Mathers and her son then had a quarrel in which her husband, who was between 70 and 75 years of age, obtained possession of a knife and inserted a dangerous wound in McWilliams chest. Drs. McIntosh and Muirhead were in attendance and did not express a favourable opinion as to the probability of the young mans recovery. Mathers, was immediately put in custody. No word, (no matter how hard I looked today) what the outcome of the two gentleman was, or if Mrs. Mather eventually went all Linda Blair in Carleton Place.  But, I did find in some genealogy records that  Nelson McWilliams did have a child with Ida Amanda Coleman before the incident, and Bertha Jane was barely 4 when this event took place. The Catholic church continues to recognize the possibility of diabolical intervention in lives, but insists the evil is primarily personal.

83652543_2843831979007011_4080506535095042048_n

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Linda Seccaspina look what we found in a recently donated police constable’s book! Actual receipt for the police services for the matter–March 1903

Arrest of Mather Alden A Mather Murder

Served Summons

Ateending Justice

Mileage to Perth Gaol ( jail)

Car fare

25 meals at 20 cents

9147c8b1-3b49-4ec1-93e9-f492df92fbdf.jpg

*May 1895– Perth Courier

McWilliams-Coleman—Married, on May 15, at the Baptist Manse, Almonte, by Rev. R. Hagen, Mr. Nelson McWilliams, to Miss Ida Amanda Coleman both of Carleton Place.

Nelson Mcwilliams

mentioned in the record of Bertha Jane Mcwilliams
Name Nelson Mcwilliams
Gender Male
Wife Ida Amanda Coleman
Daughter Bertha Jane Mcwilliams
Other information in the record of Bertha Jane Mcwilliams
from Ontario Births
Name Bertha Jane Mcwilliams
Event Type Birth
Event Date 23 Jul 1899
Event Place Carleton Place, Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Gender Female

Update

 - ALDEN MATHERS GOES FOR TRIAL Bs is Committed at...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 31 Mar 1903, Tue,
  3. Page 1

There was no other word what happened no matter how hard I searched.:)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

relatedreading.jpg

Outside Looking in at The Eccentric Family of Henry Stafford — Our Haunted Heritage

The Funeral Train That Went Through Carleton Place — Our Haunted Heritage

Stairway to Heaven in a Cemetery? Our Haunted Heritage

Old Wives Tales of Death — Our Haunted Heritage

Funerals With Dignity in Carleton Place – Just a Surrey with a Fringe on Top —- Our Haunted Heritage

Death by Corset? Bring Out Your Dead and Other Notions! Our Haunted Heritage

Things You Just Don’t say at a Funeral— Even if you Are a Professional Mourner

The Non Kosher Grave — Our Haunted Heritage

The Non Kosher Grave — Our Haunted Heritage

Standard

rosen

Planting flowers on a grave is indeed not a Jewish tradition– neither is being buried in an Anglican cemetery like St. James in Carleton Place. According to Jewish law, a Jew should be buried among Jews. It is forbidden for a Jew to be buried in a mixed- denomination cemetery, or in a cemetery that allows the burial of questionably converted Jews. In St. James Cemetery there lies a grave belonging to those with Jewish heritage– the Rosenthals. The caretakers told me for years there was no official record of this grave, but it is now included on the list with all the other gravestone markers.

Should a situation arise where a non-observant parent or loved one acquired a plot in such a cemetery, a rabbi who specializes in this area of Jewish law would be consulted. Katherine was buried at St. James Cemetery, but was Edward laid to rest next to his wife Katherine? I would like to think their relationship had The Notebook ending but I don’t think it did.

A kosher grave is one in which the casket is laid directly in the ground, and covered with earth until it is full and a small mound is formed on top. The grave should be at least forty inches deep, and wide and long enough for the casket. Above-ground burial is strictly forbidden according to Jewish law, and Kabbalahadds that all alternative burial options interfere severely with the eternal rest of the soul. There is no mound at the Rosenthal’s grave.

Some Jewish communities bury their loved ones in family plots, or side-by-side in the case of a spouse. Other communities will bury men and women in separate sections. Both of these approaches are permissible. So the question remains– is Edward’s body there? Maybe the inscription was never done, or were children’s opinions involved after his death? Maybe his body is buried in some Jewish cemetery away from his wife?

Besides involving several transgressions, it is seen as following in the way of the gentiles.On all tombstones one adds the Hebrew letters תנצב”ה, which in acrostic form means “May his (her) soul be bound in the binding of life.” Others write on the heading פ”נ , which means “Here is buried.” None of that is on the small discreet Rosenthal marker at St James Cemetery.

