Tag Archives: genealogy

Clippings of the Ferguson Falls Public Houses

Standard
Clippings  of the Ferguson Falls Public Houses

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Thu, Apr 25, 1912 · Page 12

Originally known as Millford, Ferguson’s Falls, named for a Captain George Ferguson was a bustling hive of activity with a sawmill, grist mill, tannery, three hotels, two stores, a post office, a school house, a wagonmaker and a shoemaker and a church. Ferguson’s Falls was a thriving mill town, with a tannery and many small businesses. In the 1830s, the four O’Connor brothers from Ireland landed in Ferguson’s Falls and one built this log home close to the Mississippi River in 1835.

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
15 Jan 1913, Wed  •  Page 4

The lumber industry was a lucrative business for Ferguson’s Falls and log drives were a yearly event with a stop-over in the village as the logs headed to Carleton Place sawmills. A lovely log building still stands (2008)as a testament of those days. Back then it was called the ‘Stumble Inn’ and it welcomed the weary lumberjacks as it does modern travelers today– and was run by Bill McCaffrey.

From a history of drummond township

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
28 Apr 1897, Wed  •  Page 1

Robert Doyle also had a place around 1840 on lot 16 on Concession12 in Drummond near the Community Hall. In all there were four public houses. The last one closed in 1900 and there were none after that.

With files from Whiskey and Wickedness number 3.

There is a story that one night a group of young lads gathered at one of the local establishments in Ferguson Falls and they decided their friend Bruce should take himself a wife. His friend Jack Poole insisted that Bruce should marry his visiting cousinas she was available.

Jack went home, put his sisters clothes on, including a hat with a large heavy veil and returned to the hotel. After some discussion and no one being the wiser to Jack’s shenanigans they agreed to be married. Al Ruttle the Justice of the Peace proceeded to declare a long list that the groom had to provide. The newlyweds then went for a walk. A short time later the groom, Bruce came back and said the bride had run away, and he had no idea where she was.

The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
31 Jul 1916, Mon  •  Page 3

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
27 May 1914, Wed  •  Page 5

Photos from DNE Township

Ferguson Falls 101 — The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

Rothwell and Sheppard Genealogy Ferguson Falls

Thomas Hollinger Ferguson Falls Descendants Obituary

Business Directory for Ferguson Falls 1866

Scoundrels Ruining Ferguson Falls

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

Ferguson’s Falls Women’s Institute

Ferguson’s Falls Never Had Any Falls

Once A Ribald River Town, Ferguson’s Falls May Be Dying

Have you Ever Seen the Praying Station? The Buchanan Scrapbooks

Middleville Triplets Smiths Falls Triplets Carleton Place Triplets… Jean Sabourin’s Scrapbook

Standard
Middleville Triplets Smiths Falls Triplets Carleton Place Triplets… Jean Sabourin’s Scrapbook
From Jean Sabouin’s mother’sscrapbook no date

CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
19 Aug 1908, Wed  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Jan 1949, Thu  •  Page 6


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 May 1949, Tue  •  Page 2


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 May 1949, Tue  •  Page 2

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Dec 1953, Fri  •  Page 16


CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
26 Dec 1979, Wed  •  Page 29

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Nov 1963, Wed  •  Page 5

Jean Sabourin’s Scrapbook — Class of 1962 Nurses

1957 Lanark Snow Queen Contest — Sabourin Scrapbook

The Old Bank Cafe Clippings and Memories

The Smallest Babies in the World?

John Elliott Vanished 1897

Standard
John Elliott Vanished 1897
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
28 Apr 1897, Wed  •  Page 1

This is not the first time we have seen young men disappear or leave home. Originally documented when 5 to 14 years old in 1880, these boys are traced to the 1900 census when they were young adults. In general, the decision to leave farming was related to the urban-industrial “pull” of the surrounding environment and the degree of farm mechanization of the community. While migratory behavior correlates positively with occupational change, the major social correlates are somewhat different. 

There was also the exodus to Manitoba, which was a milestone in Lanark County in the late 1800s. From north to south and east to west the farmers and farmers’ sons were flocking westward.  The main reason was that it was said Manitoba was the destination of finally having good fortune in farming.

