Tag Archives: fair

Mr. Allen’s Chickens– Appleton

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Mr. Allen’s Chickens– Appleton

Newspapers seemed to control our local towns and it wasn’t hard to sway the townsfolk into some sort of rabble rousing. Take in point some fine fowl, over 325 to be exact, that resided in Appleton belonging to the Herald’s Mr. Sam Allen. The joke was that Mr. Allen’s chickens were so well esteemed they had taken their fair share of prizes at the Almonte Fair. In fact too much so– as there were a few dozen articles about his chickens!

The “opposite side” joked that maybe a visit to “the Appleton hood” by some could relieve him of some of his fair feathered friends. Was this a warning to Mr. Allen that his poultry should enter the KFC Witness Protection Plan? Or, was it to be soon a Winner Winner Chicken Dinner for all in Lanark County? In everything– the rooster, human or fowl made and still makes the most news. It has been proven many times in the Almonte Gazette and the Carleton Place Herald. Trust me!

Anything less than the best is a felony
Love it or leave it, You better gain way
You better hit bull’s eye, The kid don’t play..

‘Winner Winner Chicken Dinner’? Consolidated Tea Co. Sparks Street

Doin’ the Funky Chicken in Lanark County

“I Like My Chicken Fryin’ Size” said the Pig

Renfrew Fair 1953-1953-Ed and Shirley (Catherine) Simpson

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Renfrew Fair 1953-1953-Ed and Shirley (Catherine) Simpson
1953-Thanks to Ed and Shirley (Catherine) Simpson

These photos are from the 104 page1953 magazine ” Renfrew and its Fair Through 100 Years” By Henry J. Walker who wrote the Carleton Saga. Donated by- Ed and Shirley (Catherine) Simpson

The greatest fair in the Ottawa Valley since 1853.” It is an exciting four days with ample amount of activities such as: Beef Shows, Heavy & Light Horse Shows, 4-H & Interclub Shows, Swine & Lambs, many more Livestock events, Exhibits, Art, Domestic Science, Women’s Institute Displays, Floriculture, Fruit, Vegetables, Junior Classes, Needlework and so much more.

Renfrew Fair 2021!!

September 9-12, 2021– CLICK HERE

1953-Ed and Shirley (Catherine) Simpson

1953-Ed and Shirley (Catherine) Simpson

1953-Ed and Shirley (Catherine) Simpson

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Sep 1953, Wed  •  Page 20
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Sep 1953, Thu  •  Page 23
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
19 Sep 1953, Sat  •  Page 34

We Don’t Need the Almonte Fair 1897 – “Admission to the grounds is 25 cents, which is twice too much!”

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We Don’t Need the Almonte Fair 1897 – “Admission to the grounds is 25 cents, which is twice too much!”

The special train which is run generally from Carleton Place connecting the Ottawa and Perth trains, arrives in Almonte at 1:30pm. On leaving town the train goes at 7 or 7:30pm, so that the majority that come never see the town or leave one solitary cent, only what they paid to the society for admission.

September 1897–almonte gazette

They have lunch before they come and arrive home just In time for supper. The admission to the grounds is 25 cents, which is twice too much. The poor farmer, which this society professed to befriend and encourage, sees but little for his hard-earned 25 cents.

He cannot, bring his wife and eight or nine children, for that means a week’s hard earnings. The mechanic in town finds nothing in his line of business, the artist but little-in his. In fact, the money of Almonte, which could be put to better use than granting to the N. L. A. S. Fair, unless they make a public statement and show their indebtedness, should be carefully guarded. Even if Almonte saw the need of such a grant, let a councillor ask it Independently of a society director.

