Tag Archives: food

Memories of Mama’s Place and Bob and Marg’s

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Memories of  Mama’s Place and Bob and Marg’s

Linda Nilson-Rogers I worked there for Salim and Salha Houchaimi, in the mid 80’s. They held staff Christmas parties, and supported many local sports teams!

Mary Anne Harrison Margaret Mantil worked at that restaurant for many years. Probably through many of its reincarnations

Sharron Davis I had so many great meals there as a kid with mom and dad and we always had a good visit with Salim and Sally and Gail.


Mary Anne Harrison
 Bob and Marg McDonald owned the convenience store at the same location. After mom did the groceries at the IGA (where the heritage mall is now) my brother and I were always given a quarter and we stopped at McDonald’s on our way out of town. I always got a bag of S&V chips and a coke. The cokes were in a cooler that had cold water in it and you had to slide your drinks through it to get them out. Mom probably made that stop so that we would be quiet the rest of the trip home to Corkery.

Tammy Lloyd- IllingworthThe best….. good times, great food!!

Madeline Anne HamiltonJoanne Neill wasnt this called apollos garden at one point?

Jen DuffMadeline Anne Hamilton it was Apollos after Mamas place moved

Gwen OneillIt was also called mel’s at one time. Mel and Cecilia Lockhart built the place in the 50s then sold it to lamoureux in the 60s

Gwen OneillThat dinning room was actually a garage where George Villeneuve was the mechanic. He had a swing in there for my brother and i to swing on. I think my parents sold the store in 1959. I was young then so could be wrong.

Catherine Chick McDonaldIt was also called Bob and Marg’s…late 60s..early 70s…because my Mom and Dad owned it.

Gerry NewtonSandy and I used to pump gas there in the 60’s

Lisa Stanley SheehanLoved this store growing up…mello rolls ❤ and the greatest folks

Rose Crawford McCormickMy mom and dad….Pat and Earl Crawford of Ashton…..loved to eat there.

Shirley FlaxmanWas that up on the hwy to Ottawa behind St James St??

Shirley FlaxmanScott Bolton We (Hutts) lived on St James St and visited that restaurant many, many times – great place. Early 60″s to late 60″s!!!

Christine Richards-BayleyMy family use to go almost every Friday .. sit in the dining rm & I always had to have a Shirley temple . Still love them

Allison VaughanChristine Richards-Bayley yep remember that! Also remember my mum and dad going there every Friday night and then going back up Saturdays to pay their bill lol !!! They had a great time there always!

Jean GossetWe live right beside all these incarnations of the same building, so we knew all the families that operated it over the years. They were all great neighbours, and complimented Irish town.

Jayne Munro-OuimetThe Eldali family who bought the restaurant from Bob and Marg, came from Madjel Balhis Lebanon. They came to Canada as a result of an unexpected evacuation when their village became a target war zone. The whole village was evacuated, the villagers left by plane to Canada and by boat to neighbouring country not affected by the war. They could not speak English, and a number of families in the Ramsay Almonte area helped them to learn. The youngest son Shaied went to Almonte High School for a few years.

Dawn JonesJayne Munro-Ouimet I think you mean the Eldali family. Said was a year older than i. Very nice family. I found out recently from one of the older brothers (who owns the pizza place in Lanark) that Said moved back to Lebanon is married with 6 kids and he is employed as an architect.

Dawn JonesJayne Munro-Ouimet did one of the girls marry Salin Houchiami? Or am I confused? Anyone?

Dawn JonesJayne Munro-Ouimet : Salin Houchiami and his wife ran the Gourmet Restaurant in Carleton place for years. I’m sure his wife is one of those girls.  Mike is now running the Gourmet. They also have a younger son Albert who is a heavy equipment mechanic.

Pansy MetcalfeI remember Mamma’s Place Restaurant and I knew the whole family! Helped them learn English and Their daughter Sabah was in my class and we became good friends!

Andy Williams-Mamma’s Place, was named after Rose Mantil who lived in Corkery. She was affectionately called “Mamma” by many, including her daughter Margaret who was a waitress at the restaurant for many years. Margaret was the one who suggested the name.

Cate JohnsonUsed to go there on Sundays way back when (liquor stores weren’t open then, and you could only drink if you ordered a meal) eat and drink our faces off! Lots of people did that and it always turned out to be a HUGE party every Sunday

Jean GossetI think before the Eldali family, the operator was Roy O’Connell, maybe my order is off a little, but he was there for a short time in the early 70’s. Of course Gail, and Margaret would be the best resources on this subject, rest their souls.

John CurrieWen’t There About 1954 To See The Hockey Games They Were About the Only Store In Almonte With A Black & White TV.

Donald ScottMan they had the ,best Pizza in the County back in the day 70’s n 80’s

Darlene MacDonaldDonna Manson worked here for many years and followed to work at the one in the mall

Donna Webb MunroGood memories. In the early 60’s- that is when my Almonte memories start- the farmers would take the milk in to the dairy and then congregate at Mommas for coffee and swap stories before heading home to work. IRA, the girls and I often ate there. Fond memories. IRA had many stories of Wayne Lockhart was a young lad – hitting the plastic ketchup bottle a certain way would put ketchup on the ceiling and also a certain young lad and would sneak downstairs after Dad had baked some pies. Never found out if he had a favourite kind.

