Tag Archives: genealogy

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

 

30594437_10155698816201886_2242085628453847040_n.jpg

 

Author’s Note—Since *Nathaniel McLenaghan was a customs collector in Perth beginning in 1897 and Edward the 7th was on the throne from 1901-1910 so this letter was written in the 1897-1910 time frame.

Apology

Nathaniel McLenaghan, Esquire. Collector of Customs and of Inland Revenue for His Majesty, Edward the 7th, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and of the British Dominion beyond the Seas, Kings and Defender of the Faith, Emperor of India, and to all these presents may come, we sent greeting.

Dear Mr. McLenaghan,

We, the undersigned, who live, move and have our being (doing as little real work as possible) in and around the County Buildings in the Town of Perth feel that we have done you a grave injustice by circulating foul slanders calculated to injure you, not only in your official capacity, but also your private associations, if such were possible.

We doubly regret our actions as well know your reputation in the community will not stand much trifling with and we hasten to make redress. We plead in mitigation of our offence the fact that we have become so accustomed to stating what is not the fact, that it is most difficult for us to tell the truth excepting when a lie will not suit  our purpose, and we trust that this apology will, with the hereinafter mentioned compensation, be accepted by you as a full and ample settlement of the whole matter and a peace offering from us.

We may say that as far as our information goes, you did not steal any wood from the Inspector of Public Schools, Francis L. Mitchell, to wit, and we base this conclusion on two grounds, either of which we deem good and sufficient.

Firstly: Mr. Mitchell had no wood to steal, that is, we believe all the wood he has been known to have since he moved to the Rideau, has been gathered by him at night from the premises adjacent to his cottage and we understand that at such times you were in company with, and like him, make your own provision for the next day. As a consequence, in our opinion, you would not be at all likely to take such a long chance on being caught, as would necessarily result from an attempt to take any of Michell’s plunder.

Secondly: We think you would be much more likely to steal the money from Michell and buy the wood. As against this last conclusion however, is the fact that Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales. For these several reasons, we are able to completely exonerate you from having either directly, or indirectly, unless perchance you may have done so in your sleep, ever harboured a single thought which would tend to deprive your friend and neighbour of a single chip of his wood pile.

In order to fully recompense you for the injury done to your reputation and to show how fully we desire to save you from financial loss by reason of our wrong-doing, we will pay you the sum of One Cent in equal quarterly instalments of One Farthing.

Believe us,

Your most humble and obedient servants,

Wm. P. McEwen

John Code

W.H. Grant

John Lee

 

 

historicalnotes

*Nathaniel McLenaghan (November 11, 1841 – September 26, 1912) was an Ontario merchant and political figure. He represented Lanark South in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1890 to 1893 as a Conservative member.

He was born in Drummond Township, Canada West in 1841, the son of Irish immigrants, and educated in Perth. He taught school for several years before becoming involved in exporting cattle. McLenaghan served on the town council for Perth. He was named deputy customs collector at Perth in 1893 and customs collector in 1897.

He died at Perth in 1912

 

img.jpeg

Clipped from

  1. The Daily Deadwood Pioneer-Times,
  2. 27 Nov 1928, Tue,
  3. Page 4

 

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

Advertisements

Mr. and Mrs. George Lashley 59th Anniversary Lanark

Standard

 

img.jpg

 

 - . on ear plst- the Mid-town SL. for Lanark...Caldwell of Dalhousie Township

December 3 1953

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

Buttons and Quilts by Sherri Iona (Lashley)

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

30516161_10155696638156886_7073750392789532672_n.jpg

Family Record as taken from Family Bible and amended by W.A. Code, October 1927

William Code and Elizabeth Hicks married the 27th of February 1849 by Reverend Mr. Harris at Perth, Ontario

Mother, Elizabeth Hicks dies at Innisville on October 23, 1895 at the age of 72, and was buried in Elmwood Cemetery at Perth.

