Tag Archives: food

Old Quebec Pies – Brodie Flour Contest 1963

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Old Quebec Pies – Brodie Flour Contest 1963

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada16 Oct 1963, Wed  •  Page 36

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada06 Feb 1963, Wed  •  Page 30

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada06 Feb 1963, Wed  •  Page 30

WHAT TO EAT IN QUEBEC?5 Most Popular QUEBECOIS PIES click

I Didnt Mean to Break the Internet With My Cranberry Pickle PieRecipe

Cranberry Pickle Pie and Utah Pickle Pie –(Last time I saw something like this, the test came…

Overnight Lock-up Guests Should Be Fed For 25c Apiece — Little Geneaology

Vintage Easter and Bunny Cake Recipes from the 60s and 70s

‘Pet De Soeurs’ or Nun’s Pastries

“Get it On” — Banging Cookies Recipe–This Will Feel Wrong, but Trust Me!

The Invincible Ginger Snap Cookies of Carleton Place

Memories of Woolworths and Chicken in a Van

Slow Cooker Boston Baked Beans–Lanark County Recipes

Easy Christmas Cake- Lanark County Recipes

Holiday Popcorn– Lanark County Recipes

Granny’s Maple Fudge —Lanark County Recipes

Albert Street Canasta Club Chilled Pineapple Dessert

Recipes from Lanark County–Glazed Cranberry Lemon Loaf

Gum Drop Cake — Lanark County Holiday Recipe

Who Stole the Cookies from the Cookie Jar? Pastry Chef Ben White

“Sex in the Pan” Memories – A RIP Fashion Violation Photo Essay

Katherine Hepburn Did Eat Brownies

The Perth Canning Company — Factories That Are No More

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The Perth Canning Company — Factories That Are No More
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
22 Jul 1896, Wed  •  Page 1

Perth Remembered

PERTH CANNING COMPANY. This label is from a product that was canned by the jPerth Canning Company Limited, which operayted in Perth from 1895 to 1902. The cannery closed because of lack of enough vegetables for canning.The premises were located on was was known as Park Avenue, know now as Rogers Road. The building was bought by a creamer company in 1902 and in 1929 became Land of Lanark Creamery until closing in 1960. Location of the Huntington Green Condominiums today.

Wendy Stanton-Gray

I lived on that street from 1954 until 1967 it was known as Market Street. The old Creamery building was all closed up and it was a great place to explore and play when we were kids. A lot of the old offices and production lines were just as they were, like they just locked the doors and walked out. I loved that place and spent hours exploring with other neighborhood kids. We never damaged anything, we just used our imaginations and amused ourselves for hours, great memories!

THEN&NOW–Perth Remembered
Aerial View of the Code Factory on Rogers Road at Harvey Street. Perth Creamery is seen across the street. In the top right of the photo you can see the original Haggart & Herron Grist Mill at Haggart Dam. This building was destroyed by fire in 1948 and the ruins leveled in 1956.
In 1893, R. Gemmill & Sons, woolen mills moved from Port Elmsley to a new building erected at the corner of Harvey Street and Park Avenue (Rogers Road). They manufactured fine quality Canadian Tweeds. In 1898 The Perth Woolen Mill Co. Ross and T. A. Code took over Gemmill’s mill. In 1899 the woollen mill changed to a felt mill. In 1985 the mill ceased operation with felt still being made at the Herriot Street plant. In 1987 the mill was sold to be converted into apartments but because of too much oil on the floors it was not feasible and the buildings were all demolished and in 1990 Ashley Chase apartment complex was built.
Note: In 1963 at the request of International Silver the street name was changed from Park Ave. to Rogers Road for the Rogers Silver trade name.
The building in the picture to the left across the street from the mill was originally the Perth Canning Company 1896 – 1902. The factory liquidated in 1900 as they were not able to get enough vegetables for canning. 1902 The Creamery Co. purchased the Canning Co. In 1914 it becomes the Perth Creamery until 1960. For the next 12 years the building was home to Millard Electric.