Bobby GallantJayne Munro and Sylvia Ford took me there for one of my first legal drinks. They got me a Singapore Sling lol it was good

Brenda MunroI don’t think I missed a day of going over to Mel and Cecilia ‘s store.. The candy was great, and My Dad took me over every evening .right Gwen.

Shannon CastonguayUsed to work there with Gail and Sue it was my first waitress job

1964 Almonte Gazette

Lisa Stanley SheehanThey were located on Ottawa St at the beginning, where Mamm’a use to be…They had grocery, restaurant

Marion MacDonaldon Ottawa Street near where the Green Mill food truck is today

Cathy McRae SharbotBefore mum and dad moved here permanently we used to come up for the weekend and we would stop at Bob and Marg’s for mellow rolls on the way home

Jim HillUsed to eat there on occasion great food back then.

Did you know Mama’s Place opened in 1979? Who remembers when they were in a ‘house setting’ on Ottawa Street?

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Linda MillsThey made a great filet mignon! Mr. Eldali and his sons

Peggy ByrneTotally different – they are a much smaller operation now than when they had the larger restaurant – they are now a small diner as opposed to a full restaurant that they were at the other larger location

Laurie McgregorCould walk up from home. Loved their pizza too

Heather Birchall TalvitieI do. My grandpa’s favourite place. He was a policeman in CP for many years I too, was established in 1969, the first of many grandchildren

D Christopher Vaughan • 4 years ago

And before it was Mama’s Place, it was Bob and Marg’s. They lived above the restaurant with their family – hope I get them all: Sandy, Paul, Jeff, Michelle, Larry, and Catherine (Chicky) McDonald

FOUND ALL THESE SMASHING ALMONTE ITEMS PAINTINGS AT MAMA’S PLACE IN ALMONTE
https://blanglais.wixsite.com/website
Jeff Reid
Mama’s Place Hockey group
Randy Rivington
lmonte Country Haven
March 6, 2020  · 

Nothing like gathering up some ladies and having finger-lickin’ fun food from Mama’s Place to kick start the weekend. Of course, Anna & Megan apparently provided the entertainment but sometimes what happens at the Haven – well all I can say is the ladies know when to talk about it and when to keep it in the toe of their shoe!
lmonte Country Haven
March 6, 2020  · 

Nothing like gathering up some ladies and having finger-lickin’ fun food from Mama’s Place to kick start the weekend. Of course, Anna & Megan apparently provided the entertainment but sometimes what happens at the Haven – well all I can say is the ladies know when to talk about it and when to keep it in the toe of their shoe!
Karen Hirst
June 11, 2018  · 

Karen Hirst, Marg McDonald, Rosalyn Wing, Mary Ann Somerton, Irene Botham, Karen Marshall, Uncertain who is at the end

The Millstone
2005: Old Mama’s Place burns down – The Millstone

The Millstone
2005: Old Mama’s Place burns down – The Millstone

Comments about the Canadian Cafe Almonte — Low Family

Documenting Badour’s Inn Almonte

What Did You Eat at the Superior? Comments Comments Comments and a 1979 Review

Dupont’s Mill Street Restaurant Renovated 1899

What Was the David Harum Ice Cream Sundae Sold in Lanark County?

History Clippings of the the Centennial Restaurant – Pakenham

Does Your Chewing Gum Lose its Flavour?

The Sadler Farm on Highway 44– Nancy Anderson

Documenting Isabel Hogan’s Candy Store

Community Comments — Memories of 46 Queen Street

A Drive to Pakenham 2008 with Updates

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A Drive to Pakenham 2008 with Updates

The view shows the carding mill, planing mill and cheese factory.

BY JANICE KENNEDY– 2008– What did you do? I spent a perfectly languid summer day doing perfectly languid summertime things getting out of town, enjoying the scenery, strolling, nibbling and browsing. Could you be a little more specific? Sure. I went to Pakenham, part of greater “Mississippi Mills.” The little village on the Ottawa Valley version of the Mississippi River is barely more than a half-hour from downtown Ottawa, so it’s a drive-in-the-country destination that doesn’t impoverish you at the gas pump. Why Pakenham? There are lots of little villages around Ottawa, aren’t there? There are indeed, many of them certainly worth a daytrip. But what’s appealing about Pakenham, besides the proximity and prettiness of the place, is its ambience.

Some visitors might call it sleepy and it does seem to be the antithesis of bustling but I prefer to think of it as laid-back. A visit to Pakenham is an undeniably leisurely affair. Is that code for “leave the kids at home?” Maybe. What I like about Pakenham is the opposite of what appeals to my two young grandsons, whose tastes run more to water parks and go-kart tracks. If you don’t count the ice cream, Pakenham’s attractions tend to be more adult-oriented. Tell me about them. The village is both attractive and historic. At nearly 200 years old, it seems to have a settled sense of self.

Many of the houses some of them meticulously restored or maintained with their original character reflect the 19th-century love of Regency and Classic Revival architectural styles. In fact, if your interests run that way, you can take a detailed historical walking tour of Pakenham, guided by a helpful little pamphlet available free at most village businesses.