Father, William Code, dies at Innisville on November 21, 1868 at the age of 49 and was buried in St. John’s Church burying ground Innisville. Mother wished to be buried in the cemetery at Perth where her brothers were buried, whom she loved dearly. There was a strong bond of affection between Mother and her brothers, and particularly between her brother William and herself.

Births

John Code born January 22 1850

Margaret Code born February 1 1852- died 11th March 1929

Thomas Alfred Code born June 9th 1854

Mary Elizabeth Code born July 26 1856

Robert George Code born October 20 1858

William Abraham Code born February 27th 1861

James Richard Code born January 27th, 1864

 

Marriages

John Code and Mary M. Butler married October 22, 1884 by Reverend R. L. Stevenson at St. James Church, Perth, Ontario

John Code and Margaret Code married December 2, 1885 at Trinity Church, Innisville by Reverend F. H. Farrar

T.A. Code and Jennie Leslie married November 12, 1890 at the Leslie home on Theodore St. Ottawa

James R. Code and Jennie Elizabeth McGregor married October 18th 1893 in St. Margaret’s Church, Toronto, by Reverend Moore

W.A. Code and Pearl C. Harris married Febriary 22, 1899 in St. Margaret’s Church, Toronto by Reverend Moore

 

Deaths

William Code died at Innisville on the 21st November, 1868

Elizabeth Hicks died at Innisville on October 23, 1895

Jessie Elizabeth McGregor, wife of James R. Code died at Toronto (no date)

Jessie Leslie, wife of T.A. Code died at Perth

Bessie Mary Code, daughter of George and Margaret Code died at Innisville August 5th, 1887

Robert George Code died at Ottawa on April 12th 1921

Mary Elizabeth Code dies at Toronto on November 18, 1922

 

Births of Children of Others

Bessie Mary Code born August 31,1886– daughter of George and Margaret Code

Margaret Carol Jones granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.A. Code born December 20, 1924 at Charlottetown, P.E.I.

Arthur William Jones, grandson of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Code, born on July 16, 1926 at Ottawa, Ontario.

Arthur Reginald Jones and Muriel Pretoria Code, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Code married on September 26, 1923 by the Reverend Channell G. Hepburn at All Saints Church, Ottawa, Ontario.

The foregoing is a somewhat disconnected account of some family history which the writer has stored in his mind if it serves any useful purpose or interests any member of the family he will be well repaid for the time given to it.

Sincerely yours,

W.A. Code

37 Second Avenue, Ottawa

October 20th, 1927.

 

historicalnotes

 

 

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

Photos of Laurie Yuill- Somerville/Mather Picnic 1937–Charles Home, Lloyd Knowles House–Foster Family

Standard
Photos of Laurie Yuill- Somerville/Mather Picnic 1937–Charles Home, Lloyd Knowles House–Foster Family

30411608_10155319230596835_1110317084496535340_n.jpg

All Photos –Laurie Yuill‎

 

30264906_10155319233356835_1547035867120582560_n.jpg30441598_10155319234361835_8442537097739202368_n.jpg

 

30412340_10155319236386835_5878113320378958506_n.jpg

30629704_10155323886936835_1504259063599333376_n (1).jpg

The Mather Clan, Aug. 4, 1937

 

30516066_10155319274906835_4131482236094630252_n

The Charles Home, Lloyd Knowles house in Drummond Township, Oct. 1885

 

30441349_10155319280576835_4333148994448907506_n.jpg

Robert Shaw Foster driving his team, 34 years old, 1889

 

30443220_10155319291296835_3708223574264339688_n.jpg

Laurie Yuill‎ to Lanark County Genealogical Society

1st: Christopher Foster, Bill Foster 2nd: Robert Shaw Foster, Carrie (Foster) Drysdale, Jim Foster, Robert John Foster, Sarah Jane (Whyte) Foster. Sorry, I don’t have a date

