Tag Archives: flood

The Clyde River Overflows 1919

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The Clyde River Overflows 1919

Lanark, Ontario, Canada-28 May 1919

As a result of the heavy incessant rain storms the Clyde River has become taxed to and beyond its limits. Its quiet waters have become turbulent and have flown out of bounds and not since the spring of 1904 has the river assumed -such unusual magnitude.

On Saturday and Sunday the river in Lanark ex tended its boundaries on the south to the centre of the Clyde Hotel yard, and on the north to beyond Mr. Robert Whites livery bam. The boom at the saw mill gave way to the strain of the rising waters and on Friday afternoon an old familiar scene was repeated. Some two thousand logs floated down the stream until they were checked their runaway voyage by a temporary boom at the dam. This was speedily reinforced by a new boom.

All the outlying district has been more or less affected by those torrential rains and the farmers experienced great difficulty cm Friday morning in getting their milk to the factory. We have heard of some cases where the roads were rendered impassable. Such high water at this time of the year is a rare thing for this part of the country.

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
22 Apr 1896, Wed  •  Page 1

Historical NOTES

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
22 Apr 1896, Wed  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
22 Apr 1896, Wed  •  Page 1

1896 flood on the eastern seaboard… this is Maine

With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’ Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
21 Apr 1909, Wed  •  Page 1

The CLYDE Rises High…. Floods 1896

The Floods of 1926

Ironworks– Mississippi Iron Works 1928 Flood and Sale

Ferry Cross the Mersey?– Irishtown Almonte

Perth Flood 1930s Tay River

  1. Memories of the Lanark Flood-Wendell Crosbie
  2. The Lanark Village Flood 1998
  3. The Floods of 1926
  4. Floating Bridges, Toll Gates and Typhoons– Clippings of Billings Bridge
  5. Flood of 1870 — Water Street is a Satirical Joke

Flood of 1870 — Water Street is a Satirical Joke

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Flood of 1870 — Water Street is a Satirical Joke
April 1870 Almonte Gazette
April 1870 Almonte Gazette

April 1870 Almonte Gazette

April 1870 Almonte Gazette
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The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
18 Jul 1870, Mon  •  Page 2

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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Apr 1870, Tue  •  Page 2

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21 Apr 1870, Thu  •  Page 2

22 Apr 1870

One who retains vivid recollections of the terrible spring flood of 1870, when the Ottawa river rose to the greatest height it has ever risen and brought suffering and hardship to hundreds of families along its course, is Mr William Timbers, veteran resident of Hawkesbury.

“I have heard.” he said, “that hundreds of houses were submerged and hundreds of families; rendered homeless along the upper Ottawa that memorable spring, but it was every bit as bad down in this territory.

“As you can see. there Is quite a drop from Main street, Hawkesbury, down to the river. But the water that year was so high it actually covered Main street and people were rowing along the road in boats. You could sail a yacht from the river right up to the center of the town.”

“I distinctly remember that the ferry boat from Grenville used to draw up at Fillmans hotel, which was situated at what is now known as Percy’s Creek. Dozens of families in the lower section had to leave their horn until the floods abated.”

STOCK PHOTO

Same weather system in 1870

The CLYDE Rises High…. Floods 1896

Flooding in Carleton Place — Why They Replaced the Dam in 1907

Memories of the Lanark Flood-Wendell Crosbie

Ironworks– Mississippi Iron Works 1928 Flood and Sale

The 1947 Almonte Flood

Ferry Cross the Mersey?– Irishtown Almonte

Perth Flood 1930s Tay River

The Lanark Village Flood 1998

The 1947 Almonte Flood

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The 1947 Almonte Flood

April 1947

The Thoburn Woollen Mills closed down at noon, Tuesday, owing to flood water from the river making it impossible to operate the boiler. It is not expected that the plant will be able to reopen for at least nine days. The level of the Mississippi River is higher than for many years but so far the Thoburn mill is the only industry to be affected by this factor. The enforced holiday will not be welcomed by the employees who will not be able to collect unemployment insurance unless they are idle for more than nine days.

It is said that high water has forced the Bates & Innes Co. of Carleton Place to close its fulling department. Many basements in Almonte are flooded owing to the melting snow. For a time, last week, big ice flows were sailing down the surface but they have ceased coming now which indicates that the upper lakes are clear. There were many other things carried along by the current such as logs, pieces of timber  and the carcasses of several pigs. The falls are now at the height of their grandeur and- many people took photographs of them on Sunday last. In the country the roads are submerged in many places with creeks overflowing their banks and flooding the surrounding country.