Many people of Orthodox Judaic faith still rely on the services of professional mourners today. When a relative dies, strict Jewish laws require mourners to go to the temple every day to recite the Mourner’s Kaddish. Families employ a professional mourner, usually an elderly gentleman to cite the prayers for them. According to our local caretaker, no one comes to the grave of the Rosenthals, Of course it is very possible that Katherine never converted to Judaism– but why would your husband’s name be on the marker. My biggest question is– how could you not be buried next to your husband for eternity?  Because I do not know the answers to any of these questions, I have become their dedicated unofficial unprofessional mourner. To which I say:

Ha’makom yenahem etkhem betokh she’ar avelei Tziyonvi’Yerushalayim –which means “May God console you among the other mourners of Zion and Jerusalem”.

Outside Looking in at The Eccentric Family of Henry Stafford — Our Haunted Heritage

The Funeral Train That Went Through Carleton Place — Our Haunted Heritage

Stairway to Heaven in a Cemetery? Our Haunted Heritage

Old Wives Tales of Death — Our Haunted Heritage

Funerals With Dignity in Carleton Place – Just a Surrey with a Fringe on Top —- Our Haunted Heritage

Death by Corset? Bring Out Your Dead and Other Notions! Our Haunted Heritage

Things You Just Don’t say at a Funeral— Even if you Are a Professional Mourner

Things You Just Don’t say at a Funeral— Even if you Are a Professional Mourner

Standard

Professional-Mourners-187x300

Professional mourners have played a part in funeral ceremonies for thousands of years. In many countries, tradition dictates that the family of the dead, especially children and grandchildren, must express their grief in a very outward manner. Not crying enough or at sufficient decibel levels would be seen as a lack of filial piety so people started hiring professional mourners to ensure a noisy and very passionate farewell.

Victorian times, professional mourners called mutes were hired and walked behind the hearse. They wore black and deployed a suitably miserable expression despite the fact that they had never even met the deceased or the family. In those days funerals were very elaborate affairs and there was a very strict etiquette in place that gave rules for everything from the colors of mourning dress to mourning timelines that had to be observed. Victorian mourning practices spread throughout Europe and professional mourners began to band together, even going on strike for higher wages. As motorized hearses were introduced into the funeral procession, professional mourners began to be phased out of the ceremony.

mourning-funeral

While professional mourners have gone out of style in western countries, professional rejoicers might be a suitable replacement to think about for the future. Paying someone to initiate a hearty chuckle at a viewing would be well worth the money because laughter is much more encouraging than tears and helps just as much in the grieving process.

7710241602_13ee737bcb_b

Sometimes you just have to laugh to help get you through it ..

1-An elderly friend was cremated and I went to the services to pay my respects. As I inched my way up to the wooden box that held the departed ashes I heard an elderly man say as he glanced at the wooden box.
“You know looking at her now she was a lot smaller than I remembered”.

2-I don’t want anyone asking at my funeral where the fire extinguisher is. I’ve often asked to be buried with one to fight off the hell fires.

3-“He died doing what he loved to do” said one minster of the the deceased who died of a drug overdose. My jaw dropped to the floor.

4-“Why is Grampy in a box?” I once asked. Someone said,“We are packing him up and mailing him to heaven. This is his good bye party”.

5-I went to a funeral for a coworker a couple of years back. As the service progressed the minister said we would hear a song, I swear “I found my Thrill on Blueberry Hill” began to play. I had to bend over to get myself under control. The final hymn was Elvis singing: “I’ll have a Blue Christmas Without You.” On that note I had to get up and leave I was giggling so hard.

Our Haunted Heritage Event Page- but tickets soon! October 15th

St James Cemtery Ghost Walk Event Page- October 28th

collage1

Outside Looking in at The Eccentric Family of Henry Stafford — Our Haunted Heritage

The Funeral Train That Went Through Carleton Place — Our Haunted Heritage

Stairway to Heaven in a Cemetery? Our Haunted Heritage

Old Wives Tales of Death — Our Haunted Heritage

Funerals With Dignity in Carleton Place – Just a Surrey with a Fringe on Top —- Our Haunted Heritage

Death by Corset? Bring Out Your Dead and Other Notions! Our Haunted Heritage

Outside Looking in at The Eccentric Family of Henry Stafford — Our Haunted Heritage

Standard

staff

On Saturday I stood across the street looking at the old red brick mansion that stands at 154 Elgin Street in Almonte. For years I have driven past the former Kerry Funeral home that is now up for sale and had no idea about the history of the house until I read a piece on the *Lanark County Genealogical Society site. Henry Stafford and his wife Mary once owned the grand home while operating a small grocery and liquor store in town at the turn of the century. As I gazed inside the windows; I swore I saw small faces peek at me from behind the sheer curtains trying to tell me about the mysteries of that home that now sits empty.

The Staffords were always said to be a well liked family and were noted around town as God fearing folk. Neighbours had no idea that inside that Elgin Street home they were not the average family that they appeared to be. Like the Schwerdtfeger family in Carleton Place, the stories about the children must have carried gossip for years throughout the town of *Almonte.

There were eight children in the Stafford family, and once again like the Schwerdtfeger sisters, not one of them ever married or had a child legitimate, or illegitimate. The children were born and lived a life of a healthy stature, and also became well-educated. “Bill Stafford, the eldest son, was a successful lawyer. Catherine Teresa, Eugenie and Loretto all graduated from St. Mary’s Hospital in Brooklyn, NY, and established themselves in the nursing profession. Emmett Stafford was also successful in his career. He was the Secretary – Treasurer to the Almonte Knitting Company and was also a member of the Board of Directors of the Rosamond Memorial Hospital.   Hanover Stafford worked in his brother Bill’s law firm where he managed the insurance division as well as the office administration”. Eight well-liked, well to do brilliant children—and not one of them chose to marry.

staff1

If they chose not to marry, or have children that is their decision, but what makes the story even more incredible is that each and every child came home to die as adults. Every single one of them left the town of Almonte and began new lives elsewhere in places bigger than they came from. The fact they came back home to their small rural town to spend their last days is peculiar– if not even downright strange. In fact three of them even chose to take their very last breaths in that very stately building on Elgin Street.

Another odd fact is that three of the children died in the same year. In 1950 black crepe/crape must have been constantly tied with white ribbon upon the door. That was an indication that the dreaded visitor of death had entered the home, and borne away another prize. It also deterred any callers from ringing the home on Elgin Street. One son, Emmett, died in April of 1950, then another sister died in June, followed by their sister Loretto in September.

It seems unusual that three of the eight children would all die in the very same year. Like the book Flowers in the Attic, were the siblings so emotionally attached— they could not bear the loss of each other?  Or was it loneliness after one passed that gave the others no will to live. It is also not uncommon in the weeks or days before death for a dying person to speak of being ‘visited’ by dead relatives, friends, groups of children, religious figures or even favourite pets. They will say these apparitions have come to “collect” them or help them let go. Did the others become lonely for their beloved siblings that had passed on– that they too wanted to join them?

I knew if I entered that home I would long to hear whispers from the children discussing moving in and out of ‘reality’, and describing other-worldly realms. Their shadows might speak of embarking on a journey, or may suddenly stare at a point in the room that reminded them of what once was. What happened to the Stafford children will forever remain a mystery, as the last surviving child Teresa took the only remaining answers to her grave in 1959. She and her siblings are buried together in St. Mary’s cemetery in Almonte. May they all rest in peace. One of the most saddest, yet most intriguing, stories I have ever read and retold.

staf

Teresa STAFFORD
St. Mary’s Roman Catholic+, Almonte Cemetery
Lanark Co./Reg./Dist., Ontario

Mary Frances Stafford
Died,July,13,1941
Loretto Stafford
Died,Sept.9,1950
Licouri Stafford
Died,June,14,1950
Emmett Stafford
Died,Apr.14,1950
Eugenie Stafford
Died,Apr.24,1949
Teresa Stafford
Died,Dec.31,1959

*THANK YOU’S GO TO—–FILES FROM: THE LANARK COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY AND A PIECE WRITTEN BY Arlene Stafford 1999

Please note…

Call me stupid but I had NO idea until this morning– that Arlene Stafford is THE Arlene Stafford Wilson who has written books about Lanark County —and her latest one is “Lanark County Connections – Memories Among the Maples”  I am hoping she has learned more about the Staffords as I am obsessed now. Well you know me- I am taking “this emotional wagon” on a journey now.

 

arlene11

 

*Almonte is situated on the River Mississippi, in the township of Ramsay, and is quite a manufacturing town. Where it now stands — a local historian tells us — was known as Shepherd’s Falls ; later on it was called Shipman’s Mills, and Shipman’s Falls. Names seem to have been plentiful, for it received another title, Ballygiblin, then Ramsay ville, and Waterford. To obviate this , confusion a public meeting was held, and the question of calling names was discussed. They believed there was “magic in a name.” The name of a Mexican “General, Al-mon-te, then prominent before the public, was chosen —” Almonte.”