CLIPPED FROM
The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
26 Apr 1900, Thu  •  Page 3

CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
26 Feb 1896, Wed  •  Page 2


CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
04 Jul 1901, Thu  •  Page 3

CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Daily News
Kingston, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
12 May 1896, Tue  •  Page 4

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
20 Jan 1897, Wed  •  Page 1


CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
05 Aug 1896, Wed  •  Page 5

Oh Woe is Addie Stewart from Perth

The Perth Gaol 1876 Almonte Gazette– Names Names Names..:)

Did Wampole Ever Move to Lanark Village?

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters — Part 28–I Didn’t Swindle Money from the Wampole & Co W.H. Brick

Scrapbook Clippings of Wampole

The Ups and Downs of the Northern Button Co. in Smiths Falls

Grocery Shopping at Watt’s in Lanark

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Grocery Shopping at Watt’s in Lanark
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
07 Jul 1915, Wed  •  Page 8

Roman Meal

Is Roman Meal still made?


Roman Meal had some pretty fun packaging, with an illustration of an ancient Roman soldier in the brand’s logo. But the brand no longer exists in North America, because the rights were sold to Flower Foods in 2015. You can still find Roman Meal in places like Japan and Thailand, though

Pettijohn


This product was originally produced by The American Cereal Co. of Chicago, Illinois. The initial packaging was tin with an illustration of a bar on a cliff and the text “manufactured from the best pacific white wheat”. The cereal was later sold in a canister similar to oats canisters seen today.

One of the first slogans for the cereal was “all the wheat but the overcoat”.

Puffed Rice and Puffed Wheat

Corn Flakes

Breakfast Bacon for Dinner

Windsor Bacon and Sausages

Cooked Ham

Canned Fish

Shopping lists have been dated back to 3000-3500 BC, when the ancient Sumerians of Mesopotamia, in the modern-day Middle East, invented the first form of writing, a system of symbols called Cuneiform.

The marker system shopping lists were first developed around the early 20th century.

CLIPPED FROM
St. Catherines Standard
St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
22 Sep 1915, Wed  •  Page 4

The Old Bank Cafe Clippings and Memories

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The Old Bank Cafe Clippings and Memories

Thanks to Jean Sabourin’s mums scrapbook I found an ad for one of my favourite restaurants no longer there.. Any memories add in the comments.. so I can document it. Thank you…

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Aug 1980, Sat  •  Page 128

Christine Ruscher

My parents owned The old bank cafe but that’s gone too.

Christine Ruscher 

My friends from Kinston 40 years ago visited the bank café and thought it was named after the river bank.

I explained it was the Bank of Nova Scotia. I am still banking with the same brand. And it was there that Bob Neilson bought the winning Olympic lottery ticket in 1972 that paid back a million dollars for a ten dollar ticket. I bought a ticket for the same cause at the same place

Kim Richmond

It was the Old Bank Bakery cafe before that. My Mom and sister both worked there as second jobs. First for Linda Dow and then for Mike and Marlene. Oh and before it was the cafe my Mom and sister and myself when I had to lol cleaned the Bank .

Amanda Melnyk

I worked here all through High School! Many fond memories of Steve and Lena! And lots of stories that still make me laugh ‘till this day!!

Joanne Johnson

Fond memories at the Old Bank Cafe. Mavis and Cathy Johnson worked there.

Irene Hall Larocque

My daughter started working for Steve and Lena when she was 13. She was just talking about them a couple of weeks ago when home for a visit.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Feb 1994, Sun  •  Page 24


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Apr 1982, Fri  •  Page 4

The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Thu, May 27, 1920 · Page 5
The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Mon, Dec 14, 1925 · Page 8

Digging Up The First Bank Manager of Lanark Village

Does Anyone Remember Cohen’s in Lanark Village?