Flooded Water Street Apr.19 1947 No1 almonte.com
Flooded Water Street Apr.19 1947 No2-almonte.com
Flooded Water Street Apr.19 1947 No3–almonte.com

There is still a good deal of snow in the timbered areas and until this has melted and been carried away the rivers and lakes will remain at a high level. The river in Almonte is within a foot of the top of the wall bordering the town hall grounds. It is level with the cement dyke which protects that part of Mill Street between the Midland Woolen Mills and the Peterson Ice Cream Company’s plant. Wednesday’s snow-storm which resulted in over six inches on the level will make another contribution to the high water and the flood conditions.The Mississippi River at Almonte and the Clyde River at Lanark are higher now than at any time since 1928. The Thoburn Woollen Mill was forced to close in April 1928 and although the floor of the boiler room has since been raised it was flooded out this week. In Lanark both Woollen mills are closed. Part of Water Street was blocked off today as it was submerged.

April 24, 1947

Falling river levels over the weekend made it possible for the Thoburn Woollen Mills to resume work on Tuesday morning after an enforced holiday which commenced on the previous Monday. At one time it was feared that the plant would be unable to resume operation for ten days but when the flood started to recede it went more quickly than expected. 

Not since 1928 had the Thoburn concern been forced to close down because of high water. And since that time changes had been made in construction at the rear of the mill which made it less susceptible to the inroads of high water. This shows that the river level must have been considerably higher this spring than in 1928. Both the management and the employees were glad to get under way again. 

The enforced holiday was not enjoyed and the hands were unable to draw from the  unemployment insurance fund because the period of idleness was too short. This form of remuneration will only be paid after nine days and then covers only the tenth and successive working days—it isn’t retroactive. 

While many properties were flooded the Thoburn Mill was the only one which had to cease operations temporarily. Others suffered inconveniences. One of the most spectacular victims of the flood was the fairgrounds of the North Lanark Agricultural Society. This big tract of land was completely under water with the exception of that corner where the exhibition hall is located. 

On the river side of the track the river was flowing within six inches of the fence posts. A man who enjoys boating and fishing on the Mississippi ran his boat and outboard motor around the track sailing in and out of a gap in the fence along the river side of the ring. It was a strange sight to see him chug-chuging around a course on which horses and cattle are wont to travel at fair time. 

There was no truth in a rumour that got around town concerning the possible collapse of a dam at Carleton Place. It was said that this was causing worry Saturday night and if it happened it would flood the lower sections of the town. Inquiries in Carleton Place failed to substantiate the fearful tale.

Related reading

Ironworks– Mississippi Iron Works 1928 Flood and Sale

Ferry Cross the Mersey?– Irishtown Almonte

Perth Flood 1930s Tay River

  1. Memories of the Lanark Flood-Wendell Crosbie
  2. The Lanark Village Flood 1998
  3. The Floods of 1926

Ferry Cross the Mersey?– Irishtown Almonte

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Ferry Cross the Mersey?– Irishtown Almonte

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Mar 1963, Fri  •  Page 3

As D Christopher Vaughan said if you are new to Almonte Irishtown was once essentially North of Ottawa Street and east of Martin Street.

Sandy France said: This is a strange story in some aspects. I recall a small creek starting at the bottom of Martin Street, but doubt the water could reach Irishtown…and Reg Axcell was the Chief of Police in Ottawa in 1963.

Well everyone, it did.

One Saturday in March of 1963 someone was driving down Bridge Street and saw the sign and wondered where the ferry was. Then as they went through the large lake style puddle and the car jostled by a pot hole they realized it wasn’t a practical joke.

On the following Monday morning the reporter of the Almonte Gazette went to pay a visit to Mr. Hill owner of the car and garage station there. They asked him about the sign and he said it was no joke. Every single year the hole and pond sized puddle was there and no one on the Almonte council would do anything. He said it was bad enough to have strangers to drive by his place of business and get their head almost chucked off in the pothole let alone ruin the underpinning of their car.

The reporter also asked him if he thought people passing by thought he had put it there to get attention to his business. He was horrified and hoped not as he wished the pothole would go away to the North Pole. Mr. Hill objected to the lake in front of his business and what concerned him more was the faulty sewer serving his home at Perth and Country Streets. He said that last year he had come home to a few feet of water in his basement ruining all the furniture and electronics. Council promised to do something and nothing was done, so the same flooding happened a few weeks later. Finally Mr. Hill had a trap to the sewer and a sump pump installed to stop future floodings. As for the pothole no idea when that was finally fixed. God save the Queen!!!

Ironworks– Mississippi Iron Works 1928 Flood and Sale

Perth Flood 1930s Tay River

  1. Memories of the Lanark Flood-Wendell Crosbie
  2. The Lanark Village Flood 1998
  3. The Floods of 1926

Ironworks– Mississippi Iron Works 1928 Flood and Sale

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Ironworks– Mississippi Iron Works 1928 Flood and Sale

November 1928

With the transfer within a short time of the Mississippi Iron Works, Limited, from Almonte to Hull, says. Ottawa’s neighboring city will have a new industry which will employ from the start about 60 men and expects to have 100 to 150 men when-fully in operation. The change from Almonte ‘to Hull was made possible through the efforts of a group of Hull city officials and businessmen.

The Mississippi Iron Works was established in Almonte in 1875 and since then has manufactured agricultural machinery, chiefly tanning mills; plows and grain and seed separators of various kinds. A site on Montcalm street near the Hull West station has been obtained. On it stands a solid brick two storey building ,around which is room for expansion. A new company to operate the iron works will be organized within 10 days and manufacturing will be started soon after. 

The Hull men backing the new industry are Mayor Theo Lambert, Ald. W. S. Larose, H. A. Champagne, J. B. Pharand, George H. Brunet, A. W. Monette, N. A. McDonald, Joseph Caron, Omer Lemieux, J. H. Belanger, A. Aubrey. The present owner of the business, A. K. MacLean, will take full charge in Hull.

When a flood last spring carried away part of the factory wall of the Almonte plant, operations were suspended. The company received attractive offers to locate in other cities, but Hull had greater inducements than any other.

April 11, 1928– The high waters of the Mississippi river did several thousand dollars damage when the wall of the Mississippi Iron Works, next the river, was half swept away by the rushing waters from the upper level of the river above the CPR bridge. The crash was heard throughout the centre of the town and when the damage was investigated it was seen that a great deal of machinery, tools and lumber had been carried off as well.

The next day the side was gone and there was a great gap cut into the centre of the plant with parts of three floors gone or badly sagged. The flume of the Almonte Knitting Company was also so badly damaged by high water that they were forced to close down, and in order to resume work they had to connect up with the municipal power plant as the damage could not be repaired till the waters subside.

Andrew Young was in partnership with John Flett who operated The AE Young and John Flett Machinists and Iron Founders on Lot 18 Coleman’s Island. The partnership dissolved in 1871 and Andrew and his brother Robert set up their iron works operations on Water St. In 1882, the brothers bought part of Lot 19 Mill St Almonte and erected the Mississippi Iron Works there. The brothers then bought the Otter Glen Woolen Mills in 1885.– People of Carleton Place — John Flett

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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Jul 1874, Mon  •  Page 2

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 Feb 1934, Sat  •  Page 10

People of Carleton Place — John Flett

The Almonte Fire of 1909

Mississippi River Power Corp.

The Storm of 1906 — George Bradford

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Renfrew Street Pakenham 1906 after the storm- Bill Bagg Collection

 

Aug 21, 1906

Almonte

This town and vicinity was visited with heavy rains which began falling about noon and continued with brief intervals during the day. The rainfall being the heaviest known for years was accompanied by electric storms with the lightning being particularly sharp.

 

Lanark

Although no great damage was known resulted in the immediate neighbourhood word reached here this morning that Mr. W. Bradford, age 65, of the Township of Darling, brother of  Mr. George Bradford, of this town and postmaster of White was struck by lightning yesterday and killed. Further particular, however, are wanting except it was known that he was struck by a bolt lightening while sitting reading a newspaper at his home at half-past three yesterday afternoon during the severe electrical storm.

Carleton Place

There was a nice rain fall and some lightning here yesterday afternoon in the town and immediate vicinity but there was no unusual downpour, but to the north and west, a few miles distant the fall was exceedingly heavy.  No damage has been reported. The parched pasture land will be much benefited.

