Tag Archives: farmers market

The Garden — Helen Halpenny –The Buchanan Scrapbooks

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The Garden — Helen Halpenny –The Buchanan Scrapbooks

With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

No date…. with files from Jean Ridell

The Halpenny’s who live at R.R. 2 Almonte have a herb garden just outside their kitchen door. The location is in a perfect spot for the cook of the house handy for quick herb fixes in a recipe. Helen grows basil, oregano, summer savoury and 28 other varieties like tarragon,lemon balm, wooly lamb’s ear and fennel. Of all these herbs Helen grows, not all are for cooking. Lavender and costmary will be dried and made up into fragrant satchels.

Across the laneway from the house is the Halpenny’s vegetable garden that the family is proud of. She feels the time and effort put into the garden work pays off because the family is self sufficient in vegetables. They buy only winter salad vegetables.

By planting vegetables with different maturation dates, succession plantings, and careful choice of varieties, there are fresh vegetables on the table from early summer until freeze up.The Extra Early Bounty Tomatoes are ready now and Rolar Vee Corn, the earliest of several corn varieties will soon be finished. Tasty Vee, Seneca Chief and Golden Bantam will extend the corn season well into September.

Experimenting with new varieties is a special interest of Helen’s. She easily names every variety as you walk with her.. ( the article was cut off here:(

2016 CHAMPIONSHIP SEED, FEED AND FORAGE SHOW RESULTS click

Helen Halpenny-Almonte Alameda donors and supporters click

HISTORY

Almonte has a rich tradition of community involvement and fellowship.

In the late 1800s and early 1900s, a thriving traditional Market was located in downtown Almonte, just off Brea Street (where the parking lot is now). Vendors would arrive with their horse drawn carriages full of hand-made items, livestock, locally grown foods, and other wares. Patrons would arrive from miles around to spend the morning stocking their own carriages with the items they needed and enjoy fellowship with their neighbours. It was an event not to be missed, and for some, their only trip into town every week.

The current Almonte Farmers Market (AFM) maintains that same feel.  It was conceived around the kitchen table of  Master Gardener, Helen Halpenny in the fall of 1989. A few local farmers met over coffee to discuss bringing together their extra produce and offering it for sale. Their vision of rejuvenating the old Almonte Farmers Market as a producer-based market laid the ground work for the successful farmers’ market that we have today.

Shortly after the farmers’ market started in its new incarnation, the market vendors were approached by Bob Chorney of Farmers’ Markets Ontario, which was just starting up at the time. Bob was amazed at how far along in the planning stages the AFM vendors were. Farmers’ Markets Ontario shared the same producer based ideas and so it was easy for the AFM to become a founding member of Farmers’ Markets of Ontario.   The FMO has given our market unfailing support and provided us with signs and other marketing tools, canopies, ideas and help throughout the years.

Helen Halpenny– Gardens Ontario

Registered Judges

Please note: OHA certified judges appear first listed alphabetically and otherwise qualified judges appear at the end of the list.

Back to Judges List

NameHelen Halpenny
CityAlmonte
Email
Phone
OHA Home Society:D 2 Almonte HS
OHA CertYes
Other Certificates:RGB-hort, GCO-design
Districts ServedD02

HALPENNY
WILLIAM STEWART

Unexpectedly in hospital at Ottawa on Friday, February 13, 2009.

Bill Halpenny
of Clayton, age 70 years.

Much loved husband of Helen Stewart. Beloved father of Elizabeth (David), Amy (Trevor) and Raymond (Jodi). Dear brother of Mary Ellen Code (late Fred). Bill will be sadly missed by his family

Mary Ellen Halpenny, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Halpenny, Almonte, RR No, 2, who graduated September 14, 1964 from the Brockville General Hospital School of Nursing. She received an award for highest standing in Obstetrical Nursing theory and practice, tying with two other graduates.

CODE – HALPENNY

A pretty wedding took place on Saturday, May 15 at St. George ‘s Anglican Church, Clayton when Mary Ellen Halpenny, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Halpenny, RR 2, Almonte, became the bride of Mr. Frederick Ivan Code, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Code of Innisville. The ceremony was performed by Rev. J. E. Allsopp of Ottawa. Mr. Stanley Hughton, uncle of the bride, was organist and Robert Hughton, cousin of the bride, sang O Perfect Love during the signing of the Register. The best man was Mr. Wm. Code, brother of the groom. Matron of honour Mrs. Sam Millar, Smiths Falls. Miss Mary James and Miss Beverly Evans were bridesmaids. Barbara Loynes of Ottawa was flower girl. Ushers were Bill Halpenny, brother of the bride and Orville Cooke. Given in marriage by her father the bride wore white floor length whisper taffeta with lace panel overskirt of organza embroidered with sequins, lace bodice with lily point sleeves. A shoulder length veil was held in place with rose of crystalet. Bridesmaids in identical street length, pale blue crystalet over taffeta and carried white and pink carnations. Flower girl in yellow crystalet over taffeta and carried a basket of Shasta daises. The bride’s bouquet was of pink roses, pink carnations and white stephanotis. For travelling the bride donned a three piece double knit suit in deep pink with pink and black accessories and corsage of white mums. Guests were present from Chapleau, Brockville, Ottawa and Smiths Falls. On their return from Prince Edward Island they will reside on the groom’s farm in Scotch Corners.

https://sites.rootsweb.com/~onlanark/NewspaperClippings/Book4/BookFour_11.htm

A photograph of the Willows family on a wagon circa 1900. Left to right, those pictured are: Alfred Willows, Catherine Willows, Ruth Halpenny, and Sara Halpenny.
Photo from Marjorie Earl. Read-The Willows Family Reunions Clippings
ALL PHOTOS from Joan Halpenny’s Family Collection— read-The Family of Joan Halpenny– McRostie

Every Foot of the House Was Crowded When the Teamsters Were Passing Through

The Family of Joan Halpenny– McRostie

Butter in pails, 17 to 18c-The Almonte Farmer’s Market 1898

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Butter in pails, 17 to 18c-The Almonte Farmer’s Market 1898

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Indianapolis Market: 1908

 

May 1898–Almonte Gazette

The Almonte Farmer’s Market was extensively patronized on Saturday morning, the space for rigs being fully taken up and everything offered for sale finding purchasers at satisfactory prices.

On Tuesday morning there was also a good turnout, and sales were quickly made. Many housewives were on the lookout for chickens and other fowl, lamb, etc., and what was offered for sale was soon picked up. Not a few patrons of the market are of the opinion: that if the hours were made from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. or 10 o’clock greater satisfaction would be ensured all round. However, these things will mend themselves with time.

The ruling prices during the past week were as follows : Butter in pails, 17 to 18c ; rolls or prints, 18 to 19c ; potatoes, 40 to 45c per bag ; mutton, 7 to 8c per lb. ; veal 5 to 6c ; chickens, dead, per pair, 60 to 70c; chickens, live, pair, 50 to 60c; turkeys, §1.00 to 11,25 each ; radishes, 5e per bunch.; green onions, three bunches for 10c ;. lettuce, three bunches for 10c ; rhubarb, two bunches for 5c : honey in a comb, 10c per lb ; fresh eggs, 9 to 10c per dozen.

 

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Market day, Jacques Cartier Square, Montreal, QC, about 1900. #vintage

A Housekeeper’s Hint 1898

On Saturday, during the editor’s absence on a visit to the market, the following was left on his desk by an Almonte lady. Farmers will find a useful hint here:

Dear Mr. Editor,

After visiting the mar­ket assiduously since its creation and carefully examining the goods on sale, it has occurred to me that through the columns of your valuable paper the people coming to market might be informed about what to bring. We want chickens, onions and other vegetables, buttermilk, flowers, horseradish, wild fruit, and everything else that can­ not be got in town.

 

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Heather Ferrier- Lanark County, Ontario’s Queen of the Furrow 2012 Linda Seccaspina Photo

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

Eggs 10 Cents a dozen–Farmers Markets of Smiths Falls and Almonte 1880

Lanark Farm Life is Not so Bad- 1951

Once Upon a Time on the Farm

Farming Could be a Dangerous Business in Lanark County? Who Do You Know?

She Doesn’t Think My Tractor is Sexy–The Farmer’s Wife 1889

and 1889

Eggs 10 Cents a dozen–Farmers Markets of Smiths Falls and Almonte 1880 and 1889

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AlmonteFarmersMarket Almonte Farmers Market – Al & Pat Watson’s Farm | by AlmonteFarmersMarket

June 15 1899–Almonte Gazette

The Almonte Market last Saturday was fairly well attended by producers. A few new commodities were offered, which were quickly sold to eager purchasers, but, with the exception of butter and eggs, there was no special demand for any one article, though everything was readily sold.

A large supply of rhubarb, lettuce and green vegetables of excellent quality sold quickly at 3 bunches for 10 cents. Some fresh fish from White Lake brought from 5 to 6c a pound. Other prices remain unchanged, and are as follows:

Butter, 15 to 17c lb –eggs 10c doz –potatoes 60 to 65c– a b a g ; parsnips, 4c. g a l.– carrots, 4c g a l.– green onions 4c a bunch– lettuce 4c a bunch– rhubarb 4c a bunch– or 3 bunches of any of these for 10c

Veal 5 to 6c lb– mutton, 7 to 8c lb.– beef 5 to 8c. lb — pork 6 to 7c. lb–hams, 7 to 8c. lb

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Men Working Tractor and Threshing Machine c1890

Hay, $9 to $10 per ton. The other prices in town this weekare : Wheat, soft, bush., 67 to 70c ; hard, 70 to 72c ; pease, 60c ; buckwheat, 40c ; oats, 30c; rye 40c ; barley, 35c ; bran, $14 per ton ; shorts, $16 ; provender, $16 to $20.

 

 

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The farm of James Leach, Montague Township, Ontario, Canada, in 1902-Bytown or Bust

 

Smith’s Falls as a Market January 1, 1880-Almonte Gazette-— Messra. Robert Yuill,-Geo. Dunlop and John Drynan, farmers in Ramsay, drove to Smith’s Falls with loads of grain, which they disposed of to everyones advantage. We certainly have reason to feel gratified that its town affords a market that attracts farmers from such a distance; but to us, if; appears as though there was something wrong in Almonte when three farmers living three or four miles distant find it profitable to convey their produce such a distance to realize the highest price. Almonte should be able to pay as high a price as Smith’s Falls.

 

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

Related Reading:

Lanark Farm Life is Not so Bad- 1951

Once Upon a Time on the Farm

Farming Could be a Dangerous Business in Lanark County? Who Do You Know?

She Doesn’t Think My Tractor is Sexy–The Farmer’s Wife 1889

Before and After— Swagger Snacks from The Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

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Romeo and Bella Seccaspina are in the two videos and I am their Grandmother. They really didn’t want anything to do with the Boston Terrier Board- They probably wanted the great Swagger Snacks from the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market. I had no idea. Before and After Swagger Snack videos.

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Buy me Swagger Snacks at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market! PLEASEEEEEEEEEEE

romeoMe too and maybe the snow will go away!!

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Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

7 Beckwith St.
Carleton Place, Ontario
 
(613) 809-0660

830 am to 1230 am

It’s Strawberry Time at The Farmer’s Market

A Fiesta in the Strawberry Patch at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Baby, I’m a Wantin’ Some Brown Dog Bakery — Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

A Fiesta in the Strawberry Patch at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Visit the Drama Free Zone Wall at The Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Where to Go When You Don’t Have a Green Thumb — Two Fields Over at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Put Your Chutney Where Your Mouth Is! — Carleton Place Farmers Market

Missy Moo’s Magical Hand Cream – Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Visit the Drama Free Zone Wall at The Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

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Some days it’s not my circus, and definitely not my monkeys. You know the feeling—today was going great until people—- yadda yadda yadda. A few weeks ago I found the perfect drama free zone at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market. I mean you can’t keep a clean reputation hanging out continually with messy people. Wait? What?

As I leaned against the wall situated between Ken Strangway’s delicous food and the scent of Francois Maltais soap; I gazed at the Farmer’s Market and felt a strange wave of serenity. And, not in the serenity now serenity now form of Seinfeld.

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Stop in to the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market. Roll out your worries, and all your weekly drama might just be censored with love. Join us please. You might just be surprised!

