Tag Archives: geneology

So Who was Wilma Stevens of Carleton Place? Nichols Family History

Standard
So Who was Wilma Stevens of Carleton Place? Nichols Family History
Wilma Stevens, a Carleton Place girl who married Thomas Nichols. I found this picture in someone’s collection and had to find out who she was. Everyone deserves to be remembered.
  • Wilma Alice Stevens and Thomas Ernest NicholsMarried on Friday, April 20, 1928 in Carleton Place , Ontario.Later I found out that later she had married Nelson McWilliams after Mr. Nichols died and I also discovered she was related to Ray Paquette.

Your Wilma Stevens post this morning brought back a “flood” of memories. This time of year my brother Tedd and I would be spending most of the summer at Tom and Wilma’s cottage-at Longview Island on Mississippi Lake, opposite Squaw Point on the 9th line of Beckwith. The original cottage was built in 1938 I believe and included a wood shed, an ice house, and an outhouse with a boathouse on the mainland accessed from the 9th line. The Nichols owned half the island and later built a cottage on a point facing the mainland which they made available to relatives. It was recently listed for sale as “170 Longview Island” although, it has been substantially renovated and updated from what I remember as a boy!

Following Uncle Tom’s death, the cottages and land were sold to Harry Probert who had plans for sub dividing the property and selling lots. I don’t know the circumstances surrounding subsequent events but the cottage and a portion of the land became the property of Tom’s son, Bill. He owned it for a number of years and subsequently sold the main cottage and what property remained to the current owner. Mr. Probert Was able to sell a lot to Mike and Irene Papworth (nee Chamney) and I believe the cottage on the point to the Sample family from Richmond.  You must remember that I was not in Carleton Place during these later years, so my recollections are second hand and therefore probably  not accurate.

In later years, Aunt Wilma lived her final years in the seniors residence at 126 Sussex Street.

By the way my mother’s name was Viola not Violet..

Regards,
Ray Paquette

1921 Census

Name:Wilma Alice Stevens
Gender:Female
Racial or Tribal Origin:English
Nationality:Canada
Marital Status:Single
Age:16
Birth Year:abt 1905
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Date:1 Jun 1921
House Number:68
Residence Street or Township:Beckwith
Residence City, Town or Village:Twp Beckwith
Residence District:Lanark
Residence Province or Territory:Ontario
Residence Country:Canada
Relation to Head of House:Daughter
Father’s Name:William Henry Stevens
Father Birth Place:Ontario
Mother’s Name:Alice Elizabeth Stevens
Mother Birth Place:Ontario
Can Speak English?:Yes
Can Speak French?:No
Religion:Baptist
Can Read?:Yes
Can Write?:Yes
Months at School:X6-89
Occupation:Stenographer
Employment Type:2 Wage Earner
Nature of Work:House Work B
Income:520
Out of Work?:No
Duration of Unemployment:0
Duration of Unemployment (Illness):0
Municipality:Beckwith
Enumeration District:97
Sub-District:Beckwith (Township)
Sub-District Number:5
Enumerator:J. H. Edwards.
District Description:Polling Division No. 1 – Comprising the Six Front Concessions of the said municipality from lot 1 to 18 inclusive in the township of Beckwith
Neighbours:View others on page
Line Number:7
Family Number:70
Household MembersAgeRelationshipWilliam Henry Stevens54HeadAlice Elizabeth Stevens47WifeLorne H Stevens12SonWilliam Alleen Stevens9SonLloyd George Stevens5DaughterIsobel N Stevens18DaughterWilma Alice Stevens16DaughterAnnie Eliza Stevens15DaughterMary Viola Stevens3Daughter

Name:Wilma Alice Stevens
Age:22
Birth Year:abt 1906
Birth Place:Carleton Place, Ontario
Marriage Date:20 Apr 1928
Marriage Place:Carleton, Ontario, Canada
Father:William Henry Stevens
Mother:Alice Elizabeth Hawkins
Spouse:Thomas Ernest Nichols

Name:
Wilma Alice Stevens Nichols
Cemetery:
St. James Anglican Church, Carleton Place
Burial Place:
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Notes:
Thomas Ernest Nichols 1901 – 1959 His Wife Wilma Alice Stevens 1904 – 1983 Nichols

STEVENS, William Allan

Suddenly at Ottawa, Ontario, on Monday, May 14, 1990, William Lloyd Stevens, in his 79th year, beloved husband of Carmel Douglas. Dear father of Joan (Mrs. Ken Wright) of Barrie, Lois Anne (Mrs. Lee Brebner) of Oakville. Loving grandfather to Alison Brebner, Judi Wright, Steven Wright and his wife Nadine, Dear brother of Vi Paquette of Carleton Place. Predeceased by his brothers Harold, Lorne and Lloyd, and his sisters Isobel, Anna, Wilma Nichols McWilliams and Edith Hughes. Resting at the Tubman Funeral Home, Westboro Chapel, 403 Richmond Road, on Wednesday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Service in the chapel on Thursday at 1 p.m. Interment Tennants Cemetery, Lanark Township. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 May 1983, Tue  •  Page 22

So who was her second husband Thomas Ernest Nichols? His father was William Abner Nichols– see The World of William Abner Nichols and grandfather was Abner Nichols–Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

Name:Thomas Ernest Nichols
Age:27
Birth Year:abt 1901
Birth Place:Carleton Place, Ontario
Marriage Date:20 Apr 1928
Marriage Place:Carleton, Ontario, Canada
Father:William Abner Nichols
Mother:Catherine Alice Hands
Spouse:Wilma Alice Stevens
Heritage Homes Disputes- Abner Nichols House

The World of William Abner Nichols

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

An Amusing Abner Nichols and His Boat

Before and After at Centennial Park

Splinters of Sinders Nichols and Brides

Looking for Information– Nichols Family History

Oh Dear, William Penfold and my AB Positive Blood

Standard
Oh Dear, William Penfold and my AB Positive Blood

William Penfold—my 4th great grandfather

In researching my lineage it seems I just can’t get a break. I am the way I am for a reason. I come from a bunch of colourful characters that my gynaecologist warned me about. My gynaecologist ?? Yes, when you are researching your ancestry talk to your gynaecologist. Don’t you?