Please send your family photos in so we can document them Linda sav_77@yahoo.com

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

Mr. Lional Barr’s Store Middleville and Other Mementos –‎Laurie Yuill‎

Mr. Lionel Barr’s Store Middleville and Other Mementos –‎Laurie Yuill‎

Standard
Mr. Lionel Barr’s Store Middleville and Other Mementos –‎Laurie Yuill‎

30516116_10155318412231835_1309185896289729833_n (1).jpg

 

‎Laurie Yuill‎ Photo– Quilting in the Church Hall, Middleville. Starting from left: Addie Somerville, Erma Mather, Irene Pretty, Nellie Reid, Veryl Manson, Kaye Stead, Evelyn Yuill, Olive Blackburn, Eva Affleck — with Addie SomervilleErma MatherIrene PrettyNellie ReidVeryl MansonKaye SteadEvelyn YuillOlive Blackburn and Eva Affleck.

 

30415462_10155318443006835_6285487352811545664_n.jpg
‎Laurie Yuill‎ Photo-

Sorry, I don’t know the year of this photo or it’s location. Willie Wilson, John Miller, Melville Woods, Rex Penman, Robbie Somerville, Jim Penman, Allie Blackburn, John C. James, Lew Somerville, Fred Woods, and Peter Barr — with Willie WilsonJohn MillerMelville WoodsRex PenmanRobbie SomervilleJim PenmanAllie BlackburnJohn C. JamesLew SomervilleFred Woods and Peter Barr.

30264640_10155318564186835_2036152012738331605_n.jpg

Janet Easdale, Annabella Creighton, Lizzie McIntyre, Mrs. James Penman, Mrs. Peter Reid, Maggie Guthrie, Mrs. George Creighton, Elizabeth Baird, Mrs. Robert Reid, Mrs. Wm. McIntyre, Mrs. James H. Rodger, Rev. Fraser, Mrs. Fraser, Mrs. Arch Nairn, Mrs. Hugh Rodger

 

all photos Laurie Yuill

30530931_10155318617126835_1289638153970845006_n.jpg

30443638_10155319216686835_898359931025411685_n.jpg
The Old Barr Store in Middleville, 1936
30516550_10155319226611835_5906702255735442630_n.jpg
The Middleville Cheese Factory in 1936

Laurie Yuill‎ sent this… Thanks Laurie!!

 

 - TEACHERS WANTED f WANTED Teachers for senior...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 20 May 1941, Tue,
  3. Page 22

THE OLD STORE SPEAKS
Reminiscence of Mr. Lional Barr’s Store Middleville
Vacated February, 1946
Rev. George Warren

It’s now full 100 years or more
Since I became the corner store
Who cut my timbers, squared my frame
I never will divulge his name.
For visions fair they had that day
Of men and women sad and gay
Who’d enter through my open door
And carry out enough and more
To satisfy their own demands
And others living on their lands.

As I look back across the years
Fond memories come that bring the tears
Father’s sons and grandson’s too
Have bid this good old world adieu
I’ve watched them carry off their dead
And bury them; And then I’ve said
I’m only wood and glass and stone
And here I’ll stand Th’l all alone
And serve the children yet unborn
Who seek my shelter from the storm.

For many years I’ve faced the west
And stood the storm, as you have guessed
That blew into my face until
I thought they’d blow me from my sill
But here I stand these many years
Defying all their doubts and fears
And when you come to take me down
I’ll certainly put on a frown
And ask you why you treat me so
When I served you well, you know.

As I have stood here year by year
Strange sounds have come upon my ear
I’ve heard the neighbours chatter much
About the weather, crops and such,
I’ve heard them cuss, spit and swear
And how I’ve blushed: and then declare
Th’o I’ve stood here for one hundred years
I’ve always tried to bring good cheer
And exercise my self restraint
That men could make no red complaint.

My shelves have held all sorts of goods
Cotton and footwear and such foods
As keep the people strong and well
And patent medicines that sell
For double what they really should
I can’t complain; I’m only wood
And news I’ve brought from day to day
Some of it sad and some of it gay,
Letters of love and business too
Is some of the work I’ve had to do.

On Sunday I have closed my door
Believing that the corner store
Which serves John Public thru the week
Would give the people time to seek
A place within the House of God
Where many noble men have trod
And join the neighbours as they sing
Their praises to the mighty king.
I’ve listened to the old church bell
Reminding men of heaven and hell.
And viewed the Church spire far above
Assuring man that God is love.

I’m older now than all the folks
Who sit and spin their funny jokes;
McKay’s and Borrowman’s, Nairn’s and Bowes’
Rodgers’, Somerville’s, and Munroe’s
Naphan’s, Manson’s, and Mather’s small
Scoular’s, Percy’s and Affleck’s tall
Barr’s and Blackburn’s, Moffat’s and Yuill’s
McPhee’s and teachers of the schools
Guthrie’s and Penman’s and Machan fair
Croft’s and Rankin’s with talents rare
Langstaff’s and Liddle’s, Lawson’s, Reid’s
Mitchell’s and Taylor’s and Dodds’ with good deeds
McCurdy’s, Gibson’s and Virgin’s too
Have bought my good, both old and new
Peacock’s, Pretty’s, and McIntyre’s
Have all enjoyed my cherry fires
Preacher and doctors and transient guest
Have all sat on my steps to rest
Or entered thru my welcome door
To patronize the corner store.

If they had put a little thought
Upon my interests, and had bought
A little paint and turpentine
I wouldn’t now have cause to whine
But you’ve neglected me so long
I’m old and weak, I should be strong
But now the old must stand aside
Give place to new, the village pride
And now I stand here nearly dead
Beside my daughter, white and red.

But every old dog has his day
And so I’ll say to Jim McKay
My friends have all deserted me
My shelves are bare as you can see
So come and take me down at will
Ceiling and wall, floor and sill.
I wouldn’t like to stand before
My daughter with her lovely door
Through with the children, bright and gay
And older folks upon their way
Shall pass to get their food and mail
Thru’ summer’s sun and winter’s gale.

But just a word before we part
My daughters care is on my back
She’s lovely with her windows bright
Reflecting in the stormy night
She’ll serve you well for many a year
So white and clean, she’ll bring good cheer
I ask for her the courtesy
Which thru the years you’ve given me.

I leave you now with no ill will
To any one in Middleville
Perhaps some day they’ll find a place
Where I can hide my dark brown face
Perchance they’ll turn me outside in
And cover up my head with tin
It’s possible that I may house
Some horses, chickens or some cows
And then I’ll hold my head up high
And look my neighbours in the eye
So if you chance to come my way
Just look across and shout “Good day”,
I’ll recognize you as of yore
When I was Barr’s old corner store.

 - A delegation from the Blakondy and Clayton...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 06 May 1932, Fri,
  3. Page 18

     - Rey. Adelbert Warren Dies in Canandaigua Rev....

    1. The Ottawa Journal,
    2. 09 Jan 1946, Wed,
    3. Page 22

     

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

 

30443462_10155694217961886_2422463530352508928_n.jpg

Aunt Ann, before passing on was a slim, slender girl in her teens, and it was not until the later years of her life that she became stout. It may be interesting to some to be informed that Aunt Ann was considered one of the best dancers amongst the girls of her day. To work all day in the house, or in the fields, and dance all night was a common occurrence on the part of the girls of Aunt Ann’s time. Would or could the girls of today do it?

These were the days when the sickle was the sole means of cutting the grain, and Aunt Ann declared she had many a time bound grain into sheaves all day after a reaper with the sickle and danced all night. These were the days when a jar of good whiskey was brought to the fields and placed at one end of same. It became a case of keen competition when more than one reaper was engaged to see which could reach the jar first. These were the days when whiskey was pure and unadulterated and left none of the ill effects experienced today by thirsty ones. The fact that all drank of it more or less without injury would seem to indicate that if  the brand is A1 it is quite in order to take a little for the stomach’s sake.

