Tag Archives: farm

Ontario History — What Was Beaver Hay and a Stripper Cow? Lanark Era Classified Ads

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Ontario History — What Was Beaver Hay and a Stripper Cow? Lanark Era Classified Ads
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
06 Dec 1899, Wed  •  Page 1

A “Stripper Cow” is an old cow well past her prime. A cow that has nearly stopped giving milk, so that it can be obtained from her only by stripping.

Steer
A castrated, male bovine.

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
18 Aug 1915, Wed  •  Page 1

Beaver Hay is the rank grass that grows in beaver meadows.

Speaker: Yeah, some places they made them. Interviewer: Yeah. Speaker: Just all round. Interviewer: Quite different. Um- Speaker: Brought them to a peak. Generally went and got a- a load of wild hay from the beaver meadow or somewhere. Interviewer: Yeah. Speaker: To put on the top because beaver hay turned the water much better than the other. Interviewer: Oh that’s interesting. I wonder why that was. Speaker: I don’t know. At that time, you-know, they, ah- they used to have these big beaver meadows that they had to cut with, ah, the scythe. You’ve seen them?

Speaker: Arnold Milford, Gender: Male, Age at interview: 93, Interview: 1977, Lanark County

Speaker: The loft was above and you put up a hand, you-know? Interviewer: Mm-hm. Speaker: You’d fork it up to the loft and somebody would stack it back and spread it back in the mow. Interviewer: Yes. This was wild hay. Speaker: Wild hay, yeah. Interviewer: Yes. Speaker: Beaver w– what they call beaver hay. Interviewer: Yes

Speaker: Alfred Starz, Gender: Male, Age at interview: 72, Interview: 1978, Lanark County

Broiler Chicken
A meat chicken raised to the weight of 2.65 kg or under.

Buck
Male goat.

Buck
Mature, male deer.

Buckling
A young, male goat (teenager).

Chevon
Meat that comes from adult goats.

Chick
The term for a baby chicken (male or female) until it is about three weeks of age

Cockerel
A young male chicken.

Colostrum
The first milk that any animal (including humans) produce after they give birth. This milk helps to pass along the mother’s immunity to disease to her offspring.

Roaster Chicken
A larger meat chicken raised to the weight of over 2.65 kg.

Sow
An adult female pig that has given birth.

Wattle
The reddish-pink flesh-like covering on the throat and neck of a turkey. It helps to release extra body heat.

Weaned
This term is used to describe the stage when animals are taken off their mother’s milk and fed solid foods, like grasses.

Wether
A neutered male sheep.

The Farmer is the Man

Eggs 10 Cents a dozen–Farmers Markets of Smiths Falls and Almonte 1880 and 1889

Dating A Farmer — It’s Not All Hearts And Cow Tails

Lanark Farm Life is Not so Bad- 1951

Once Upon a Time on the Farm

Farming Could be a Dangerous Business in Lanark County? Who Do You Know?

She Doesn’t Think My Tractor is Sexy–The Farmer’s Wife 1889

Remembering Haying in Lanark County- The Buchanan Scrapbooks

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Remembering Haying in Lanark County- The Buchanan Scrapbooks
With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..
From Jon Playfair’s album from Laurie Yuill
From Jon Playfair’s album from Laurie Yuill

From Jon Playfair’s album from Laurie Yuill

From Jon Playfair’s album from Laurie Yuill

From Jon Playfair’s album from Laurie Yuill

Related reading

Remembering and Documenting The Loose Hay Loader

D.W. Stewart Farm -Kenmore Farm– Illustrated Station

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D.W. Stewart Farm -Kenmore Farm– Illustrated Station

Name:John Stewart
Age:24
Birth Year:abt 1863
Birth Place:Ramsey, Ontario
Marriage Date:28 Dec 1887
Marriage Place:Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Father:Duncan Stewart
Mother:Christina McDongall
Spouse:Hughena Roberts