The Lanark Laundromat Blast — Unsolved Mysteries of Lanark County

The Shaky Maple Lanark Clippings

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The Shaky Maple Lanark Clippings

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 May 1979, Fri  •  Page 87

Suzanne Champagne and trilliums in wood at Shaky Maple, near Lanark village Citizen photos by Lynn Ball

The last leg of our jaunt included a luncheon stop at the Shaky Maple Restaurant at the Lanark village limits (look for the sign on the left side of the road). The food is good (especially the Queen Elizabeth coffee cake), the prices are reasonable and the Shaky Maple is open all weekend.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada23 May 1980, Fri  •  Page 75

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Jul 1984, Tue  •  Page 19

read-Patterson’s Restaurant Perth

Shaky Maple, a huge new restaurant operation recently opened by two Carleton Place couples: Terry and Lynn Julian and Wayne and Dianne Shaver. It used to be a wilderness survival training school and now is a dining room and banquet hall, fully licensed. They offer Sunday brunch buffets at $5.25. There’s a Mother’s Day special at $6.25 and although the place can hold more than 300 persons, a reservation would be a good idea (259-2985). They talk about plans to open a campsite and rent canoes that will allow for.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada11 May 1979, Fri  •  Page 87

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 May 1982, Sat  •  Page 51

There are long rides along the winding Clyde River in that area. The history and beauty of Lanark is something Americans seem to have discovered. When our bus arrived at the Glenayr Kitten Mills in the centre of town, an American tour bus was already there. Mill personnel said hardly a day goes by that one or more busloads of Americans don’t arrive for that tour. The setting is old. The cornerstone of the mill building says 1860. Inside the equipment is modern and baffling.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada11 May 1979, Fri  •  Page 87

Politics at The Shaky Maple

The tug-of-war over the ministry of natural resources building turned into a verbal boxing match at an all-candidates meeting here Thursday, but the 125 voters who turned out to the Shaky Maple restaurant seemed more content to watch than participate. Round one began when Liberal Ray Matthey said the proposed move of the ministry’s offices from Lanark Village to Carleton Place will result in a loss of part-time work for about 60 local farmers and about $25,000 in revenue to local merchants.

Throughout the meeting, both he and NDP candidate Cliff Bennett accused Tory MLA Doug Wiseman of bowing to the Davis government and turning a deaf ear to his constituents. “Why does he ignore the people’s wishes and cram statistics down our throats all the time?” Bennett asked. Wiseman, exasperated by the lack of time to explain the situation properly, said he had to fight to keep the building in Lanark and has been “working like the devil” to convince the Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority to take over the vacant quarters.

The MCVA’s 11 full-time employees and 40 summer students “will probably bring more money to the merchants of Lanark” than the ministry’s 23 full-time workers, he said. Wiseman said his opponents “forget there’s a caucus and a leader. You can’t have 40 members going in different directions.” Nuclear energy, government assistance to the Children’s Aid Society and Interval House, doctors opting out of OH IP and provincial sales tax were also raised briefly.

On the question of job prospects in Lanark, Wiseman defended his government’s economic performance, pointing to 89 loans worth more than $15 million to industries and tourism, and 3,600 new jobs over a five-year period. He told how Lanark has benefited under his 10-year reign, citing $2.1 -million worth of improvements to Calabogie Road and grants to farmers and industries as examples. Bennett reiterated his party’s made-in-Onta-rio economic strategy, while Matthey said he would bring representatives of several municipalities together to build a community industrial park to provide better roads, communication and facilities. Matthey said tourism in the riding is being developed at the expense of agriculture, and promised to stop foreigners from buying farms and leaving them fallow.

