Tag Archives: H.D. Gilmour

Before and After on Lake Ave West — H. D. Gilmour

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1936 Carleton Place Directory courtesy of The Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum. Not only was H.D. Gilmour a builder in Carleton Place– his wife’s family was part of Almonte history. Below is one of his homes on Lake Ave West that is presently being renovated.

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Mrs.H. D. Gilmour of Carleton Place was a niece of the late Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Shipman, with whom she spent her early years. Mr. L. W. Shipman was a grandson of Daniel Shipman and the last of the Shipmans to live in Almonte. He lived to be quite an age, and many will remember him riding his bicycle or driving his car around town when he was in his eighties. Over the years he could be seen bicycling, or in later years driving his car, out to the old cemetery, there to work cutting the grass and weeds and brush – trying to keep the resting place of his ancestors in a decent appearance. He had evidently been obliged to constitute himself a one-man cemetery committee, custodian and caretaker for the upkeep of the cemetery. Since then there has been no one.–Almonte Gazette 1970.

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More on the Gimour family from the North Lanark Regional Museum

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Appleton’s Twisted Chimney

Digital Photo, Fall 2012
Donated by Sarah Bennett

This digital photograph from 2012 shows the once famous log cabin cottage in Appleton owned by the Gilmour family (left side of photo). Here is the full story, written by Kenneth Godfrey:

My grandfather, Harry D. Gilmour built this cottage, and put a ‘beehive’ shaped stone fireplace into one corner. He asked Beatty Hamilton, a well-known bricklayer from Carleton Place, to build its chimney, but literally with a “twist”. Beatty was at first not pleased with the idea, as he feared that folks might think it a poor job on his part, but H.D. (who enjoyed verbal and visual jokes) prevailed, and persuaded him to build it as a spiral, and I think it stood for many years until a fairly recent renovation, and alas, the chimney (like many other unique quirks from the past) is no more.

More on Beatty Hamilton from Carleton Place from Jennifer Fenwick Irwin from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Museum.

“Saw your story about Hamilton Beatty the brick layer”. This was where he lived at 274 Joseph Street, before he covered the original siding with brick. Also attached is a close up photo of the  house from two summers ago when they installed limestone lintels on the windows, and it shows the clapboard underneath the present brick.

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Buy Linda Secaspina’s Books— Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac– Tilting the Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place and 4 others on Amazon or Amazon Canada or Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street in Carleton Place