The results of farming were terrible in the years of 1880- 1890 and a hay crop had failed owing to drought in summer of 1888. Yesterday I learned in the Almonte Gazette there was a terrible infestation of insects and grasshoppers that ate the crops that summer of 1888. The spring of 1889 was turned into rain and dampness which also hindered growing. Read- When Crops Failed — Lanark County Went Manitoba Dreamin’

John Elliott never turned up anywhere– so he either ran of foul play, changed his name, and the list is endless.

CLIPPED FROMOttawa Daily CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada16 Dec 1892, Fri  •  Page 8

Drummond Centre United Church — and The Ireton Brothers 38 Year Reunion–Names Names Names

The Boy Who Disappeared From Beckwith–Gordon Taylor

Whippet– Whippet Good! What Happened to Arthur Milton Gunter?

The Man who Disappeared– Stories of Dr. G. E. Kidd

The Old Woman Who Walked From Perth?

The Strange Disappearance of Bertha Sumner of Carleton Place

The Man of the Walking Dead of Maberly

Elliott

Birth of a Friendly Town — Merrill Elliott

The Sad Tale of the Foley Family–Foley, Harper, Sly, Bowes & Elliott

Elliott Brothers Pipe Band– Looking for Information

Dr. Andrew Elliott of Almonte — Tarred and Feathered

Where was Oso and Oso Station? Names Names Names

Standard
Where was Oso and Oso Station? Names Names Names
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
12 Jul 1911, Wed  •  Page 1

Perth Courier, June 21, 1889

Oso Station—Mrs. Robert Johnson presented her husband with a handsome boy last week.

Oso Station:  Mrs. Storms from Olden Station has moved here.—William Connors, our venerable shoe maker, is ill.  Little hope for his recovery.—G. E. Armstrong has his grocery window fitted up handsomely with nice things for the Christmas table.  It is quite an artistic arrangement.  William Armstrong was the designer.

Warren–

The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Thu, Dec 08, 1910 · Page 7

Jack K…..skiFollow
Christ Church, Oso, Ontario, along Road 509, north of Highway 7


CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
04 Dec 1918, Wed  •  Page 4

Jack K…..skiFollow
Christ Church, Oso, Ontario, along Road 509, north of Highway 7

Actually it’s North Sherbrooke

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
03 Feb 1909, Wed  •  Page 5

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
24 Feb 1909, Wed  •  Page 5

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
13 Jun 1917, Wed  •  Page 5

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
29 Sep 1909, Wed  •  Page 5

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
07 Feb 1906, Wed  •  Page 8

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
12 May 1915, Wed  •  Page 5

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
06 Sep 1911, Wed  •  Page 5

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
28 Dec 1910, Wed  •  Page 8

Oso Township

Background

Towns and Villages

  • Clarendon Station
  • Crow Lake
  • Deerdock
  • Lillies Mill
  • Oso Station
  • Sharbot Lake  * (KFPL Library Branch)
  • St. George’s Lake
  • Zealand

So Where is that Gnarled Oak in Beckwith?

Where is it Now? The Heirloom of William Camelon

Marilyn Robertson Snedden Lanark County Dairy Princess

Standard
Marilyn Robertson Snedden Lanark County Dairy Princess
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Aug 1958, Sat  •  Page 2

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Jul 1958, Mon  •  Page 16

July 1958

Marilyn Robertson

Marilyn won over the other two contestants, Margaret Blair, Lanark; RR 1 and Carolyn McLenaghan, Perth RR 1. Each girl milked a cow in turn with special stalls set up outside. All the contestants made excellent showings when preparing the cow and equipment, milking and then washing fthe equipment with Marilyn was chosen as winner by the panel of judges, J. Bogaerts, Dairy Inspector from Almonte; C. E. Butterill, Dairy Inspector from Perth and E. T. Rodgers, Cheese Instructor for Lanark from Arnprior.

Marilyn Robertson will represent Lanark County in the Ontario Queen. Finals at the Canadian National Exhibition. Joan Stewart from Lyn, the Dairy Princess from Leeds County was present and presented Marilyn with the “Dairy Princess of Lanark County’’ ribbon. Then Marilyn received a cheque for $50.00 from Mr. Bogaerts on behalf of the committee, $25.00 for placing first and $25.00 for travelling expenses to the C.N.E. Held in conjunction with the Lanark County Holstein Breeders’ Association at their Twilight Meeting at-the farm of John E. James.

