Tag Archives: Findlays

The Miracle of 1974

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The Miracle of 1974

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May 21, 1974 Carleton Place

A Smiths Falls woman and two children were swept one-half mile down the churning, swollen Mississippi River, over the Carleton Place dam and the Bates and Innis Falls Monday afternoon before being rescued unharmed.

“It was absolutely a miracle they survived,” said Sgt. Ray Mclsaac of the Carleton Place police.  Hilda Gilligan and her six-year-old son Jeffrey, both of 18 Greg St., Smiths Falls, and Donna Porteous, 9, of 15 Condie St., Smiths Falls, set out in a rented aluminum boat about 5:50 p.m. At Findlay’s Foundry, about a quarter-mile upstream from the dam, the boat’s motor failed and they tried unsuccessfully to paddle to shore against the swift-flowing current. People along the shore noticed the three boaters in trouble and immediately called the fire department, but the firemen could only look on helplessly as the boat was carried downstream.

 

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When the boat approached the Carleton Place dam, the children, who were wearing life jackets, jumped out and were carried over the dam. Mrs. Gilligan, still in the boat, also was swept over the dam and was rescued below the dam by Constable Bill Shane of the Carleton Place police. The children travelled another quarter-mile down the river, over the 15-foot-high falls and through the rapids.

 

There 21 -year-old Dale Machin, of 180 William St., waded into the water and grabbed Jeffrey. Mr. Machin threw the boy onto the shore, grabbed a neighbour’s small boat and paddled out to rescue the girl. The woman and two children were rushed to the Carleton Place and District Memorial Hospital but required no treatment and were released.

“Nobody thought they would come up alive,” said Sgt. Mclsaac. “The only reason they survived was that the current was travelling so quickly they didn’t touch bottom. They were just carried along on the crest of the water. It really was miraculous.”

 

A Record of Drowning — River Falls and Cisterns

Down at Old McIlquham’s Bridge

Joseph Wooldridge Phillip Low- Near Drowning 1963

Dr.Cram and Dr. Scott Drowning 1907 –Cram Genealogy

Robert Drader Bill Shail Saved from Drowning May 28 1957

Tales from the Mississippi Rapids

A Carleton Place Tale to Send Shivers Up Your Arm — The Sad Tale of Margaret Violet King

Spring 1909 Pakenham — James Lunny William David Story

Stories of the Mississippi River — Elk, Rice Beds, and Corduroy Roads

The Sad Tale of Alexander Gillies and Peter Peden

The Dangers of the Mississippi River-Arnold Boner 😦

HIGH SCHOOL CADETS RESCUE CHILD IN RIVER

Murder or Accident — Bates & Innes Flume

The Tragic Death of Dr. Mostyn Shocked the People of Almonte

The Appleton Incident 1954

Debbie Dixon and The CPR Bridge Incident in Carleton Place–Linda’s Mailbag

What Happened on the CPR Railway Bridge?

CARLETON PLACE MYSTERY— Moulder’s Body Found With Bullet in Chest 1905 Part 2

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CARLETON PLACE MYSTERY— Moulder’s Body Found With Bullet in Chest  1905 Part 2

On October 22 of 1905  in Carleton Place A sensation was created here when the dead body of Cardinal Miller, aged 22, a moulder in Findlay Bros. foundry, was discovered in a bush about 20 yards from the Franktown road and one-half mile from the Carleton Place town limits.

The young man was known to have driven off in that direction at 8 o’clock  three days ago at which time he was reported missing. The horse and buggy were found on Saturday three or four miles from town on the road leading at right angles from the one near which the body was found on McGregor’s farm. Search proved that young Miller had been shot in the left side of his chest with the bullet passing just below his heart.

The deceased’s coat and vest were unbuttoned. The weapon had been discharged at close range to his outer shirt. A revolver supposed to be one he purchased Thursday evening, at  Taylor’s Hardware store was found nearby. Coroner Metcalfe was summoned from Almonte and an inquest was opened, several people giving evidence.

At 8.56 this evening the Inquest was adjourned until tomorrow afternoon at four o’clock, the Jury not being prepared to give a verdict. Family and friends did not accept the theory of suicide thought indications  pointed to an unfortunate ending.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Oct 1905, Mon  •  Page 4

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BeckwithLanark CountyOntarioCanada  Show Map

PLOT St. Fillans

historicalnotes

 - The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 Oct 1905, Mon  •  Page 11

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 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Oct 1905, Wed  •  Page 10

Update

How did “Cardy” Miller die? I found out today working on a piece about the mills in Carleton Place- In 1903 Findlay employee Cardy Miller took away his sorrow by a self inflicted shot to the heart on the 10th line as he could take no more…

NAME: Cardinal Miller
GENDER: Male
AGE: 20
RELIGION: Presbyterian
BIRTH DATE: 1885
BIRTH PLACE: Ramsey
DEATH DATE: 19/10/1905
DEATH PLACE: Lanark Ontario Canada
CAUSE OF DEATH: Shooting Instantaneous

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Just Like a Clue Game –“Who Dun it” in Beckwith?