Name:Duncan Stewart
Gender:Male
Racial or Tribal Origin:Scotch (Scotish)
Nationality:Canada
Marital Status:Married
Age:31
Birth Year:abt 1890
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Date:1 Jun 1921
House Number:21
Residence Street or Township:Ramsay
Residence City, Town or Village:Township of ??
Residence District:Lanark
Residence Province or Territory:Ontario
Residence Country:Canada
Relation to Head of House:Son
Spouse’s Name:Isabel Stewart
Father’s Name:John Stewart
Father Birth Place:Ontario
Mother’s Name:Hughena Stewart
Mother Birth Place:Ontario
Can Speak English?:Yes
Can Speak French?:No
Religion:Presbyterian
Can Read?:Yes
Can Write?:Yes
Months at School:00-80
Occupation:Farmer’s Son
Employment Type:2 Wage Earner
Nature of Work:Fathers Farm B
Duration of Unemployment:0
Duration of Unemployment (Illness):0
Municipality:Ramsay
Enumeration District:97
Sub-District:Ramsay (Township)
Sub-District Number:38
Monthly Rental:01
Number of Rooms:0
Enumerator:A. S. Duncan
District Description:Polling Division No. 3 – Comprising the east half of the 8th concession from lot no. 1 to lot no. 14 inclusive; also the 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th concessions from lot no. 1 to lot no. 15 inclusive except that portion belonging to the town of Almonte
Neighbours:View others on page
Line Number:12
Family Number:21
Household MembersAgeRelationshipJohn Stewart56HeadHughena Stewart46WifeDuncan Stewart31SonIsabel Stewart26Daughter-in-lawAlexander Stewart8/12Grandchild

It would be impossible to give an entire list of the names of the early immigrants of Beckwith, but some of the earliest as follows:Duncan McEwen, Donald Anderson, John McLaren John Cram, and John Carmichael in the 10th concession.Peter McDougall,  Duncan . McLaren, AIex. and Donald Clark, John and Peter McGregor, in the ninth concessionAlex McGregor, Peter Anderson, John Stewart, and Donald Kennedy in the eighth concessionFindlay McEwen, Archie Dewar John and Peter McDiarmld in the seventh concessionRobert, John James, and Duncan Ferguson, and Duncan McDiarmid in the fifth concession.

From a glance at the names it is pretty obvious that the folks came from the “heathery hills of Scotland”, but it might be of interest to know that they came to form a miniature colony. Although a few returned to there original homeland most would never see their loved ones or homes again.After six weeks journeying across the Atlantic they arrived at Montreal, and proceeded in small open boat’s up the St. Lawrence to Bytown/ Ottawa. Then they began another weary journey to the solitude lands of Beckwith, where there travel was more impeded than ever. No railway lines, no roads, simply a narrow blazed trail through the leafy woodland. Read Beckwith 1820 Census Lanark County–Who Do You Know?

CLIPPED FROM
The Windsor Star
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
23 Apr 1898, Sat  •  Page 5

People of the 7th LINE in Beckwith


Thanks to Margaret McNeely

Here is a pic of my father-in-law Lorne McNeely he was 18 so would be 1929. Taken on the farm on 7th line Beckwith
Know your ancestors thanks to Donna Mcfarlane


Know your ancestors thanks to Donna Mcfarlane

This is the Rev. James Carmichael who preached one of the last sermons at the old church on the Beckwith Township 7th line….mentioned in one of your articles– Have you read The Spirit of the 7th Line?

Photo from Corry Turner-Perkins.. Beckwith School on 7th Line about 1960 Top Row- Keith McNeely, Miss Griff, Dennis(?), Dave Turner, Donnie McNeely, Ronnie MdNeely,Jim NcEwan,Raymond Stanzel, 2nd row from top- (?) Jorgenson, Jerry McNeely, Edward Stephens, Bert Jorgenson, Joyce Spoor, Nancy McNeely, (?) White, 3rd row-Arlene McEwan, Jennifer White, Barbara White, Sharon McGregor, Lorain McNeely, Dorothy Stanzel, 1st row- Wayne McNeely, Eddie(?), Hallie Flegg, Perry Stephens

Related reading

Beckwith Mystery — Anyone Remember a Meteor Coming Down on the 7th Line?

The Spirit of the 7th Line

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Saw this online a 7th line property for sale

for sale click

Information about the D.W. Stewart Farm came from:

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

The identity of the Women’s Institute still lies profoundly in its beginnings. The story of how this historic organization came to be is one that resonates with women all over the world, and is engrained in the mission and vision Ontario WI Members still live by today. CLICK here–

Snippets of The Duncan Farm ( Dondi Farms)

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Snippets of The Duncan Farm ( Dondi Farms)

Archibald McNab was the 13th chieftain of the McNab clan from the Loch Tay region in Scotland. In order to escape heavy debts, he fled to Upper Canada where he negotiated for land along the Ottawa River so that he might bring his clansmen from Scotland as settlers. Read more here…click and here Click

Related reading

Wind Storm in Ashton- Heath Ridge Farms 1976

Death of Local Farms in 2025?

Alan and Betty Thompson Meadowside Farms

The Abandoned Farm House in Carleton Place — Disappearing Farms

The McNaughton Farm– Memories Ray Paquette

Looking for Information on the Native Fort Farm of Fred Sadler of Almonte

The Bryson Craig Farm in Appleton

Local News and Farming–More Letters from Appleton 1921-Amy and George Buchanan-Doug B. McCarten

Information about the Duncan Farm came from:

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

The identity of the Women’s Institute still lies profoundly in its beginnings. The story of how this historic organization came to be is one that resonates with women all over the world, and is engrained in the mission and vision Ontario WI Members still live by today. CLICK here–

Snippets of the Thompson Farm — Ramsay

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Snippets of the Thompson Farm — Ramsay

Related reading

Who was Patricia Thompson From Clayton?

Looking for Stories and Photos- Thompson Family

Black Rock Clayton

Information about the Thompson Farm came from:

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

The identity of the Women’s Institute still lies profoundly in its beginnings. The story of how this historic organization came to be is one that resonates with women all over the world, and is engrained in the mission and vision Ontario WI Members still live by today. CLICK here–

Symington and Family — Odds and Ends Lanark County

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Symington and Family — Odds and Ends Lanark County
Tom Edwards
December 28, 2017  · 



Looks like supper with Grandma Edwards. Mom, Dad, Ruth Craig, Eldon Craig, maybe Josie Symington at the end of the table, next one I don’t know, then Uncle Johnny and Essie Erskine.

Brenda Craig Shewchukfrom left, Ilene, John, Ruth, Eldon, Mr. Symington, (owned the house) Brian Fumerton, Uncle Johnny, Aunt Essie, Elsie, Ray,
SEE below– Women’s Institute
Name:Joseph Henry Symington
Gender:Male
Age:86
Birth Date:20 Mar 1853
Birth Place:Ontario
Death Date:22 Jan 1940
Death Place:Almonte, Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Father:Charles Symington
Mother:Ann Symington

Marg McNeely
.

Hi Linda…..here is a pic of employees of the BNS in 1957 at Xmas party at the Lake Park Lodge.
Front row L-R…..Kathryn Downie, Noel Dagenais, Mrs. Cross, Mr. Cross (Bank Manager), Ray Eldridge, Phyllis Donnelly.
Back row L-R…..Irene Taylor, Marg (Tosh) McNeely, Wayne Symington, Ruby MacPherson, Doris Willows.
All were local people except for Noel and Ray

As a side line they installed, 486 lockers for storing perishable foods and this was a great success from the beginning. At the present time all these units are rented and it is proposed to create more of them. Mr. Milton Symington has been the manager of the plant during the years that have passed since its inception. He will be retained in that position and it is understood the new management proposes to adopt a more aggressive policy and to expand along various lines. Read–Cold Storage Plant in Almonte- Meat Locker Trivia