 

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This photo came from the late historian and antique collector Bill Bagg, but we have some questions and hopefully one day we will find out where it really was.

Adam Armstrong disagrees with the location

Sue Campbell

9 hours
I agree. This can’t be Pakenham. I grew up in the house at 37 Margaret Street in Pakenham. The last house. Renfrew Street and Margaret Street would have connected at our house if there wasn’t a ridge. Looking up Renfrew Street from my house to the Hwy29. Then it continued across the highway up a huge hill going up to the Catholic Church. I am not sure where this picture was taken.

 

 

 

 

1906 shipwreck found in Georgian Bay by Windsor diver and international team-

The J.H. Jones was lost in a storm and everyone on board died

 

 

relatedreading

Entire Dam Above Smiths Falls Swept Away

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Entire Dam Above Smiths Falls Swept Away

 - Entire Dam Above Smith's Falls is Swept Away,...

 - 81 cUl to The Evening Journa. Email Fall. April... - t the break, but At beat it will perhaps be a... - I ordin-1 I I There' waa little or no demage...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 13 Apr 1904, Wed,
  3. Page 1

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  1. Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.relatedreading

    The Smiths Falls Storm of 1897

  2. The Storm of June 1899

    Ya call that a Snowstorm? Linda’s Mailbag

    Storms of Carleton Place- Which One?

    Lightening Strikes Again –The Storm of 1972

    The Day The Wizard of Oz Came to Carleton Place

    To All the Snowmageddons I Have Loved Before

    Lightening Strikes Again –The Storm of 1972

     

The Lanark Village Flood 1998

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Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority— Photo–Lanark Village Flood 1998

1998 – Flooding occurred along the Clyde and Mississippi Rivers. An emergency was declared. Flooding caused considerable strife for a number of weeks.

If you have personal memories, PM me–leave a comment– or email me at sav_77@yahoo.com so I can add them here for a more in depth story.

 

See Memories of the Lanark Flood- by Wendell Crosbie tomorrow

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Photo from the Almonte Gazette 1998

On the 8th of April 1998 the citizens of Lanark crowded on to the main street of that village to watch a home that was in danger of being swept away being covered by national news. In other parts of the Lanark Highlands, as well as the village of Lanark, the Clyde River had overflowed their  banks and a state of emergency was called for the area.

The Ontario Provincial Police had also called in a helicopter to search for those who might be stranded by flooded roads. Pakenham had also been at the mercy of the Mississippi River and  I remember the Riverbend trailer park near the town limits being underwater.

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Photo from the Almonte Gazette 1998

Even those with double sump pumps found themselves in waist high water in their basement while Water Street completely flooded. Two hundred members of the military had descended on the village of Lanark while another 100 went up to Dalhousie Lake to fill and place sandbags around the local homes. Lanark set up a billeting system  at private homes rather than open a shelter.

A Mississippi Mills firefighter was quoted as saying that the ice storm of 1998 was a terrible inconvenience to everyone, but this was a disaster. Firemen soon found out that they were better fighting fires than floods and Beckwith, Glen Isle Pakenham, Dalhousie Lake were all affected but none so seriously as the village of Lanark.

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Photo from the Almonte Gazette 1998

Because most people were not covered by flood insurance –some wondered if they would be eligible for some government coverage similar to the ice storm of January 1998. After it was all over some played the blame game while others reviewed where they might have gone wrong and seriously looked at those who had built on flood plains.

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Photo from the Almonte Gazette 1998

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Photo from the Almonte Gazette 1998

historicalnotes

There are other photos of the flood on Google Image- but I refuse to pay $19.95 each to put them up on here but– do check out the 4 different photos by clicking here. There is even one of Jason Labelle age 14 at the time riding his bike and The Ark which as you know was flooded.