Dating back to the 1840s, Pakenham’s general store is thought to be the oldest continually operated general store on the continent. With everything from fresh baked goods to brass beds, it’s a great place to browse. What’s the highlight? Pakenham’s landmark is The Bridge. If you come by way of Kinburn Side Road, the exit you take from Highway 417, you enter the village by way of its famous stone bridge (“the only five-arch stone bridge in North -America,” tourist literature boasts). It’s an impressive structure, built in 1901 with locally cruarried stone cut in the squared look of the time, suggesting solidity and endurance. Small riverside parks by the bridge allow you to get a good look at the five sturdy spans and, on the north side, to listen to the rushing burble of the water over what is called Little Falls.

Pakenham’s century-old bridge is the only five-arch stone span bridge in North America. Then there is 5 Span Feed and Seed (“We feed your needs”). Besides agricultural and cottage supplies, 5 Span also sells outdoor clothing and local maple syrup appropriately, since Pakenham is in Lanark County, the heart of Ontario maple country. Which reminds me: A visit to Pakenham could happily accommodate a short jaunt to Fulton’s, the sugar bush just a few minutes outside town (directions at fultons.ca). Sounds wonderful, but aren’t you forgetting something?

Did you not mention Ice cream? I certainly did. Summertime’s easy livin’ , should always include at least one afternoon stroll by the river or in this case, relaxation on one of the park benches near the landmark bridge to contemplate the flow of the Mississippi a homemade waffle cone in hand filled with the smooth, cool glories of ice cream. In Pakenham, you can get your dose of frozen decadence at Scoop’s (111 Waba, just off the main street) or at the General Store. Either way, it’s a short walk to the river.

OK, I confess. Right next to the feed and seed suppliers, a small stand operated by local Cedar Hill Berry Farm was selling red, ripe and irresistible fresh strawberries. With visions of shortcake dancing in my head, I picked up a litre and doubled back to Watt’s Cooking? for a package of fresh tea biscuits (not quite shortcake, but close enough). That evening, in little more time than it takes to whip up a bowl of cream, we had our glorious old-fashioned summer dessert thanks to our Pakenham daytrip. I guess you could call that a sweet ending to a pretty sweet day? I guess you could, although it also made for a sweet beginning the next morning.

This was written inThe Ottawa Citizen==Ottawa, Ontario, Canada26 Jul 2008, Sat  •  Page 64

Restaurants updated

Centennial Restaurant ($$) read-History Clippings of the the Centennial Restaurant – Pakenham
Canadian
Distance: 0.31 miles

Copper Kettle Restaurant & Pakenham Inn ($$)
Canadian
Distance: 0.31 miles

Penny’s Fudge Factory

Cartwright Springs ($$)
Breweries
Distance: 2.77 miles

Law and Orders Pakenham

Service options: TakeoutAddress: 239 Deer Run Rd Unit 2, Pakenham, ON K0A 2X0

Hours

Saturday11a.m.–6p.m.
Sunday11a.m.–5p.m.
MondayClosed
TuesdayClosed
WednesdayClosed
ThursdayClosed
Friday11a.m.–6p.m.

3 Apples Bakery5.0  (5) · Bakery2544 County Rd No 29 · (613) 883-3358

Related reading

History Clippings of the the Centennial Restaurant – Pakenham

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History Clippings of the the Centennial Restaurant – Pakenham
Pakenham downtown thanks to Marilyn Snedden via the collection of Margie Argue and her late brother Dan Paige–read-Pakenham Community Centre Photos

Do you ever watch a movie, set in a small town where people go into a restaurant or pass each other on the street and greet each other? You wish for instant that you lived in a town like that and Almonte is that with the Superior Restaurant and Pakenham is that sort of town with the Centennial. That is what these restaurants should be best known for. It is the place where families gather, where people go after church, where the guys gather before they go hunting. It’s where people greet one another when they walk in the door. For a moment you can feel like you belong and just take in the laid-back friendliness. Let’s keep these restaurants alive!!!!

Mississippi Mills salutes long-standing businesses at second annual recognition event Click

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Sep 1977, Tue  •  Page 80

The Citizen, Ottawa, Tuesday, September 6, 1977 An artistic salute to a good restaurant By Robert Smythe

The women at the Centennial Restaurant in , Pakenham, Chit., have been serving up good restaurant food and motherly advice for some time, and it is in recognition of their service to the community that the owners of Andrew Dickson’s craft ; store and gallery have put together a month long “Salute to the Ladies of the Centennial Restaurant”. Of course the show’s food theme affords the perfect opportunity to display predictable plates, goblets and place mats all of which abound at the Salute, in the earth tone chunkiness that you come to expect from local potters.

But those who have abandoned this homespun functionalism have done so with a good deal of humor. Their totally impractical tributes to the Centennial are the brightest of this group effort. Ice-cream is really the restaurant’s ace special, and so it is only natural that Paddy Mann’s vanilla cone banner should be hanging outside the old stone building. The image has also found its way onto colored T-shirts, screened by Jane Bonnell.