15 Sep 1897, Wed  

September 1897–almonte gazette
September 1897–almonte gazette

Rossow’s Midgets in vaudette, February 1910
Photographer
Feinberg
Date
February, 1910
Notes
Rossow’s Midgets was a vaudeville boxing act that pitted German brothers Franz and Carl Actermeier against each other. The brothers, both little people, were managed by Herman Rossow. Collection of studio portraits of entertainers, actors and actresses who performed on the American and British stage in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

THE BARRETTS- -I worked with Harry “POP” Barrett for a period of four weeks in the year of 1908. Somehow or other I didn’t fit in Harry’s act and was let out after four weeks, three of them having been spent in rehearsals. Harry Barrett if still living–and I hope he is–was a fine old juggler. He started off his career as a club juggler. Club jugglers of that day did not do the routines presented at a later date. In those days it seems that swinging clubs was in vogue and after a few deft moves with the swinging clubs he would go into a routine with one club, snaking it through the arms over the back and around the neck, from that he would go into a two club routine duplicating the same moves only with two instead of one club. His clubs for this routine were made somewhat like the present day clubs except that they were much heavier and the butt ends were bell shaped, the bell bottoms taking to some extent the place of the knobs on the handle end. Many of the intricate moves of snaking the clubs were done by grasping the butt ends, necessitating the bell bottoms. Someone at that time thought up the idea of juggling three clubs. Undoubtedly it was considered at that time to be sensational. Harry and his brother Joe did a two man juggling act. Later, Harry’s son Charles joined the act -making it a trio. While playing an amusement park date at Syracuse, N.Y., Pop bought a cheap straw hat such as farmers used in that period. While back stage he idly tossed the hat in the air. He noticed a tendency of the hat to return to him boomerang fashion. In the course of his act that day without any practice Pop tried out the stunt on his audience. They were amused and encouraged him. The stunt became a principal part of Pop’s act from that time on. After many months of trial and error he developed numerous tricks new to the juggling field. A good many of the tricks must be given credit where credit was due. Pop had a habit of changing partners quite often, these partners were instrumental in developing new tricks for Harry’s act. I believe

Moran and Wiser worked with Barrett and if I’m wrong forgive me. To the best of my recollection Moran and Wiser developed the spinning hats for which they are still famous. Spinning the hats was done by placing the index finger in the inner rim of the hat– where the sweat band is –and tossing them boomerang fashion over the head of the audience and returning to the fingers again. After all these years it is still something to see.

Jim Baggett of The Elgins was a partner of the Barretts and also contributed his share of hat tricks. There are many ways of juggling straw hats and while Barrett was the first one to use them in a juggling act, Moran and Wiser set the fashion in hat spinning, THE HARDDIGS, now deceased, invented the head to head passing of hats tossing them to each other in a forward and flat motion to each other’s head and lighting there, being off with the left hand and passed to the right and then to the partner again. A very fine applause getter and good for laughs. Frear, Baggett and Frear also used hats in their baseball act. The Dewey Bros. To the best of my knowledge were the first to use derby hats as means of getting tricks out of them, using them in somewhat the same manner as straw hats.

Well someone had to start the ball rolling, and some one did originate this and that trick and bits of comedy.

But each trick -and each bit of comedy has been suggested by someone or something that has been done before by someone else. In other words, one idea suggests another, and presto- A new baby is born- perhaps twins. I think it little behooves any of us to say, “That fellow stole my stuff. I originated that trick or piece of business. Wait till I see him”. And it may be that you did originate that trick. So what? Are you not using some trick originated by someone else also? So, steady boys, think back— where did you get your original idea?

Getting back to Pop Barrett. Pop used to have a happy time in telling of the jumps of his day. After working in a Wine room – equivalent to our present day nightclubs – for four or five weeks of months at maybe fifteen dollars a week, he would jump to Syracuse, do the same stunt there for a few weeks, then to Chicago, and then San Francisco. After playing Frisco they would hop a freight back East, lay around till all the money was gone, go to work making cigars, getting tired of that they would get the act ready again and repeat the same routine. Great stuff, sez I.

September 1897–almonte gazette

Prize for a farmers daughters pie..:)

The Almonte Fair has a long  history that is older than Almonte.–click- http://almontefair.ca/jpb/history/

Clippings and Photos of the 1958 Almonte Turkey Fair

Are You Ever too Old to Go to The Rural Fair? — Almonte

The 1947 Almonte Flood

Nellie Thurston –Balloonist Maiden Voyage in McFarlane Grove

The Lumsden Family at the Ottawa Exhibition 1899

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 4-“the proprietor of a merry-go-round was paid a bonus to bring his machine to the Fair “

When Researching — Tragedy Somehow Shows Up- Fair Family- Watson’s Corners

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When Researching  — Tragedy Somehow Shows Up- Fair Family- Watson’s Corners

Died, at Watson’s Corners on Sunday, Feb. 7, the beloved wife of George Fair, aged 51.

When Marion Agnes Craig was born in 1845 in Lanark, Ontario, her father, Alexander, was 30, and her mother, Agnes, was 24. She married George Fair on August 26, 1870, in her hometown. She died on February 4, 1897, in Lanark, Ontario, at the age of 52, and was buried in Watsons Corners, Ontario. Agnes Craig married George Fair in Lanark, Ontario, on August 26, 1870, when she was 25 years old.

Perth Courier, Feb. 19, 1897

Watson’s Corners:  It becomes our sad duty this week to record the death of Mrs. George Fair which took place at her late home on Sabbath morning, 7th inst. After suffering intensely from cancer for months.  On December 15 the deceased underwent an operation and had what was supposed to be at the time all the cancer removed but as time went on it was found that her system was full of cancer which eventually caused her death.  

Deceased, whose maiden name was Agnes Craig, was born in Dalhousie 51 years ago.  Twenty six years ago she married George Fair who survives her and came to live in our village where she has resided ever since with the exception of a few years she spent in Michigan.  The deceased was of a kind and loving disposition and made friends with all with whom she came into contact. 

 During her illness her sufferings were such as pen would fail to describe.  Some time previous to the end she called her loved ones to her bedside and bade them a loving farewell telling them she was going to the home prepared for God’s children where there would be no more pain or sorrow.  

The funeral on Tuesday was very large the church literally packed while many had to remain outside.  Rev. J.A. Leitch preached a very appropriate sermon after which the remains were conveyed to the cemetery and deposited in their last resting place to await the resurrection morning.  Deceased was a member of Zion Church, the Ladies Aid Society and Christian Endeavor Society and also a teacher in the Sabbath School.

Name:Mrs George Fair ( Marion Agnes Craig)
Gender:Female
Age:51
Birth Date:abt 1846
Birth Place:Dalhousie
Death Date:4 Feb 1897
Death Place:Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Religion:Presbyterian
Cause of Death:Cancer

Her husband George Fair was born on October 25, 1830, in New York, USA. He married Agnes Craig on August 26, 1870, in Lanark, Ontario. He died on October 30, 1913, in Palmerston, Ontario, having lived a long life of 83 years, and was buried in Watsons Corners, Ontario.

Her youngest son was accidentally killed in 1901.

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The Windsor Star
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
21 Oct 1901, Mon  •  Page 5
Name:George Levi Fair
Gender:Male
Age:15
Birth Date:abt 1886
Birth Place:Dalhousie
Death Date:18 Oct 1901
Death Place:Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Religion:Presbyterian
Cause of Death:Accidentally Shot Died Instanlty

When George Levi Fair was born on April 22, 1886, in Lanark, Ontario, his father, George, was 55 and his mother, Marion Agnes, was 40. He had four siblings. He died as a teenager on October 18, 1901, in Watsons Corners, Ontario, and was buried there.

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Did You Know the North Lanark Fair was Once in Carleton Place?

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Did You Know the North Lanark Fair was Once in Carleton Place?
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Nov 1899, Wed  •  Page 2

by Edna Gardener Lowry
Who is there that doesn’t like to go to
the fair? We think of the old song
which says ‘Hi Ho, Come to the Fair’.
There is excitement in the air, there is
so much to see and to hear and so
much going on all around you.
We cannot but look back to those
early days so far in the distance
when the pioneers of the area felt the
need to get together each fall, and
show with pride some of the
highlights of the year’s work; “where
old friends could meet, to meet new
friends.”

