Tag Archives: findlay plant

Findlay’s Award Night 1954– Whose Name do You Remember? Names Names Names

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Findlay’s Award Night 1954– Whose Name do You Remember? Names Names Names

Perth Remembered photo

Sept 1954

Findlays Limited of Carleton Place gave a presentation dinner to employees with over twenty-five years’ service, at Rideau Ferry Inn on Friday evening, Sept. 17th. Seventy-five employees or former employees sat down to dinner.

Among those honored on this occasion was Mr. Stanley D. James of Almonte who has rounded out 36 years in the Company’s service.

The following employees, all with thirty-five or more years’ service, were given suitably engraved gold watches: Edward R. Gibson, Joseph Poynter, Jam es E. Crawford, Alvin E. Baird, Stanley D. James, J. Kenneth Simpson, Carns R. Lever, Earl L. Fleming, Richard C. Jelly, J. Nairn Findlay, James H. Cavers, Williaifi J. Fraser, Miss M. McPherson and Miss E. Viola Cummings. The two ladies did not attend the dinner, but were given wrist watches.

Taken inside Findlay’s in May of 1962, this photo shows the final stages of stove assembly and reminds all that “The Customer is the Next Inspector Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

The following thirty-five employees with more than twenty-five years’ service received suitably engraved silver-plated trays: C. Herman Miller, Clarence A. Waugh, Bryan S. Drader, C. Leslie Mullins, C. Roy Cooke, John F. Stevens, William G. Lewis, J. Aylwin McAllister, C. Herbert Simpson, W. Alvin. Doe, Silas Davidson, George L. Bulloch, Robert H. Donahue, D. Alwyn Prime, Ernest Lay, Charles E. Johnston, Harry] J. Brebner, J. H enry McKittrick, Robert A. McDaniel, Keith C. MacNabb, Kenneth B. Howard, G. Ernest Giles, Ernest A. Buffam, William C. Cummings, John McDiarmid, Traverse E. Coates, Harold H. McaFdden, Russell E. Simpson, H arry P. Baird, D. Hamilton Findlay, George E. Findlay, John A. MacGregor, William K. White, R. Gordon: Drummond, Edward T. Bittle.

After the dinner, the recipients were given an opportunity to speak and many interesting anecdotes of the past were brought to life again. This is the second such presentation dinner. A similar one was held in 1949 at which 25 watches and 48 trays were presented.

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

It’s Findlay Friday yet again… and here we have one of the many photographs loaned to the Museum by Bill and Betty-Anne Findlay! This Findlay Family photograph depicts William Findlay (Bill’s grandfather and son of the Findlay Foundry founder, David Findlay) along with his wife and four children.

Seated in the front is Mr. William Findlay, his wife, Mrs Annie Shaw Cram Findlay, and their youngest daughter, Rosamund. Standing behind them are their three oldest children, William Fraser (Bill’s father), David Douglas, and Dorothy.

This photograph was taken in 1916, the day before David Douglas left for the war.

Llew Lloyd said In the summer of 1968 Brian Ford and he worked the evening shift in the oil department . Cecil Robertson was the shop foreman . The next summer he went to see Cecil for a job , but he was full up .He told me that Jack Bittle was looking for help in the enamel shop . Just as he was leaving Cecil asked him  if he had a pair of cowboy boots . When he answered yes , he said , ” wear them Jack likes tall people ” . That summer, thanks to Cecil’s advice and Ken Blackburn’s boots, he worked with another group of great guys at the Findlay Foundry 

Clippings of the Sold Findlay Firm 1965

Findlay Plant on Townline –September 1978

Memories of Findlays 1972 – “They’re Proud, Independent, and Resigned to the Loss of their Jobs”

Looking for Names- Findlay Foundry

The Inner Remains of the Findlay Foundry

From the Belly of the Findlay Plant….

Someday my Prince Will Buy Me a Cinderella Stove

Findlay’s 101 and a Personal Confession

Where Did you Learn to Swear in Carleton Place?

Funky Soul Stew was Once Cooking in Carleton Place

Cooking with Findlay’s — Christine Armstrong’s Inheritance and Maple Syrup Recipe

Commercial Centre Planned for Findlay Site

Walter and John Armour and A Findlay Stove

The Findlay Foundry Ltd. Closes—- The Video

Forgotten Letters – William Findlay- Almonte Memories –The Buchanan Scrapbook

Photos of Carleton Place — Larry Clark— Findlay Memories

Friday’s Message About the Findlay Foundry and Whistle

Findlay’s and the Mennonites 1977

49 High Street — Community Notes About The Findlay Guest House

The Man Known as D.K. Findlay–David Findlay

Findlay Plant on Townline –September 1978

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Findlay Plant on Townline –September 1978
Bill Russell– There are also some that were reproduced at the Findlay plant on Townline that can be identified by a ditto gun label gun that was attached to the pattern prior to moulding. This was a date code. 

September 1978

The first new mechanized gray iron foundry to be built in Eastern Ontario is nearing completion on the outskirts, of Carleton Place. Construction was commenced six months ago and completion is expected within the next four or five weeks. Mr. Donald F. Reynolds, President and General Manager of Findlay Foundry Limited, said today that he expects that Ontario Hydro will install power lines to the new plant this week which will perm it equipm ent testing and tryout during the next few weeks.

The new electric induction melting furnace is now in place as well as elaborate mechanized sand handling and air pollution control equipment. The new plant is expected to be the largest user of electrical power in this area. Findlay Foundry Limited, a new Company organized last year, and in no way related to Findlay’s Limited, took over the operation of the old High Street foundry when Findlays Limited announced in July 1969 that it was discontinuing its unprofitable foundry business in line with corporate policy of its parent company.