The writer has a large sized photograph of Grandma Codd which he prizes very much. It was passed on to me and every time I gaze upon the fine old face the words come to my mind that were commonly used to express the appreciation of his friends that “Johnnie Codd’s word is as good as his bond.” This would seem to be a very good testimony of the character of the man and one not often used in these days of stress and struggle. My fondest recollection of Grandfather or Granda, as he was always called, is of occasions when he rode we younger ones on his knee and sang to us that appealing song, the last line was:

*”Oh Jennie put the kettle on and we’ll all have tea!”

Of Grandmother Codd the writer has no information; as stated in the beginning of the family history, as she was Mary Ann Nugent, and judging from the large- sized photograph which used to hang in the old home of the family at Innisville, she must have been a kind and good woman.

My mother, Elizabeth hicks was born at Enniskillen, County of Fermanagh, Ireland and came to Canada in 1842. She lived in Perth until her marriage to William Code. my father on the 27th of February, 1849.

The widowed mother of Elizabeth Hicks came to this country with her two daughters (Elizabeth and Mary), the latter becoming James Kerr. The foregoing will explain the connection between the Kerr and Code families and show how an intimacy and friendship of a lifetime came about.

Mother (Elizabeth Hicks) had three brothers, namely, James, Robert, and William, and all lived in Perth at the time of their death. For many years Robert at Ferguson Falls held the position of Postmaster and conducted a small store. Some years before his death he removed to Perth.

Mother died at Innisville on the 23rd October, 1895, at the age of 72 and was buried in Elmwood Cemetery, Perth.

Father died at Innisville on the 21st of Novemeber 1868, at the age of 49 and was buried in St. John’s Church burying ground near Innisville. Mother expressed a wish to be buried in the cemetery at Perth. There was a strong bond of affection between Mother and her brothers, and particularly between her brother William and herself.

Much more might be added to what has been written, but it is hoped enough has been related to form the basis of a more detailed story which one of the present generation may some day write.

Tomorrow: Family Record as taken from Family Bible and amended by W.A. Code

 

historicalnotes

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

 

The McArton’s of Ramsay

Standard
The McArton’s of Ramsay

29939697_10160150097510332_946571086_n.jpg

 

30020024_10160150097465332_1208151335_n.jpg

Photos of Almonte Bridge by Janet McArton of the 7th line of Ramsay from Marie White of Lanark County Tourism

img.jpeg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 09 May 1933, Tue, Page 11

 

 I had no idea that Janet McArton was a renowned artist but there is little written about her. If you have any information about her, please do email me. sav_77@yahoo.com

Information from Melissa Alexander from North Lanark Regional Museum

Janet McArton was one of eight children born to John McArton and Mary Ann Houston. Her birth date is a bit hard to pin down, but it seems to be around 1848 and she passed away in Ramsay on May 8, 1933. Her father, John, arrived in Canada in 1829 at 14 years of age with his parents from Glasgow, Scotland and they settled in Dalhousie Township. John then settled in Ramsay Township in the early 1840s and married Mary Ann in 1843. Mary Ann was born in Glasgow as well, and her father, Stewart Houston, was one of the pioneer settlers of Ramsay Township.

 

369_716_328_79 (1).jpg

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 11 Jul 1933, Tue,
  3. Page 3

John was one of Ramsay’s oldest residents when he died at 84 years of age in 1899. He was well-respected in the community and was a justice of the peace so there’s a bit of a write up about him in the paper. They describe him as “a man of cheerful disposition and bright intellect, [possessing] a wonderful amount of general knowledge, gained through much reading, which rendered him a pleasing and instructive companion and an interesting conversationist, and his stories of incident and adventure of the early pioneer days were always of interest to his hearers. He possessed a warm and loving heart, and a genial disposition, which made him hosts of friends wherever he went.”

Janet and her older sister, Sarah, never married. After both their parents died, they moved in with their younger brother John, who had an adjoining farm. After that, there is very little information about them, except that Sarah was killed by a drunk driver in 1928 when she was leaving church.  (see Sent to Canada’s Shutter Island for the Death of Sarah McArton)

She would have been in her mid-80s at that point.”

 - Mainy Pay Tribute To Mishap Victim One Of...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 29 Aug 1928, Wed,
  3. Page 13

 

historicalnotes

  1. John McARTON was born in 1815 in Dalhousie Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada1 and died on May 20, 1899 in Ramsay Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada1 aged 84.
    John married Mary Ann HOUSTON, daughter of Stuart HOUSTON and Sarah KINCAID, about 1842 in , Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada. Mary was born in 1815 in Glasgow, , Lanark, Scotland1 and died on November 6, 1893 in Ramsay Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada1 aged 78.
    Children from this marriage were:

      2 F    i. Sarah E. McARTON was born on February 3, 1844 in Ramsay Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada.2
      3 M    ii. James McARTON was born in 1847 in Ramsay Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada.
      4 F    iii. Janet McARTON was born on February 5, 1848 in Ramsay Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada.3

    + 5 M    iv. Dr. Stuart McARTON was born on July 22, 1852 in Carleton Place, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada,4 died on August 3, 1903 in Paisley, Bruce Co, Ontario, Canada aged 51, and was buried in Ramsay Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada.

    + 6 M    v. John McARTON was born on August 21, 1856 in Ramsay Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada.3
      7 F    vi. Helen McARTON was born in 1862 in Ramsay Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada.5
    Helen married Stuart HOUSTON, son of John HOUSTON and Marion Selkirk (__?__), on May 11, 1886 in Carleton Place, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada.5 Stuart was born in 1863 in Ramsay Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada.

 - ; Carieton Place (Special to' The JournaL) - ....

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 29 Jan 1898, Sat,
  3. Page 3

 

 - ' Carleljoii Pjaoe : , ' , . .(Special to the "...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 22 May 1899, Mon,
  3. Page 3

 - The Jate John McArton, of Ramsay whose death...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 30 May 1899, Tue,
  3. Page 8

 

 - . IS RE8TIM1 WELL. CARLETON PLACE. Aug. 28....

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 29 Aug 1928, Wed,
  3. Page 13

 

 - FUNERAL OF MRS. I. SMITH. ' CARLETON PLACE....

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 26 Mar 1931, Thu,
  3. Page 11

 - FUNERAL OF MRS. I. SMITH. ' CARLETON PLACE....

March 26 1931

 - JOHN MeAlTON. CARLETON PLACE. Jan. 10.'...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 21 Jan 1938, Fri,
  3. Page 7

 

 - , Mrs. John McArton CARLETON PLACE, Jan. 28....

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 26 Jan 1954, Tue,
  3. Page 7

 

 - . IS RE8TIM1 WELL. CARLETON PLACE. Aug. 28....

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 29 Aug 1928, Wed,
  3. Page 13

 - it Miss Eileen Edwards . Weds A. W. McArton...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 10 Jan 1940, Wed,
  3. Page 9

 - H. A. McArton Dies In Ottawa Hospital !...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 09 Jan 1943, Sat,
  3. Page 4
  4.  - CRIGGAR GLENNA LOUISE (nee McArton) On...

Clipped from

  1. The Chilliwack Progress,
  2. 31 Dec 1999, Fri,
  3. Page 20

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

Sent to Canada’s Shutter Island for the Death of Sarah McArton

What Happened to the Gold on the Ramsay 7th line?

Looking for the Artist of this Carleton Place Painting

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

The Female Artist from Carleton Place That Never Went Viral

%d bloggers like this: