Tag Archives: findlay

What do you Know about the Prince of Wales Cairn?

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What do you Know about the Prince of Wales Cairn?

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 22 Jul 1974, Mon, First Edition, Page 2

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First we lost a few skids of stone from the Findlay house on High Street that were supposed to be saved. Later I found out that the missing stone is sitting on McArthur Island along with the stone from Central School and Prince of Wales. (some of the school’s stone was used as fill to fill up the river channel next to the Gilles building down by the back bridges)

No one is aware that this cairn existed except a few, but the article above from the Ottawa Journal says it does. Saturday I drove around and around the block and saw nothing but this concrete slab. It looked like something was once in there?

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David Robertson seems to remember a cairn but not at this location as pictured but down the street straight off the side of the building. “I seem to remember someone telling me the cement base pictured was a location of a water well with pump — I could be wrong”.

Bill Brunton thinks it was located right across the street from Barbara Couch’s old house and David  thinks he is right. Bill also mentioned that he thinks the cairn was once hit by a car?

Anyone?

Today I went back and think this is the location just on top of the wee hill as you can see the stone buried in the ground, or what is left of it.

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Cairns of Carleton Place

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Findlay Memorial Cairn-High Street

This is the Findlay Memorial Cairn, located on the site of the first foundry on High Street. It gets missed, tucked away on the north side of High Street in a tiny little park with a shuffleboard court! All that remains is an empty field and a cairn of a once great company. The Findlay Cairn on High Street–The Inner Remains of the Findlay Foundry

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The Willis Cairn in Riverside Park-photo sent to me by Jennifer Fenwick Irwin-The Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

In Riverside Park there lies a little-known site which is of some interest in the town’s history.  It is found at the extreme end of the town’s park, near Lake Avenue and close to the Mississippi River.  This was a burial ground, where members of one of the first families of settlers of the town were laid in a now unmarked graveyard. The late Alex John Duff, Beckwith farmer, that he recalled this burial ground in his youth in the 1880s as being at that time a little cemetery about 15 or 20 feet square, a gravestone in which bore the name Catin Willis.

Discovery of this site in 1946 was reported at a Carleton Place Parks Commission meeting, at which the suggestion was made that the area should be marked as a historical site by erection of a cairn. Later the remains were exhumed and moved to the United Church cemetery. – Whatcha’ Talkin Bout Willis? — This Old House in Carleton Place

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The Morphy Cram on Emily Street

The Cairn above placed on the property now owned by The Bell Telephone Company, which was the original burying site for the Morphy Family, first settlers of this area. In 1819 Edmond Morphy, his wife Barbara Miller and their eight children, the first residents on the site of Carleton Place, emigrated to Upper Canada from Ireland and settled here.–Read more The Statue of Liberty of Carleton Place

MORE Cairn photos at the very end

So About that Ballygiblin Sign…. Fourteen Years Later!

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.–

relatedreading

The Carleton Place House That Disappeared

So What Happened to The Findlay House Stone?

Before and After with Bill Bagg and the Mississippi Gorge

Realizing How High the Mississippi River once Roared

Take Me Where the Mississippi River Once Flowed– The Hidden Mill River

Channeling John Gillies

The River Dance of the McArthur Mill in Carleton Place

The Writing on the Wall Disappeared but the Memories Don’t

Maybe We Should Film Oak Island in Carleton Place? The Day the Money Disappeared

So About that Ballygiblin Sign…. Fourteen Years Later!

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Thanks to Glenda Mahoney— Jim Mahoney– Valerie and Gary Nichols Jim Tye Reverend McDowell Cairn at Zion Memorial Church 1991

Memories of Findlays 1972 – “They’re Proud, Independent, and Resigned to the Loss of their Jobs”

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Memories of Findlays 1972 – “They’re Proud, Independent, and Resigned to the Loss of their Jobs”

 

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Photo from the Ottawa Citizen 1972 thanks to the kindness of Marion Giles McNeely

 

May 20 1972

“I just can’t get it through my thick head why they are closing a plant equipped to produce like this one.” Don McNeely who had worked at Findlays for 33 years.

“It’s always been a good life here- I don’t know where I am going to get a job-there are a few possibilities.” Mr. Lowe

There were only about employee 125 cards left beside the time clock where there were once 200. The protests of unions, the public meetings, the anxious intervening of politicians, and the uproar in the House of Commons are finished. And so is Findlays.

“We were going to get another deck, but that’s out”, joked one man looking at the worn out one.–anonymous worker

 

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Photo from the Ottawa Citizen 1972 thanks to the kindness of Marion Giles McNeely

 

“There’s a sentimental attachment to the place and to fellow workers but no one is going around crying”.–anonymous worker who had been at Findlays for 16 years.