Well, as the standoff continued two young lads Alex Symington and Cecil McIntyre, decided they would do their good deed as it was also Boy Scout Week. They discussed a plan among themselves and then began to pelt the skunk with snowballs. The skunk still didn’t move from either defiance or stupidity. Minutes later with both sides trying to decide what to do, the skunk just decided to move and sit on the side of the road for a spell. I am pleased to also offer the news that Mel Royce finished clearing that road for everyone that lived on the 12th Line of Ramsay.–He Almost Became a Dead Skunk in the Middle of the 12th Line

Information about the Symington Farm came from:

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

The identity of the Women’s Institute still lies profoundly in its beginnings. The story of how this historic organization came to be is one that resonates with women all over the world, and is engrained in the mission and vision Ontario WI Members still live by today. CLICK here–

Also read-

The Bryson Craig Farm in Appleton

Local News and Farming–More Letters from Appleton 1921-Amy and George Buchanan-Doug B. McCarten

Anna and Cecil Turner Memories Appleton

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Anna and Cecil  Turner Memories Appleton
Photos text by the W.I. See below
ndy Baird with raw wool at the Collie Woollen Mills, photo by Malak Karsh
1945-1946
Appleton, Town of Mississippi Mills, Ontario, Canada


Credits:
North Lanark Regional Museum (2012.79.12.6)
Photographer: Malak Karsh
Donated by Eleanor Wright & Irene Dunn Thompson

Some of the wool definitely came from local markets. The Tweedsmuir History of Appleton documents the production of local wool for the Caldwell mill. An Appleton Tweedsmuir History article submitted by Anna and Cecil Turner April 10, 1976 recounts:

“In the days when the mill at Appleton made 100% pure wool blankets (Caldwell’s) the wool was bought from the local farmers (much of it). Some of the women would keep a fleece of wool to make their own woolen comforters, using teased wool as a filler. The price of wool was higher if the wool was washed. To do this, many farmers drove their sheep down to the river in the spring and washed them there. (…) this wool had the oil restored to it and was preferred by the mill workers to the fleeces that were washed and dried after shearing. Hence the ‘river washed wool’ brought a better price. Of course dust came back into the wool on the journey home but the wool could still be sold as washed wool. Few if any sheep were drowned.” — North Lanark Regional Museum

Another story you might like to enjoy-Another Memory of the Cavers family in Appleton

From the Buchanan Scrapbooks

Information about the Turner Farm came from:



About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC
The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.


The identity of the Women’s Institute still lies profoundly in its beginnings. The story of how this historic organization came to be is one that resonates with women all over the world, and is engrained in the mission and vision Ontario WI Members still live by today. CLICK here–

Remembering and Documenting The Loose Hay Loader

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Remembering  and Documenting The Loose Hay Loader
From Celeste ReisingerAbandoned – Ottawa/Gatineau & The Valley

Comments from The Tales of Almonte

Ken MacDonaldIt’s a loose hay loader towed in behind the wagon it carried the hay up and it fell on the wagon deck where a man or two, transferred the hay to the back possibly with children tramping and packing it so they would get a bigger load.originally pulled by horses

Darlene MacDonaldKen MacDonald I remember tramping the hay for Florence and Wilbert. Horse drawn wagon.

Stuart McIntosh–Helped Edgar Hudson loading hay with one of these. Hard to keep your balance on those old narrow bunk wagons.

Steven CurrieStill have ours in Clayton

Stuart McIntosh
2h  · 

Kept ours too Steve

Laurie PrettyBin there done that!

Kevin CurrieGot one at my place too.

Marion MacDonaldThank you for posting this.

Stan CarterCan remember as a young lad loading the wagons with pitch forks, no fancy self loaders…..

Stephen BrydgesStan Carter that we did and in the hay loft helping spreading the hay and adding salt.

Stephen BrydgesRemember the coils of hay.

Bryant CougleStan Carter stan the man

Stuart McIntoshHelped Geordie Pretty coil hay.

Bonnie Farrellymy Dad had one, remember those days

Interestingly, they followed the wagon they were filling — I can’t think of anything else that normally does that. Usually the thing doing the filling is in front of or to the side of what is being filled. Driven by the wheels and a chain, hay would be picked up from windrow and then moved up the loader by the wooden bars with steel fingers.