Canadian Disaster Database

Event Category Disaster
Event Group Natural
Event Subgroup Meteorological – Hydrological
Event Type Flood
Place Eastern Ontario and Quebec
Event Start Date March 28, 1998
Event End Date April 15, 1998
Comments Eastern Ontario and Quebec, March 28 – April 15, 1998. Warm weather and thunderstorms caused spring flooding. In Ontario, the Clyde River, Ottawa River, Mississippi River and rivers feeding Lake Nipissing overflowed. The lower Trent System below Peterborough from Rice Lake to Bay of Quinte also experienced flooding. States of Emergency were declared in these communities: Lanark Highlands, Village of Kearney, Township of Drummond, North Elmsley, Beckwith Township, Carleton Place and Mississippi Mills. In Quebec, over 15 rivers flooded and caused the evacuation of 3,697 people in 140 municipalities. Rivers on the North Shore of St. Lawrence River, St. Lawrence River, Assumption River, Chateauguay River, Richelieu River, Ottawa River, Lake St. Pierre and Lake Champlain flooded. Damage mainly occurred in the MontÃrÃgie and Mauricie regions.
Fatalities 0
Injured / Infected 0
Evacuated 3757
Estimated Total Cost $27,741,685
Federal DFAA Payments $7,246,824
Provincial DFAA Payments $14,570,459
Provincial Department Payments $5,924,402
Municipal Costs Unknown
OGD Costs Unknown
Insurance Payments Unknown
NGO Payments Unknown
Utility – People Affected 0
Magnitude 0.0

 

Related reading

The Aftermath of the Lanark Fire June 1959

The Lanark Fire of 1895

Lanark Fire 1959– Hour by Hour

The Lanark Fire June 15th 1959

Awaiting the Ice Storm of 1998? (pictures take time to load)

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

The Flood in Perth

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Photo from Perth Remembered–Photo shows Arthur Ralyea making his way around in a boat at the corner of North an d Sherbrooke Streets in front of the Perth Shoe Factory. Wampoles and Jergens in the background.

 

Ever wonder why the town  of Perth considered Foster Street to be in a flood plain?

THE PERTH COURIER APRIL 23, 1926

A Flood in Perth Last Week. Perth Shoe Co. Employees Ferried to Work – Streets and Cellars Flooded.

Perth was the scene of a flood last week, the most serious experienced in the town for upwards of forty years. Fortunately, it only lasted for a short time and no great loss was incurred. As announced the Courier last week the two tributaries of the Tay River here overflowed their banks on Thursday and at night following that situation the section of the town from Beckwith Street embracing James Brothers Foundry, Perth Shoe Co. plant and the C.P.R. property became flooded and beyond the C.P.R. main tracks the fields were covered with water and presented a large lake-like appearance.

 

The 2nd line road more familiarly known as the “Long Swamp” road was completely submerged with water from near the tracks to past the beginning of the McLaren swamp, the water easily reaching to the height of an ordinary wagon box, Friday and Saturday operations were ceased in James Brothers Foundry. On Friday it was impossible to use steam at the plant of the Perth Shoe Company and many of the employees were dismissed from work. The office staff and a few in other departments, however went to work but had to be ferried by boats from the foot of Foster Street and on Sherbrooke Street to the plant. The basement of the plant was cleared of certain of the stock in storage there and the firm’s loss in that respect was slight.

 

The residences on Sherbrooke Street were practically islands as they were all surrounded by water. Beckwith Street from the skating rink corner to near the boy’s playground of the Public School was submerged by a couple of feet of water and many of the cellars of the houses in the vicinity were flooded. Saturday and Sunday the water began to gradually lower and on Monday the streets were almost in their normal condition again. Since last week the waters of the Tay have also lowered considerably and thus ended any further anxiety.

 

 

Author’s note- I tried in vain to find other newspaper reports but those issues of the Almonte Gazette were missing from 1926. In the Ottawa Journal archives it described how the flume of the old grist mill which has stood the ravaging of Spring waters for over 40 years on the Tay River was crumbling.

Because of the breaking of this flume the waters had begin to rise to the bank, but farther down the fields were flooded for miles around. Over three feet of water was lying in those fields. The C.P.R. yard was flooded and the water had come up North Street and James Brothers Foundry was surrounded by two feet of water. The cellars on Herriot Street were also flooded and logs were places in Bob’s Lake hoping to stop the water.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

The Harold Kettles Series – Blowing up Beaver Dams in Beckwith

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Harold Kettles of Carleton Place was an explosive man. Not only in his field of work of “explosives” but also how he could sit down and tell you stories that would pop your eyes out. A folk hero is a person, who may or may not have existed, and is famous and well liked by people, or people of a certain country. Usually it is someone who helped the common people or fought against the authorities, such as a bad king.

Well Harold was real alright– and you either liked him or you didn’t. Harold was always there with a helping hand, and as far as I know he didn’t really like kings or those in authority. They always seemed to mess with his plans. He was also a risk taker from what I knew of him, so I am combining a story of explosives in his honour called The Harold Kettles Series.