100 Feet of a Drama Free Zone awaits you every Saturday on the Drama Free Wall.

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Linda SeccaspinaWendy LeBlancCathie Hawkins McOrmondLisa Strangway chillin’ at the drama free wall

Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

7 Beckwith St.
Carleton Place, Ontario
 
(613) 809-0660

830 am to 1230 am

Where to Go When You Don’t Have a Green Thumb — Two Fields Over at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Put Your Chutney Where Your Mouth Is! — Carleton Place Farmers Market

Missy Moo’s Magical Hand Cream – Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

There’s More to Life Than Poutine — Street Eats at The Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

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What is Street Food? I would officially say it’s artisan food sold on the streets, farmer’s markets etc., or more accurately, not served from restaurants or café’s. It’s re-inventing the ‘classics’ by stripping down the dish to it’s core ingredients and then re-designing it using improved cooking methods and ingredients. In layman’s terms, it is fresh food without gravy, vinegar and ketchup as a condiment.

Some of you know Ken Strangway as the head honcho of Lanark Laughs at Ballygiblin’s. Lanark Laughs began as a way for area comedians to get some stage time and bring laughter and much needed entertainment to the residents of Lanark County. Ken not only makes us laugh, but he has a food cart that he built himself with an ever changing menu at The Carleton Place Farmer’s Market on Saturdays.

Not only does “Street Eats” have the regular sandwiches, hot dogs and sausages with buns that are baked locally; he also has Chicken and Potato Roti. What the heck is Roti? Roti is a Bahamian favourite, that you can finally buy here in Carleton Place and not have to purchase a ticket for the next flight to the Bahamas. The chicken roti is inspired by Ken’s visits to the Caribbean. One customer, who is originally from the West Indies, said the roti was very authentic.

All Ken’s menu items are fresh, and some of his ever-changing items have included: peameal bacon on a bun, tacos, chicken & potato roti, and smoked meat. His pico de gallo is homemade, as well as the taco meat using Ken’s secret seasonings. You can’t get that at Subway! Now, you can eat locally at Street Eats for better value, and more your bang for your buck. Stay tuned for the Dagwood Sandwich!

Ken can be found at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market most Saturdays.  He’s also booked to do the BIA Lambsdown Fair and the BIA Bridge Street Bazaar.  Come say HI to Ken, he might even spare a joke or two along with that delicious food!

Related reading:

Forging or Foraging For Food at The Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

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I like the word forging… but the correct term is foraging.. Whatever word you use come on down to the Carleton Place Market.:)

Let there be kale!  Yes,there will be KALE this weekend at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market!

Shiitakes are what is called an “entry level” mushroom that’s far more predictable than the oyster mushrooms, maitake, and garden giants he also grows. Producing them outdoors requires: a shady location, a supply of hardwood logs, a water source, and spawn to inoculate the logs in the spring. Over the course of the year, the fungus will run through the logs, colonise them, and produce mushrooms.

Majore Farm has freshly picked Shiitake mushrooms at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market.These are grown in oak logs at the farm. The are grown by Doug Majore right here in Lanark county. I had some of his mushrooms and they are delicious! Come and get some for yourself at the market, they are only in season in the spring so get them before they are gone until next year.

Kira Weiler said: These are the best mushrooms ever…we picked some up last time we were at the CP farmers market…and ate them all raw before we got home…so good!!
Make your own culinary herbal garden pot for your window or patio. May 30th at 11am
Bring your own pot or purchase one at the workshop. Cost is 15.00 or 10.00 if you bring your own pot (includes all your herbs and soil). Please call 257-9005 to register

Garden Tip from Ottawa Journal 1948

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Related reading:
 

Eco Tripping at The Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

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Farmers’ markets are not only a great way to sample a community’s natural bounty, they’re also a unique setting to experience its culture. While each farmers’ market is different, a really good farmers’ market brings a sense of community to the cities and municipalities where they operate.

I have written a few things on our local Carleton Place Farmers Market, but each week is different so come on down. Here is just a sampling of stories:

Showering With Missy

Boot Scootin’ Boogie at The Carleton Place Farmer’s Market 

Saturday Morning at the Farmers Market

Why You Need to Support Farmers and Local Produce

She’s My Apple Pie!

Here are two great gals.. and because I accidently deleted their pictures on my phone.. oh well, but come on down and say Hi, and remember you will see new vendors all the time at our market.

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Her popcorn is off the hook —- Homemade by Natalie:)

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Jade Armstrong — Watercolours, comics, prints,portraits and commissions

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