Tag Archives: happy valley

Documenting Homes –353 Lanark — Carleton Place — I Deem this a Historical Building.

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Documenting Homes –353 Lanark — Carleton Place — I Deem this a Historical Building.

Documenting House in Carleton Place and I agree with Dan Williams this is a historical building.. truly.. for generations..

Tom EdwardsTed Hurdis Is this Art’s house?

Penny TraffordTom Edwards Garry says he recognizes the driveway! Lol

Tom EdwardsPenny Trafford Never had a tour of the house. LOL Always just inside the door

Ted HurdisTom Edwards pretty sure it is. I recognized the back door. Lol

Ted HurdisArt had a little wooden window installed that slid over after you knocked.

Tom EdwardsTed Hurdis He should have been President of the BIA. Never was outta stock and kept his clientele very happy.

David Munro199 For a house in Happy Valley ? 

Dan WilliamsDavid Munro Yeah it’s a lot but it’s a historical building!

Dan WilliamsWhen my son visited Art he told him that he was the 3rd generation of our family he had served! I played a lot of golf with Art and he told me a lot of stories and had some awesome one liners. He was great fun to play with.

Cate JohnsonI recognize that house from years gone by LOL. Like Tom, just inside the back door

Karen RobertsonNext door to where I grew up. If that house could talk.

Dan WilliamsI’m pretty sure Sparky Gilbeau told me the house was gone. Maybe he can help.

Bonnie MitchellDan Williams oh, it’s still there! Ive seen it recently. (I also lived next door growing up)

Happy Valley in Carleton Place–

So, we have read about an area around Santiago Street called Chiselville in the 1800s a few months ago. But where was Happy Valley? Well chances are if you talk to someone who has lived her a spell, they will tell you that Happy Valley was just off Townline Street in the Lanark and Carleton Street area, where you could get yourself some illegal beverages no questions asked.

I am still waiting for some stories to come out of the locals to write about this area–so if you know of any stories about the white lightening of Carleton Place do tell please. I am all ears!

Also read-Not Happy in Happy Valley? Head up to the French Line for some Sweet Marie

Did You Know Where Happy Valley was in Carleton Place?

The Scene of the Crime – It was 68 years ago today

Did You Know we had a %^&* Creek in Carleton Place?

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Last night we had a real round table discussion about Happy Valley on The Tales of Carleton Place. But, as I keep telling everyone, we will not get down to the bottom of things until we keep dishing around the pickle barrel.

Peter Redden thought  the Neelin Street area was called Happy Valley, and boy everyone was set straight pretty quickly, and that is what I like. Happy Valley will always be off Townline, but  now we have the new facts that the Neelin Street area was once called Treasure Valley as Wendy LeBlanc told us:

Wendy LeBlancLinda, When I was a kid in the 50s to mid-60s, the area know as Happy Valley was the area along Carleton and Lanark Streets north of the Town Line. Many hard-working families lived there – the Dugdales, Percys, Gilbaults, Bairds, Omearas; Thompsons, Flynns – and I remember going to Victoria and Prince of Wales Schools with kids from all of those families. My father – who grew up on Campbell Street – referred to the area that is now in the arena property as Treasure Valley; I recall walking the area that was not covered by the town dump (currently the ball fields in front of the arena) with Dad and particularly remember a pear tree growing there.

We have to also love my gal Joann Voyce and her remarks that that particular area was called SH1T CREEK as the sewage plant drained around there. I don’t think I will ever ever forget that one.

Peter Redden added his thoughts and especially noted were the veterans of Carleton Place:

“The memories of a child, 50 years later.  I remember both places now: Happy and Treasure, when I lived there.  I suspect the gobsmack is about our vets. and I truly remember them as left behind and then seeing them on Remembrance Day with their blazers and medals.  I was heart broken as an 8 year old.  But that was a reality of everywhere.”

 

If you have other memories, please add them

RELATED READING

 

Not Happy in Happy Valley? Head up to the French Line for some Sweet Marie

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Holy cow, I don’t want to get in trouble, so this blog is for information purposes only! What you choose to do with it– well, don’t tell me. Before you start, check the laws in your local area, some places you cant even own a still let alone use it to make a drinkable product.