Marilyn Robertson was a strong contender for the simple reason that having no brothers she and her sister Rosalyn were their father’s right hand men at their home farms. Each family farm, 10th line of Ramsay received $5.00. The milking stalls, motor, pipeline and most of the equipment were provided by Carson Farm Supplies, Perth.The Perth District Co-Op provided the milker. Assisting with the competition were Carl McIntosh, Almonte RR 5 and James Lowry, Almonte RR 3.

The prize money was donated by all the dairies and creameries in Lanark County along with the main milk producer organizations, Lanark County Federation of Agriculture and Lanark County Junior Farmers’ Association. At the C.N.E. in Toronto she. will be required to milk by machine where time and general efficiency will count. Her father, Mr. George Robertson sold his farm this spring and the family now live on Water Street, Almonte. A ll Marilyn’s friends will be pulling for her, especially during the most trying part where each contestant is interviewed and required to make a short speech on the Dairy Industry in Ontario. Marilyn Robertson will represent Lanark County in the Ontario Queen Finals at the Canadian National Exhibition.

In 4-H Club work, Marilyn has an excellent record, having completed nine 4-H Homemaking Club and five 4-H Agricultural Club projects. This year, Marilyn is Assistant leader of the Cedar Hill 4-H Garden Club and a member of the Almonte 4-H Calf and 4-H Grain Clubs. In 1957 she was chosen as one of five representatives from Lanark to the Provincial 4-H. 

Marilyn has competed in several livestock and seed judging competitions placing fifth in the Intermediate Division of the Lanark County Livestock Judging competition last year and third in the Junior Section o f the County. She is past president of the Pakenham Junior Farmers Girls Club and this year is secretary-treasurer of the Lanark County Junior Farmers’ Association.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Oct 1958, Fri  •  Page 32
ArchivesLanark–Marilyn Snedden (Archive Vice Chair) with historic quilt quilted by a combined effort of the North Lanark Womens Institutes.

Pakenham Photo Marilyn Snedden via the collection of the Argue Family

St. Andrews United Church Pakenham

Photo from the scrapbook of Lucy Connelly Poaps
Marilyn Snedden and Dolly Tolshack

Remembering Rosy Robertson

Banker Snedden —–James Snedden

Old Almonte Photo Collection — In Back of the D. W. Snedden Drugstore 1953

Rosebank, Blakeney, Norway Falls and Snedden’s Station

Bennies Corners and the Snedden Family

William Wylie Cabin — The House that Seniors Saved — North Lanark Regional Museum

Standard
William Wylie Cabin — The House that Seniors Saved — North Lanark Regional Museum
PLease play while viewing photos…..

Photo Millstone News Before

Photo- Dawn Morrison– After

The Pioneer Log Cabin located on the grounds of the North Lanark Regional Museum has always been a popular tourist destination for many years. The cabin has not only local historical importance, but is architecturally an excellent example of rough-hewn log settler’s home. The construction is typical of log homes found across the Ottawa Valley in the early half of the 19th century.

Sadly, the cabin has been closed for almost three years owing to its state of disrepair and accessibility issues. Major repairs were required to preserve the exterior and to maintain the cabin and its contents in a safe condition.




Photo- Dawn Morrison

The cabin was originally built circa 1840 on Lot 15 Concession 11 of Ramsay (near the present Almonte Roundabout), by the William Wylie Family who resided on that lot from 1837 to 1853. The building was also owned by the Lockhart Family for several generations, and finally by the Thurston Family. It was donated originally to the town of Almonte. A few years later they decided that they did not have use for it and the North Lanark Historical Society in 1983 by Don and Britt Thurston and moved to its current location. The historical society set up a committee in 1983 to oversee the cabin project, with members Grant Anderson, Helen Davidson, Stewart Drummond, Ernie Giles, Victor Kellough, Dawn Leduc, Frances McLean, Norman Paul, Jean Steel and Gerry Willard.

They cut the ribbon!!!

Stones for the fireplace and chimney came from the local Don Duncan farm. The cabin was rebuilt over the next two years with funds from a New Horizons Grant and volunteer labour from the NLHS. It opened as part of the museum in the summer of 1985 and has since been a popular attraction for visitors of all ages.