 

The Funeral Train That Went Through Carleton Place — Our Haunted Heritage

Stairway to Heaven in a Cemetery? Our Haunted Heritage

Old Wives Tales of Death — Our Haunted Heritage

Funerals With Dignity in Carleton Place – Just a Surrey with a Fringe on Top —- Our Haunted Heritage

Death by Corset? Bring Out Your Dead and Other Notions! Our Haunted Heritage

Old Wives Tales of Death — Our Haunted Heritage

Standard

Related reading:Dead Ringers –To Live and Die in Morbid Times

1860 Mrs. Howe

BIRD
A bird in the house is a sign of a death. If a robin flies into a room through a window, death will shortly follow.
CORPSE
If a woman is buried in black, she will return to haunt the family. If a dead person’s eyes are left open, he’ll find someone to take with him. Mirrors in a house with a corpse should be covered or the person who sees himself will die next.
DOG
Dogs howling in the dark of night, Howl for death before daylight.
DREAMS
If you dream of death it’s a sign of a birth, if you dream of birth, it’s a sign of death. If you touch a loved one who has died, you won’t have dreams about them

DYING
A person who dies on Good Friday will go right to heaven. A person who dies at midnight on Christmas Eve will go straight to heaven because the gates of heaven are open at that time. All windows should be opened at the moment of death so that the soul can leave. The soul of a dying person can’t escape the body and go to heaven if any locks are locked in the house.

cask

EYE
If the left eye twitches there will soon be a death in the family. If a dead person’s eyes are left open, he’ll find someone to take with him.

FUNERAL
Funerals on Friday portend another death in the family during the year. It’s bad luck to count the cars in a funeral cortege. It’s bad luck to meet a funeral procession head on. Thunder following a funeral means that the dead person’s soul has reached heaven. Nothing new should be worn to a funeral, especially new shoes. Pointing at a funeral procession will cause you to die within the month Pregnant women should not attend funerals.

GRAVE
If the person buried lived a good life, flowers will grow on the grave. If the person was evil, weeds will grow.

MIRROR
If a mirror in the house falls and breaks by itself, someone in the house will die soon.

MOTH
A white moth inside the house or trying to enter the house means death.

PHOTOGRAPH
If 3 people are photographed together, the one in the middle will die first.

THIRTEEN
If 13 people sit down at a table to eat, one of them will die before the year is over.

UMBRELLA
Dropping an umbrella on the floor means that there will be a murder in the house.

Our Haunted Heritage Event Page- but tickets soon! October 15th

St James Cemetery Ghost Walk Event Page- October 28th

collage1

hauntedheritage

cemeterywalkPhoto from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Tales of the Tombstones — The Crozier Children

Standard

The story below is from the Fairview Cemetery on Davidson Street, Listowel, Ontario

jessie

Jessie Keith died on October 19, 1894, 13 years old “while defending her honour” – She was born December 20, 1880, and was the daughter of William and Jane (McGeorge) Keith of Elma Twp. Jessie was brutally murdered at the edge of a woodlot near the railway tracks in Elma Twp., just east of Listowel on the way home from running an errand. Almede Chattel, a tramp from Ste. Hyacinthe Quebec was arrested a few days after the murder, convicted of the crime
and hanged in Stratford jail on May 31, 1895.

The monument to Jessie was unveiled in May 1896. The Goddess Flora (goddess of flowers) dropping a rose on the grave was sculpted out of Cerara marble in Italy and waserected on a Peterhead granite pedestal from Aberdeen Scotland on an Ohio free stone base, by R. T. Kemp of Listowel. The monument was restored in June 2006 by Stratford Memorials in Listowel.  Survived by parents; sister, Ida and brother, Alexander.  Her sister Ida died 2 years later February 26, 1898, 19 years old, “with a broken heart over the tragic loss of her sister”

A statue as beautiful as the crime was ugly

‘The story reflects so well on the townsfolk of the region, the way they kept their tempers and brought the killer to justice.’ CLICK

There is nothing more tragic than the death of a child. In researching St. James Cemetery in Carleton Place for our Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Cemetery walk October 28th. I have come across a few names I need to pay homage to. Like Cecil Cummings and Margaret Violet King– they need to be remembered.

And so I begin research on the Crozier children who all died in the same time frame within a 4 year period.

crozier

I found it odd that a small ceramic dog bed was placed at each gravestone as they had died in the 1870s. Today I found out that a Jewish lady comes to visit their gravestones on a regular basis after finding them one day. Planting flowers or leaving anything but a stone is not a Jewish tradition. It is also tradition that visiting the graves of others who are buried there is not done. Not visiting other graves is out of respect to the person who is being buried, as well as to the person previously interred.

So why does she do it? She also scatters graham cracker crumbs around the grave and gets annoyed when birds begin to eat them.Today I found out why she does that. When the cemetery would close for the evening, some mourners would come and sprinkle crumbs on their loved ones plot as some sort of tradition so that animals would keep them company during the night.

Stay tuned for more. Remember our Haunted Heritage Event at the Museum is October 15th and the Cemetery Walk is Oct 28th

crozier2

 

crozierqq

 -

Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Oct 1894, Thu  •  Page 1