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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Oct 1891, Tue  •  Page 4


The annual fair of the North Lanark
Agricultural Society is one that we
should enjoy. It is one of the oldest
fairs in the Ottawa Valley,
continuously in operation each year
without a break. It began in Carleton
Place, not Almonte, away back in
1840 when the Bathurst District
Agricultural Society was formed.
The Bathurst District included Lanark
and Renfrew counties and that part of
Carleton County which included
Bytown. It had Perth as its judicial
centre, here all property was
registered and all court cases tried,
even for Bytown. However, the
Bathurst District gave way to the
riding of Lanark and Renfrew and
finally the North and South ridings of
Lanark were created in 1848.
The North Lanark Agricultural Society
continued from the former district
society.


The annual “Show Fair” was held for
a number of years in Carleton Place.
Then because many more Ramsay
people were exhibitors, a meeting
was held in the Ramsay town hall, on
the 8th line near the Auld Kirk, Jan
22, 1858. There the Constitution was
drawn up for the North Lanark
Agricultural Society which was to
hold its annual fair at Ramsayville,
now Almonte.

 -
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Nov 1879, Thu  •  Page 4


For a few years the fair was held on
the McFarlane Farm where Boyd
Jamieson now lives. An annual picnic
was also held there by the society.
However in 1862 three acres of land
were purchased in the town beside
the river where it has remained.
An agricultural hall and drill shed was
built in 1865 for this was the time of
the Fenian Raids. In 1868 the roof fell
in from the great weight of snow so the present agricultural hall had to be
built the next year. It provides space
for exhibits of fruits and vegetables,
flowers, grain, baking, canning,
sewing and children’s exhibits, as
well as commercial displays and
refreshment counter and tables.
In 1868 the spacious grand stand
was erected where over the years
horse lovers have witnessed races,
hurdle jumping and high stepping
beauties, massive draft horses and
parades of horses and cattle in the
ring.


There were always several bands in
attendance, brass bands and
highland pipe bands and military
bands. It was here that many people
saw their first moving pictures and
watched balloons ascend and float
away. Their passengers would land
somewhere, sometimes near,
sometimes far away. Usually there
was a display of trapeze work when
you held your breath in fear lest the
performer crashed to his death.
There were wonderful shows with
elephants walking on milk bottles,
trained seals, playing drums and
throwing blazing torches to each
other to be caught in their mouth.
There were clowns and trained dogs.
The acrobats and performers were a
great thrill. Boys and girls went home
determined to try the same stunts or
train their dogs or horses to perform
like those at the show.
The climax came on the final night
when a great delight was the
marvelous display of fireworks which
lit up the sky with rockets and
sparklers such as we have not seen
for many years.
In earlier days the agricultural society
not only put on the annual fair but
sought to improve livestock and
farming practices. They imported fine
herd sires and made them available
to livestock breeders.

They held field


crop competitions and annual
ploughing matches which attracted
many farmers. They even had
mowing matches where machines of
different makes were in competition
so that farmers could see which
could do the best job. Cash prizes
were awarded at the fair for ploughs
and other farm implements
manufactured in the area, prizes
were given also for homemade cloth,
blankets, carpets, homemade cheese
and maple sugar.


We have reason to respect and
admire the foresight and determination of our forefathers in
promoting improved agricultural
practices through competition and
encouragement to stimulate a desire
for the best. Only good farmers can
succeed now as then. The social
aspect of the fair was also very
important. It is good for the rural
people to get together and meet with
both their rural and urban friends and
acquaintances. It is bound to create
better understanding.

http://www.almontefair.ca/images/1983FairGrounds.jpg


We also have reason to thank the
present officers and workers for their
untiring efforts and endless labour in
building up this fine organization.
As the scope of the work grew, it was
found necessary to expand the area
and make additions to the property.
The society has been able over the
years to purchase and pay for
expansion. Indeed it has the deeds
for eleven parcels of land needed for
its wider scope of activities.
The NLAS buildings have been a
great asset and have been kept up to
date. There are now new buildings for
all of the livestock.
A fine commodious dining hall where
the best of meals are served is
another great asset, as well as further
provisions for refreshments in the
main hail and under the grandstand.

http://www.almontefair.ca/images/nlas_fairgrounds_plastic.jpg

The main hail is a very superior
building in which to house exhibits.
The society has been very gracious
over the years in sharing its facilities
with the people of the town and
community. The grounds have been
used as a ball park and many
spectacular games of baseball,
football and lacrosse have been
played here over the years. They
have also shared the fine beach
which has made it possible for the
children to learn to swim under
supervision. The main hail is used for
wedding receptions and dances.
This NLAS Fair at first was a one day
affair. In 1868 it became a two day
fair and the attendance rose that year
to between five thousand and six
thousand people. Now a three day
fair is held with the first day being the
day on which exhibits are prepared
and placed and Friday and Saturday
for the crowd. Here’s hoping that the
weather is fine this year and the
crowds are big.
Hi, Ho, Come to the fair–by Edna Gardener Lowry

http://www.almontefair.ca/images/close_in_NLAS_Hall.jpg

Red Letter Days of the Lanark Fair 1910

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Photo Adin Wesley Daigle
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Sep 1910, Sat  •  Page 11

The World’s Fair- Lombardy Fair

Results of School Fairs Lanark County — Who Do You Know?

“Sale” Fairs — Crops and Sometimes Fair Damsels

Clippings and Photos of the 1958 Almonte Turkey Fair

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 4-“the proprietor of a merry-go-round was paid a bonus to bring his machine to the Fair “

Eva L. Devlin Pilot Crashed at Perth Fair

The Lanark Fair 1904 Names Names Names

McDonald’s Corners Fair Marks 100th Anniversary 1956 Names Names Names

“Around the Local Fairs in 80 Days”? Lanark County Minor Steampunk Story

The Country Fairs 1879

Are You Ever too Old to Go to The Rural Fair? — Almonte

It Happened at The Richmond Fair 2012 – Photo Memories

Doin’ the Funky Chicken in Lanark County

The World’s Fair- Lombardy Fair

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The World’s Fair- Lombardy Fair
Adin Wesley Daigle

June 5 ·  

Lombardy Agricultural Society 2nd place ribbon, 3rd place behind .

Every second day for over a year in 1995-1996 I used to pass the Lombardy Fair grounds on my way to see my sister who was dying in the Cancer hospital in Kingston. Originally the Lombardy Fair was nearer the village and in 1980 moved to its new grounds just three years ago.  Known locally as “The World’s Fair” with 45 acres, a race track. Lions’ building, food booth and the community hall, fair officials were hoping to raise the rating from “C” class fair to “B” class. I often wondered about the history but it wasn’t until Adin Wesley Daigle posted his finds of the prize ribbons from the past that I knew I had to document something.

 -
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Sep 1952, Wed  •  Page 21
Stories and Photos of the Lombardy Fair
Mrs. D. C. Moodie

In September of 1952 there were only about 100 men. women and children in this little village on Highway No. 15 near Smiths Falls, but each year since 1866 they pooled their efforts under the title of the Lombardy Agricultural Society to stage a fall fair that rates among the best in Eastern Ontario.

In 1951 it attracted over 4,000 visitors and the central figure behind this prodigious undertaking was a housewife named Mrs. D. C. Moodie. For only $70 annually she took on the job of fair secretary which kept her busy throughout most of the year.

Her husband was a Lombardy blacksmith and jack-of-all-trades who had been the Fair secretary for 10 years before her. In 1950 Mrs. Moodie took over the job for “just for one year” but it seems she was persuaded to stay on.

In 1942 there were only 21 exhibitors at the Lombardy Fair and in 1951 there were 60. When Mrs. Moodie complied the prize list for the 73rd annual fair in 1952 she included 500 separate classes. Mrs. Moodie was the mother of three children, Barbara, Beryl and Wayne, who helped her out during fair preparations by running messages.

Working with Mrs. Moodie, too are most of the villagers. President of the Lombardy Agricultural Society was Gordon W. Smith, reeve of South Elmsley Township. Spencer Blanchard was first vice-president, and Mr. Moodie was second vice-president. G. Weekes was treasurer. Directors were: Orvllle Covell, Harold Tennant. Donald Covell, C. Rea, Francis Jordan, Ross Miller. Lawrence Scott, Steacy Moorehouse and H.- E. Wood. Lady co-directors were: Mrs. G. W. Smith, Mrs. H. E. Wood, Mrs. Robert Joynt, Mrs. Gordon Pegg, Mrs. Spencer Blanchard. Mrs. Merrill Bass. Mrs Orvllle Covell and Mrs. O. Wright.

Rain at the Lombardy Fair - They postponed them in those days

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Oct 1900, Mon  •  Page 8

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Oct 1904, Wed  •  Page 

 - The Ottawa Citizen Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 06 Oct 1900, Sat  •  Page 2

If you have any memories contact me at sav_77@yahoo.com so I can document them. Thank you!

 PHOTOS  Our Board & Past Presidents - Welcome to the Lombardy Agricultural ...
Fun at Lombardy Fair extends five generations and counting for ...

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 Aug 1970, Mon  •  Page 4
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Aug 1982, Mon  •  Page 3
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Aug 1987, Thu  •  Page 6
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Aug 1972, Mon  •  Page 3
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Aug 1972, Mon  •  Page 3

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Aug 1982, Tue  •  Page 8
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Aug 1972, Fri  •  Page 3
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CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
31 Aug 1964, Mon  •  Page 2
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Aug 1964, Wed  •  Page 4
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Sep 1958, Sat  •  Page 5
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Sep 1956, Fri  •  Page 10
relatedreading

Results of School Fairs Lanark County — Who Do You Know?

“Sale” Fairs — Crops and Sometimes Fair Damsels

Clippings and Photos of the 1958 Almonte Turkey Fair

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 4-“the proprietor of a merry-go-round was paid a bonus to bring his machine to the Fair “

Eva L. Devlin Pilot Crashed at Perth Fair

The Lanark Fair 1904 Names Names Names

McDonald’s Corners Fair Marks 100th Anniversary 1956 Names Names Names

“Around the Local Fairs in 80 Days”? Lanark County Minor Steampunk Story

The Country Fairs 1879

Are You Ever too Old to Go to The Rural Fair? — Almonte

It Happened at The Richmond Fair 2012 – Photo Memories

Doin’ the Funky Chicken in Lanark County

The Lanark Fair 1904 Names Names Names

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The Lanark Fair 1904 Names Names Names

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CLIPPED FROM

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Sep 1904, Tue  •  Page 4

 

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historicalnotes

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relatedreading

McDonald’s Corners Fair Marks 100th Anniversary 1956 Names Names Names

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McDonald’s Corners Fair Marks 100th Anniversary  1956 Names Names Names

 - .. LANARK.-XiclZ-aSDliU LANARK.-XiclZ-aSDliU...

The Society has been active since 1853, back to when Canada was becoming the wonderful nation that it is today.

The 165th Annual Fall Fair
Saturday – September 29, 2018
  click here..

6179796006_3d1a305acc_b.jpg

McDonalds Corners Fair, 2011 | by chasdobie

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 02 Oct 1956, Tue,
  3. Page 35\\

  4. Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

    Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

     

     

    relatedreading.jpg

  5. “Around the Local Fairs in 80 Days”? Lanark County Minor Steampunk Story

    The Country Fairs 1879

    Are You Ever too Old to Go to The Rural Fair? — Almonte

    It Happened at The Richmond Fair 2012 – Photo Memories

    Doin’ the Funky Chicken in Lanark County