With files from The Millstone and the North Lanark Regional Museum.

The Wolfe family –we were asked as a school if we could attend and answer questions about log cabin construction historical tools and common repairs or restorations as well as anything about what we teach. I (Stuart Morrison) of the Morrison family am currently head instructor of our school and Brian and Dawn are the Owners of the Pat Wolfe Log Building School. Stuart Morrison

Thanks to my BFF Kevin Mitchell from Valley Sheds for help with the new holding shed

Yesterday was the GRAND REOPENING OF THE HERITAGE CABIN

In an age where I constantly am faced with watching one older building after another torn down for new development –yesterday gave me great joy to see this building loved and finally restored. The fact that every step of the way was organized by a group of seniors from conception to end made my heart proud.

We Celebrate

Music!!!

Alex!!

Amy!!

DONATE

All donations will be recognized and issued a charitable tax receipt. Donations may be sent to the NHLS by regular mail or you can donate online electronically.

Donations can be made online or by cash or cheque in-person at the Museum or by mail:

North Lanark Regional Museum
P.O. Box 218
Almonte, ON
K0A 1A0

Cheques can be made payable to the North Lanark Historical Society

All you need is love, some elbow grease, and never give up. Thank you to all who did. May developers one day realize heritage matters.

Mississippi Mills Councillors John Dalgity, Bev Holmes and me Linda S…. Councillor for Carleton Place..

Mississippi Mills Deputy Mayor Rick Minnille, Councillors Jhn Dalgity and Bev Holmes

Now take the kids and family to visit this amazing log cabin

Admission fee is by donation

VISIT US

We’re on the outskirts of the pretty little village of Appleton, about 10 minutes from Almonte. The collection is always available for researchers by appointment. 

HOURS

Weekdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Also open weekends starting in June

CONTACT

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
24 Dec 1918, Tue  •  Page 8

Marion Bolger — Almonte Hockey Queen 1957

Standard
Marion Bolger — Almonte Hockey Queen 1957

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Feb 1957, Thu  •  Page 12

1957 Marion Bolger read-

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Apr 1957, Thu  •  Page 41


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
19 Mar 1957, Tue  •  Page 20

Here She Comes —Miss Almonte High School January 1958

Miss Almonte 1975

Still Looking for Memories of Theresa Galvin –Miss Almonte

Mr. Mississippi Beauty Pageant 1982 Joe Banks

Jean Duncan Lanark Dairy Queen

Remembering Rosy Robertson

1970s Lanark County Beauty Queens

Here She Comes Miss Almonte — Karen Hirst and other Notes

Here She Comes Miss Eastern Ontario –Photos

The Dark World of the Miss Civil Service Beauty Contests

  1. Here She Comes Miss Eastern Ontario –Photos
  2. Last Night I Saw Someone I Loved at the Halloween Parade
  3. Glamorous Marilyn Allen Miss Snow Queen and Others 1950s
  4. The Mikado ADHS 1956 Fran Cooper

The Dalhousie Settlers of Innisfail Township

Standard
The Dalhousie Settlers of Innisfail Township

Perth Courier, September 30, 1932

The Dalhousie Settlers of Innisfail Township

Not Transcribed In Full

A reprint from the Barrie Examiner

A memorial erected to the Dalhousie settlers of Innisfail township, perpetuating the memory of a band of Scottish settlers from Dalhousie Township who located in Innisfail early in the last century and whose descendents played a large part in the up building of that township—a handsome memorial was unveiled and dedicated in the 6th Line Cemetery last Saturday afternoon, Sept. 17, 1932.  There was a large attendance although the weather was rainy and possibly kept some people away.  The sun came out long enough to permit the carrying out of the ceremony but the addresses had to be postponed until later in the day. 

The memorial is in the form of a cairn surmounted by a kildalton cross and is 19 feet high.  Stones were specially selected by the builder Alfred Davis of Belle Ewert from the farms which these Dalhousie men cut out of the forest 100 years ago.  On the cross are carved an axe and a sickle emblematic of pioneer labors.  The monument is of excellent workmanship and is a credit to the builder and worthy of the rugged men and women in whose memory it is erected. 