My great grandfather was in charge of British Music Halls then ran away to America leaving the family. Another was a lady in waiting to Queen Victoria with loose skirts. A great grandfather was a lawyer who took on scalawags and now it seems William Penfold my 4th great grandfather was a bit of a smuggler. How is your day going?

So I blame AB positive blood……

Was it Because I Have AB Positive Blood?

I was told by my doctor once that 10% of the world’s population has AB Positive blood and it’s where I get my “oddness” from. Funny, I never thought I was odd! All I knew was I didn’t want to end up in the military like my Father had daily visions of. It had come to his attention many times that I was different, and I stuck out like a sore thumb in my rural hometown in Quebec. When your father is a prominent municipal fixture, and the only electrician in town, word travels around like a bush fire that your daughter is weird or a character as they called me. Honestly, there are lots of people like myself, and then there are those that pretend not to be.

My friend Wanita Bates said something once that made complete sense to me after all these years.

‘Linda, some of us have gifts to feel what is going to be in style, and you and I are one of them.” When I had my store I was way ahead of fashion trends, but when major retailers grabbed on to it and money making was involved–I was long out of it. 

So after heated arguments with my father, I left home and headed to Montreal, Quebec. I attended fashion design school on Bleury Street where I became instantly bored. Instead of great 60’s fashion and styles that I was expecting my teacher made me make pattern after pattern of 1950’s styles. After classes, I would venture into store after store, just absorbing the culture and the fashion.

After almost completing my course, I decided I needed to find a job. Well Twiggy, Mary Quant, and all the Carnaby Street styles were afloat and guess who was wearing them? My Dad was getting remarried and gave me $75 dollars to buy something for his wedding. Being the drama queen I purchased a black velvet Twiggy mini dress and a black floor length Dr. Zhivago style coat. It was a real floor duster with black faux fur trim, and Omar Sharif would have been proud.

So when I went for job interviews I insisted on wearing the same “ultimate”outfit I wore to the wedding. Most clothing manufactures were not into the “Carnaby look” yet and I was told time after time, “Kid, get yourself another coat”. In layman’s terms I was scaring all these fashion people with my wardrobe. Defiant, I kept wearing it.

A few weeks later I got my dream job. It was working for trendy Le Chateau on Ste. Catherine Street hemming pants. It was their first store, and their clothing styles were worn by anyone who wanted to be someone. I was right up their alley– or so I thought.

Sadly, I only got to work there for about 6 months, as I was basically hired for the Christmas rush. In those few months I got to meet the Montreal trendsetters, wore “Gabardine Mod” pants, and so began my lifetime eating disorder. But, it was a time I will never forget, and believe fashion has never been so exciting. Just being able to sneak into the Boiler Room on Crescent Street and watch fashion happen was mind blowing.

For some reason only known to God, I was just not ‘cool” enough to work as a salesperson in their store, and rent had to be paid. In the middle of the coldest winters ever I hauled my derriere all over the Island of Montreal looking for a job.

I finally found a job at The Fine Togs Clothing Co. It was a childrens manufacture run by Blossom and her husband Hy Hyman. Actually Blossom ran the company and Hy smiled a lot and played golf. They thought I was a spunky kid and if I had stayed there, I would have probably be retiring from the company about now. They were good people.

If my grandmother Mary was my foundation for my hard working ethics, then Saul Cohen was the drywall. He expected me to arrive at 7:30 every morning and I had to ask to leave around 7:45 pm at the end of the day. The man worked me to the bone, and I just chalked it up to experience. I worked in the cutting department, sewing, swept floors, did book work, and worked in the show room. There was not one stone that he did not make me turn over, and turn over again.

‘Sauly” was relentless, and when he found out that my Mother had been born to a Jewish Mother  he made sure I knew about my heritage. Anytime I asked to leave early he would turn around and say to me,

“Do you know how our people suffered?”.

Enough said.

One day he decided that I was ready to represent the company selling their clothing line at the Place Bonaventure clothing mart. He told me I had to have, no, must wear, something conservative.

So I did what every other girl my age did. I went to Sears and bought “The Suit”. It was navy blue, a box jacket complete with a knee length pleated skirt. I had red shoes and red earrings to match. That was the last time I wore something so conservative. It just wasn’t me.

I applaud Saul for everything he taught me and how someone actually got me into something that wasn’t black. Word got around the clothing market about me and I was soon hired by a competitive children’s wear company run by Palestinians. Yup, I was no peace maker between the people of Israel and Palestine, but this was a time I will never ever forget.

Was it Because I Have AB Positive Blood? Basic Element #2

I finally got my wish to be an assistant fashion designer, and quickly found out I was going to collect a pension before I became a designer. Lessons that were learned: when management says your designs basically stink– don’t believe them. A year after I left a certain firm, I saw my ‘unsuitable’ designs in the Eaton’s catalogue making lots of money for them.

Disillusioned, I left Montreal for love in Sherbrooke, Quebec. Again, mentors in life were: my Grandmother, Saul Cohen, and owner of Au Bon Marche–Morty Vineberg. I learned the retail trade from the bottom up from him, and to this day, if there is a spot for just 50 items, and I have 300; I can whip that into shape as fast as you can say “bargain designer clothes”.

Morty opened a discount clothing store in what he called “the dark side of Ottawa”. Today, I believe they call that Vanier, or is it part of Ottawa now? He told me how people would not cross the Cummings Bridge and shop in Vanier. Mr. and Mrs. Vineberg wanted to be the first, besides the seasonal swans, to get Ottawa consumers to cross that darn bridge. I think if there hadn’t been an “interior crime spree” going on in the store, again, I would have stayed.

Each day I had to turn my eye, and to be honest, I did tell Morty in certain terms, that all was not well in that former Bingo hall. But, it had gotten to a point that I needed to spread my wings, and so barely a year after the Vinebergs had transferred me, I quit. Ange, was working as a project manager for Olympia and York’s fabulous 240 Sparks, but he encouraged me to open my own business and a week later he too left his job.

Was it Because I Have AB Positive Blood? Basic Element #1

Flash Cadilac was created and flourished through creativity. I was lucky I was able to pursue my dreams– but I had never taken the word “no” for an answer. In fact I had never listened to anyone who tried to talk me out of my views on life, fashion, and being yourself. At age 15 I marched into the Vice Principal’s office who doubled as a guidance counselor and told him I would not be returning to school the next year. I also asked for my $10 dollar school book deposit back.

I can still remember to this day where his desk was positioned in the room, and the look on his face that was partially hidden by his oversized spectacles. In a crisp but curt tone he scolded me.

“My dear Miss Knight, what golden path have you chosen for yourself?”

“I am going to be a fashion designer Sir,” I said emphatically.

He got out of chair and perched himself on the edge of my chair and asked me loudly if I was jesting.

Jesting?Jesting?

I quickly realized had I told him I had gotten pregnant by the Keebler Elves it would have gone over better. He continued in a loud monotonous drone telling me young ladies became either nurses or teachers. 

The elderly gentleman suggested maybe I look into the world of home economics if “I enjoyed sewing”. Seeing most of us either skipped our “Home Ec” class because of the Suzy Homemaker recipes or stared at the teacher’s legs while she spoke because we knew it made her uneasy, that notion was definitely out.

With that I stood up and again I asked him to cut me a cheque for $10.00. With my Grade 9 education, a shake of his hand, and $10.00 the world was now my oyster.

William Penfold—my 4th great grandfather

When William Penfold was born in 1791 in Itchingfield, Sussex, England, his father, John, was 32 and his mother, Elizabeth, was 32. He married Hannah Humphrey on February 18, 1821, in Hartfield, Sussex, England. They had 12 children in 23 years. He died on April 13, 1872, in Hartfield, Sussex, England, having lived a long life of 81 years.

The Standard
London, Greater London, England
24 Oct 1857, Sat  •  Page 3

What is a Chandler-

a dealer or trader in supplies, provisions, etc., of a specialized type:a ship chandler.a retailer of provisions, groceries, etc.

CLIPPED FROMThe Standard
London, Greater London, England
01 Feb 1850, Fri  •  Page 8

  1. William Penfold (1791-1872)4th great-grandfather grandfather of me…
  2. Emily Penfold Hider Friend (1823-1900)mother of …
  3. Harriet Hider Crittenden (1850-1910)mother of …
  4. Arthur Crittenden (1873-1954)father of …
  5. George Arthur Crittenden (1896-1970)father of …
  6. Bernice Ethelyn Crittenden (1927-1963)mother of …
  7. Linda Susan Seccaspina (1951-)You

Is it all Relative? Linda Knight Seccaspina

A Letter to my Grandchildren April 14, 2020 — Linda Knight Seccaspina

We Are Family

Linda’s Countdown to the Royal Wedding–Day 2-May 13th Mother’s Day

When the Skeletons Finally Come Out of the Closet “D-I-V-O-R-C-E”

Standard
When the Skeletons Finally Come Out of the Closet “D-I-V-O-R-C-E”

My grandmother on the maternal side was Gladys Ethelyn Griffin Crittenden. She was born and grew up in Laconia, Belnap New Hampshire. She married my Grandfather George Crittenden in 1917 in Montreal and had my mother in 1929. She died at the age of 39 and no mention of her daughter was mentioned in her obit.

The Gazette
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
15 Apr 1935, Mon  •  Page 7

When I was a child I heard whispers that I am sure children were not supposed to hear. I knew my Grandfather had a few women that were not my Grandmothers, but one was not supposed to talk about things like that. For years I wondered why the name Cecile was said with a horrified face.

One day at a 10 am Church service I was sitting with my grandmother in our usual pew when someone with heavy perfume tapped my grandmother on the shoulder. My grandmother quickly looked at me in horror and her lips became pursed. The strange woman waved to me and my grandmother clutched my hand very quickly and told me not to speak to her.

Well, I thought, here we are in a place of God and my grandmother is not being too neighbourly. The church service ended and we left quickly. It did not stop the lady and she followed quickly behind us. In fact, she followed us all the way home, and into the verandah where she sat down on one of the chairs. My grandmother instructed me to go into the kitchen while she talked to this woman.

The woman quickly vanished after my grandmother spoke to her and I don’t think I ever saw her again. My grandfather had just passed away in Seattle and apparently it had something to do with that. My grandmother said she wanted money and expected to be in the will as she was “Cecile”. I never found out who “Cecile” really was until today. I just assumed that she was one of my grandfather’s former girlfriends.

My mother from the ages of 14-18 was in the Ste Agathe Sanitarium because she had tuberculosis and had one lung removed. I heard the stories many times about my Grandfather’s wife that had burned all my mother’s things and sold her piano because she had convinced my grandfather that my mother was coming back. But was that true? When my mother was released she never did go back to Park Extension in Montreal, and instead went to Cowansville, Quebec to work at Bruck Mills.

Apparently my mother not coming home and being an only child caused a rift between my grandfather and Cecile and the marriage went south. Really south.There was no uniform federal divorce law in Canada until 1968 and this was the very early 50s. Instead, there was a patch-work of divorce laws in the different provinces, depending on the laws in force in each province at the time it joined Confederation. In Quebec, the Civil Code of Lower Canada declared that “Marriage can only be dissolved by the natural death of one of the parties; while both live it is indissoluble”.

The English Matrimonial Causes Act 1857 provided that a husband could sue on grounds of adultery alone, but a wife would have to allege adultery together with other grounds.The only way for an individual to get divorced in the provinces where there was no divorce law—as well as in cases where the domicile of the parties was unclear—was to apply to the federal Parliament for a private bill of divorce. These bills were primarily handled by the Senate of Canada where a special committee would undertake an investigation of a request for a divorce. If the committee found that the request had merit, the marriage would be dissolved by an Act of Parliament.

So today, I found out that my Grandfather had to apply to Parliament for a divorce on the grounds of adultery.

Montreal, Quebec, Canada
30 Jun 1953, Tue  •  Page 24

Of George Arthur Crittenden, of Montreal, Quebec; praying for the passage of an Act to dissolve his marriage with Cecile David Crittenden. 1953 November

MONDAY, 7th December, 1953. The Standing Committee on Divorce beg leave to make their one hundred and twentieth Report, as follows:- 1. With respect to the petition of George Arthur Crittenden, of the city of Montreal, in the province of Quebec, clerk, for an Act to dissolve his marriage with Cecile David Crittenden, the Committee find that the requirements of the Rules of the Senate have been complied with in all material respects. 2. The Committee recommend the passage of an Act to dissolve the said marriage. All which is respectfully submitted. W. M. ASELTINE, Acting Chairman.

Crittenden. George Arthur Petition, 40; reported, 125; adopted, 136. Bill (N-4)-lst, 2nd and/3rd, 153-154. Passage by Corns., 245. Message, 246. R.A., 279. Ch. 161.

So I am assuming it was easier for a man to get a divorce from his wife in those days and since adultery was the only way to get a divorce– the woman had to suck it up.

So, maybe the story was all wrong from the beginning and I am starting to give Cecile the benefit of the doubt even though she was not kind to my mother. Maybe she did have an agreement with my grandfather that he said: ‘ If I get this divorce using you as the ‘ bad guy” I will leave you something in my will”.

Quebec has been slow on giving civil rights to married women: until 1954, a married woman was legally listed as “incapable of contracting”, together with minors, “interdicted persons”, “persons insane or suffering a temporary derangement of intellect … or who by reason of weakness of understanding are unable to give a valid consent”, and “persons who are affected by civil degradation”

The removal of the married woman from this list, however, did little to improve her legal situation, due to marriage laws which restricted her rights and gave the husband legal authority over her: legal incapacity was still the general rule until 1964. A woman did not have equal rights with her husband regarding children until 1977.

So why else would she have turned up after he had passed away 20 years later– had not something been promised to her for a facility in the divorce. After all- she was labelled the bad guy in family stories.

I guess we will never know now, but now I know the rest of the story.

Park Extension Montreal

.

Did you know?

It has been argued that one of the explanations for the current high rates of cohabitation in Quebec is that the traditionally strong social control of the church and the Catholic doctrine over people’s private relations and sexual morality, resulting in conservative marriage legislation and resistance to legal change, has led the population to rebel against traditional and conservative social values and avoid marriage altogether. Since 1995, the majority of births in Quebec are outside of marriage; as of 2015, 63% of births were outside of marriage.

Related reading

Let’s All Go to The Drive-in!

Patriotic Stink Bugs Celebrating the 4th of July as an Ameri-Canadian Child

Is it all Relative? Linda Knight Seccaspina

I Am Who I am Because of You

My Name is Bernice — A Letter to a Daughter

The Old Church in Island Brook That Needs a Home

What Do You Do if You Just Can’t Walk Right In?

We Are Family

The Summer of 1964

Did They Try to Run the World?

Gravelle Toshack Almonte Farmer Killed By Train

Standard
Gravelle Toshack Almonte Farmer Killed By Train

Added by David T
Ottawa Journal Saturday 20 April 1929

Almonte Farmer Killed By Train
Gravelle Toshack Meets Instant Death When Horses Are Frightened
ALMONTE, April 20. – While crossing the railway line at Wylie’s crossing, Almonte, this morning, Grevelle Toshack, a prosperous farmer of the distric, was knocked down and instantly killed by the 10.17 C.P.R. train.
Mr. Doshack was driving a tam of horses and ad stopped at the Producer’s Dairy to wait for his son. As the train approached the horses, evidently frightened, ran right into its path and the vehicle was shattered. One of the horses was cut in two, while the other escaped.
The victim was well known in the township of Ramsay, where he had been a farmer for many years

Ottawa Citizen 20 April 1929.

Farmer is Instantly Killed by a Train!
ALMONTE, April 20. When his horses became frightened at the Pembroke C.P.R. train and ran onto the railway track at Wylies Milling Company here shortly after 10 o’clock this morning, Gravelle Toshack, a farmer in the township of Ramsay, four miles from here, was struck by the train and instantly killed.
Mr. Toshack was thrown about fifteen feet from the track and when picked up was dead. One of the horses was also killed and the wagon completely demolished.
Mr. Toshack with his son had come into town and had stopped at the Producers’ Dairy, which is close to the track. His son went into the dairy and during his absence the train passed through the town. The horses became frightened and started to run away. Mr. Toshack, not realizing that the train was so close, did not jump from the wagon.
It is likely that an inquest will be opened this afternoon.
Name:Greville E Toshack
Age:27
Birth Year:abt 1872
Birth Place:Ramsey, Ontario
Marriage Date:24 Jan 1899
Marriage Place:Canada, Lanark, Ontario
Father:John Toshack
Mother:Janet Young
Spouse:Annie Snedden

GRAVELLE TOSHACK INSTANTLY KILLED AT MAIN STREET RAILWAY- CROSSING

Name:






Greville Ewen Toshack
Gender:M (Male)
Birth Date:20 Mar 1871
Birth Place:Ramsay, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Death Date:20 Apr 1929
Death Place:Almonte, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Cemetery:Auld Kirk Cemetery
Burial or Cremation Place:Mississippi Mills, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Has Bio?:Y
Father:John G. Toshack
Mother:Janet Toshack
Spouse:Annie Toshack
Children:Annie Marion ToshackRobert Ewen Toshack

1929, Friday April 26, The Almonte Gazette front page
GREVILLE E. TOSHACK INSTANTLY KILLED AT THE MAIN STREET RAILWAY. CROSSING
Community Stirred by Tragic Death of Well Known Ramsay Farmer
Horses Bolted Over Track In Front of Train Greville Toshack Unable To Control Team and Was Killed
Team was Standing When Train Whistled Engine Crashed Into Wagon and One Horse Was Killed
Remarkable Concourse at Funeral and at the Auld Kirk Cemetery Where Interment Was Made. Mr Toshack
Was Fine Athlete in His Younger Days.