The Ottawa Citizen 

PAGE 3

 Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Friday, March 13, 1981

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Jul 1979, Fri  •  Page 65

Patterson’s Restaurant Perth

Clippings and Memories of Perry’s Restaurant

Memories of Mrs. Gee’s Homemade Egg Rolls

Comments about the Canadian Cafe Almonte — Low Family

Before and After — Gourmet Restaurant

Jim’s Restaurant Fire 1969

The Superior Restaurant — 1948

What Did You Eat at the Superior? Comments Comments Comments and a 1979 Review

History Clippings of the the Centennial Restaurant – Pakenham

Dupont’s Mill Street Restaurant Renovated 1899

Who Remembers Harry’s Cafe?

Clippings and Memories of Perry’s Restaurant

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Clippings and Memories of Perry’s Restaurant
Jan KammersgaardJan Kammersgaard–Sherri Iona Kelly Sargeant hauled it down, i have a pic of it on another group

Last week on the Lanark Village Community page I saw this photo that Jan posted for Sheri Ionas comment-

Sherri Iona

Part of The Landing belonged to my ancestors ( it was a house) and was moved to Lanark some years back. From Lavant Station

So I thought it should be documented. Thanks Jan for posting this.

Shirley Kargakos photo

Doris Quinn

Yes you certainly had a good business there. Food was great and no matter when you went you would always meet someone you knew. That was a wonderful venue.

Debbie Devlin Dixon

It was always such a treat to go to ‘ The Restaurant’ we seen our cousins and had awesome pizza. Great times!

Colleen Donohue

Nice Shirley, I hear the food was really good and very friendly atmosphere!

Eleanor Wright

In the early 20’s my husband was ill. Friends used to take me for a Sunday drive for a change of scenery. We would stop at Perry’s for a snack. Without fail, Perry would cook up a big order of fried mushrooms and send them home to my husband. This was his favourite treat when he was able to drop in when he was well. My husband died in 2011 and this is still a fond memory of Perry’s kindness

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Apr 1981, Mon  •  Page 32

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Jul 1979, Wed  •  Page 87

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 Apr 1977, Fri  •  Page 42
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Nov 1985, Fri  •  Page 64

Julia James
October 28, 2015  · 


Shirley, here’ what you looked like 50 years ago October 22, 1965, I think everyone will enjoy this photo of you and Perry on your Wedding Day

Patterson’s Restaurant Perth

Memories of Mrs. Gee’s Homemade Egg Rolls

The Dalai Lama Bakery 1978

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The Dalai Lama Bakery 1978

Cathy Geuer visited India, an Indian doctor advised them to do something they enjoy, and to be their own boss. They took his advice to heart, and thus was born the Dalai Lama Bakery. “ We thought about it, and believed the idea would go over well in Almonte,’* says Ron, who rises every morning at 5.30 to begin baking bread. “ We figured baking would attract people to the store, and then they might try other things we have.” The Dalai Lama Bakery, at 108 Queen Street, began operations in mid-September, 1977. The building was a former boarding house, much in need of repair. ” It was a shambles,” says Ron. The couple fixed up the interior, panelled the walls and opened shop. The store is named after Dalai Lama, the pope of Lamaist monks in Tibet, who Ron once met while on a trip to India. Bread-baking goes on until late morning, as 4oes bagel and cookie-baking. An average day’s baking produces 40-45 loaves of bread {60-65 in winter), six dozen bagels and 12 dozen cookies

“ Every day is busy,” says Cathy, and the baked goods are always sold out. A steady stream o f regular customers drop In for their daily loaf of bread, or weekly supply of the Dalai Lama’s “ munchie mix” . Customers bring their own containers and are encouraged to look around the shop. • ‘ Except for one bread and bagel oven and four cookie ovens, no machinery at all is used at the Store. “ It is so much more work to do it all by hand, but it makes a big difference.” according to Ron. As well, everything baked or stocked by the Dalai Lama store contains no synthetic or refined ingredients. No white flour or refined sugar is used, – wholewheat flours and honey are used instead. The store still has the odd customer looking for w hite bread however. “ We think all the additives, etc. are just garbage,” says Ron. Organically-grown foods and ingredients make such perfect sense ”he adds.

Ron and Cathy carry this philosophy over into their personal eating habits. They are both vegetarians, eating no meat and very few dairy products. Ron, “29, has ”been vegetarian for about’ eight years and Cathy, 30, for about two. They also abstain from alcohol. The family, including two year-old Susanna, and Jude, aged four months, lives above the shop. Ron says he likes running a family business. “This way we know what is in the store, and what to recommend” . He adds, “ It takes time to build a business” . And it takes a great deal of hard work. Ron and Cathy do all the baking themselves. This summer, however, they had extra help from a summer student. But with every shelf and corner occupied with bags, bins, jars, etc. the store is becoming crowded. “ We grew out of this space long ago.” says Ron, who hopes some day the shop can move into : larger quarters. Last winter, in conjunction with Algonquin College, Ron and Cathy taught a vegetarian cooking class for eight weeks.

They hope to do it again this year, although it won’t be subsidized by Algonquin this time.

“ People come in often and ask us about their health,” says Cathy “ and want us to suggest

foods to help them ’’. Customers certainly have a great variety to choose from in

any case. 

Besides the trays of bread, bagels and peanut butter, oatmeal or carrot/raisin cookies and 

a scan of the shelves reveals dried beans, peas and lentils. “moussy” non-alcoholic beer, eggs, wholewheat pasta, mustard, oils, jam s, sauces, baking supplies, nuts, seeds, coffee substitute, herb teas, dried fruits (including four kinds of raisins), rice flours, honey, granoia, spices, olives, and even cook books and magazines. 

The store also supplies granola to other stores in Ottawa and the Valley, and will bake cakes to order. And what do you do after eating all this delicious food? Well brush your teeth of course, with special all-natural (no sugar) toothpaste – available at the Dalai Lama.

thanks to Joyce Tennant. Canadian April 19 1978.

First There was Pickle Pie- NOW- KOOL-AID Pickles– Snack Attack!

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First There was Pickle Pie- NOW- KOOL-AID Pickles– Snack Attack!

Photo- Pinterest

Want a Snack Attack? How about KOOL-AID Pickles? I dare you!!!

This recipe will give you 8 yummy servings

You need:

1 (32 ounce) jar dill pickles

2 envelope packages of unsweetened red Kool-Aid

½ cup white sugar

Open your pickle jar, DO NOT snack– and pour off the liquid from the jar into a bowl.

Add your regular Kool-Aid and sugar to the pickle liquid, and stir until the sugar is completely dissolved.

Pour the mixture back into the pickle jar, making sure that pickles are completely covered — Cover jar tightly and shake well.n

Refrigerate the pickles for at least one week before serving– AND–   you can store in the refrigerator for up to 2 months.

I Didnt Mean to Break the Internet With My Cranberry Pickle Pie Recipe

Cranberry Pickle Pie and Utah Pickle Pie –(Last time I saw something like this, the test came back positive. It was a boy)

“Get it On” — Banging Cookies Recipe–This Will Feel Wrong, but Trust Me!

Katherine Hepburn Did Eat Brownies

What was a Fowl Supper?

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What was a Fowl Supper?
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
01 Dec 1915, Wed  •  Page 1

We have been attending this annual dinner with our family and neighbours ever since we moved to rural Saskatchewan in 2010. In the years when I felt cranky, I misheard it as “foul supper,” and in others, with yellow leaves filling my eaves and rain barrel, I heard “fall.” Regardless of pronunciation, fowl suppers are a Prairie harvest tradition, usually held under the auspices of churches and volunteer community groups, with women dishing up and washing up in the church kitchen the day of, and women cooking and baking in their home kitchens for days in advance.