“They’re proud, independent,and resigned to the loss of their jobs. It’s management’s democratic right to close down the plant.”–anonymous worker

“I did some bricklaying work once, but it took forever to do the calculations.”-Milt who never finished Grade 6 and planned to return to school.

 

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Photo from the Ottawa Citizen 1972 thanks to the kindness of Marion Giles McNeely

 

“The only jobs you can get are ones nobody else wants. Who wants to work for $1.85 an hour.”-Alfred, an immigrant who had worked for two years at Findlays. (Findlay salary was $2.16)

“There is some possibility that the enamelling department could continue to do custom work, but we don’t know where the money would come from to finance the operation.”- Gerry 14 year veteran of Findlays

“It’s almost as if they bled this company dry to keep the other going.”  (Montmagny Plant) Gerry 14 year veteran of Findlays

 

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Photo from the Ottawa Citizen 1972 thanks to the kindness of Marion Giles McNeely

Don McNeely and Gordon Lowe

 

Mr. McNeely was considering a job in Smiths Falls but he didn’t know if he would take it because he didn’t want  to do all the highway driving.

“There isn’t much work here in town and I don’t want to travel”.–Woman who worked in the electrical assembly department for 16 years.

“Maybe things will get better–we’ll have a big party at the end. But, it’s going to be terrible not working.”– another Findlay veteran.

The prospect of years filled with comforting routine finally faded at Findlay’s and all that is left is an empty field.

Found by Bill Russell… thank you

 

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The Findlay Brothers buy the land on High Street–Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 19 Jan 1901, Sat, Page 4

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal20 Aug 1947, WedPage 20

 

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Bill Russell posted this— Yes Linda these were made at the plant on the town line. The pucks were presented to the CJOH No Stars Hockey team at a charity game held at C.P. Arena March Our team was The Findlay Outcasts. Lol

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Photo Bill Russell

Llew Lloyd– Before the Findlay brand of pans were marketed, the men in the moulding shop used to make them on the side for home use. There are still some of them around. They are unlabeled and don’t have the same finishing as the ones produced for sale to the general public .

Bill Russell– There are also some that were reproduced at the Findlay plant on Townline that can be identified by a ditto gun label gun that was attached to the pattern prior to moulding. This was a date code. 

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 Deputy Mayor Jerry Flynn came to our Christmas Open House and found his father Clifford in this painting of workers at Findlay’s Limited! You never know what (or who) you’ll find at your local museum! Visit us soon!
 
 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal29 Aug 1934, WedPage 7

 

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum–‎Findlay Plaque Unveiling 2014– Have you seen the Findlay Plaque on the old Patterson building across from the town hall?

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  23 Jul 1974, Tue,  First Edition,  Page 2

 

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Photo Tom Edwards–Karen Lloyd said: Lil McLaren in the striped blouse

 

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Have you seen the Findlay movie at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum? During WWII, a movie was filmed inside the foundry depicting the war department. The war department was created to produce ammunition boxes and grenade castings. The movie is special in the fact that it captured the large number of women employed atFindlay’s working in the war department.– Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum #strongwomen

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

 

Looking for Names- Findlay Foundry

The Inner Remains of the Findlay Foundry

From the Belly of the Findlay Plant….

Someday my Prince Will Buy Me a Cinderella Stove

Findlay’s 101 and a Personal Confession

Where Did you Learn to Swear in Carleton Place?

Funky Soul Stew was Once Cooking in Carleton Place

 

Cooking with Findlay’s — Christine Armstrong’s Inheritance and Maple Syrup Recipe

Commercial Centre Planned for Findlay Site

Walter and John Armour and A Findlay Stove

The Findlay Foundry Ltd. Closes—- The Video

 

 

 

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 May 1964, Sat  •  Page 1

Looking for Names- Findlay Foundry

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Hi Linda

Would you post the attached photo and see if I can get some of them identified.  This is a picture of employees of Findlay Foundry that celebrated 35 years working there.  The only ones I can identify are:  4th standing from the left is Moff Blaine; my father – Hilton Dorman is standing 7th from the left and the 11th from the left standing is Tom Labron.  That’s all I know in the picture.  These 3 individuals celebrated 35 years at the foundry and the guy sitting in the middle is holding the silver tray that was presented to each of these men.  I don’t know if all of them worked there for 35 years or not.  Linda Stewart, Tom Labron’s daughter gave me a copy of this picture. Any help to identify the men would be appreciated.