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Yesterday Caroline Nembhard told me a tale of growing up just outside of Prospect. Word was Elmer Bud had a distillery over in Montague township off Boundry Rd on the Pinery Side Rd. Caroline believes there was also one on the 9th line, but she can’t recall the owners name. Oh wait, maybe it was Howard Kettles who worked with dynamite, but she is not sure. Caroline’s neighbour Bob Purdy used to visit both distilleries and come home feeling no pain shooting off his gun as per the usual ritual, but he never seemed to hit anything.

One winter in 1971 the threesome of  Purdy, Kettles and Bud had too much to drink and decided to blow up a beaver dam on Purdy’s property on the 3rd line of Beckwith. Well that beaver dam happened to be located in a very large swamp that was frozen over in the middle of January. After the Three Musketeers followed through on that promised explosion, it flooded from the 3rd line of Beckwith to the 4th in no time at all.

 

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Cavanagh Construction had to be called in to rebuild the Townline, now known as Ashton Stn. Rd. The morning after they blew up the dam, not knowing about any damage, Carolyn’s mom got her ready to head out to the school bus. Except, there would be no school bus that day since the road was washed out.

Caroline was 6 at the time and remembers this vividly, along with the fact she was wearing a dress and leggings. Her mom stood on the porch watching Carolyn valiantly trying to make her way down the laneway, which was now covered in water and ice. After falling a few times Caroline gave up, turned around, and went back into the house. The family was stranded in their home for a few days until Cavannagh rebuilt their driveway, and she remembers they also got a new deep ditch as they never had one before.

Their family was one of only 5 houses on the road at that time and the rest of the winter the kids played on the ice in the fields caused by that dam blowing up. As Carolyn said, this was just one of a few stories of living out on the Townline on the edge of Beckwith Township. 

 

historicalnotes

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Clayton Ontario History Photo
Howard Bolger at a beaver dam in the Clayton area. All the trees that are down in this area were cut by the beavers.

 

 

KETTLES, Harold Vincent – In hospital Carleton Place, Ontario on Saturday November 7, 1987, Harold Vincent Kettles of RR 1 Carleton Place, in his 63rd year. Beloved husband of Evelyn Neilson. Dear brother of Helen (Mrs. Bill Simpson), Ashton, Ontario and Hazel (Mrs. George Tinker), Santa Barbara, California, USA. Friends called at the Kerry Funeral Home & Chapel, 61 Lake Ave W, Carleton Place, Ontario. Funeral Service was held in the Chapel on Tuesday, November 10, 1987 at 2 p.m. with Rev. W. E. McDowell of Zion Memorial United Church officiating. Interment United Cemeteries of Carleton Place, St. Fillan’s Section. Donations to the Heart & Stroke Foundation of Ontario would be appreciated.

 

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Evelyn Kettles with Peggy Saunders

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Evelyn Ketttles

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The pic on left is martha mccauley and right is dot miller and evelyn kettles 1967 parade .. mom is on womens inst float and evelyn and dot in front of harold kettles-photo donna mcfarlane

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Dale Costello–I think he owned the farm next to my grandfather, James Aitken on the 9th line. He lived in a beautiful stone home. There was an old sugar shack on the back end of the property, next to Kettles property. Had to careful back there as the wolves hung out nearby.

Mike Dakers– I can remember as a boy, and this was allowed, Harold coming to the farm and blowing beaver damns to smithereens: sticks,mud,water,Harold flying every where.lol It was quit an event. Good memory,Harold was quite a man, but was good at what he did.

Shawn Devlin– When I was a wee lad living at the blacks corners Store. Harold would come in for a visit and would quite often bring me a gift. One time he brought me a rain deer statue and I placed it in the window.
Evelyn came to get gas and said isn’t that neat I have the exact same thing at home. (oh no she didn’t, not anymore) lol– He would also lick his thumb mark an X on your arm and then smack you one!

Dawn Jones-I heard a story of Harold Kettles doing the blasting for the New Beer store up on Townline. He must of been quite the legend. Several stories to hear.

Related reading:

The Harold Kettles Series –Sandpit Blasting 1884

A Dy-no-mite Story About Harold Kettles of Carleton Place

The Uni-Bomber of Carleton Place? Didn’t I Blow Your Mind?

An Explosive Highway 7 Tale