Regardless of which small town you find yourself in, the fowl supper menu is changeless and most of it is homemade: turkey, stuffing, gravy, mash, rutabaga, carrots, salad, buns, and pie. Pie, glorious pie, in all manner of flavours, including — this lucky year — homemade butter tarts. As I picked up a plate of apple pie and added a tart to my plate, I observed many others doing the same thing, usually with a grinning glance around. The presence of Ontario-born butter tarts on a Prairie groaning board is a small indicator of our mobile population: I’ve eaten them in Newfoundland, too, as a partner to figgy duff following a traditional Jigg’s dinner.

Fowl supper tables are communal, so when we sat down, I was elbow to elbow with a stranger, who promptly introduced himself before tucking into his spuds and turkey. Several tables over, I saw some good friends, our nearby neighbours, but they were deep in conversation with their tablemates, so visiting waited until we’d all eaten our pie. As I munched, I recalled the bartering power commanded by butter tarts in the bidding wars that accompanied school lunchtime in my childhood. A butter tart could get you anything, but who’d want to trade it away? from Glacier Farm Media

Read- Was the Butter Tart Really Invented in Barrie, Ontario? Jaan Kolk Files

What wasan Oyster Bar or Pyster supper.. click here.

The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Wed, Oct 15, 1919 · Page 1
CLIPPED FROM
The Sun Times
Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada
07 Nov 1953, Sat  •  Page 12

Related reading

Potluck Don’ts?

The First Burns Anniversary Supper Almonte 1830 notations Of Bairns and Burns

Pease Pudding in the Pot, Nine Days Old

The Little Red House– Dinner Parties were Frequent and the Wine Flowed Freely

Ye Olde Tea and Concert 1888 in Perth- LCGS Annual Potluck

McDonald’s Corners Party 1888-LCGS Potluck

Glen Tay Social 1887 LCGS Potluck

Christmas Rations and Food — Christmas 1942

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Christmas Rations and Food — Christmas 1942

Delivery

Not withstanding the greater amount of shopping which is conducted at this period of the year, delivery restrictions remain in effect. it is pointed out by the regional office of the Wartime Prices and Trade Board, and no special concessions can or will be granted for their relaxation. 

“This Christmas will not be like the old, peaceful holiday of pre-war days,” James Stewart, administrator of Services for the Board, remarked recently. “Labor, gasoline, rubber and vehicles are vitally needed by the armed services and war industries and must be conserved.” 

Accordingly, Christmas shoppers are advised to carry as many of their parcels as they can since retailers are permitted to make only one delivery a day. This advice is given, together with a suggestion that the public shop early, to avoid an overtaxing of delivery facilities. “We have been assured,” Mr. Stewart adds, “that only those who leave their Christmas shopping to the last minute will suffer any inconvenience by reason of the delivery restrictions continuing in force.”

Meat

Fear having been expressed in some communities that farmers who have been in the habit of slaughtering livestock and selling meat to regular customers either on public markets from door to door will be prevented from doing so under the slaughtering order of the Wartime Foods Administration now points out that there is no intention whatever of interfering with this legitimate meat trade.

 Banners who engage in it are of course, required to obtain permits before they carry out slaughtering of livestock for the sale of meat to others, but as long as this trade is conducted in accordance with the regulations of the Board and there is no attempt deliberately to evade those regulations or to violate the ceiling on meat prices, they need have no fear of interference with their accustomed practice.

Farmers who have always been in the habit of selling meat to their customers on markets or elsewhere will be permitted to continue that business. They will be granted permits to carry on this trade as soon as they make application, and these permits will be in effect until such time as officers of the Board have reviewed each case and decided it upon its merits, after which new permits for continued operations will be granted. No permits are, however, needed when the farmer slaughters livestock for consumption in his own household.

December 1942- Almonte Gazette
Almonte Gazette 1942

Food Review of the Smorgasbord at The Queen’s Royal Hotel 1947

Fight Over the “Restaurant on Wheels” 1899 — The First Food Truck Fight

Remembering Milk Weed Pods and World War II