Gail Bent has made Gobelin tapestries of a stove and a Scottish frugal fridge (with only one carrot in it), but her funniest piece is Holstein By Any Other Name. It is a white wood udder, whose four generous teats are delivering a gushing stream of fibre milk down the wall into a waiting galvanized bucket. Across its side is emblazoned a silver MOO. Alice Paige’s jars of jam jelly look luscious sitting in the window with the sum streaming through them, especially when their deep clear color is echoed by a pair of ruby red satin lips hanging nearby.

Other clever and cute stuffed toys include some glossy eggplants, halved avocados, and a delicious chocolate wafer ice cream bar with a large bite taken out of it. Regular stuffed sandwiches come in several separate layers one for the lettuce, one for the meat, two for slices of bread. Inedible food was also heaped onto brooch pins. Of these, Neil Stewart’s jewelery work was exceptional. Using ivory, silver and brass he has assembled a miniature breakfast of bacon and eggs sunnyside-up, on a tiny round plate. Another piece features a slice of pie (a la mode?) and accompanying fork. At the other extreme of scale is Wayne Cardinelli’s oversized Blue Ribbon Pie in the Sky Award for the Centennial. The medal, which is at least one foot across, has been struck in clay for the occasion.

Sally TuffinI remember when it had red and white checkered tablecloths and shelving where local hand crafts were displayed for sale. Food was excellent.Then when I was a student at Pakenham Public we used to go out with friends to lunch at the Centennial.At the end of the schoolyear our bus drivers used to buy us all an ice cream at the ice cream counter. Worked there for a year when I was a teenager.

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Sep 1971, Sat  •  Page 47
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Mar 2015, Mon  •  Page 25– Former Bookeeper of the Centennial Restaurant
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 Feb 1994, Thu  •  Page 18
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Oct 1971, Sat  •  Page 4

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Oct 1975, Sat  •  Page 88

Heaps of ice cream in the biggest cone in the country (maybe in the whole world) goes for 50 cents at the Centennial Restaurant in Pakenham. Ont., on Highway 29 and it’s big. People come from all over the Ottawa Valley, and beyond, to try the cone they’ve heard about at the Centennial, as its name suggests, opened in 1967, and Elsa Stewart, its proprietor, explains: “We started serving the big cones around 1970. Some of the girls at the restaurant began scooping out larger cones and I encouraged them to continue.” She describes the cones, modestly, as “two, good-sized scoops.” Some of her customers liken them to softballs and its Sealtest and it’s good, but it’s the hefty scoops that really impress everybody. The restaurant keeps three freezers packed with tubs of ice cream and there’s good variety chocolate, vanilla, tutti frutti. strawberry, chocolate-walnut, maple, and heavenly hash a devastating mix of marshmallow-chocolate ice cream with chocolate chips and a few nuts. One of the nicest things you can do on a warm summer day is stop at the Centennial, pick up a cone and stroll two blocks to the lovely, old stone bridge that crosses the Mississippi River at Pakenham.

Bev Deugo I worked at Centennial Restaurant in Pakenham in the summer when Elsa Stewart owned it…scooped ice cream until my fingers froze ….Cones were huge, lineups were long, we scooped for hours on a hot summer day.

CLIPPED FROMNational PostToronto, Ontario, Canada14 Jul 1979, Sat  •  Page 10

An Almonter doth protest!!!

National Post
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
08 Sep 1979, Sat  •  Page 66

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 May 1980, Fri  •  Page 74

This arched landmark is one of only a few such bridges in North America. Built in 1903 across the Mississippi River, it is less than eight metres wide and was designed for horses and wagons. As the years went on, motor vehicle traffic put such stress on the bridge that it was threatened with demolition. Instead, after history lovers protested, the stones were taken down, catalogued and then replaced over a reinforced concrete structure in 1984.

Details: The bridge is near the intersection of Kinburn Side Road and County Road 29, just as you come into Pakenham.

While you’re in the area: The grey tower of St. Peter Celestine Roman Catholic Church dominates the village. The lovely stone building opened in 1893.

The Bookeeper
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Sep 1971, Sat  •  Page 24
Christa Lowry, Mayor of Mississippi Mills
September 20, 2020  · 

Sunday Night Family Dinner when it’s my turn to cook. Thanks to Omar at the Centennial Restaurant for helping me out!
#SupportLocal #VyingForFavouriteAuntie

Who has been to the Centennial in Pakenham??? Carebridge Community Support1 min · So happy to work with community builder Omar of Pakenham’s Centennial Restaurant. Using donations from our MMTogether fund initiative we purchased gift certificates for tenants of 5 Arches Housing and members of the Pakenham SeniorsClub. The Centennial and Omar have been fixtures in downtown Pakenham for over 25 years!

And yes, Rice Pudding is history:) Faye Campbell
  · Pakenham  · 

Having lunch with my UCW group in Pakenham Centennial Restaurant had the best rice pudding with raisins and whipped cream. The best I ever tasted.

Elsa Stewart former owner

Turning over of Stewart House at Pakenham to United Church
 
Sunday took place when Mrs. Elsa Stewart, left, hands Rev. Murray McBride case containing golden key, while he already holds deeds given to properties. Other property is White House next door to shelter those on lay retreats and conferences.  Photo by Peter Greene

Mrs. Elsa H. Stewart
Deceased
Pakenham, Ontario, Canada
Order of Canada
Member of the Order of Canada
Awarded on: June 20, 1983
Invested on: October 05, 1983
R. ARTHUR STEWART, C.M. Operators of a model livestock-breeding farm, the Stewarts have been active in many farm organizations, founded university entrance bursaries to the Ontario Agricultural College in Guelph for local students, and donated and worked in a United Church retreat house. They have also been major contributors to the restoration and revitalization of the village of Pakenham, Ontario.