Hayloader in action — it was quite a work out for the pitchfork men on top of the load during the hot, sunny days best for making hay.

If you drive around you’ll see barns built as late as the 1950s still setup for loose hay work — the dead giveaway is an extension of the roof over a beam from which a pulley used to (or still does) hang.

This is an outside haystack being made. Properly made a haystack resists rain quite well — same principle as using straw to thatch roofs.

Inside a barn you would see a similiar operation, though. A device would grab hay, be hoisted up the pulley either by a team of draft animals or a motor vehicle, and then slide down a track in the barn to where the farmer wanted to dump it. Since the track was in the center, the hay would still need to be pitched to the sides.

Today dry hay is normally baled. Even in Amish country, where horses will draw forecarts with a motor on them to drive the balers. It’s less labor intensive for man and beast, and the hay is packed denser so more will fit under the barn roof.

Most large farm operations make large bales — typically around 1200 to 1800# depending on size and how densely packed the hay is. These are much more efficient to handle with machines, and labor to handle small square bales is scarce. Small squares remain popular for small farmers without much equipment — they’re typically around 45# when being sold to “horsey” people, or 75# when baled for “cowey” people. Remember to ask how much a bale weighs when pricing them!

In my area many dairy farms do not make hay — they “greenchop,” cutting the grass into fine pieces that are ensiled. When packed tight and air limited, usually by covering with plastic held down by old tires, the grass pickles itself. This silage is retains a lot of nutrition and is very palatable to the cows — and it uses relatively little manpower.

The Derry Farm of Angus McDiarmid

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The Derry Farm of Angus McDiarmid

This 200-acre farm – lot 24, concession 5 was originally a Clergy Reserve. In 1854 it was purchased from the Crown by Angus McDiarmid.The price paid was 100 pounds Sterling. Angus McDiarmid came to Canada with his father, Duncan, in 1818, and settled on the west half of the farm. Being a Clergy Reserve, he could not obtain title, but remained as a squatter until the lot was thrown open for sale. 

This history of the east 100 acres is rather vague. It seems certain that a man named Leslie once lived here, but at what time and for how long is not known. He, too, must have had only squatter’s rights. In any case the entire lot was farmed by Mr. McDiarmid long before thedate of its purchase.

Angus McDiarmid married Annie Livingstone, a first cousin of the African missionary, her father, Donald, who is buried in Kennedy’s Cemetery, being an uncle of the explorer. The McDiarmids had a family of eight children, named as follows: 

Donald, who died while he was studying to enter the ministry; Dr. Peter, who practiced medicine

In Iowa; Dr. Duncan, who practiced in Western Ontario; Dr. James, who also practiced

in Western Ontario; John, who inherited the farm; Margaret, who married John

Ferguson, living on the farm directly to the north of her home; Janet, who never

married; and Mary, who married Joseph Kidd. A fourth girl, Jessie McDiarmid,

although only a first cousin of the others, was brought up as a sister.

The present home is very old, having been built by Angus McDiarmid but the date is not known. It is a log house. The logs were covered with metal siding around 1900. Today the house is covered with aluminum siding. It was screened from the sixth line by a grove of trees which was planted by Dr. Duncan McDiarmid while a young man. 

He had been teaching in a grammar school in Glengarry County, and had asked for a raise of salary to 700 dollars. On being refused he resigned, and while at home he planted the trees. Some of these trees are still growing on the property today. At one point there was an earlier log home which stood at a point to the south of the present one, and across the creek, but all traces of it hav disappeared. Angus McDiarmid, on his decease was succeeded by his son John, who married Janet McRorie. John conducted a singing school in The Derry during the 1870’s. He died at an early age leaving two boys, James and John.

 His widow married Samuel Simpson, who lived on the farm until John the 2nd reached his majority. John the 2nd also known as Jack married Tena Drummond and had four children, Viola, Roy, Earl and Eric. John died in 1938 and Earl took over the farm. Earl married Mary Thom and they had two daughters. Marjorie married Douglas Campbell and lives on the ninth line of Beckwith. Catherine married Neil Thomas, their home is built on a corner of the McDiarmid farm. Earl died in 1975 and Mary in 2002. John Campbell, Earl’s grandson and his son Joey Campbell are farming the McDiarmid land today. Earl’s grandaughter Janine McLeod (Thomas) and her family live in the house built by Angus. Seven generations of the Angus McDiarmid family have lived on and worked this farm.

Beckwith Heritage Committee-Information submitted by Leona Kidd 

Cemteries

Kennedy Cemtery-459 Glenashton Road Lot 24, Con 8 The cemetery was named after the Kennedy family who settled in Beckwith in 1818 from the Parish of Comrie of Perthshire Scotland. The land belonged to John Kennedy and later owned by Robert Kennedy. An annual memorial service is held in June of each year, along with the Dewar Cemetery. 4.

459 Glenashton Road Lot 24, Con 7 The Dewar Cemetery is named after the Dewar family who settled from Perthshire Scotland in 1818. The land for Dewar Cemetery was donated by Mrs. Archie Dewar on the condition that the family plot would receive perpetual care.

Old Kirk of Beckwith township. The remains of the recently demolished Old Kirk Ruins may be seen near Carleton Place on the Seventh Line road of Beckwith township, two miles south and a mile east of Blacks Corners. The stone church was built in 1832, replacing a log church building. It served the first two Canadian generations of the first large settlement of Gaelic-speaking Scottish Highlanders in the district of Upper Canada north of the Rideau River.

Perth Courier, November 7, 1873–On Monday last Angus McDiarmid of Beckwith went to Prospect village to make some purchases. On returning home, which he had left in apparent good health, he was taken suddenly ill and sat down by the side of the road where he was afterwards found dead. The cause of his sudden death was heart disease. He was a man much respected in his neighborhood.

The Lanark Era – Wed May 19th 1897Malvern, York County, Ontario, on Saturday, Dr. McDiarmid, aged 67 years. A son of the late Angus McDiarmid, and a cousin to William, Duncan, and Robert McDiarmid of Carleton Place .

The Derry” while recognized as a community for almost two hundred years has never been officially recognized as a place name on a map.   Yet  “The Derry” is a well known location throughout  the larger community of southeastern Lanark and southwestern Carleton Counties, Ontario.  The Derry compromises the former school section, SS No. 6, and generally recognized as lots 17 through 26 of concessions 5 and 6 Beckwith Township.  
In “The Story of the Derry”, (p. 52), George Kidd writes about origin of “The Derry” as the name of this community.

The origin of the name “Derry” is directly connected with this farm (S.W. 1/2 Lot 22, Concession 5, Beckwith; Robert Ferguson farm).  The story is told by James D. Ferguson of Winnipeg:  “The word ‘derry’ means a grove, such as is comprised principally of ash, oak or birch trees.  It seems probable that my grandmother, finding all these trees growing on her son’s farm gave the place this name, which eventually came to include the whole community.”  Mr. Ferguson states further: “There is a song which I heard sung long ago, but I remember only the chorus-
Hame, Derry, hame: and it’s hame we ought to be
Hame Derry, hame: to our ain countree
Where the ash and the oak and the bonnie birchen tree
Are all growing green in our ain countree.”

There is a place in Perthshire of the same name.  The fact that it is always spoken of as “The Derry”, and not “Derry” seems conclusive evidence that the word is the Gaelic name for a grove, containing especially those trees mentioned in the song.
  The baptismal records for Donald Ferguson’s children all include “Donald Ferguson in Derrie and his wife Mary Ferguson his spouse had their son baptized”;  providing additional insight about the origin of the name given to the community.

Until the last quarter of the twentieth century, many of the farms were owned by descendants of the pioneers who had arrived beginning in 1818. The  Ferguson, Kidd, McLaren, McDiarmid, and Stewart families lived on farms carved out of the forests by their ancestors.  Other families associated with the settlement of the Derry – Leach, McEwen and Davis lived nearby as did descendants of the Scott family.  But a decade into the twenty-first century much has changed.  Only one surname of the pioneer families, i.e., Kidd, is found on the many mailboxes which line both the sixth line, now Kidd Road and the fifth line, now Ferguson Road.  A great-great-great-granddaughter of Angus McDiarmid lives in the home which he built  and a great-great-great-granddaughter of Samuel Leach lives nearby in the fourth concession overlooking the farms of The Derry.

Also read-

Duncan McDiarmid — Family of the Derry

My favourite picture from Donna.. children of dorothea mcdiarmid of anna bertha cram and wm judson mcdiarmid

The Farm of Alec and Chrissie Tosh — David Tosh

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The Farm of Alec and Chrissie Tosh — David Tosh

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 David Tosh

Hi Linda,

Here are some old photos of my grandparent’s farm including the one that I already posted.  Two others are newspaper clippings from when the house was for sale.  The last one is an auction sale that was done when my grandmother decided to move out of the house.

Thanks David!!!

Stuart McIntosh Cream cans by the gate. Wood smoke from the brick chimney.

Allan Stanley I loved going there as kid… Great Aunt Chrissie always had on an apron and was always baking pies and cake

Stephen Brathwaite Where was that?

David TosThe end of Union at Carss

Steven Currie— Is it still standing David

David Tosh It was still there when I took a photo of it last August.

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David Tosh Just the house. All the barns were torn down in the early 1980s.

Steven Currie Love them old places u grew up with, I own the old farm my dad’s family grew up in outside Clayton

Steven Currie Is it still in the family?

David Tosh I don’t think so

Margaret McNeely Aunt Chrissie Tosh…..her specialty was donut holes….she use to sell them to a lot of people.

 

Tosh Farmhouse 4

 

 

Tosh Farmhouse 5

 

 

 

Tosh Farmhouse 7

 

Tosh Farmhouse 8

 

Granny Tosh auction 1

There were three bridges going onto the Island, one called Stone Bridge, one called Back Bridge and the other one called Front Bridge. After you cross the Back Bridge as if you were going into the Rosamond Estate they had a huge set of stairs that took you up to Union Street. We used them many times for a short cut to my Uncle Alec and Aunt Chrissie Tosh’s farm at the end of Union Street and I’m sure many of the mill workers used them when going home after work. I have read in the local paper that they are restoring the steps for the new Coleman Island Trail.

A few of our swimming spots were underneath the old blacksmith shop at Gary Houston’s house, at Rock Bottom on the Tosh farm and also at Brown’s Dairy located in part of the town they called New England. 

Growing up on the Coleman Island in the 40’s and 50’s Marg McNeely

 

 

genea

 

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David Tosh

 

Here are some more members of the Tosh Family.

TOSH Mary Christina (Chrissie)

In hospital at Almonte, Ontario, on Wednesday, July 8, 1981, MARY CHRISTINA (CHRISSIE) BOND (of Almonte). In her 85th year. Beloved wife of the late Alexander Tosh and much loved mother of Stuart, Ottawa; Mervin and Orval, Almonte; Hartley, Oakville. Dear sister of Mrs. Harry Nontell (Ruby), Creston, B.C.; Mrs. Pansy Kuehl, Kitchener; Mrs. Jean Proctor and Mrs. Kay Goodfellow, both of Almonte. Predeceased by Florence, Alberna, Pearl and Gordon. Also survived by nine grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren. Rested at the Gamble & Comba Funeral Home, 127 Church Street, Almonte, from 2-5 and 7-9:30 p.m. Thursday and where service will be held on Friday at 2 p.m. Rev. Ed Smith officiating. Interment Auld Kirk Cemetery.

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Hi Linda,

I think this photo was taken in Almonte but I don’t know for sure.  My Uncle Mervin lived in Almonte for most of his life so perhaps it was.  Thankfully, someone wrote the names of the people on the back of the photo.  Left to right they are Helen Cochran, H Edmunds, Mervin Tosh, Lyle McLaren, Mary Mitchell.  Thank you.

David Tosh.

What you Might Not Know About the Union Street House–The Walker Era