The Boy Who Disappeared From Beckwith–Gordon Taylor

“2,000 people on the streets”–Dr. Finlay McEwen of Carleton Place

History Still Lives on at The McEwen House in Beckwith

The Media Then and Now–Johnny Gillies Had a Gun

Keith Morrison and the William and Catherine Struthers Morris Family

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Keith Morrison and the William and Catherine Struthers Morris Family

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Know your People of Carleton Place—We have the Morris Room in the Carleton Place town hall. I did not know much about Keith Morris. We all do now.

Know your People from Carleton Place

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This is Keith Morris’s Great Grandparents.. the picture is of William Morris, Catherine Struthers Morris and son William.. The picture accompanied an article entitled the Scottish weaver... Donna Mcfarlane

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Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown A true gentleman!

Donna Lowe Ward Such a lovely man. Keith and his wife Beth were our neighbors on Charlotte Street and were so kind and friendly.

Janet French-Baril A wonderful man, full of kindness.

Theresa Fritz He was a great guy and great CAO. He wrote me the most beautiful letter of reference when he reitred. I still have it to this day.

Marlene Springer Started and went to school with his eldest daughter, Ann, Keith worked for Findlays in sales until working for the town. Again he had my dad repair town parking meters!

Stephen Giles Keith was one of the most ethical men to have ever walked through the doors of the Town Hall. Keith, his wife Beth and their family were the nicest people you could know.

Karen Blackburn Chenier One of my favourite people ever.Grew up on Charlotte St and probably spent more time at the Morris home than my own.I can still hear his very distinct chuckle. Great sense of humor which his kids have inherited.!

Laury Foubert Wonderful Boss. Very fair and approachable. Those were good times at the Town Hall.

Karen Dorman This is my uncle. He was married to Beth Stanzel. They have 5 children. Linda , the Morris violin at the Middleville museum was donated by his family.

Dot Smith Great great gentleman very sweet to everyone , Town Hall had a gem when Keith worked there 👍🏼💚

Sandy Dobie Keith was a very special, gentle man who played golf at Mississippi when he finally retired.

 

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all photos Donna Mcfarlane

 

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Another child of William and Catherine Struthers was Janet who married her first cousin John Cleland.. (taught in Ramsey) one of their daughters Nettie married Albert McGonigal and she would be Bill McGonigals grandmother.. the two girls are Nettie on left and Annie Cleland– the couple are Nettie and Albert McGonigal…

 

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relatedreading

Comments and Memories About the Carleton Place Findlay Company

Those Were the Best Days of Our Lives!

Shane Wm. Edwards Findlay Fish Tale…

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Shane Wm. Edwards Findlay Fish Tale…

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A picture of one of the elusive Findlay fish.

Shane Wm Edwards sent me this photo and it has to do with Findlays and a fish story as he said. Anyone know what this is?

Bill Russell I’d like to hear Shane’s version of the story. I have one of these which we hand moulded from the original in the late seventies. The original belonged to my late uncle Terry Russell. There were a few that made the trip to the Perth scissors factory for a nickel finish. Glenda Mahoney may remember her father having one of these.

Glenda Mahoney I certainly do remember. We have Dad’s collection between the four of us. Thanks Bill Russell.

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Photo Glenda Mahoney

So what was Shane’s story?

Shane was told that when men were being trained to work the “molds” that they had to make a metal fish.  Before they were hired on the fish had to be up to standard and they were also bottle openers. I came across a small heavy fish Saturday and that was the story I was told. I wondered if anyone can verify it.

Greg Nephin– Not sure if this is a Findlay but looks familiar, was my grandfather’s who worked there

No photo description available.

 

 

Findlay Favorite Stove and Range logo

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte
 

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Confederation Life Bulletin 1961 Findlay

Comments and Memories About the Carleton Place Findlay Company

 

Notes About J.K. Findlay

Memories of Findlays 1972 – “They’re Proud, Independent, and Resigned to the Loss of their Jobs”

Looking for Names- Findlay Foundry

The Inner Remains of the Findlay Foundry

From the Belly of the Findlay Plant….

Someday my Prince Will Buy Me a Cinderella Stove

Findlay’s 101 and a Personal Confession

Where Did you Learn to Swear in Carleton Place?