Art and Elsa Stewart

Pakenham’s Stewart Community Centre was named for Art and Elsa Stewart who greatly contributed to the restoration and revitalization of Pakenham in the 1960s, 70s and 80s. It was opened in 1974, replacing the old Community Hall. Art and Elsa were awarded the Order of Canada in June of 1983. Operators of a model livestock-breeding farm, the Stewarts were active in many farm organizations and founded university entrance bursaries to the Ontario Agricultural College in Guelph for local students.

tJuliana Mcfarlane-Sabourin and Omar from the Centennial restaurant
Juliana Mcfarlane-Sabourin and Omar from the Centennial restaurant

Related reading

Dickson Hall Fire Pakenham-H. H. Dickson

Pakenham Community Centre Photos

Did You Know the Village of Pakenham Moved?

The Story of the Carleton Place Christmas Basket and Angel Tree Program

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The Story of the Carleton Place Christmas Basket and Angel Tree Program
The Carleton Place Christmas Basket Program

We need your donation!

Because of Covid-19 there is no Santa parade to collect money and organizations that usually donate will not be able to this year!

Donations can be e-transfer to cpchristmasbasket@gmail.com or mailed to Christmas Basket 296 Gardiner Shore Rd Carleton Place, Ont. K7C 0C4

We give tax receipts for $20 or more!

If you have questions call 343-463-0192

#community #weareinthistogether #carletonplace #pleasehelp

Please consider donating.. Thanks so much!
I just made a donation to support CARLETON PLACE CHRISTMAS BASKET PROGRAM on CanadaHelps.

Brice McNeely, a Tannery and Eggs Benedict

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Brice McNeely, a Tannery and Eggs Benedict
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Jun 1989, Sat  •  Page 109

Here in Carleton Place can park their cars and eat great food, including breakfast, beside the Mississippi River. The building was constructed in 1861, although a tannery was first operated on the site in 1852.

Joe Scott took a poor calf skin to Brice McNeely who had a tannery on the banks of the Mississippi on Bell Street and asked what he was paying for hides. Brice told him 60 cents each with ten cents off for every hole in the hide.

You’d better take it, Mr. McNeely, and I think I owe you something for it,” was the startled reply from J. Scott as Brice looked at the hide with more holes than Swiss Cheese.

Carleton Place Herald 1900

Farmers may have driven their animals to Carleton Place, where John Murdoch’s tannery at “Morphy’s Ford” turned hides into leather. It’s now The Gastro Pub, still with the beautiful patio.

Brice McNeely bought the business in 1860 and left the building to his son, who turned it into a summer home at the turn of the century. It first became a restaurant in 1981, and a dining lounge was built from a local log barn. The lounge is named “Henry’s” after a friendly ghost who’s rumoured to haunt the premises. Now it is called The Waterfront Gastro Pub

12 Bell Street (0.08 mi)
Carleton Place, ON, Canada K7C 1V9-(613) 257-5755

Image may contain: food, text that says 'DOUBLE BACON BENNY THE WATERFRONT GASTROPUB'
Highlights info row image

Read more about the history of Brice McNeely here:

You Would Never Find Warm Leatherette at the Local Carleton Place Tannery

The Moore Legacy — Frances Moore — Genealogy

The McNeely Family Saga– Part 3

The McNeely Family Saga– Part 1 and 2

The Carleton Place House with the Coffin Door

“This day twenty years ago I came to Carleton Place, near the close of the Civil War.  At that time property was of little value.  I took charge of the railway station as station master.  The only industries in the place were the grist mill, run by Mr. Bolton, Allan McDonald’s carding mill, Brice McNeely’s tannery and the saw mill run by Robert Gray, with one circular saw.  David Findlay’s foundry was just starting.

The lead mines were about closing down then.  Twenty years ago it may be said there was no such thing as employment here for anyone and, strange as it seems, no one seemed to wish for work.  Their wants were few, and those wants seemed to be soon supplied.–George Lowe, a seventy year old resident of Carleton Place: (July 1884)

Ad from Carleton Place newspaper 1873 from .. Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Brice McNeely’s tannery is one of the oldest in this part of the country. The proprietor manufactures leather of various kinds and is one of our substantial steady and increasingly prosperous men, with considerable real estate. John F. Cram, whose large wool-pulling establishment is well known in this section, manipulates a vast amount of sheep pelts in a year, his premises being one of the most extensive in Eastern Ontario. He also manufactures russet leather.

Did you know the library used to be in the town hall and Brice McNeely Jr was not only the superintendent for the St James Sunday School but also the town librarian. He picked out the books for you to read and you had no choice in the matter and had to take what was given to you.