 

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                           St. Declans- Bytown.net

Seems when Happy Valley off of Townline in our fair town of Carleton Place couldn’t provide the liquid jollies, it was mentioned in the newspaper that a few of our prominent citizens headed up to the French Line where they were introduced to Sweet Marie. No folks, Marie was not a lassie, but a liquid distilled from potatoes, and it was said to have a wallop or kick to it equal to that of a cantankerous mule.

 

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This recipe is from the Moonshine Recipe Library

Ingredients
  • This recipe is adjustable. If you would like to make 5 or 20 gallons, easily half or double recipe.
  • 10gal. of Fermenter
  • 20lbs. of White Sugar
  • 2.5lbs. of Potatoes
  • 1 Can (12oz) of Tomato Paste
  • 1 Lemon (1 Large, or 3 Small)
  • 2 Tablespoons of Baker’s Yeast (Ex. Fleischmann’s or Red Star)
  • Option One:
  • For a great fermenter use Brute trashcans.
  • Two: Check your local donut shop free or cheap old filling buckets. Go for the five gallon size.
  • Three: You can also buy brand new five gallon paint buckets, making sure that they are plastic. Note: Later on while making 10 gallons of mash it is easier to mix in one bucket but the downside is that it becomes very hard to move a 10 gallon bucket after filling with mix. Splitting mix into two 5 gallon buckets makes it easier to move but harder to mix

Related reading:

From the Files of The Canadian — Who is This? Where is This?

 

 

 

 

historicalnotes

There is today and has been since the mid 1830s a French settlement in Darling Township. It is still known as the French Line. The French from Lower Canada were among the first in the area as they made up part of the crew of the survey teams for the original surveys. The greater part, however, arrived here as a direct result of the political strife of 1837-38. The village of St. Benoit, Cte. Deux Montages, was burned to the ground in reprisal for the affair of St. Eustace. The families Majore, Cardinal and Lalonde all came from St. Benoit and even as I was growing up the story of “La Grande Brulee” was still being told. Others (the Rangers) came from Coteau du Lac. The economy was as chaotic then as now and they came because of the work commencing in the timber industry in Lanark. Some arrived by way of the Upper Ottawa and the rest came via Brockville and Perth.- Lanark County Genealogy Society

Did You Know Where Happy Valley was in Carleton Place?

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From an article in Prohibition Canada

To say that not everyone in Canada supported prohibition is an enormous understatement.  One has to understand that when prohibition was enacted in most provinces, it was the circumstances of the referendums (many men were at war, many women were voting, it was seen as being patriotic to support prohibition) that tipped the vote on the side of majority.  Nevertheless, liquor was banned, yet many still wanted liquor.

There were numerous ways to get around the system of provincial prohibition, and just hide from the government.  Some of these places and tactics include: doctors’ prescriptions, speakeasies, or blind pigs, and bootlegging among others.  One way people tried to obtain alcohol legally was through a doctor’s prescription.  If given a doctor’s prescription, that person could go to the local drugstore and fill the prescription by buying alcohol, as at the time it was common to drink alcohol if one was sick.

In Ontario from 1923-1924, doctors had issued a total of 810,000 prescriptions for alcohol, which would seem suspicious, but the outbreak of the Spanish Flu at the time accounted for many actually being ill and others pretending they had influenza just for the liquor.  As public sale of alcohol was outlawed, the drinking went underground to private places not everyone could access.

Speakeasies, or blind pigs, were private saloons set up during prohibition that were accessible only by password and were highly popular because they were bootlegging (the sale of alcohol as a beverage) at a time were alcohol was not as easy to come by.  Despite the fact that the sale of alcohol was banned, these speakeasies still obtained good liquor from brewers and distillers through bribery, and falsified contracts.  Though not all liquor going around at that time was good liquor, some who could not obtain real liquor, produced their own moonshine, which was homemade liquor.

 

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So, we have read about an area around Santiago Street called Chiselville in the 1800s a few months ago. But where was Happy Valley? Well chances are if you talk to someone who has lived her a spell, they will tell you that Happy Valley was just off Townline Street in the Lanark and Carleton Street area, where you could get yourself some illegal booze no questions asked.

I am still waiting for some stories to come out of the locals to write about this area–so if you know of any stories about the white lightening of Carleton Place do tell please. I am all ears!

 

historicalnotes

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal07 Apr 1950, FriPage 12