On the octagonal side of the monument are bronze panels bearing the names of eight families of these settlers, while on the front of the monument facing #11 Highway is a bronze tablet bearing the following inscription:

To commemorate the honored group of Scottish Dalhousie Settlers Allan, Cross, Climie, Duncan, Laurie, Jack, Todd, Wallace, who came to Innsifail Township A.D. 1832 after ten year’s stay in Dalhousie, Lanark County, Ontario.  This emblem is erected by their descendents A.D. 1932 and placed on the threshold of the pioneer log kirk and a later edifice.

Octogenarians present were Mrs. Charles Cross, 86; William Jack, 82; and Joseph Todd, 82(?) 92(?).  They are the oldest members in their respective families.  A  number of objects of interest from pioneer days were exhibited.  These included a piece of a weaver’s beam used in Dalhousie Township owned by Miss Mary Jack; a lute over 100 years old played by Mrs. Martha Cross; also her husband’s white linen trousers made of hand made material which were wore to kirk and on other special occasions; a weaver’s shuttle brought to Canada from Scotland by Isabella Malcolm who afterwards became the wife of Charles Todd whose grandson Charles MacLennan resides on the old pioneer homestead of Charles Todd; cooper’s tools and a Bible brought from Scotland by the grandfather of John Wallace of LeFroy(?); a Paisley shawl owned by Mrs. (Rev) A.B. Reckie(?) of Binbrook and worn by her grandmother Wallace on her wedding day.  Howard Allan has a wicker chair made in Dalhousie before these settlers came to Innisfail.

The chairman in a brief address gave a few facts regarding the Dalhousie settlers. He felt that the memorial was a tribute not only to these but to all who opened up settlement in the township.  The sterling and kindly character of these early settlers were practiced, preached and left by them.  They were noted for their friendliness, always ready to help those in need.  Mr. Allen pointed out that while some sought to cast odium on the Dalhousie settlers for their supposed sympathy with the “rebels” in 1837, some of the settlers and their descendents were distinctly honored.  When the municipality was organized William Cross was elected as its first reeve, Eben Todd was an ex-warden and others in these families have also served in important positions.

Short sketches from family histories wee given by the following:  Allan by Fred Allan, Churchill; Cross by Mrs. (Rev.) TarkingtonLittle by the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Little of Innisfail; Duncan by William Duncan of Lefroy; Jack by Mrs. William Jack of Lefroy; Todd by Elmer Rothwell of Gilford; Wallace by Robert Wallace of Hamilton; Laurie (or Lowery) by J.J. Whalen of Vancouver.

In connection with the Todd history Mr. Rothwell read portions of a letter written 90 years ago by Thomas Todd, Edinburgh, to his brother John Todd in Innisfail.  It dealt with the politics and relative conditions of that day in Scotland and pictured a depression as bad as that through which the world is passing today.

A.F. Hunter’s History of the County of Simcoe contains the following sketch of these pioneers “Innisfail, like West Gwillimbury(?), had its ‘Scotch Settlement’ but the group of settlers which it comprised came from another quarter and at a later date—the autumn of 1832.  Previous to that year they had settled in the township of Dalhousie, Lanark County but finding its rocky surface anything but a congenial dwelling place and seeing no prospects of making a permanent home here they came to Innisfail.  Their native place was Glasgow and its vicinity where some of them had belonged to the recalcitrant brotherhood of Glasgow weavers so notorious in British history.  They left Scotland at the time of the intense public excitement preceding the passing of the Reform Bill.  Most of them had taken part in the agitation and like the Pilgrim fathers of an earlier time they preferred to life beyond the sea rather than endure the grievances of their native land.  Most of the, too, were platform orators and enthusiastic Reformers, which their descendents are to this day.  The individuals who, with their families, composed this interesting group of settlers were:

John Lawrie, N1/2 Lot 17, Concession 2

Rev. John Climie, S ½ Lot 17, Concession 2

John Todd, S ½ Lot 19, Concession 2

Hugh Todd, North ½ Lot 12, Concession 5

Garvin Allan, Concession 3(?), Lot 15(?)

Robert Wallace, South ½ Lot 18(?) Concession 6(?)

William Duncan, South ½ Lot 18(?) Concession 6(?)

William Cross, Lot 20(?), Concession 6

James Jack, North ½ Lot 21, Concession 5(?)