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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Feb 1896, Tue  •  Page 5
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Jul 1903, Sat  •  Page 6
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Dec 1942, Sat  •  Page 12

Let’ s Remember Rationing Coupons

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Let’ s Remember Rationing Coupons
property of Adin Wesley Daigle

To help people stay healthy while rationing food, the government put together Canada’s Official Food Rules, that told people how much of each of the six food groups — milk, cereals and bread, meat, fruits and vegetables, fish and eggs — they should eat every day. You know it today as the Canada Food Guide.

These cards above permitted Mrs. McColl of Carleton Place to purchase rationed food from a local shop. Eleven million ration cards (lead image) were issued in Canada. Inside there were coupons issued for such things as sugar, butter and meat

People were willing to deal with it because we were very clearly attacked by another nation’s military and were presented and for Canadians, it was the ultimate exercise in sharing. Since Great Britain was virtually cut off, our food exports provided an essential lifeline to the mother country. By the end of the war Canadian exports accounted for 57 per cent of all wheat and flour, 39 percent of bacon, 24 percent of cheese, and 15 percent of eggs consumed in Britain.

I don’t think vegetables were rationed as they didn’t require much resources to cultivate them (no grain to feed them, etc), and they started the dig for victory project which increased the amount of ground growing food dramatically (basically anywhere that was a decent patch of soil was use for planting). People got inventive, things like carrot cake were popular (grow your own carrots).

Weekly ration for 1 adult (~1944)

FoodAmount
Bacon & Ham4 oz
Meat~ 1/2 lb minced beef
Butter2 oz
Cheese2 oz
Margarine4 oz
Cooking fat4 oz
Milk3 pints
Sugar8 oz
Preserves1 lb every 2 months
Tea2 oz
Eggs1 fresh egg per week
Sweets/Candy12 oz every 4 weeks

Here, the past, and its culinary turns, could be more instructive then we might think. Certainly puts things into perspective, doesn’t it?

193 Wartime Recipes–https://the1940sexperiment.com/100-wartime-recipes/

The 1940’s Experiment

Frugal Wartime Recipes to See You Through Challenging Times!

This is a recipe for simple currant spiced buns that turned out so absolutely tasty and yummy and easy to make that I simply called them GLORIOUS..
They are not only economical but taste sooo good!–https://the1940sexperiment.com/2009/11/12/glory-buns/

The more I think about it the more I think it’s a terrible, terrible thing. I think about war a lot and I think about how all over our world it has effected every day families regardless of colour or creed.

I made these WWII ‘Glory Buns’ today after I had observed the Remembrance Day silence and while I listened to the full Remembrance Day service from Bridgewater, Nova Scotia, on my local radio station, CKBW.

First of all I listened to Pierre Allaine

Pierre Allaine: Was a 14 year old when war broke out. He used to ferry people, lying flat on a barge during the night, across the river, by pushing the barge silently with a long pole to the free side of France. Pierre recited Flanders Field at the service in Bridgewater today.

Next I watched Frank Hammond who shared his thoughts… Quote: Conflicts today are not being resolved through power and the only real way is through negotiation…

And then Bert Eagle… Quote: Bert Eagle: There should NEVER be another war again, EVER, yet if I were a young man again and we went to war I would serve my country gladly…..

Above all I’ve been thinking of the BRAVE men and women who have taken part in a war and lived through it or given their lives and the BRAVE families at home battling to keep their children safe and fed and holding things together…

And the Glory Buns? It was such a glorious day that it needed to be celebrated with simple glorious food on my best glorious tray….. it reminded me just how lucky we really are.

Recipe for Glory Buns

  • 12 oz of wholewheat flour (or white)
  • 2 oz margarine
  • 2 oz sultanas/currants/raisins (optional)
  • 2 oz sugar
  • 8 fl oz warm water
  • 3 teaspoons of quick rise dried yeast
  • 1 teaspoon dried cinnamon powder
  • pinch salt

To glaze:

  • 3 tablespoons water
  • 3 tablespoons sugar

Method
Place all the dried ingredients in a bowl (apart from dried fruit) and stir
Rub in the margarine
Mix in the dried fruit
Add in the warm water
Knead well (use extra flour if mixture is too sticky)
Divide dough into 12 balls
Place on greased deep sided tray (I like to use the 8 x 8 inch foil trays and place 4 balls in each)
Cover with plastic film or plastic bag
Leave to rise somewhere warm for an hour or so
When risen place in oven at 180 C for 15 minutes or so until golden brown
When cooked remove from oven onto a wire rack to cool
When cool prepare glaze by heating the water and sugar together until dissolved
Using a pastry brush apply the glaze generously


https://www.elinorflorence.com/blog/rationing/

When I Say Whoa–I Mean Whoa–The Dairy Horse

Guess What I Found?–A Purchase from the Yard Goods Store

Memories of Gold Bond Stamps?

Ration Cards from Gord Cross’s family

Nostalgia — Lamb Quarters

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Nostalgia — Lamb Quarters

Lambs quarters, fat hen, pig weed or goosefoot is one of the plants/weeds my Grandfather Crittenden talked about eating when he was a kid near Call’s Mills. Oddly, no one in the family ever fed it to me. My Grandmother would point it out when it was growing in her flowerbeds, and pull it out. Grampy Critt claimed not to know that much about edible wilds, but get him talking and quite a bit came out. Some folks used to call it “Poverty Food”.

Lambs quarter is also known as wild spinach, and is interchangeable with spinach in your usual recipes. I’ve seen some use it in vegetable lasagna or some of the spinach in smoothies. You can also replace some of the basil or spinach in pesto with lambs quarter. Remember — lambs quarter smells “green”. Do not to eat the lambsquarters raw. I can’t remember why, and since I didn’t taste them raw myself, I don’t know. Maybe because of the fuzzy texture? Or perhaps they have a bitter flavor?

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Lamb’s Quarters sprouts

Sautéed Lambs quarters with Lemon

a large bowl of lambs quarters
1 tablespoon butter
salt
lemon wedges

Pluck the leaves from the thicker stems (just because they can be a little tough), but don’t bother to separate out the tender baby stems. Wash well and spin dry.

Sizzle a pat of butter in a skillet and then toss in a great mountain of the weeds. Push them around for 1-2 minutes until wilted and dark green. Sprinkle with coarse salt and lemon juice. Serve hot.

Add skillet-cooked (or steamed) greens to any number of soups and pots of beans.

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The Orlando Sentinel
Orlando, Florida
06 Jun 1985, Thu  •  Page 85

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 May 1917, Sat  •  Page 8

Oddities — Lanark County Puffball Mushrooms

Remembering Milk Weed Pods and World War II

Did Bad Nutrition Begin with Importing Onions?

Cry Me a Haggis River!

The Beckwith Kitchen and Beckwith Butcher “Handy List to Keep on File”

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The Beckwith Kitchen and Beckwith Butcher “Handy List to Keep on File”
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The Beckwith Kitchen

1 Costello Drive, Unit 3
Carleton Place, Ontario K7C 0B4

(613) 257-8330

http://www.thebeckwithkitchen.ca

Letting everyone know that we are remaining open. You are still welcome to come into the store and shop – just please respect our requests that we posted. Our staff are working hard to keep meals and desserts coming out. We may not be able to offer all our usual products but we are trying. Also our some of our meals depend on the butcher store being able to provide us with what we need. Thank you for your understanding.

I decided this is our mascot! He makes us smile.
Keep Safe.

The Beckwith Kitchen

Good Wednesday morning!

As we navigate through these times, just wanted to let you know we had a visit from the representative of the Leads, Grenville & Lanark Health Unit to see how we were doing and review what precautionary measures we had taken. She was very satisfied with what we had implemented and could not add anything to what we had done. Our mayor, Doug Black, happened to be in the store at the time. Thank you for your support. Would also like to give a special thank you to Linda Seccaspina for all the support she is providing to businesses still open in Carleton Place. Her support keeps our spirits up and willingness to keep pushing through!
Have a safe day!
Kathleen & Rob Carpenter

Good news – we have created a website where we have posted a list of items that are normally in our Freezer – I say normally as with the surge of people shopping we are short stocked.
Take a look: www.thebeckwithkitchen.ca
Thank you Miranda for getting this done so quickly💕

 

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Above is a list of sample frozen dishes we have in house – we do make fresh everyday so have items in our fridge as well. Note that we cannot guarantee all items are available. We regret there are no price listings as we package all by hand and prices for meals and squares are by weight. Soups prices vary depending on size and type. Please call if you have any questions – 613-257-8330.

 

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Scalloped Potatoes

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The Beckwith Kitchen Spaghetti and Meatballs.
House crafted tomato pomodoro sauce, tender savoury beef meatballs, string noodles and freshly grated parmesan cheese.

 

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Remember — The ‘Fine Print’ During these times

To our valued customers
Due to recent events, we are taking extra steps to ensure your safety and the safety of our staff.
Effective immediately our hours will be 11:00 am to 5 pm, Monday to Saturday. We will be CLOSED on Sundays.
We will no longer be accepting cash – Debit and Credit only.

If you are sick – DO NOT ENTER the store
If you have been traveling and have not quarantined for 14 days or you have been in close contact with a returning traveler – DO NOT ENTER the store. Please call in your orders and we will arrange pick up. You will be required to pre pay prior to pick up.

 

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Chicken Enchilada


We encourage you to plan your meals for a week in order to limit your time out.
We also encourage you to call in your order ahead. As we are getting many call in orders, we will prepare them in the order received and will call you when they are ready – time to get them ready depends on volume and availability of product from our staff cooking and our suppliers. Therefore, do not expect it within 24 hours. Again, we will call you when it is ready. Please refrain from calling numerous times to see if it is ready as the time it takes for us to answer your call, takes time away from our staff preparing the orders.


We ask that you please respect the above. Failure to do so could result in more restrictions, and/or closure of both our stores.
We thank you for your support and cooperation
These are different times we are living in now.

 

 

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The Beckwith Butcher

1 costello drive unit 4 (0.90 mi)
Carleton Place, Ontario k7c0b4
(613) 253-6328

 

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Available pork sausages for our packages.

