Tag Archives: fentons bakery

Mellowing About Mello Rolls

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Mellowing About Mello Rolls

6226867dbdd908097344ba9f2021ee4b

You had to go to a candy store or drugstore to get ice cream in days gone by because home freezer storage was rare in those days. The ice man would have his shoulder draped with a wet, dirty potato sack on which a huge block of ice balanced. Then he’d heave the block into our ice box, scraping the corners if it didn’t fit inside the space. And that was for refrigeration, not freezing.

Mello-Roll

A Mello-Roll was a three-inch-long ice cream drum about one inch in diameter, wrapped in peel-away paper with blue print on it that sometimes blotted onto the ice cream itself. The candy store operator would peel the paper off gingerly and drop the roll into the rectangular collar of a short-stemmed cone with a flat bottom. Ice cream was sheer velveteen in those days, a texture so silky the tongue actually slid across the ice cream with each lick. The richness of the cream was probably double that of today’s rich ice creams. It was well after World War II when Mello-Roll disappeared from the scene. Candy stores no longer carried it and the memory has faded.

Harvey Levine said: They were made by Borden’s. I believe Borden’s used three different brand names: Borden’s, Horton’s and Reid’s. All three brands were made in the same factory using different labels. One of the special features of the cone was that it had a flat bottom, enabling the server to place it on the counter while he or she took cash and made change (with the exception noted below).

As you remember,the cone was cylindrical from the bottom, rising to a rectangular shape at the top, deep enough to accommodate the lengthwise cross-section of the cylinder of ice cream. The only available flavors were chocolate, vanilla and, I think, strawberry (in those days, ice cream came in very few flavors anywhere).

 

Image result for mello rolls

Elsie-and-MelORol.jpg

 

An advantage to the operator was that inventory could be tightly controlled, unlike scooped ice cream. The server never touched the ice cream, since the customer merely had to grab the two ends of the wrapper and unroll the product while it was still in the cone. The advantage to the eater (and the parents of small children!) was that the ice cream didn’t hang over the edge of the cone, and it wouldn’t drip down the outside of the cone to make the hands sticky.  I never thought there was enough ice cream in a Mel-O-Rol!

Norma Ford- Mellow Rolls, sold them at Hughes Grocery at the foot of Lake Ave W and Sarah St. in Carleton Place (a bakery now). I am not a fan of ice cream but I loved these would save every cent to be able to buy one. Remember how easy it was to get in the cone and then take the paper off. Wish they still made them, have a special flavour. Thanks for that memory Tom, I can now taste them again in my mind.

Donna Mcfarlane We used to get them at Wilsons drug store on Bridge Street in Carleton Place. I remember Lena Stanzel worked there. There was something about them that cannot be beat.

Linda Gallipeau-Johnston We got ours at our corner store when Isabel and Ray Heinz had it – Queen and Morphy in Carleton Place – only a short walk from Park Ave.

Beverlee Ann Clow i was just remembering yesterday about buying our 5 cent mello rolls in Bill Ballantyne’s grocery store in Lanark way back when.

Susan Elliott Topping I remember buying them at Gorden Frazer’s store in Almonte, but they were on a different kind of cone.

Wendy Rogers We always stopped at the Perth Dairy on Harvey Street on the way to the cottage for our vanilla ice cream rolled in paper dropped into a cone.The best ice cream we ever had. Our other stop was to Moodie’s ice house for ice for our refrigerator at the cottage. Great memories!

Earl Alexander Donaldson Couldn’t keep up to the demand , on a hot summer day . Beats the scooping . I ate my share ! Used to work for Bill (Bomba ) Hewitt , owner of Hewitt’s Groceteria . The Great Lanark fire of 1959 , put Bill and many others out of business forever 😥

Don Bush

Back in the 50’s, once a month on a Sunday, my father drove the family out to Captree at the end of Jones Beach to see the fishing boats. There at the concession stand, he would buy me a Mello Roll. Until now, 2022, it never occurred to me that it was so well known. I guess as a child with my limited vision of the world, I assumed it was only sold at Captree. This morning my wife was saying that she never liked ice cream because as a child it would drip down on her hands and get them sticky. Right away the Mello Roll and it’s special cone came back to mind. Thanks for enlightening me with its history

 

historicalnotesimg

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 18 Jul 1968, Thu,
  3. Page 29

img

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 14 Jul 1971, Wed,
  3. Page 29Image result for fenton's bakery ottawa

Below– The Fenton’s Bakery/Laura Secord/World of Maps at Wellington and Holland

Image result for fenton's bakery ottawa

The Fenton’s Bakery/Laura Secord/World of Maps at Wellington and Holland is a well-known example.

 

 

relatedreading

 

Watch Out for the Glue in Your Ice Cream!

Remembering Peterson’s Ice Cream

Why Value Ice Cream Sandwiches Don’t Melt

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

 

Sometimes I am blown away to who reads my blog or how a recipe for a pickle pie goes viral… This morning I got this on my blog about Melo Rolls. Robert Dennis Rentzer woulld be the second to last lawyer. His comment on Melo Rolls–


https://lindaseccaspina.wordpress.com/2018/03/23/mellowing-about-mello-rolls/
Robert Dennis Rentzer
11 hr.
As a kid in Broooklyn N.Y. in the early 1950s I remember these very well. Placed horizontallly rolled into a cone with a similar shape at the top and round to hold with a flat bottom.
Even after the candy stores stopped selling them they lived on in the nasty phrase which endured as an insult,


And to Harvey Levin who did an insulting interview of me when I represented Rodney Kimg, I can now repeat that phrase which, now at 82 years of age, I haven’t had occasion to say for about 70 years. which is:
“Up your ^&** with a Mello Roll.”
Bob Rentzer (age 82).
6226867dbdd908097344ba9f2021ee4b

You had to go to a candy store or drugstore to get ice cream in days gone by because home freezer storage was rare in those days. The ice man would have his shoulder draped with a wet, dirty potato sack on which a huge block of ice balanced. Then he’d heave the block into our ice box, scraping the corners if it didn’t fit inside the space. And that was for refrigeration, not freezing.

Mello-Roll

A Mello-Roll was a three-inch-long ice cream drum about one inch in diameter, wrapped in peel-away paper with blue print on it that sometimes blotted onto the ice cream itself. The candy store operator would peel the paper off gingerly and drop the roll into the rectangular collar of a short-stemmed cone with a flat bottom. Ice cream was sheer velveteen in those days, a texture so silky the tongue actually slid across the ice cream with each lick. The richness of the cream was probably double that of today’s rich ice creams. It was well after World War II when Mello-Roll disappeared from the scene. Candy stores no longer carried it and the memory has faded.

Harvey Levine said: They were made by Borden’s. I believe Borden’s used three different brand names: Borden’s, Horton’s and Reid’s. All three brands were made in the same factory using different labels. One of the special features of the cone was that it had a flat bottom, enabling the server to place it on the counter while he or she took cash and made change (with the exception noted below).

As you remember,the cone was cylindrical from the bottom, rising to a rectangular shape at the top, deep enough to accommodate the lengthwise cross-section of the cylinder of ice cream. The only available flavors were chocolate, vanilla and, I think, strawberry (in those days, ice cream came in very few flavors anywhere).

Image result for mello rolls
Elsie-and-MelORol.jpg

An advantage to the operator was that inventory could be tightly controlled, unlike scooped ice cream. The server never touched the ice cream, since the customer merely had to grab the two ends of the wrapper and unroll the product while it was still in the cone. The advantage to the eater (and the parents of small children!) was that the ice cream didn’t hang over the edge of the cone, and it wouldn’t drip down the outside of the cone to make the hands sticky.  I never thought there was enough ice cream in a Mel-O-Rol!

Norma Ford- Mellow Rolls, sold them at Hughes Grocery at the foot of Lake Ave W and Sarah St. in Carleton Place (a bakery now). I am not a fan of ice cream but I loved these would save every cent to be able to buy one. Remember how easy it was to get in the cone and then take the paper off. Wish they still made them, have a special flavour. Thanks for that memory Tom, I can now taste them again in my mind.

Donna Mcfarlane We used to get them at Wilsons drug store on Bridge Street in Carleton Place. I remember Lena Stanzel worked there. There was something about them that cannot be beat.

Linda Gallipeau-Johnston We got ours at our corner store when Isabel and Ray Heinz had it – Queen and Morphy in Carleton Place – only a short walk from Park Ave.

Beverlee Ann Clow i was just remembering yesterday about buying our 5 cent mello rolls in Bill Ballantyne’s grocery store in Lanark way back when.

Susan Elliott Topping I remember buying them at Gorden Frazer’s store in Almonte, but they were on a different kind of cone.

Wendy Rogers We always stopped at the Perth Dairy on Harvey Street on the way to the cottage for our vanilla ice cream rolled in paper dropped into a cone.The best ice cream we ever had. Our other stop was to Moodie’s ice house for ice for our refrigerator at the cottage. Great memories!

Earl Alexander Donaldson Couldn’t keep up to the demand , on a hot summer day . Beats the scooping . I ate my share ! Used to work for Bill (Bomba ) Hewitt , owner of Hewitt’s Groceteria . The Great Lanark fire of 1959 , put Bill and many others out of business forever 😥

historicalnotes
img

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 18 Jul 1968, Thu,
  3. Page 29
img

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 14 Jul 1971, Wed,
  3. Page 29Image result for fenton's bakery ottawa

Below– The Fenton’s Bakery/Laura Secord/World of Maps at Wellington and Holland

Image result for fenton's bakery ottawa

The Fenton’s Bakery/Laura Secord/World of Maps at Wellington and Holland is a well-known example.

relatedreading

Watch Out for the Glue in Your Ice Cream!

Remembering Peterson’s Ice Cream

Why Value Ice Cream Sandwiches Don’t Melt

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

Sometimes I am blown away to who reads my blog or how a recipe for a pickle pie goes viral… This morning I got this on my blog about Melo Rolls. Robert Dennis Rentzer woulld be the second to last lawyer. His comment on Melo Rolls–
https://lindaseccaspina.wordpress.com/…/mellowing…/
Robert Dennis Rentzer
11 hr.
As a kid in Broooklyn N.Y. in the early 1950s I remember these very well. Placed horizontallly rolled into a cone with a similar shape at the top and round to hold with a flat bottom.
Even after the candy stores stopped selling them they lived on in the nasty phrase which endured as an insult,
And to Harvey Levin who did an insulting interview of me when I represented Rodney Kimg, I can now reorat thst phrase which, now at 82 years of age, I haven’t had occasion to say for about 70 years. which is:
“Up your $%^& with a Mello Roll.”
Bob Rentzer (age 82).