Funky Soul Stew was Once Cooking in Carleton Place

 

Cooking with Findlay’s — Christine Armstrong’s Inheritance and Maple Syrup Recipe

Commercial Centre Planned for Findlay Site

Walter and John Armour and A Findlay Stove

The Findlay Foundry Ltd. Closes—- The Video

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Karen Dorman
Karen Dorman
Image may contain: indoor
In memory of Mary Henry who died in 2018–Henry, Mary (nee McEwen)

Confederation Life Bulletin 1961 Findlay

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Confederation Life Bulletin 1961 Findlay

 

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Photos from Donna Mcfarlane

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Moulton Iron

 

Findlays Limited - Steel Stamping Press

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

Comments and Memories About the Carleton Place Findlay Company

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Comments and Memories About the Carleton Place Findlay Company

 

 

 

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Photo- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Karen Dorman My grandfather Ben Stanzel worked there in shipping until he retired at age 72.
Terry Latham Can recall the sound as you walked by on High St. Every few windows it would change.

Dan Williams My dad Biddy Williams worked there for years along with the future Mayor’s father Cliff Flynn. Dad was secretary of the union I believe. Other memories include the Findlay’s picnics in the park by the canoe club including free hot dogs and ice cream.

Chris Gordon Drum line practice on the foundry floor (Revelliers, or as they were then, the Junior Trumpeters).  My mum worked in the office, my grandfather, Sid Stanfield, worked in the foundry.

Margaret Greer There are still steps down to the river. You can see they are just up from the person sitting on the cement wall. Our Mom use to take us down there after dinner on a hot summer’s day for a cool swim before bed.

 

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Findlays photo- David Findlay-http://www.findlayphoto.ca/findlaysltd/h824914c0#h824914c0

 

Llew Lloyd The ” Findlay Boathouse ” in the rear of the picture was the favourite swimming spot during my Mom’s childhood .

Gary Box When was the building taken down?

Bill Brunton I moved to CP in April 1972 and I remember it was in the process of being torn down then.

Gary Box Thanks Bill, I wasn’t sure I had seen it in the 50’s and 60’s…….but I must have, since we had a cottage on the Lake in the from the 1920’s to 1996 and did our shopping in CP. Mind you I was pretty young then and now I’m pretty old.

 

Michael Doyle My sister and I would deliver sandwiches to my Dad for his lunch. He worked there as a pattern-maker until he left for Montreal in 1939, at the start of the war, to work for Canadian Vickers in Montreal, which had been awarded a contract to build the PBY Flying Boat. Canadian Vickers, a sub of Vickers in England (and subsequently Canadair), was a boat builder and inasmuch as there was no aircraft manufacturer in Canada at the time large enough to handle the contract, they gave it to a boat builder.

 

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Photo- Michael Doyle

 

Doug B. McCarten We used to swim from the concrete steps as well….got caught skinny dipping at night more than once!  I guess my Mom knew where to look lol

 

Glenda Mahoney Skinny dipping of course. Was that not what the stairs  were for?

Llew Lloyd Bryon Wallace and I have referred to it as ” fat dipping ” for quite a few years now .

Doug B. McCarten Llew Lloyd that congers up a completely different image hahahaha

Doug B. McCarten The moulding shop was at the river end of the building…..


Kurt Bigras Poured iron in the moulding shop built stoves in the electrical and painted space heaters Willard Lagree was my foreman great guy

 

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Findlays photo- David Findlay-http://www.findlayphoto.ca/findlaysltd/h824914c0#h824914c0

Doug B. McCarten Spent my time in the moulding shop, electrical, enamel room, japanning room, stock room taking parts to the line…. certainly taught me a very good lesson though! I learned that I needed to go back to school because that was not the life I had envisioned….Great motivation! I loved the people though!


Norma Ford My Dad, Hilton Dorman worked as a moulder for 35 years with Findlay’s. My husband also worked on the shake-out and then as a moulder in Findlay’s Foundry. I had several Uncles and a brother who learned their trade – tool & dye maker at Findlay’s. Findlay’s Foundry was a family business for sure not just for the Findlay Family but for so many other families in Carleton Place. It was an institution. I can remember the smell of the foundry to this day and it is a very good smell.

Doug B. McCarten I agree wholeheartedly, tough tough work in the moulding shop!

Linda Gallipeau-Johnston Geez Norma – your family sure did it’s time!!! The summer must have been crazy.

Mike Flint We swam to that spot many times..

Steven Flint Ya. We Did! Then strawberry milkshakes from Granny

Janis Nixon My Grampa worked there.

Bill Brown Grandfather Harvey Campbell worked in the moulding shop and my father worked there for a short time from 1969 until it closed

James R. McIsaac Used to have band practice there in the winter….

Amanda Armstrong Brandon Armstrong ‘s grandfather John Hobbs worked there

Sherri Iona I walked by it every day on my way to and from school. I remember their whistle.

 

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The Demolition of Findlays photo- David Findlay-http://www.findlayphoto.ca/findlaysltd/h824914c0#h824914c0

Cathy Paul Dulmage When I was little my Dad worked there and after I heard the whistle I would go up to the end of the sidewalk to meet him.

Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown My Mom worked there from 1961 to 1965. My Grandpa Ernie Buffam worked there for 40 years, I believe in the Molding Shop.

Bill Crawford My Grandfather was a moulder for many years. My Mum & Dad worked in the electrical dept. for several years as well. The whistle was a constant reminder of the time of day in CP.

Krista Gladish Penson My dad Max Gladish was purchasing agent. I remember as a very young child waiting for him at the High St entrance

Chris Gordon I remember your dad. My Mum Rose Marie (now Amott, then Gordon) worked for him.

Tom Edwards My dad John Edwards worked with Max, Gerry Tinslay, Moff Blaine, Flo Mace and Keith Morris in the office there as well. Remember we used to go to Appleton to visit Andy Gladish now and again and we would drive him into Carleton Place.


Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown And also my Mom.

Tom Edwards Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown I didn’t know that Jo-Anne.

 

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Findlays photo- David Findlay-http://www.findlayphoto.ca/findlaysltd/h824914c0#h824914c0

 

Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown Tom Edwards she be the quiet one like myself-1961-1965 approx

Tom Edwards Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown Dad was there from the time the Dairy closed in Almonte til Findlays closed. Likely about 1965-72.

Tom Edwards LOL I don’t think quiet would be the description either Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown. LOL

 

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Photo Bill Russell

 

Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown My grandpa Buffam was there over 40 years until it closed.

Tom Edwards My grandfather Carney O’Connor worked there forever Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown too. He worked in the plant in the moulding shop. He always talked about Sonny Ferguson who worked there with him. I remember they all bought the Irish Sweepstakes tickets. LOL.

Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown Tom Edwards aww Sonny Ferguson was a great man. My aunt was married to his brother.

Donna Mcfarlane Dad Bill Mccauley got his moulding trade at Davidsons in Ottawa and came to Findlays in 1939 had to quit in 1951 due to health.. went back in 1955 to another shop not sure if it was Enamel shop and was there til they closed

Llew Lloyd Tom Edwards I worked in the enamel shop one summer with Sonny Ferguson . What a character .

Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown Llew Lloyd that’s an understatement! Teresa Ferguson pass on the memories to Chris!

 


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Photo from the Ottawa Citizen 1972 thanks to the kindness of Marion Giles McNeely

Don McNeely and Gordon Lowe

 

 

Bill Crawford Sonny & my dad Doug wired our new house on Dufferin St. in 1959/60. I’m not sure if either of them knew what they were doing, but the place never burned down, so they must have done something right! Mum called it “the house that beer built”.

Llew Lloyd Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown i just realized my interaction with Sonny was from the year before when Brian Ford and I I worked for Cecil Robertson in the oil department and Sonny was the head of the electrical shop . The next summer I worked in the enamel shop and Jack Ferguson was one of the sprayers . He was a laugh as well . I met lots of great people there .

Tom Edwards Bill Crawford I have received many tuning ups from Maude Crawford over the years. Doug used to just laugh whenever she got going. She was best friends with my Aunt Hilda Ferguson.She was a great lady. She took me into her backyard one day and she showed me all the different plants she had. She had about 75 different types of plants and shrubs. 😍😍😍😍

Neil Larmour I played countless hours of hockey there after the factory was gone. As I’m sure 90% if people from town did

Sylvia Giles My Grandpa Gordon (Mom’s Dad)worked there in late 40’s into 50’s he worked in the mould shop and made tools for the foundry!! I think he made 5 cents an hour

Penny Trafford Posting for Garry Gibson. This is a bottle opener his Grandfather Eddie Gibson made in the mold shop. He always carried it in his pocket. Eddie worked for Findlay’s for 35 years. It was passed to Doug Gibson after his death and Doug carried it in his pocket for years, and now belongs to Garry.

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Barry Trafford Penny. Your Uncle Walter worked at Findlay’s also. I think I might of been five. Remember waiting for dad to come home on the steps of our house every night. Would get the odd treat for waiting. Not sure of the year Aunt Reta would know.

Glenda Mahoney My Dad worked there for years. He made so many great friends. Findlays was a big part of our lives.

 

 

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Findlays Limited – Enamel Shop from D. Findlay click here.

Dipping ground coat in enamel shop.

Donna Mcfarlane They were like a family.. when we were burnt out in 1954 and dad was hospitalized for some time due to burns… they took up a collection and paid for the hospital stay… even though dad was not working at the time… he had to quit moulding due to his lungs.. After the fire findlays contacted dad to see if he was interested in working in another area away from the moulding shop.. he was there from 55 til they left cp

Llew Lloyd My grandfather , my mother, and all four of her brothers worked at Findlay’s for various terms . My father worked there before the war and for a short time after he returned from overseas . I worked there for two summers .

Bill Brunton Why were those steps there anyway? In that picture there isn’t one. Was there a Wharf there at some time for something unrelated to Findlays .

Bill Brunton In that picture there isn’t a dock. I meant.

Joann Voyce Lived just up the road on High St opposite the loading dock. Moved there in 1948 and the steps were there then and no dock then

Doug B. McCarten I don’t ever remember anything there just the steps….


Dan Williams I remember them dumping the snow there in winter. Salt and all!

Doug B. McCarten Yup, me too!

 

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Photo Tom Edwards–Karen Lloyd said: Lil McLaren in the striped blouse

 

 

Doug B. McCarten I can still call to mind the fragrance as I walked by, a combination of grease and sweat from the pressing room where sheet metal was formed into parts, the smell of the enamel in the dipping room and the acrid fragrance from the moulding room as the metal was poured into the moulds and as they cooled….. Because we lived just down the street, I also recall the soot like particulate that fell on my Dad’s car (cause I had to wash it lol)! The smoke 💨 stack was literally smoking at certain times. Back in the day before we ever thought about environmental issues or pollution in general.
Man, what a time, everything was so much simpler then….

 

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Llew Lloyd In the summer of 1968 Brian Ford and I worked the evening shift in the oil department . Cecil Robertson was the shop foreman . The next summer I went to see Cecil for a job , but he was full up .He told me that Jack Bittle was looking for help in the enamel shop . Just as I was leaving Cecil asked me if I had a pair of cowboy boots . When I answered yes , he said , ” wear them Jack likes tall people ” . That summer, thanks to Cecil’s advice and Ken Blackburn’s boots, I worked with another group of great guys .

Dan Williams Good one!

Doug B. McCarten Jack Bittle was a terrific guy! Perhaps because I was tall lol! I really loved working for Jack in the Enamel room! Would always ask after me long after I had left Findlays!

Llew Lloyd I have fond memories of Jack Bittle , Doug Gravelle , Vic Tinslay , Cal Drader , Jack Ferguson and Wayne Williams mom whose first name I can’t remember . There was a Sadler who went on to become a custodian at Caldwell school, a McDermid a Ramsbottom and a MacLellan there as well .

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The inner remains of Findlay’s- Photo from the Delmer Dunlop Collection at Archives Lanark


Doug B. McCarten Jack Bittle was a terrific guy! Perhaps because I was tall lol! I really loved working for Jack in the Enamel room! Would always ask after me long after I had left Findlays!

Llew Lloyd I have fond memories of Jack Bittle , Doug Gravelle , Vic Tinslay , Cal Drader , Jack Ferguson and Wayne Williams mom whose first name I can’t remember . There was a Sadler who went on to become a custodian at Caldwell school, a McDermid a Ramsbottom and a MacLellan there as well .

Doug B. McCarten Llew Lloyd thanks so much for the above list all of whom did their best to help me along….. I guess I have been gone too long…..thanks for the reminder!

Doug B. McCarten Llew Lloyd do you remember who it was who ran the japanning room who had lost a finger at work? I can see his face but no name so far! Another great guy who was a long time employee at the plant!

Llew Lloyd Doug B. McCarten Not sure you mean by the japanning room , but if that was where all the raw metal was dipped in various vats , the Sadler whose first name I can’t remember worked there . The men I remember from the oil department are Cecil Robertson , Ab Lynch , a Julian and a McNeely . Cecil Devlin was the night watchman .

Doug B. McCarten Yes, it was just off the enamel room. Dip tanks for sure….japanning is a dip process by hand in a black lacquer type liquid…. the fellow I remember lost his finger when it got caught in the cogs of a wheel attached to another piece of equipment…


Wendy LeBlanc My dad, Ken Robertson, worked in the electric stove department from after WWII until the last part of the 1950s. I have a letter sent to Dad overseas offering him work at Findlay’s when he returned to Canada. It was heavy, dirty work but Dad never seemed to mind. The reason he left the Foundry was he had passed the exam to work at the Post Office where, although the salary was less at the time, there was also less chance of a strike that could lead to a financial disaster for our family.


I worked there for the summer of 1965 following Grade 13. I did day work ( as opposed to piece work the men on the line did) with the women in the electric and gas department. The women worked as hard as the men, always worried that they might possibly run behind with the components the men needed on the line. Everyone I worked with during that summer always gave a 100% effort, and I will never forget their dedication to providing for their families.

Margaret Greer I am enjoying reading how Findlay’s played a part in the lives of Carleton Place people especially our generation.We lived right across the street and although Doug McCarten said there was a smell and some sort of soot we didn’t seem to experience it.

Llew Lloyd The morning , noon and 5 o’clock foundry whistle was a big part of those years .

Joan Stoddart If you missed the whistle Stoddart’s hounds would let you know it had happened

 

Stuart McIntosh I worked in the oil department, enamel shop and moved raw steel and also used the spray booths for piece work. Remembering Mr. Julian. Sonny Ferguson and one of the Lowe lads. Steel cage elevator moving finished stoves to top floor, spot welders, dip tanks, hand- cuffed operators(saved losing fingers) and racing down large wooden stairs at quittin time.
My mother and 2 sisters kept house for the wonderful Findlay family



Toby Randell All that remained by the time I grew up was the cement slabs where buildings once stood and the town would put ice rinks on. Dozens of kids ranging in age from 7/8 up to 18/19 would play shinny. I can remember spending hours and hours on those rinks. It was a great learning experience and I have lasting friendships with people I played with to this day.

Jayne Graham That was the best rink! Sherene Baird and I would skate there at night… me with my Karen Magnusson skates!

Llew Lloyd Bob Rintoul is credited for his work on that rink .


Gwen Spencer Swam there in my early years Changed in the building behind.
Rhonda McRae Landriault My Dad worked at Findlays till they closed..David McRae

Kurt Bigras I quit a week early to try and get work at another foundry no go


Steven Anderson Lived a block away. Remember as a wee lad the demolition. Played on it and remember seeing open stair openings. Then they were sealed up. Played hockey on the site years later!

Elisabeth Hick sadly a young man lost his life when a wall collapsed on him during the demolition

Debbie Garraway I believe it was Clarke Rothwell

Llew Lloyd This accident occurred at the Sewage Treatment Plant .

David McNeely I remember walking by Findlay’s in the winter on way to school and seeing bottles of milk sitting on the window sills to keep cold.You could also take bundles of old newspapers in and get paid.

Bill Brunton I forgot about that huge pile of twisted Steel and cement that was there for what seemed like a long time. We moved to 209 Moffatt Street in 1972 and the building was still there then but not for long after. It was pretty impressive when You think how much space it took up.

 

Debra White
Hi yes my dad Wilmer white worked at findleys and than stayed on when it went to Leigh instruments and than to spar airspace. I would meet my dad for lunch in the spring and summer and we would go to the park and in the winter I would wait for him after work. I would play in the snow beside the for at the far entrance and when it was very cold I would go in and sit on the bench by the water fountain and the doors where they paint this was one of my child memories I will always cherish cause it was about my dad and I.

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  23 Jul 1974, Tue,  First Edition,  Page 2

 

 

 

Notes About J.K. Findlay

Memories of Findlays 1972 – “They’re Proud, Independent, and Resigned to the Loss of their Jobs”

Looking for Names- Findlay Foundry

The Inner Remains of the Findlay Foundry

From the Belly of the Findlay Plant….

Someday my Prince Will Buy Me a Cinderella Stove

Findlay’s 101 and a Personal Confession

Where Did you Learn to Swear in Carleton Place?

Funky Soul Stew was Once Cooking in Carleton Place

 

Cooking with Findlay’s — Christine Armstrong’s Inheritance and Maple Syrup Recipe

Commercial Centre Planned for Findlay Site

Walter and John Armour and A Findlay Stove

The Findlay Foundry Ltd. Closes—- The Video

 

 








Notes About J.K. Findlay

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Notes About J.K. Findlay
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Author’s Note–Note number 3– we certainly have a history here don’t we..:(

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  22 Dec 1941, Mon,  Page 6

 

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Sep 1950, Mon,  Page 16

 

Sept. 4th 1952

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Photo

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Featured Artifact – December 2013–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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The Findlay Steamer
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After tasting plum pudding in a CPR dining car in 1940, Nora Findlay persuaded the chef to divulge his recipe, which she claimed, was a carefully kept company secret. David Findlay recalled “Mother used to lace the mix with large amounts of rum or brandy in addition to the bottle of stout. Guests always left the table in a happy mood!”

Nora passed the recipe on to her granddaughter Janet. The pudding should be made before the end of November, but Mrs. Findlay always maintained that the best ones were made on “All Saints’ Day”, November 1st.

CPR Plum Pudding
10 oz.seedless raisins                          8 oz. apple, finely chopped
10 oz. sultana raisins                             Juice and peel of one lemon
12 oz. currants                                         Juice and peel of one orange
8 oz. mixed peel                                      1/2 tsp. vanilla
4 oz. slivered almonds                           3 oz. rum
4 oz. pecans or walnuts                         4 oz. stout

Candied cherries and pineapple to taste.
 Mix above ingredients in a large bowl and cover. Stir each day for 3-4 days.
4 eggs, well beaten                               8 oz. brown sugar
8 oz. flour                                                   1/2 tsp. nutmeg
1/8 tsp. baking soda                               1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/8 tsp. baking powder                           1/4 tsp. ginger
10 oz. soft bread crumbs                       1/4 tsp. allspice
10 oz. ground beef suet                         1/4 tsp. salt
Mix dry ingredients together, stir in eggs. Add fruit mixture and stir well. Place in a well greased   mold. Steam for 5-6 hours. Cool, wrap well, and store until Christmas. Reheat by placing in   steamer for up to 3 hours. Yield: 6 lb. pudding.
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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Nov 1931, Sat,  Page 36


Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

Memories of Findlays 1972 – “They’re Proud, Independent, and Resigned to the Loss of their Jobs”

Looking for Names- Findlay Foundry

The Inner Remains of the Findlay Foundry

From the Belly of the Findlay Plant….

Someday my Prince Will Buy Me a Cinderella Stove

Findlay’s 101 and a Personal Confession

Where Did you Learn to Swear in Carleton Place?

Funky Soul Stew was Once Cooking in Carleton Place

 

Cooking with Findlay’s — Christine Armstrong’s Inheritance and Maple Syrup Recipe

Commercial Centre Planned for Findlay Site

Walter and John Armour and A Findlay Stove

The Findlay Foundry Ltd. Closes—- The Video

 

 

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Memories of Findlays 1972 – “They’re Proud, Independent, and Resigned to the Loss of their Jobs”

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Memories of Findlays 1972 – “They’re Proud, Independent, and Resigned to the Loss of their Jobs”

 

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Photo from the Ottawa Citizen 1972 thanks to the kindness of Marion Giles McNeely

 

May 20 1972

“I just can’t get it through my thick head why they are closing a plant equipped to produce like this one.” Don McNeely who had worked at Findlays for 33 years.

“It’s always been a good life here- I don’t know where I am going to get a job-there are a few possibilities.” Mr. Lowe

There were only about employee 125 cards left beside the time clock where there were once 200. The protests of unions, the public meetings, the anxious intervening of politicians, and the uproar in the House of Commons are finished. And so is Findlays.

“We were going to get another deck, but that’s out”, joked one man looking at the worn out one.–anonymous worker

 

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Photo from the Ottawa Citizen 1972 thanks to the kindness of Marion Giles McNeely

 

“There’s a sentimental attachment to the place and to fellow workers but no one is going around crying”.–anonymous worker who had been at Findlays for 16 years.

“They’re proud, independent,and resigned to the loss of their jobs. It’s management’s democratic right to close down the plant.”–anonymous worker

“I did some bricklaying work once, but it took forever to do the calculations.”-Milt who never finished Grade 6 and planned to return to school.

 

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Photo from the Ottawa Citizen 1972 thanks to the kindness of Marion Giles McNeely

 

“The only jobs you can get are ones nobody else wants. Who wants to work for $1.85 an hour.”-Alfred, an immigrant who had worked for two years at Findlays. (Findlay salary was $2.16)

“There is some possibility that the enamelling department could continue to do custom work, but we don’t know where the money would come from to finance the operation.”- Gerry 14 year veteran of Findlays

“It’s almost as if they bled this company dry to keep the other going.”  (Montmagny Plant) Gerry 14 year veteran of Findlays

 

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Photo from the Ottawa Citizen 1972 thanks to the kindness of Marion Giles McNeely

Don McNeely and Gordon Lowe

 

Mr. McNeely was considering a job in Smiths Falls but he didn’t know if he would take it because he didn’t want  to do all the highway driving.

“There isn’t much work here in town and I don’t want to travel”.–Woman who worked in the electrical assembly department for 16 years.

“Maybe things will get better–we’ll have a big party at the end. But, it’s going to be terrible not working.”– another Findlay veteran.

The prospect of years filled with comforting routine finally faded at Findlay’s and all that is left is an empty field.

Found by Bill Russell… thank you

 

historicalnotes

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The Findlay Brothers buy the land on High Street–Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 19 Jan 1901, Sat, Page 4

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal20 Aug 1947, WedPage 20

 

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Bill Russell posted this— Yes Linda these were made at the plant on the town line. The pucks were presented to the CJOH No Stars Hockey team at a charity game held at C.P. Arena March Our team was The Findlay Outcasts. Lol

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Photo Bill Russell

Llew Lloyd– Before the Findlay brand of pans were marketed, the men in the moulding shop used to make them on the side for home use. There are still some of them around. They are unlabeled and don’t have the same finishing as the ones produced for sale to the general public .

Bill Russell– There are also some that were reproduced at the Findlay plant on Townline that can be identified by a ditto gun label gun that was attached to the pattern prior to moulding. This was a date code. 

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 Deputy Mayor Jerry Flynn came to our Christmas Open House and found his father Clifford in this painting of workers at Findlay’s Limited! You never know what (or who) you’ll find at your local museum! Visit us soon!
 
 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal29 Aug 1934, WedPage 7

 

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum–‎Findlay Plaque Unveiling 2014– Have you seen the Findlay Plaque on the old Patterson building across from the town hall?