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Now accepting over the phone orders! Please call in your meat order (613)-253-6328 and we will have it ready for you when you come to pick it up!
If you’re quarantined…
call in your order, pay over the phone with a credit card, and we will bring it out to your car for you!
Don’t Forget about our freezer packages!
Case of Bone in chicken breast (40 lbs) $175
Case of Boneless Skinless chicken breast (40 lbs) $185

To our Valued Customers

Due to recent events, we are taking extra steps to ensure your safety and the safety of our staff.
Effective immediately our hours will be 11:00 am to 5 pm, Monday to Saturday. We will be CLOSED on Sundays.
We will no longer be accepting cash – Debit and Credit only.
If you are sick – DO NOT ENTER the store
If you have been traveling and have not quarantined for 14 days or you have been in close contact with a returning traveler – DO NOT ENTER the store.
Please call in your orders and we will arrange pick up. You will be required to pre pay prior to pick up.
We encourage you to plan your meals for a week in order to limit your time out.
We also encourage you to call in your order ahead. As we are getting many call in orders, we will prepare them in the order received and will call you when they are ready – time to get them ready depends on volume and availability of product from our suppliers. Therefore, do not expect it within 24 hours. Again, we will call you when it is ready. Please refrain from calling numerous times to see if it is ready as the time it takes for us to answer your call, takes time away from our staff preparing the orders.
We ask that you please respect the above. Failure to do so could result in more restrictions, and/or closure of both our stores.
We thank you for your support and cooperation
These are different times we are living in now.

 

 

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relatedreading

Pease Pudding in the Pot, Nine Days Old

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Pease Pudding in the Pot, Nine Days Old

 

Pease pudding in the pot, nine days old. Some like it hot, some like it cold, … The dish probably started out as pease porridge, but after the pudding cloth was invented, it became a pudding, often eaten with salt pork. Puddings, in those days, were not the creamy thickened desserts which we call pudding today.

 

In 1947 there was was a strange advertisement by Dodds and Erwin of Perth, headed “Some Like It Hot.” People thought it might be about boogie woogie but instead it was. about “peas brose”  Ever hear of it? “What’s better than a nice cup of pease porridge right now?” asks the ad.

This goes on: “They say it was pea brose that made Scotland the second best nation on earth (the first being Ireland.) “Others say it was pea brose that drove the Scotsman away from home. So tastes differ.”

It was said that it could be found at Snow Road, and Flower Station. (Both were on the old Kingston and Pembroke branch of the CPR).

 

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Pease pudding is an English dish consisting of boiled peas which are seasoned with salt and other spices, and then cooked together with bacon or ham for extra flavor. The final result is a thick porridge with mild, yet rich flavors. Originally, pease pudding was cooked in large cauldrons which were hanging over an open fire.

Traditionally pease pudding is served with pork and was often cooked in a muslin with the ham. Today, it is even available in cans throughout the United Kingdom.

Recipe here CLICK

 

 

historicalnotes

 

Dodds & Erwin has been serving the agricultural community for over 99 years. Established in 1918 the business is now being operated by 4th generation Erwin’s! We supply feed and farm supplies to all the local farms as well as purchase most of our grain locally off those same farms! We also have a wide variety of wild life feeds and pet foods to suite your needs. In the summer months of May-October we have a vast bulk landscape supply depot as well as every variety of lawn seed to garden seed you desire! Stop into our Feeds n’ Needs outlet at 2870 Rideau Ferry road, 1 km south of Perth on county road 1.

 

 

 

Funky Soul Stew was Once Cooking in Carleton Place

Cooking with Findlay’s — Christine Armstrong’s Inheritance and Maple Syrup Recipe

Food Review of the Smorgasbord at The Queen’s Royal Hotel 1947

Fight Over the “Restaurant on Wheels” 1899 — The First Food Truck Fight

Jim’s Restaurant Fire 1969

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Jim’s Restaurant Fire 1969

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Donna Mcfarlane picture was taken in 1961 when I worked for her the summer I graduated from high school… I worked in the booth that she had beside the restaurant..

Anne McRae I worked there all thru high school. This is how I paid for college. Eleanor Antonakas taught me so many life skills great person

Sandra Dakers I worked there when I was 14 and the Olympia for a bit too!

 

44788985_10156080696476886_8602620022721871872_n.jpgPenny Coates Kind of a hoot because after it was Jim’s it was sold to a couple and her name was Heidi and it was called that for about a year or so and then it became the Gourmet.

Tammy Marion My very 1st job was at Jim’s Restaurant as a waitress in the summer of 1977.They obviously rebuilt after this fire. I remember my hourly wage being something like 2 bucks an hour or almost that lol..

 

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Tammy Marion My very 1st job was at Jim’s Restaurant as a waitress in the summer of 1977.They obviously rebuilt after this fire. I remember my hourly wage being something like 2 bucks an hour or almost that lol..

Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown It was Jim’s for a long time. We took over the Supertest Coffee shop and gas bar in 1965 and I believe it was Jim’s then.

 

relatedreading

Rolling Down Highway 15

Weekend Driving- Smiths Falls Franktown and Carleton Place 1925

“If Wayne Robertson Jumped Off the Highway 7 Bridge Does that Mean You Do it?”

Something Really Spells Funny on Highway 7

The Lost Highway

Breathtaking Bargains and Jukebox Favourites at The Falcon on Highway 7

Sentimental Journey Through Carleton Place — Did You Know About Sigma 7?

Twin Oaks Motel Opens -1959 — Highway 7 Landmarks

An Explosive Highway 7 Tale