 Norma Ford

Robert Hawkins-Feduke added: 

The gentleman, first row, fourth from the left, is my uncle, “Buck” Hawkins, who was a long time employee of the foundry.

Want to see more? Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News

RELATED READING:

The Inner Remains of the Findlay Foundry

From the Belly of the Findlay Plant….

Someday my Prince Will Buy Me a Cinderella Stove

Findlay’s 101 and a Personal Confession

Where Did you Learn to Swear in Carleton Place?

Funky Soul Stew was Once Cooking in Carleton Place

 

Cooking with Findlay’s — Christine Armstrong’s Inheritance and Maple Syrup Recipe

Commercial Centre Planned for Findlay Site

Walter and John Armour and A Findlay Stove

The Findlay Foundry Ltd. Closes—- The Video

From the Belly of the Findlay Plant….

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Thanks to Norma Ford the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum now has a movie about the Findlay Plant. Please come and enjoy this silent film display about our local Findlay plant and relive what Carleton Place was built on through the ages. As Wendy LeBlanc said:  ‘David Whiteley’s fabulously creative display unit around the movie. Both are must sees. Bring the family and live their the history!’

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The Carleton Place Beckwith and Hertiage Museum is open SEVEN days a week: Monday through Saturday 1 – 4pm and on Sundays from 1 – 4pm. So yes, visit us this afternoon and also come see the memories of Annie E. Duff.

RELATED READING:

The Inner Remains of the Findlay Foundry

Findlay’s 101 and a Personal Confession

Someday my Prince Will Buy Me a Cinderella Stove

Where Did you Learn to Swear in Carleton Place?

Funky Soul Stew was Once Cooking in Carleton Place

 

Cooking with Findlay’s — Christine Armstrong’s Inheritance and Maple Syrup Recipe

 

Some of the History of the Carleton Place and District Memorial Hospital

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Carleton Place’s own Mr. D. Findlay was the first chairman of our local hospital board. He was also instrumental in putting forth the motion that we desperately needed a hospital in Carleton Place. Before our hospital was built, our local residents had to travel to Almonte or the Ottawa Civic Hospital. In August of 1946, Mayor Coleman announced that a decision had finally been made to begin building a hospital.

An application to the Ontario Government for a charter to operate a hospital was the next step, and it was received in June 1950. A public meeting was called, and the first board of directors was formed. Soon after in March 1951 the firm of Grever and Smith Architects of Kingston were hired to draw up the plans, and in January of 1953 the firm of M. Sullivan and son Ltd. of Arnprior was given the contract to build the hospital.

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It wasn’t until 1953 that Honorable George Doucette turned the sod and later that year the first cornerstone was laid. As soon as July of 1954, the general public of Carleton Place was allowed to view the completed hospital, and in 1955 the hospital was officially opened. That year marked the end of more than 8 years of effort to construct a 30 bed hospital. By 1961 the occupancy had increased to the extent that an expansion was desperately needed.

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Tenders were called, and by the fall of 1966 the work was completed, and the hospital had increased from 30 to 52 beds. A study was completed in 1978 that showed more space was needed- especially for out-patients. In 1980 the board of directors were seeking new ways to expand services without burdening the tax payers.

Carleton Place Canadian files-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

1955 Ottawa Journal

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1956 Ottawa Journal

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Was This the Architect of the Findlay Homes on High Street?

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Today I poured through the archives looking for things and I would bet my last dollar I found the architect for one of the Findlay homes on High Street. I really wanted it to be the one that was demolished as I still cannot believe three council men decided the fate of that home-even though it was in great disrepair. I seem to have taken the memory of this home under my wing.

ashane (1)Photo by Shane Wm Edwards.

Dumps Bradley wrote a few memories about that particular house which I wrote about, and it is all on record at The Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum if you are interested. Her parents, Anne and Frank Bradley, bought the house from the Findlays in 1954. The home really wasn’t that old having been built in 1910. It was built of Newfoundland Stone and the Bradleys personally renovated it themselves. But the ad for tender was placed in early1900 so that would be too soon for this home.

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G. M. Bayly was what they would once call a ‘young upstart’ dabbling in Ottawa politics and forming his own architectural business before the age of 30. George became an alderman in the Wellington ward on his first try, defeating a long time representative from his area. The newspapers noted he was more widely known in the social and civic circles of Ottawa than his opponent. He was a fairly new resident of that ward but the Ottawa Journal said he held intelligent and independent views, and was born and bred in Ottawa.

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He was responsible for the design and building of several Ottawa schools, and a few homes in the Glebe.

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The above ad was placed for a Carleton Place home that would seem of some opulence. Bayly, looking quite dapper by appearances, and an Ottawa mover and groover probably made sure to move in affluent crowds. It is quite possible he became acquainted with the Findlays at social events. Remember the Findlays were quite forward thinking for their time, and would welcome new ideas. An eight horsepower Ford was bought by Findlay Brothers as the first automobile owned in Carleton Place in 1900. I can see these gentlemen getting along splendidly.

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I kept dating the Findlay homes, and I think it is the red brick one (George Findlay home) built in 1901, as it is very similar to ones that were built by George Bayly in Ottawa. More food for thought- and back to the archives.

Buy Linda Secaspina’s Books— Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac– Tillting the Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place and 4 others on Amazon or Amazon Canada or Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street in Carleton Place

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We Can’t Move our Carleton Place People Out!

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Photo of the Construction of the Findlay Plant on High Street in Carleton Place 1901- The Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum. The brick construction was built on land sold by the Canada Lumber Company.

Sometimes we think things are really bad until we see times were just as tough years ago. In April of 1954 three industries were struggling. Bates and Innes Textile Mills were hurting, Renfrew Woolens had closed and Findlays was beginning to decline and would end up closing in 1974.  In 1954 a total of $15,000 of week was being paid out in unemployment in Carleton Place that would last 313 days for each employee. Payments varied from $17.10 a week per single man to $24 for a married man.

R. Vernon McCarten of the Carleton Place Chamber of Commerce said,

“We can’t move our people out; we’ll have to move something in.”

D.D.Findlay president of Findlay’s Limited voiced his concern about the town. His firm had been making stoves since 1860 and had 319 employees on the payroll in 1953, but it had presently dwindled to 234. He attributed the loss to competition from the United States. Also use of coal and wood ranges on the farm had diminished as propane gas and electric stoves were becoming popular. Bates and Innes were getting very few orders and only operating at 2/3 capacity. Renfrew Mill closed down when the men went on strike putting 75 out of work. Findlay hoped that new business might come to town and pointed out the new 36 bed hospital was opening up and almost entirely paid for and half the cost of the furniture and equipment underwritten.

Some hoped the new shortening of Highway 7 might bring people to live in Carleton Place. The town however applied to the OMB for permission to spend $30,000 to buy 5 acres of land on the east side of town for industrial purposes. When the mills all finally closed it affected people who had never worked at anything else but textiles. There were three generations of Fergusons that worked in the textile industry, and what would their future hold now.

The Findlay Plant closed in 1974.

Bates and Innes ceased operations in 1963, due, in part, to the introduction of synthetic fibres.

Renfrew Woolen Mill closed that year.

Who is This in Carleton Place?

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I saw this photo today at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

This is Jean Isabel Galbraith Findlay at 192 High Street in 1909

More Findlay reading:

Frying with Findlay’s Foundry — Christine Armstrong’s Inheritance

Ken Findlay Fatally Shot on High Street

The Carleton Place House That Disappeared

The Carleton Place House That Disappeared

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Photos of home being torn down: Shane Wm. Edwards

Black and White Photos-The Carleton and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Last Photo- Linda Seccaspina

With files written by Dumps Bradley-The Carleton and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Last week I sadly stared at the vacant lot next to the Stoneridge Manor. It was once a majestic Findlay stone home located on the south side of High Street. If you ask anyone, no one is really sure what year it came down. All I remember is one day it was there, and the next week it wasn’t. The demolition seemed to occur quite quickly. The home was once used as part of the manor, but it was noted the stairs were terrible, and it wasn’t feasible to carry the patients up and down.

Dumps Bradley wrote a few memories about the house, and it is on record at The Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum if you are interested. Her parents, Anne and Frank Bradley, bought the house from the Findlays in 1954. The home really wasn’t that old having been built in 1910. It was built of Newfoundland Stone and the Bradleys personally renovated it themselves. Frank Bradley loved his front drive, and covered it with pristine white gravel. You didn’t dare let your vehicle leave ruts in it less you be scolded by Frank.

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The verandas were not only lovely to look at, but Anne would put her children’s beds out there so they could spend summer nights looking at the stars. Her children also loved the kitchen, and they fondly remembered lunches with Anne reading stories to them while they ate. Their piano was mentioned as it took 5 years to tune it in Canada, due to the damp weather when it had originally resided in England.

Dumps Bradley said that her father was very proud of his 50 different bottles of whiskey that he kept in their bar that resembled an English pub. Anne and Frank stripped and sanded all the floors in that home, and even stripped the dark finish off the stair rails. There wasn’t one thing they did not improve because of how much they loved their home.

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There were wonderful gardens complete with strawberries and raspberries and an asparagus bed that took years to flourish. All the garden gatherings were stored in the Honey House complete with root cellar.

It sounded like Utopia so what happened?

The house was sold to an order of Roman Catholic Christian brothers before it became the Manor. Dumps said they built a very “unattractive concrete block chapel” and later others built the flat “concrete bunker” of a nurses home in the 70’s. Older residents of Carleton Place will remember sledding on a hill behind the house between the Apple trees and playing hockey on the rink.

Dumps apologized for the way she felt, but she was bitter. The beautiful home she grew up in was desecrated. She said it should have never been allowed to happen as it was built by the biggest employer in the town- the Findlay Foundry.

Peter BradleyThe house was sold to the Christian Brothers organisation in 1961. they then added a stone chapel to the town side of the house which made it imbalanced and ugly. later on the Brothers sold it on and it was developed as a nursing home. this made the house unsalable as a residence and it was not suitable for the nursing home and it was left empty. The heating pipes froze and the house flooded from then on it was all downhill. With the modern concern for maintaining heritage in Canada it would have been a planning impossibility to develop within the curtilage of a listed building. A steep learning curve for preservation!

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 It had to be demolished through neglect. All the timber porches became rotten and were a danger. The central heating system was not drained when the house was unoccupied in the winter and froze. This was a gravity system with 2 inch steel pipes and twin boilers, the pipes split causing sever water damage internally. Anybody with pockets deep enough to restore the house would not want to look out over the flat roof of a nursing home fifteen feet away built on the lawn. Nowadays that could not happen as nothing can be built within the curtilage of a listed building. It is a sad story when viewed with the knowledge of hindsight. If planning had been refused for the care home the house may have still been standing. A big may!….
Peter Bradley

It was demolished because the then town council passed a planning application for an ugly nursing home on the front lawn, after that nobody would buy the house and it fell into disrepair. At the time there was great animosity against the Findley’s after the sale of the foundry to Moffat’s who then closed it down, a sort of retribution in which heritage was the looser.

Jayne Munro-Ouimet Linda, I worked there when the House and acres was known as 12 Acres Nursing Home. The property was owned by 2 people. The lady’s name was Doreen Harbour and the man I forget his last name was Gerry. We were told the new home was being built because there was structural issues with the foundation, maybe that is why the med cart would take a sudden role across the floor, if you parked it at the bottom of the long elegant red carpeted staircase. This couple built the current LCT building, we moved the residents from the Peden Home first and then those from the Ontario Hospital who were placed there because the hospital had closed. Then we moved those that did not require 24hour care. Dr. Haham who owned the house across the street, was the resident Doctor, and Dr White also lend a helping hand. The Ocean Wave Firefighters help with the moving of those bed ridden residence. Harry Hamilton and Mrs Fitzgerald were the two residence who lead the march to their new home and cut the opening ribbon. The opening day gala brought about 350 curious folks to hear the Rudle family musicians and the young lad from Carleton Place who was an Elvis Presley impersonator. Frank Gordon bought the home from Doreen and Gerry.

Photo- Linda Secccaspina

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Edith Knowlton 1969

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David Robertson that is 1969 i believe .. that is me in the pic with the old stone building that was used for a dressing room in the background

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Peter Bradley
Here is a picture of the old Findley coach house before the nursing home was built. It did burn down unfortunately.

The house had been left abandoned for a number of years and someone told me the interior looked exactly like a horror film. Then, it was the rot that made the house suffer.

It has been said that the stone from the house was sold to Cohen and Cohen in Ottawa with 2 skids of said stone kept here. It seems it is “lost” somewhere on one of our town lots– sitting there in case we need it. Need it? Should there not be some sort of monument built from it, rather than let the stone sit there and waste away similar to the fate of that beloved home? I was told by the Manor management that they do not own the empty lot. A terrible waste of a one-time beautiful home.

This photo is from Judy Pallister.Thanks!

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Update from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum: A demolition permit was issued to remove the Findlay house in September of 2005.  No one is aware of the stone at the public yard. 

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Related Story: Tragic Tale of Ken Findlay

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Carleton Place- The Happiest Damn Town in Lanark County

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Tilting the Kilt, Vintage Whispers from Carleton Place by Linda Seccaspina is available at Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street, the Carleton Place Beckwith Museum in Carleton Place, Ontario and The Mississippi Valley Textile Mill in Almonte.  available on all Amazon sites (Canada, US, Europe) and Barnes and Noble