They settled close together and this circumstance together with the fact that a number of their descendents remained at the old homesteads and in the neighborhood gave the southeastern part of Innisfail the Scotch-Presbyterian flavor which it possessed.

At the Rebellion of 1837 some of these settlers did not desire to go to the front and assist in the quelling of the uprising as that natural sympathy to some extent with the principals advocated by William Lyon McKenzie and his party.  As the Dalhousie settlers were not outspoken in their opinion on the matter they were suspected of having non-pacific intentions.  One of the possessed an old rusty musket which was promptly taken from him lest he aid the rebels cause and he was forced by loyalists to go to the frontier.  This circumstance attached the name “Rebels in Disguise” to the Dalhousie people and their descendents for some years after the Rebellion.  Another report was circulated that they had been banished form Glasgow to Dalhousie and that they had fled from their places of banishment to Innisfail.  This report was chiefly made to do duty at municipal elections when any of the Dalhousie settlers were candidates.

John Lawrie on, on the list given above, was a prominent person in his neighborhood and a platform speaker of ability.  His two sons John and William Lawrie together with Dugald McLean were the three sawyers of the settlement for which they manufactured almost all of the lumber for the district with a whipsaw in one of the ole time saw pits.  About the year 1840 John Lawrie, Sr., and McLean obtained a canoe near DeGrasse Pt. on Sunday afternoon and set out to cross the lake to Roach’s pit on the opposite shore.  They were never heard of afterwards and it is supposed they had been drowned off De Grasse’s Pt.

The other son William Lawrie, probably better known than any other member of the group.  A few years after his arrival at Innisfail he married a daughter of Rev. John Climie and filled a variety of callings.  At one time he preached occasionally; at another he occupied the position of chief constable after having served a term in Bradford as Bailiff of the Division Court and another in Barrie in the office of Sheriff Smith.  At another time he was bailiff, auctioneer, etc and traveled throughout the county to a considerable extent in these capacities.

Rev John Climie, the second individual on the above list had been a weaver in a village seven miles from Glasgow.  A brother of his started the famous Clark spool firm of Glasgow.  The name of the firm continued for several years as Climie and Clark.  His family consisted of four sons and some daughters who came with him from Scotland. One of the sons died in Innisfail soon after their arrival.  Rev. John Climie, Jr., of his family, was a Congregationalist minister and was stationed from 1849 onward for some time at Bowmore in Notiawaxaga(?) and subsequently at Darlington(?) in 1851; Bowmanville in 1856; and Belleville in 1861.  It appears to have been difficult for him to abastain from taking part in politics.  His son W.R. Climie was secretary of the Ontario Press Association and editor and proprietor of the Bowmanville Sun until his death in 1894(?).  William Climie another son of the pioneer lived on the homestead on the 2nd Concession line.  The two remaining brothers George and Andrew went to Perth County.

Dalhousie Settlers list click here…

THE THIRD WAVE
The Lanark ‘Society Settlers’ Ralph Shaw click here.

Lanark Society Settlers

Welcome to the Lanark Society Settlers Freespace Page! click here

The Story of Wild Bob Ferguson of Dalhousie Township

Hoods School SS #2 Dalhousie

Did you Ever Hear About Hoods Corners?

The Tragic Life of Mary Paul–Hood’s Settlement- Mary Beth Wylie

The Church On the Hill in the Middle of Hood

Drummond, Lanark, Darling, Dalhousie, Bathurst and North and South Sherbrooke –Be Ready to March — 1838

Geddes Rapids Bridge 1903 — Dalhousie Lake

Dalhousie Township Names Names Names –Land Registry Genealogy

Adventures at Dalhousie Lake at the Duncan’s Cottages — Noreen Tyers

Documenting Frank Lancaster — Painter — Carleton Place

Standard
Documenting Frank Lancaster — Painter — Carleton Place
THE OTTAWA CITIZEN
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 Jul 1939, Sat • Page 10

Carol Kwissa

Frank Lancaster was my grandfather all the others except for the Marshalls were my uncles from my father’s (Stan Lancaster) side .My grandfather and uncle Doug were well known local painters .

He painted Findlay, Bates,etc. and St James Church.

We lived right beside my Uncle Doug and my grandparents my grandmother taught me to bake and acceptable table manners lol.

one of the High Street Homes in Carleton Place

She told me about the accident often to explain why my grandfather had a little limp and why his leg hurt when the weather was bad. My grandfather also painted beautiful murals on the walls of “the rich people on High Street” …his words. I did see some of them they were beautiful to me as a child.

Carol Kwissa

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 Feb 1955, Wed  •  Page 20


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
19 Mar 1946, Tue  •  Page 5

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Nov 1944, Tue  •  Page 18

So Who Painted Those Wall Murals at our Carleton Place Hotels?

The Mystery Murals of The Queen’s and Mississippi Hotel

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  03 May 1898, Tue,  Page 7
In 1916, Whitcher sold the land to a James Steele and in 1920 Steele sold the land to Bates and Innes. The year 1922 was the year that Bates and Innes sold the land to the Salvation Army. The Salvation Army may have been located at 12 Bridge Street since 1907 and rented the building and in 1922 bought it.
The Salvation Army in Carleton Place dates 65 years from 1907-1972. The doorswere closed due to lack of attendance. In 1958, the Citadel was rebuilt because a fire damaged the previous building on this site.
This site was the home of the Salvation Army for 50 years until 1972 when Aldot Ltd. purchased the land. There is a judgment on the books in 1983 and then the Victoria and Grey Trust Co. assumed ownership and sold the property to Dianne Orr.  In 1985 a Milford assumed ownership until 1990 when Milford transferred ownership to Ontario 656731. In 1991, Ontario 656731 leased the property and building to Pizza Pizza and it has been Pizza Pizza at this location to the present day until the company moved out in 2017 into a new location on Highway 7 and McNeely Ave.

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 1– Canadian Tire to The Moose

Margaret Rosalind Whitcher — William Henry Witcher Paint Business Owner

More Barnardo Children to Document…George Parker — Fred Townsend — Annie McNish–

Standard
Another Home Boy has come to Eastern Ontario-CLIPPED FROM
The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
03 Jun 1909, Thu  •  Page 7

There’s a spirit of celebration that spices most reunions but David Lorente doesn’t expect to encounter it Sunday. Instead, Lorente is preparing for and possibly an outpouring of pride when dozens of “Home Children” and their descendants gather here. “I think it will be cathartic,” says Lorente, whose father Joseph was one of the more than 100,000 British “orphans, waifs and strays” who were exported to Canada as farm laborers between 1870 and 1930. “There will probably be a lot of emotion,” adds Lorente, who organized this first reunion of the “little immigrants.” “And I hope some of the stories will come out.”

The stories are likely to be heart-wrenching “A little boy, a big land and not a friend in the world,” one Home boy wrote of his childhood experiences. Besides loneliness, many Home Children endured exploitation and abuse. Another Home boy bitterly recalls being introduced with the words: ” ‘He’s only a Home boy we’ve got.’ It’s a wonder he (the farmer) didn’t say ‘We call him Fido.’ ”

To improve their chances in life, the Home Children were given the option of being sent to a still-in-the-making country that was mostly rural and rough. In return for the children’s work, farmers promised to treat them like members of the family and pay them a small wage. Instead, many farmers gave the children nothing more than stoop labor and the back of their hand.

“I know of one case in which a Home boy got a lump of coal at Christmas, nothing else,” Lorente says. “That’s like something out of Dickens.” Although they were victims, many Home Children have tears and anger hidden their past. “There was a stigma attached to being a Home child,” Lorente says. “They have been very reticent to talk about it. “Other people looked down on them. They were made to feel ashamed.

Many of these kids were denied a childhood and nobody seemed to care.” They came from philanthropic organizations, including the Church of England Waifs and Strays Society, the Fegan Home of Southwark, London and the largest of all, the Barnardo Homes founded by Dr. Thomas Barnardo. Barnardo established a network of children’s homes throughout the British Isles. By the turn of the 20th century, almost every second immigrant child in Canada was from a Barnardo Home.

Lorente estimates about 10 per cent of Canadians are descendants of Home Children, and he is hoping to find somebody who can tell him more about his father. Joseph Lorente came to the Ottawa Valley through St. George’s Home on Wellington Street, which “served as a “distributor” for Home Children. He was sent to a farm near Brudenel, about 16 kilometres south of Killaloe, and eventually worked on a farm near Bells Corners.

Beatings were frequent and brutal. Young Lorente, a runty teenager, was expecting a beating one day after an argument with a farmer. “The farmer was standing on a hayrick, so my father threw a pitchfork at him. He wasn’t seriously injured but my father was so scared, he hid in the woods for two days.” But the incident, and others like it, so troubled Lorente’s father that he spoke of them only on his deathbed. “When he told me, he broke down,”

Lorente says. “But I still don’t know when he got here or on what ship. And I don’t know much about his family life in England.” In her book The Home Children, author Phyllis Harrison, a “former information officer for the Children’s Aid Society in Ottawa; writes of the loneliness that dogged the children, some of whom yere as young as four or five. “Invariably, children were sent from the distributing home alone.

Name tags around their necks, to be met by unknown farmers on unknown railway platforms. It was the loneliest moment of their lives. Loneliness looms as the hardest thing to bear in their letters. But there were other trials.

Michael Driscoll, a Home boy from Essex, told Harrison of his experiences, on an Ottawa-area farm. ‘. “At this farm I was given to understand that an orphan was the lowest type of person on Earth just about, and the insults I had to take even at the age of 10 or 11, have always stayed with me.

“It’s only the bruises on the outside I don’t feel any more. I was horse-whipped, kicked, and belted ground until I got so hard I could I longer feel it. Many nights I went to bed and cried and prayed for what I don’t know.

“This farmer took great pride in telling me that there was no law for an Englishman in Canada.” Charles W. Carver of Winnipeg told Harrison of the seven years he spent on a Manitoba farm near Arrow River. “Those seven years were hell. I was beat up with pieces of harness, pitchforks, anything that came in handy to hit me with I got it. “I didn’t get enough to eat. My dinner was put in a 10-pound syrup pail. Not wrapped just a piece of paper to cover it. When it came time to eat it, it was dry as old toast. ‘ “I never had a coat if it was raining. Just a grain sack over my shoulders and no shoes. They made my underwear from grey flannelette. It did not keep out much cold.”

Joe Brown was one of the lucky ones. Brown, a retired priest living in Pembroke, came to Canada in 1929. He was 14. An orphan, Brown was sent to live with Sam and Molly Coyne in Brudenell. The Coynes provided love and kindness to Brown in full measure. ‘ “I was a member of the family,” Brown says in an interview. “And not only me, the Coynes took in five other children.

The Home Children a stronger sense of what they accomplished. “They had to struggle when they were only kids,” he says. -“But they raised families, fought in wars, and built a piece of this country.”

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada26 Jan 1991, Sat  •  Page 14


CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Daily News
Kingston, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
15 Nov 1886, Mon  •  Page 1


CLIPPED FROM
The Daily Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
10 Nov 1916, Fri  •  Page 7

CLIPPED FROM
The Daily Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
09 Dec 1925, Wed  •  Page 6

CLIPPED FROM
The Daily Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
28 Nov 1925, Sat  •  Page 8

OFTEN, THE CHILDREN IN THE HOMES WOULD MAKE THESE BOXES. SOME BARNARDO BOXES WERE MADE AT THE THE BARNARDO TECHNICAL SCHOOL IN ENGLAND. MOST CHILDREN WHO IMMIGRATED TO CANADA RECEIVED A BOX, OTHERS WERE PROVIDED WITH SACKS.

CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Daily News
Kingston, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
26 Nov 1889, Tue  •  Page 4

CLIPPED FROM
The Daily Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
22 Jun 1908, Mon  •  Page 8

Home Boy Lawsuits — Pakenham– The British Home Children

The British Home Children — The Trip to Canada

Ernest Kennings — Home Boy — British Home Children

Robert Laidlaw Home Boy — British Home Children–Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

Did You Know About Dr. Barnardo’s Baby’s Castle? British Home Children — Home Boys

Canadians Just Wanted to Use me as a Scullery-Maid

Laundry Babies – Black Market Baby BMH 5-7-66

More Unwed Mother Stories — Peacock Babies

The Wright Brothers– British Home Children

Home Boys and Family–Mallindine Family — Larry Clark

Clippings of the Barnardo Home Boys and Girls

Lily Roberts of Drummond The Rest of the Story

British Home Children – Quebec Assoc click

Ontario East British Home Child Family click

British Home Children Advocacy & Research Association click