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  23 Jul 1974, Tue,  First Edition,  Page 2

 

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Photo Tom Edwards–Karen Lloyd said: Lil McLaren in the striped blouse

 

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Have you seen the Findlay movie at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum? During WWII, a movie was filmed inside the foundry depicting the war department. The war department was created to produce ammunition boxes and grenade castings. The movie is special in the fact that it captured the large number of women employed atFindlay’s working in the war department.– Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum #strongwomen

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

 

Looking for Names- Findlay Foundry

The Inner Remains of the Findlay Foundry

From the Belly of the Findlay Plant….

Someday my Prince Will Buy Me a Cinderella Stove

Findlay’s 101 and a Personal Confession

Where Did you Learn to Swear in Carleton Place?

Funky Soul Stew was Once Cooking in Carleton Place

 

Cooking with Findlay’s — Christine Armstrong’s Inheritance and Maple Syrup Recipe

Commercial Centre Planned for Findlay Site

Walter and John Armour and A Findlay Stove

The Findlay Foundry Ltd. Closes—- The Video

 

 

 

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 May 1964, Sat  •  Page 1

The Inner Remains of the Findlay Foundry

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The inner remains of Findlay’s- Photo from the Delmer Dunlop Collection at Archives Lanark

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Photo- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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This is part of the Findlay Memorial Cairn, located on the site of the first foundry on High Street. It gets missed, tucked away on the north side of High Street in a tiny little park with a shuffleboard court! All that remains is an empty field and a cairn of a once great company.

historicalnotes

Mike Doyle–Thank you, Linda, for this. My father Meyer Francis Doyle (b: 1910), worked in the Findlay plant as a pattern-maker prior to 1939, when he was hired by the Canadian Vickers Company in Montreal, as his trade, learned at Findlays, was integral to the manufacture of the PBY ‘Flying Boat’ which Vickers was building for the war effort.
This plaque and photos will now be part of my family history.

RELATED READING

Findlay’s 101 and a Personal Confession

Someday my Prince Will Buy Me a Cinderella Stove

Where Did you Learn to Swear in Carleton Place?

Funky Soul Stew was Once Cooking in Carleton Place

 

Cooking with Findlay’s — Christine Armstrong’s Inheritance and Maple Syrup Recipe

 

Someday my Prince Will Buy Me a Cinderella Stove

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Photo from- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

History of the Gas Kitchen Stove

Though gas cooking had found a place in England by the 1860s, and range manufacturers were beginning to ship their product overseas, in America gas was considered too expensive a fuel to be burned for cooking (not to mention the source of an after-taste in some minds).

After 1900, though, gas companies were seeing electric power companies nibble away at their bread-and-butter business —lighting—so they turned to the kitchen as the source of a new market. Since gas ranges had no need for the heavy, cast iron box of a wood- or coal-burning range, they could be built in much lighter and more compact forms. Plus gas ranges gave off much less excess heat and had no need for a chimney, making them ideal for the new, smaller kitchens of houses like bungalows. What’s more, they were light enough to stand on tall, slender legs to become, along with sinks, one of several pieces of freestanding furniture in the early modern kitchen.

By the 1910s the design of a gas cookstove had arrived at the iconic look of the cabinet range—a burner top at left or right of a baking oven with a broiler below. Ranges were usually constructed of sheet metal and cast iron with a baked enamel finish. Gas fed the burners through an exposed manifold running across the front that was controlled by wheel handle valves or utilitarian cocks. By the Roaring Twenties, the cabinet range hit its stride as a five-burner, two-oven appliance. A popular sales hook was porcelain enameling of all surfaces in black, white, or grey, but the big breakthrough was the invention of reliable heat regulators for controlled oven temperatures.–

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Ad- November 12, 1931–Ottawa Journal

historicalnotes

Michael Doyle--I remember my grandmother’s range in the 1940’w, which was wood burning with a water tank on the right side to heat hot water for dish washing. I believe it was a Findlays but I’m not sure. She lived in Almonte, very near the Rosamond mill, where all my aunts (the Voyce girls) worked.
My father worked at Findlay’s in Carleton Place in the middle to late 1930’s, when he took a job at Canadian Vickers in Montreal for the war effort.

 

Related reading:

Findlay’s 101 and a Personal Confession

Funky Soul Stew was Once Cooking in Carleton Place

 

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historicalnotes

Old-Factory-1

Elmira’s connection to antique appliances dates back three generations. Founder Tom Hendrick’s father supplied woodburning cookstove parts to local Mennonites from his hardware store in Elmira, Ontario. In 1975, Tom saw an opportunity to supply not just parts, but complete cookstoves, to the local market and, potentially, all of North America. He acquired the rights for the Findlay Oval cookstove, and began manufacturing in what had been a chicken barn on the outskirts of the small town of Elmira. The popularity of the stoves grew, and consumers soon began to ask for similar styling in gas and electric models. Hendrick responded, and the product line expanded to include a full line of gas and electric ranges with traditional styling and some of the modern features the company offers today. Fireplace shops, appliance stores and emporiums across the continent became an enthusiastic dealer network for Elmira’s growing line of products.