Greville E. Toshack, prominent Ramsay farmer, was instantly killed at the C.P.R. crossing on Main Street on Saturday morning shortly after 10 o’clock. His team had been standing at the Producer’s Dairy which is close to the railway track, which the east-bound local came along. The whistle of the locomotive evidently startled the horses. They bolted up Main Street. The engine struck the wagon. One of the horses was killed. The details of the tragedy were considered at the inquest on Monday evening. It seems that this team all winter had made the trip almost every day from the Toshack farm to the Producer’s Dairy and had never shown signs of uneasiness at the passing of trains. On the fatal occasion Mr Toshack was sitting sideways on the single board between the front and hind wheels of the wagon. He held the reins and was waiting for his son Robert who was inside the Dairy building. At the curve, which is some 600 yards from the crossing the locomotive whistled and, according to Mr Andrew Cochrane, of Almonte, who was talking to him at the time, the horses started up. They stopped for a second or so and then bolted across the track just as the train approached. Mr Toshack’s back was toward the incoming train. Apparently he did not hear the whistle, and was bestowing all his attention on the effort to control his horses. The locomotive whistled, the bell was ringing continuously, and the emergency brakes were applied but the tragedy could not be avoided. Mr Toshack was thrown from the wagon on to the siding at the Wylie Mill and his head struck the steel rail. He died instantaneously.


One Horse Escaped.
It is curious that the horse nearest the locomotive escaped, and it is conjectured that the tongue of the smashed wagon hit the farther horse and killed it. The wagon was broken into splinters and part of it carried on the cow-catcher of the engine until it was brought to a standstill. Mr Toshack was very widely known and the tragedy caused the deepest regret in the community. He was 58 years of age, the eldest son of the late John Toshack and his wife, Janet Young, and a descendant of that Greville Toshack one of the pioneer settlers of Ramsay who came from Scotland over a century ago. He was born on the farm where he spent all his life. As a young man he became very well known throughout sport. He was a fine lacrosse and baseball player as well as a runner and had the happy knack of making and keeping friendships. he never lost interest in games in his later years and he was a familiar figure amongst the spectators at local sports.


Leaves Four Sons
Thirty years ago he was married to Miss Annie Snedden, who survives with a family of four sons, Robert at home, and John, Greville and Fred, of Prescott. One daughter Annie predeceased him some years ago. He is survived by one sister, Mrs W.A. Snedden of Blakeney, and to them all the deepest sympathy of a very large circle of friends is extended. The funeral which was held on Monday afternoon from his late residence on the ninth line of Ramsay was attended by an extraordinary large gathering of mourners. The cortege was about a mile and three quarters long. Interment was made at the Auld Kirk cemetery where most of Mr Toshack’s relatives have been laid.


Masonic Funeral
The funeral was conducted under the auspices of Mississippi Lodge A.F. and A.M., of which Mr Toshack was a member. The service was conducted by Rev J.R. MacCrimmon of Bethany United Church and Mr A.M. Woottor, of Blakeney United Church. The pallbearers were Messrs Alex Barker, George Graham, John McGill, John Lindsay, Oswald McPhail, and Oral Arthur. Amongst those who attended the funeral from a distance were Mr Thos Harris, Montreal; Mr George Graham and Mr S.H. Ogden, Ottawa; Mr Wilfred Snedden, Toronto; Mr and Mrs Stanley Everett, Prescott; Mr James Wilson and son of Renfrew; Mr and Mrs Robert Buckham, of Kinburn; Mr R. Moir, Mr and Mrs C. Baker and Mrs George Etherington, Arnprior; Mrs T. Wilson, Fitzroy; Mr and Mrs Wm Young and Mr and Mrs Andrew Young, Clay Bank. It was a touching sight at the Auld Kirk Cemetery when the four Toshack boys and the four Snedden boys surrounded the grave of their father and uncle as he was laid to rest.

Perth Courier, August 24, 1877

California Correspondence—In last week’s and this week’s issue will be found most interesting letters from California by Mr. Gavin Toshack, lately engaged on the editorial staff of the Almonte Gazette.  Mr. Toshack has told the story of his voyage there in very graphic terms and we hope to publish his experiences in the “land of the gold” in the shape of equally interesting letters in future issues of the Courier.

Related reading

Fred Gauthier Survivor — 6 Months 1 Day –1942 Almonte Train Wreck – Vern Barr

Tragedy and Suffering in Lanark County-Trains and Cellar Stairs

Miss Ida Paul — Sarah More

Standard
Miss Ida Paul — Sarah More
(The accompanying photo was taken at the time of the marriage of Ida’s sister in 1901.)  

If you don’t know who Sarah More is– well she is an amazing historian. I tell tales — Sarah documents technical history as well as stories and I greatly admire this woman. Mississippi Mills is so lucky to have her as well as all of us.

A little story about a much-loved Appleton schoolteacher=—By Sarah More

In the 1870s, William Paul of Mountblow, Ramsay Township (1841-1930), and his wife, Sarah Shaw, moved to just outside of Appleton where they raised three boys and four girls. 

William & Sarah’s second daughter, Miss Ida Paul, graduated at the head of her class at Normal School (Teachers’ College). She taught from 1898-1932 on the site of today’s North Lanark Regional Museum in Appleton. She was always concerned for a boyfriend who never returned from WWI, as well as, her youngest brother, Charlie, who returned with shell shock and damage to his lungs.

After the death of her parents, Ida came to live with her niece’s family. Ida’s niece remembers all of Ida’s students passed their high school entrance exams. Ida’s great-niece remembers receiving help with Algebra saying, “[Ida] was very kind and always used positive words to solve a problem.” “She expected high marks and encouraged the children to reach them.”

Christmas was fun, because the children were allowed in Ida’s room to open their Christmas stockings which were made of silk and could stretch to about five feet. She used to walk down to the pond to where the children were skating and throw candy on the ice to see who could pick it up the fastest.

The children were also fascinated by her little bottles of homeopathic medicines as most families tried to cure themselves first. Ida’s age was a well-guarded secret for unknown reasons. She even refused to have her year of birth inscribed on the family gravestone. (She died in her 93rd year.) Ida was raised in a Christian home and was a member of the Carleton Place United Church. 

Thanks so much Sarah!

I added the following clippings and genealogy about Miss Paul- Linda

Name:Ida A Paul
Gender:Female
Marital Status:Single
Age:17
Birth Year:abt 1874
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Date:1891
Residence Place:Ramsay, Lanark North, Ontario, Canada
Relation to Head:Daughter
Religion:Free Church
Can Read:Yes
Can Write:Yes
French Canadian:No
Father’s Name:William Paul
Father’s Birth Place:Ontario
Mother’s Name:Sarah Paul
Mother’s Birth Place:Ontario
Neighbours:View others on page
Household MembersAgeRelationship
William Paul50 Head
Sarah Paul45Wife
William A Paul20Son
Effie Paul19Daughter
Ida A Paul17Daughter
Annie Paul14Daughter
Jessie Paul12Daughter
Franklin I Paul9Son
Charles H Paul5Son
Enumeration District:83
1891 census
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Feb 1898, Wed  •  Page 8
he Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Jul 1896, Thu  •  Page 1

Do You Know This Man? Wave’s Inn –Lorie Paul

The Wondrous Life of Norman Paul

The Amazing Mr. Paul

John Tombs 90 Years Young

Standard
John Tombs 90 Years Young

 

75521606_2385432468248854_4218879558054576128_n.jpg

Thanks to Penny Trafford This was Lori Devlin’s status from yesterday.

Celebrated a milestone birthday for this wonderful man today! Happy 90th birthday Dad🥰

 

I was just going to post it on  my historical page but thought it needed to be documented.

74505851_400208287322389_8129495728293675008_n

Lor Devlin said: “John Tombs worked for the school board for almost 30 yrs. Prior to that, he worked as a carpenter for many years, for Parkman and Taylor. Mom’s name is Marg. Tombs’s lived on Bell street (Dad’s parents and siblings).  They were just between where the Leatherworks is and the apartments”.

72836238_546835172746961_7754779279329591296_n

Lynn, Jan and Lori with their parents celebrating John Tombs 90th.

 

 

genea

 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Jul 1971, Tue  •  Page 28

relatedreading

The “Margaret Thatcher” of Campbell Street

Bell Street– Carleton Place Ontario

Robberies in Carleton Place — Mr. Ed Campbell of High Street

Looking for Info on Foster Family Middleville

Standard
Looking for Info on Foster Family Middleville

 

geneology

 

Phil Foster emailed the LCGS yesterday and hoping someone could help him.

Hi,

I was wondering if there was any info on the Foster’s of Lanark/ Middleville/ Tatlock/ Drummond? I know some still live in Middleville. John and Catherine are buried at St.Pauls Anglican, but last time I was there their marker was gone …any info or pics of family would be pretty cool.

They came to Lanark in around 1819 and settled on Lot 12 Concession 7 or the other way around. John’s and Catherine where the Patriarch and Matriarch or the family…this may help.

Thanks again

genea

I found this on ancestry.ca

 

Name: John Foster
[John Morris Foster]
Gender: Male
Marital Status: Married
Race or Tribe: Irish
Age: 40
Birth Date: Sep 1880
Birth Place: Ontario
Census Year: 1911
Relation to Head of House: Head
Province: Ontario
District: Lanark South
District Number: 90
Sub-District: 4 – Bathurst
Sub-District Number: 4
Place of Habitation: Bathurst

 

 

NAME: Catherine Foster
GENDER: Female
MARITAL STATUS: Married
RACE OR TRIBE: Scotch
AGE: 32
BIRTH DATE: 02/1877
BIRTH PLACE: Ontario
CENSUS YEAR: 1911
RELATION TO HEAD OF HOUSE: Wife
PROVINCE: Ontario
DISTRICT: Lanark South
DISTRICT NUMBER: 90
SUB-DISTRICT: 4 – Bathurst
SUB-DISTRICT NUMBER: 4


HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS:
Name Age
John Foster 40
Catherine Foster 32
Florence Foster 15
Wilbert Foster 13
Ethel Foster 11
John Foster 4
Ruby Foster 3
Matilda Foster 2
Elizabeth Foster
Walter Foster 10/12

That’s all I got– can anyone add to this?

 

relatedreading

Photos of Laurie Yuill- Somerville/Mather Picnic 1937–Charles Home, Lloyd Knowles House–Foster Family

Wilbert Foster Garage Fire —Lanark

Did You Know They Moved St. Paul’s Cemetery?

 

The Westport Jamboree — Looking for Photos

8 Photos — Looking for Hilda Dunkley Lesway’s Story

Looking for Memories of Stubby!!!

Mentions of Merrickville: Fire and Folks

Standard

 

img (51).jpg

Photo-The Ottawa Journal26 May 1980

 

In May of 1980 a grocery store was wiped out and a young couple lost all their possessions in a fire that gutted a century old building on Merrickville’s main street. The fire broke out that day shortly before 3 p.m. which was caused by exploding cans of charcoal lighter that was stored in the back of a grocery store. The flames erupted into a giant fireball which crept up the back wall into the attic area.

Though the grocery store which was owned by Robin Chinkiwsky was hardly burned damage was extensive when the floor above caved in. Only one upstairs apartment was leased out and the two individuals that lived there were uninsured and lost everything. However their dog Sally was instrumental in alerting to the fire. The smoke was reported as deadly and the firemen found it impossible to control the flames.

 

historicalnotes

10photoboy1.jpg

 

Master W.J.F. James,
Kemptville or Merrickville.

This photo is from an album purchased at a yard sale in Winchester, Ontario. Other photos in the album were taken in studios in Paris France, New York City, Auburn New York, York Pennsylvania, and Curacao West Indies. This photo was the only one dated.

On a sheet of paper inside the album is written in pencil: “Presented to Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Johnston & Family. By Mr. & Mrs. Thos. Hames or Homes“. Click here to see it.

The photo is dated Jan. 28th, 1896, and the boy is identified as Master W.J.F. James. The photographer is D. E. Pelton, Kemptville & Merrickville, Ont.

merrickville-hockey-1903.jpg

Merrickville, Ontario :Men’s Hockey Team, 1903-1904

Men in the photo are identified thus:
Officers: Jim Mills; F.A.J. Davis; G.R. Putnam (Reeve); T. Edwards.
Team: Gordon Angus (Goal); Tom Kyle (Point); Mervyn Merkley (Rover); John Cranstoun (Rover); George Laycock (Centre); Harry Watchorn (Wing); Jud Watchorn (Wing).

Thanks to the late Dr. Hal Cumming for this photo. He believed that the man directly behind the goaltender was his uncle, John Cranstoun, but was unable to identify any other individual officers or players.


Can you provide names, corrections or comments?
Please email Charlie Dobie.

related reading

Village of Merrickville

Paranormal Hauntings of the Rideau Canal and other Unsolved Ghost Stories

You Say Goodbye I Say Hello – Doors of Merrickville (takes time for photos to load)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

More “Clippings” on the Local Crams

Standard

 

10368246_828360327220863_2980064115626097021_n.jpg

 

Tonight is the inaugural meeting of the 126th Council of the Town of Carleton Place.
This photo shows the “The First Carleton Place Town Council 1890” (after incorporation as a town).
Front Row : D. Cram; William Pattie, Reeve; Richard F. Preston, Mayor; Abner Nichols, Joseph Stewart, James Morton Brown
Back Row: T. Hodgins; Colin Sinclair; A.R.G. Peden, Clerk; A.T. Hudson; Alex Campbell; Peter Grant”.–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

John F. Cram – 1833/1915

Wool Puller of Carleton Place, Tanner at Appleton, Carleton Place Councillor for 12 years, Reeve for 3 years, School Trustee for 12 years and Reform Association President.


David Cram  – 1848/1902

Mayor of Carleton Place – 1895.

Albert E. Cram – 1867/1929

Mayor or Carleton Place – 1909 & 1910 – Wool Dealer – Manufacturer.

 

Perth Courier, December 25, 1868

Cram—Birth, at Appleton on the 9th inst., the wife of John F. Cram, of a son.

Cram-Scott—Married, at Almonte on Thursday, 10th inst., at the residence of the bride’s sister, by Rev. William McKinzie, Mr. William Cram of Carleton Place to Miss Lizzie Scott of Almonte.

Perth Courier, January 8, 1869

Cram-Moffatt—Married, at Carleton Place on Tuesday, 29th (?) ult., by Rev. J. Carswell, Isaac Cram of Beckwith to Martha Mary Moffatt of Carleton Place.

Perth Courier, October 1, 1869

Allan-Cram—Married, at Brockville on the 14th (?) Sept. by Rev. Mr. Mulhern, Mr. Thomas Allan, Jr., of Perth to Miss Maggie Cram, 2nd daughter of Daniel Cram, Esq., of Glen Isle.

Perth Courier, Nov. 9, 1888

A resolution of condolence has been passed by the students at the Royal College in Kingston to Daniel Cram, Carleton Place on account of the death of his son, a student at the college, this summer.

Perth Courier, Feb. 19, 1897

The Herald says that Mrs. Daniel Cram, Sr., died at Carleton Place on Saturday last in her 73rd year.  Her maiden name was Margaret Harkness, daughter of Col. Harkness, aide-de-camp to the Duke of Richmond when Governor General of Canada.  Deceased was born in Lancaster, Glengarry, Ontario and was married to the late Daniel Cram in 1845(?).  Seven of their nine children born are living.  In religion she was a devoted Baptist.

1917–John F. Cram and Sons bought over eight thousand muskrat pelts in one week from district trappers and collectors.

1869-An enlarged stone grist mill building was erected by William Bredin on Mill Street, together with buildings occupied in the following year by Joseph Cram as a planing mill and by John F. Cram as a tannery.  A stone church building for the Zion Presbyterian congregation was built at the church’s present Albert and Beckwith Street location.

1833- Among commissioners chosen to supervise the spending of some 200 pounds of provincial grants for road repairs in the neighbourhood of Carleton Place, mainly in Beckwith township, were John Cameron, James Cram, Duncan Cram, William Davis, Thomas James, Phineas Low, John McDonell and Archibald McGregor, Robert Johnston, Donald Robertson, David Moffatt, Thomas Saunders, Stephen Tomlinson, James Bennie and William Drynan.

The building of the first stone church in Ramsay township, still standing at the Auld Kirk cemetery, was completed in 1835.  Its Church of Scotland members included a number of residents of Carleton Place.  Its trustees in 1836 were James Wylie, James Wilson, John Lockhart, John Bennie and John Gemmill.  This congregation’s first resident minister, the Rev. John Fairbairn, came to Ramsay in 1833.  The first child baptized by him was John Fairbairn Cram, a later prominent resident of Carleton Place.  The church was succeeded by St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, later Bethany United, of Almonte.

 

*St. Fillans, Maplewood and Pine Grove or Cram’s United cemeteries include land obtained by John Cram in 1818 on his arrival from Comrie in Perthshire. From St. Fillans in Perthshire came a large number of the settler’s arriving in that year. Scotch Corners, separated from the main part of the township by the Mississippi Lakes and containing the Scotch Corners cemetery, was named as being a predominantly Scottish farm settlement. It was occupied in 1822.

February 4, 1967         John W. Cram Paid Final Tribute

This community was saddened last week by the passing of a beloved and respected citizen, John Wallace Cram.  He died in  Hospital, Carleton Place, Saturday morning, February 4th. Funeral service was conducted by the Rev. Mr. J. E. MacPhail at the Fleming Bros. Funeral Home, Tuesday, February 7th. John Cram was born on Glen Isle November 1896, the  third son of Daniel Cram and his wife Euphemia Houston.

John went to school in Ramsay and the Carleton Place High School. He farmed till uncertain health induced  him to retire and later moved to 27 Albert St., Carleton Place. He is survived by his widow, the former Eva F. Stevenson, a daughter Barbara, (Mrs. E. G. Cameron) of Ottawa and a son William with Ontario Dept. of Lands and Forests, (Air Service) at Sault Ste. Marie and nine grandchildren.

Two brothers survive, Glen in Three Hills, Alta., and Boyd in Ottawa; and two sisters, Grace (Mrs. Benjamin Guhl) of Cleveland, Ohio, and Florence (Mrs. Harwood McCreary) of Glen Isle. Two brothers predeceased him, Murray and William and two sisters, Laura and Jessie (Mrs. Morley Wilkinson). He was a life-long Baptist and active in that Church’s affairs, serving at one time as Clerk and on the Board of Managers for many years.

At one time he was on the Beckwith Council and also a Trustee at Ramsay S. S. No. 8. He took an active interest in agricultural matters, His sound judgment and keen, kindly sense of humour will be missed by a host of friends. Pallbearers were: Elmer Reid, Bill Anderson, Hollie Lowry, Robt. Hawkins, Bert Lowry and Arnold Jackson.

July 21, 1968         Dan B. Cram Dies – 65th Year

The funeral of Daniel Boyd Cram took place July 23, from the Alan R. Barker Funeral Home, McArthur Avenue to the Baptist Church where Rev. John MacPhail assisted by Rev. Ron Crawford of Ottawa conducted the service. Interment was made in the United Cemeteries. Mr. Cram died in an Ottawa hospital, July 21 after an illness of many years. He was in his 65th year and had resided at Glen Isle. He was born October 22, 1903, a son of the late Daniel Cram and his wife, Euphemia Houston of Glen Isle. He attended the Carleton Place Baptist Church. He was predeceased by his four brothers. Murray, Glen, Jack, and William; also by two sisters, Miss Laura Cram and Jessie, Mrs. M. Wilkinson. Survivors include two sisters, Grace, Mrs. Ben Guhl of Cleveland and Florence,  Mrs. Harwood McCreary of Glen Isle. The pallbearers were Robert Anderson, Robert Hawkins, Bert Lowry, Dr. E. G. Cameron, Dan McCreary and Glen Robertson

 

More Cram information from bytown.net

 

Related reading:

The Rosamond Christmas Party 1863-or- When Billie Brown and I Slid Down Old Cram’s Cellar Door

Donald Cram — Nobel Prize for Chemistry

 

Searching for Elizabeth Cram–Updates on Andrew Waugh

Searching for Joey Cram of Carleton Place

I Now have Part of Joey Cram

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

*St. Fillians Cemetery–click here

Part of United Cemeteries near Carleton Place.

Burials 1836 to 2001

CramJohn.JPG

In Memory of John Cram, who died Oct 4, 1881, aged 86 years.

Native of Combrie, Perthshire, Scotland.

The original owner of Cram Cemetery.

 

The McNeely Family Saga– Part 3

Standard

The McNeely Saga thanks to John Armour for sharing. It’s only through sharing that we share history.

Notes regarding on section of the Clan who emigrated to Canada were compiled by Elizabeth McNeely, the eldest living descendant of Brice McNeely, the son of Brice McNeely, who was born in Ireland in 1794 and came to Canada with his father in 1820.

It is not known when the spelling was changed from MacNeill to its present form but it would seem that there were several branches in Scotland and in Ireland and presumably all were descended from the House of Niall of the ancient Royal Line in Ireland. This is part 3

e010771565-v6.jpg

Arklan Farm Sept 1892 Photos-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

James, m. Margaret Edwards, lived on Arklan Farm, part of original grant. (Arklan) Brice, m. Margaret Elizabeth Lynch On Burgess farm, on Lake Avenue. John J., (Ashton) Arnold W. (Taxi Driver) Willard Mrs. Wm.Simpson Mrs. Ray Kennedy Mrs. Horace Coleman Mrs. Jack Yeaman (Faye) Mrs. Robert Service Brice,m. Frank, m. Jessie Boale Isabel,m. Wm.Pierce Arthur,d.,m. Margaret Erena James Kathleen,m. Barry Fraser Norman Helen,m. Eugene Bezak Mildred, m. J.A. Lynch Margaret J., m. Mr. Price Eliza Anne, m. Mr. Ramsbottom Daughter went to St. Hilda’s.m. Rev. Grant Sparling Also adopted son. Nathaniel D. Moore, Blacksmith in Carleton Place–Family now in Washington State, USA Seven Children

 

abnerw

Photo from the John Armour photo collection

John Armour–This is a picture of Abner Nichols, (very early 1900’s) from my late Grandfather Walter Armour’s collection. Abner Nichols married Eliza McNeely (daughter of 2nd generation James McNeely). My Great Grandfather, Robert Armour married Jessie McNeely (daughter of 2nd generation McNeely, Thomas Moore)

 

Eliza, m. Abner Nichols

Wm. A. Nichols

Thomas E.

 

Nichols1.JPG

William A. Nichols – 1870/1933

Mayor of Carleton Place – 1902 – Planning & Sawmill Owner.

 

William Thomas Doris (Mrs. Paynter)

Pamela (Mrs. P. O’Reilly)

Velma (Mrs. Neil McGregor)

 

 

Thomas, m. Susan Donnelly

Charlotte, at Everett, USA

Nathaniel (Thanie)

James Catharine Albert–drowned when young

Brice–died young

Joan, m. Mr. Jergenson

 

Eva Jergenson, Everett High School

Gladys Jergenson, m.

 

download

 

Stay tuned!!!

The McNeely Family Saga– Part 1 and 2

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

Related reading:

An Amusing Abner Nichols and His Boat

Before and After at Centennial Park

Splinters of Sinders Nichols and Brides

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

The World of William Abner Nichols