The parent company had also closed another foundry it owned at Montmagny. Quebec. Mr. Reynolds stated that most old style manual foundries using cupola and other melt systems are losing money and it it is inevitable that most of these will likely close down because of this factor and the high cost of pollution control equipment that would be required to comply with Ontario’s new pollution control laws that go into effect later this fall. The modern methods of production will mean that there will be less manual work involved, and obviously this is a much more attractive proposition to our type of industry. 

There will be a closer control of the metal analysis, and the working conditions are far more acceptable with this method of melting as opposed to the cupola. A short period of time will be needed to allow people to become acquainted with the machinery, but this should not take too long; the technicalities of remain the same regardless of the method employed. The long service employee from the old foundry should greatly appreciate the vastly improved working conditions, and it is hoped that as the company matures, it will be in a position to improve still further with the working facilities and keep “in step” with progress.

Mr. Reynolds said that the new plant will likely be operated on a two shift basis almost from the date operations there are commenced and the total number of employees at the new plant will be about the same a* at the old plant. “We are pleased,” Mr. Reynolds stated, “that we managed to maintain employment of the foundry staff at Carleton Place during the past year despite the profitability factor, because we are convinced that over the long run the community, our employees and the shareholders will benefit from the actions we have taken.”

A Carleton Place company that specialized in customizing fire trucks and other emergency vehicles shut down November 11, leaving two dozen employees locked out and confused.

A notice on the front door claims that Eastway911 did not pay its $12,000 rent this month — and states the Ottawa landlord, Kilkee Corporation, wants $500,000 in damages and penalties.

The statement said the company is considering how to continue to operate the business in what it describes as a “challenging and disappointing situation.”

“Eastway911 Emergency Vehicles Ltd. has paid municipal taxes and remains ready, willing, and able to pay November rent. It has advised Kilkee Corp. of this fact,” the statement added.

Cornwall Freightliner, a trucking parts and service company in Cornwall, is one business that’s now looking at its options after the sudden closure.

Freightliner frames are part of two new trucks at Eastway911, and two more frames are headed there now, said sales associate Karl Paschek.

“So, a total of four of them for half a million dollars,” said Paschek.

Kilkee Corporation refused to comment on the record.

CBC news

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Aug 1987, Tue  •  Page 6

Memories of Findlays 1972 – “They’re Proud, Independent, and Resigned to the Loss of their Jobs”

Looking for Names- Findlay Foundry

The Inner Remains of the Findlay Foundry

From the Belly of the Findlay Plant….

Someday my Prince Will Buy Me a Cinderella Stove

Findlay’s 101 and a Personal Confession

Where Did you Learn to Swear in Carleton Place?

Funky Soul Stew was Once Cooking in Carleton Place

Cooking with Findlay’s — Christine Armstrong’s Inheritance and Maple Syrup Recipe

Commercial Centre Planned for Findlay Site

Walter and John Armour and A Findlay Stove

The Findlay Foundry Ltd. Closes—- The Video

Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 150th Birthday – Part 4

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The Millstone has published its first instalment of 365 FACTS ABOUT MISSISSIPPI MILLS. It will be a series of posts for Canada’s 150th birthday this year — “365 Facts About Mississippi Mills.” So I thought I would begin to a few about Carleton Place.

The facts below are from the flyer passed out on January 1: Carleton Place-A Valley Town at Confederation 1867 by the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum. I have personally added some extra tidbits under the facts.

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Photo from the  Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Fact- Industries included a grist mill, carding mill, shingle mill, a tannery and David Findlays’ foundry. James Gillies was constructing his new sawmill, soon to employ 100 men, and produce 10,000 feet of lumber per day.

Did you know why the turbine wheels were put outside the main stone walls on free standing timbers at the MCArthur Mill? Find out here: The River Dance of the McArthur Mill in Carleton Place.

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Photo from the  Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Have you ever heard the story about Roy Bates who  owned a spectacular Airedale dog? Read more here-Roy Bates and His Dog Named Taffy— ahh Paddy

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Photo from the  Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Do you know the story behind this millstone on Mill Street? The original millstone was found during the renovations. What makes it so significant? Find out here: Down by the Old Mill Stream — Carleton Place

 

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Photo from the  Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Fact- Shops on Bell, Bridge and Mill Street were open from 6 a.m until 10 p.m and the average work day for laborers was 11 hours.

Did you know the block of Bell Street next to Bridge Street was the second early business section of the town? Read more here: Bell Street– Carleton Place Ontario

Did you know about our earlier businesses like William Kelly who was the proprietor of the British Hotel,  on Bridge st. corner of High Street? The travelling public will find this a good house to stop at, as it is centrally situated, and every attention is paid to the comfort of its guests. Read more here: Business Directory of Carleton Place 1866 and 1867- Any name you recognize?

 

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Photo of  Edward John Griffith from Maryanne Bannon Robertson, Burlington Ontario

Or how about a butcher  from The Central Meat Market that we dug deep to find. Read more Edward John Griffith here: Name That Carleton Place Butcher? FOUND!!

findlaysdead.jpgThe inner remains of Findlay’s- Photo from the Delmer Dunlop Collection at Archives Lanark

 

 

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Photo from the  Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

So many stories about the Findlay Foundry– where do you begin? Some kids even learned to swear walking by the Findlay plant each day– and when the daily whistles coming from the plant stopped– the town mourned for a business that helped make our town. Click here for many links to stories about the Findlay Foundry-Looking for Names- Findlay Foundry

 

 

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Related Reading-

Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 15oth-part 1

Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 150th Birthday – Part 2

Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 150th Birthday – Part 3

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun