Tag Archives: election

Vintage Election Posters 1894 1898 1905 Lanark County — James Bell and James Armour

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Vintage Election Posters 1894 1898 1905 Lanark County — James Bell and James Armour
All files from Jim Houston

All these delicate paper posters are quite large– meant for the walls of election places. They are mostly in good condition but have been rolled up for years. I only found one of them that exists at the Difenbaker Centre at the University of Sasktchewan. They were given to me by Jim Houston from his family collection to document. The Houstons lived at 11 Lake Ave East in Carleton Place, Ontario.

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
02 Feb 1898, Wed  •  Page 4

Returning Officer — no signature

All files from Jim Houston

All files from Jim Houston

Charles Clarke (November 28, 1826 – April 6, 1909) 

All files from Jim Houston

Sept. 11, 1936 – C.M. FORBES was appointed Registrar of Deeds for the Registry Division of North and South Lanark in the place of JAMES ARMOUR, deceased.

All files from Jim Houston

Signing Officer James Bell

CLIPPED FROM
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Jun 1894, Sat  •  Page 2
All files from Jim Houston

James Armour becomes the Lanark County returning officer.

How?

The former returning officer James Bell was his son-in-law. All in the family as they say.


CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
20 Jul 1904, Wed  •  Page 8

Signatures of the Past — William Houston

Signatures of the Past —-Houston

The Snowstorm of March 1947 – Jim Houston

Tea with Linda Seccaspina Carleton Place Election 2022

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Tea with Linda Seccaspina Carleton Place Election 2022

Tea with Linda- Introduction

My speech at All Candidates Night– Two Minute Speech

Good Evening Carleton Place!

Four years ago I quickly learned,along with my fellow new councillors, that changing the direction of rampant growth the town was headed to wasn’t going to be easy. We all pledged to do everything we could to ensure smart livable growth for the town and continue to try and find answers for affordable housing.

I voted no on some smaller housing projects– not because I don’t like developments but because I am sick of seeing things that don’t fit into existing older neighbourhoods. I have asked every developer about thoughts of providing a few units of affordable housing, or something for first time house buyers but none did.

In the past 4 years I brought forward to council the following notice of motions and thanks to my fellow councillors we got the 4 votes to get things done. No one does anything by themselves, we work together.

1-fixed difficulties folks faced regularly when trying to cross busy streets from the trails. New crosswalks were installed.

2– requested staff to do a timely review of the town’s response to the storm and power outage in May so we can do things even better next time. Thank you staff!

3-passed a motion regarding atvs so they could cross the trail at Mc Ewens on Townline to gas up and available parking for them near the market.

4-Staff recommendations studying year-round safety of on street parking so we can get emergency vehicles down a street and set precedence for wider safer streets in new builds.

I took a strong stand on voting NO on the proposed bylaw to enter private outdoor property without reason, –Voted no to Ocean Wave name change, our heritage needs to be remembered.

Voted no along with Theresa Fritz in 2018 about passing snow plowing and parking rules during the winter so we could study it more. Sadly it was passed 5-2 when it was brought back a second time.

My name is Linda Seccaspina and I don’t want to have to tell the younger folks that I remember when these developments were all just woods. I want to be part of council these next four years so my grandkids will be proud to call Carleton Place home.

Thank You

My speech at All Candidates Night– One Minute Speech

Tea with Linda Affordable Housing Part 1

Tea with Linda Affordable Housing Part 2

Tea with Linda Affordable Housing Part 3

Older and young Canadians alike face difficulties finding affordable housing. If elected, how will you address the housing crisis in our community and help more young people, older Canadians and other vulnerable populations find an affordable place to live?

In the last four years I’ve been very involved with Carebridge, Age Friendly North Lanark and United Way East, working with them to find solutions to make housing more affordable. Carleton Place Council recently also passed provisions, which I supported, to cut developers a break on fees for building affordable housing. We need to encourage more apartments be built, along with smaller homes – things that cost less to build per unit so rents and selling prices come down. We also are encouraging things like granny suites where people have room on their properties – this will also create affordable rental units.

The housing affordability crisis is rooted in a serious lack of supply. Exclusionary zoning policies prohibit multi-family housing units from being built on properties in which single-family homes are currently situated. If elected, would you advocate putting an end to exclusionary zoning to ensure that more homes can be built here? If so, how will you address ‘NIMBY’ constituents? If not, how will you work to achieve the goal of more units built in existing neighbourhoods?

First off, there isn’t a lack of supply, there’s just a lack of the right type of supply. But to get to the heart of your question on exclusionary zoning, Carleton Place does not have such a policy, nor would I advocate for that. I think everyone agrees that we need higher density building in established neighborhoods, but I believe it is also important to keep with the character of those neighborhoods – architecture that fits the surrounding buildings and doesn’t obstruct views or create shadows. And buildings like this have been approved in this term of Council – the new multi-unit building on Bell St that replaced a dilapidated single family home is a prime example. It’s these conditions that help keep NIMBY arguments to a minimum.

Toronto is currently the only municipality in Ontario that has a Municipal Land Transfer Tax (MLTT). The additional municipal tax is a significant barrier for people already struggling to get into the market. Over the last several years, there have been municipalities that have tried to give themselves MLTT powers. Do you support the expansion of MLTT powers to municipalities outside of Toronto? Would you advocate against your municipality gaining MLTT powers if one of your fellow councillors was pushing for it?

Our development fees, as long as they are reviewed regularly, are enough, and target the developers making money on their land purchase, rather than say, an individual looking to buy a plot of land to build their family home on. There has been no discussion of a MLTT here in Carleton Place and I would not support it.

    4. * This question is meant for City of Ottawa candidates, however much of the question still applies here * Ottawa’s new Official Plan outlines ambitious housing supply targets for both intensification and affordable housing development. Costly delays to development approvals and municipally imposed fees impact both supply and affordability as these costs are borne by prospective purchasers and/or tenants. Do you support reducing red-tape and development fees? Would you advocate against a measure that is likely to increase development delays and fees if one of your fellow councillors was pushing for it?

Carleton Place also has ambitious growth plans regarding population, which were handed to us by the County. It means there will have to be additional growth in Carleton Place, however it needs to be more measured than it was prior to this council coming in four years ago. The rate of growth has already put our infrastructure behind and is causing an accelerated revamping of our water treatment plant at a huge cost. The speed of growth in town is the number one complaint I hear from residents, along with the need to maintain our small town charm and heritage. So no, I will not support reducing development fees for developers, except under the special circumstances that have already been introduced to the town’s Official Plan as it relates to affordable housing. And it is our approval process that helps ensure we maintain the town’s charm. We do need better communication and ensure the planning and building departments are taking time with newer developers to our area to make sure they understand our bylaws. But if the process is done right, and with added guidance from staff, a developer should be able to follow our Official Plan and Development Bylaws and not have issues with added red-tape.

We have lost more social housing units in the County than we have built over the past 25 years. This is an issue right across the Country. 

There are over 800 people on county subsidised housing  list and if I wanted to get into  County housing it would take 8 years.  However, what I have seen is that landlords are requiring tenants show proof of income and do credit checks. This means they have to disclose they are using a rent supp and landlords discriminate against them because of it.  All buildings built after 2018 are not subjected to rent control.. Your rent goes up 500-60 bucks and landlords call it ‘ going market rate”– Deplorable!

So I joined groups like Age Friendly North Lanark ( part of Carebridge) and United Way East (senior group) and learned this is a problem everywhere. Should we accept this? Of course not. I think the federal government start buying existing buildings from the private market

Build build build social housing as fast as possible (you know you can control the rents in social housing), purchase properties for social housing (like hotels) and fill gaps with rent supp and PHBs. Yes, these are all funded by the County/province/federal government.

One developer says every development they will do from now on will have affordable housing. I asked them how much is their affordable housing and they say 100,000 less than going rate. Affordable housing is not 100,000 less than a 700,000 house next door.I wish these builders could take these calls I get and tell me what to say to these people needing something they can afford. In Canada, housing is considered “affordable” if it costs less than 30% of a household’s before-tax income

 Mayor LeBlanc went to Elizabeth Court in 2014 and told everyone a senior building was coming behind Caramabeck and there was a photo op with committee members and Carebridge. New council got in and the whole idea fell by the wayside.

Health Care

We are now getting a new Health Hub in Carleton Place, but we could have had it when Almonte had theirs– years ago. Unfortunatly the local doctors turned it down in 2006. At that time there was no staff shortages and doctors were worried about their private practices. Now, new doctors seldom choose having their own office etc and prefer to be in a medical centre where everything is available to them: i.e. Blood services MRI, screening etc.This is the new way things are being done and new doctors no longer want to put in the usual long hours- hence you see some local doctors cutting their patient list. Its called burn out. I just wish we had accepted it in 2006 and been ahead of the game. But now we must embrace any opportunity shown to us and encourage it.

No matter what happens I salute the other 7 women that did our town proud and we should never forget them:.. Barbara Walsh, Trudi Dickie, , Mayor Melba Barker, Linda Schmidt, Councillor and Mayor Wendy LeBlanc and Theresa Fritz. Vote October 24th

Linda Seccaspina

 Theresa Fritz

Wendy LeBlanc (mayor)

Linda Schmidt

Melba Baker (mayor)

Barbara Walsh

Trudie Dickie

Geneva Anne Tripp (1952)

So much so that when the world says, “but that’s not how we’ve always done things” you still stand up, chin up, shoulders back and say, “that doesn’t matter because it’s how we can start doing things now.”

Maddy Dever to

Linda Seccaspina

My question for the candidates is what do you think it will take this town, first, and then its businesses to remove barriers and make this town a place accessible for everyone everywhere?

As a first step, can you pledge to ensure that every new development, program, road, park, etc be built to be inclusive from the start?— Maddy, as you know I have a cane now and its difficult for me to navigate around curbs etc. I always fought for accessibility as my mother was in a wheelchair for most of her life. Using a cane I know what it is to get to a streetcorner and think before I walk off of it..which is nothing compared to you. We have an accessibility committee but I was sad to learn that they did not have much say in theMain Street improvement, but was overjoyed to see you try it out. I have said this town is not accessible but have been corected that I am wrong. They are wrong. Its a need for some of us and we need to keep fighting..

How Do I Convince You How Important Tuesday Night is to Carleton Place?

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How Do I Convince You How Important Tuesday Night is to Carleton Place?
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The mayor, Louis Antonakos , has been found guilty again for the FIFTH time by the Integrity Commissioner and it will be brought up at a special meeting Tuesday evening.  I don’t like this anymore than anyone else does, but there is an election coming up October 22. So please attend Tuesday night and make your decisions for the upcoming vote.

What’s going on Carleton Place? Logically, you’d want an intelligent person who understands the best approach and methods running for mayor in the best possible way. But no, people seem drawn to demonstrations of questionable intellectual abilities, and I just don’t understand it.

In today’s politics, a vote is far more likely to be a force of castigation than a result of inspiration or aspiration. I call it the “least-lousy justification: “My side sucks, but not as much as those other guys. democracy would be perfect if it weren’t for all the people involved”.

This election people are being given something to vote for rather than against— like finally a council that will work together and get things done. No more drama! No more chaos!  We have some brilliant caring people running this election and we need a new direction.  Can Carleton Place stand another 4 years of bad media? You tell me, because in the end it is your decision, and your vote will form the future of Carleton Place for the next 4 years.

 

Because some appear to have lost sight of the larger issues, like our town moving ahead positively, we have managed to split our town on thoughts about the mayoral election, and turned an entire generation off from it. The cycle continues, as you see young people so totally uninspired by the way our town runs, and are now resigned to its trials and tribulations of chaos.

l say we reinvent the town of Carleton Place’s politics and government by voting in the positive and what our town really deserves. I don’t want people to feel compelled to hold their nose while voting. Please attend Tuesday’s night council meeting and listen to what has happened. This is not pot stirring or bringing up old issues. These are new issues which you need to know about before making your decision.

 

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Please be There!

A G E N D A
FOURTH SPECIAL MEETING OF THE 129TH COUNCIL
Tuesday, October 16, 2018 Council Chambers 7 PM

 

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READ more here..

 

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Got Something to Say About this Election? JOIN

Carleton Place Politics: Discussion And Debate–CLICK

 

 

 

Related reading….

Am I the Only One? An Opinion from the Lone Wolf Who Cares

Am I the Only One? An Opinion from the Lone Wolf Who Cares

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Am I the Only One?  An Opinion from the Lone Wolf Who Cares

I don’t like this anymore than anyone else does, but there is an election coming up October 22. The mayor, Louis Antonakos , has been found guilty again for the FIFTH time and it will be brought up at a special meeting again Tuesday evening. Vote for who you please but how many times does this man have to be found guilty for people to understand we need a new captain at the helm.. Do we want the history of Carleton Place to repeat another 4 years?

 

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read more here… CLICK

 

Why am I the only “new guy”  running for council saying anything about this? Why are the other challengers not speaking up? Are they happy with what’s going on and just willing to let all this slide?  I have been consistent in my views, and stood up for everything I believe in– as I want the best for Carleton Place. Someone who has been found guilty and disrespects the staff is not who I want in charge. It’s common sense 101.

I’ve had people email me tonight wondering if the mayor should be disqualified for running this time because of this last conviction. Ontario has very firm rules about municipal stuff like that. I just found this in an old issue of a 2013 Now Magazine talking about Rob Ford. “How to get rid of a Mayor”

What can we do about him?

Well, there’s laughing and crying, but you knew that already.

No, I mean, like, to get rid of him?

Ah.

Can council remove him?

No.

Can the province remove him?

In theory, yes – the province can pass pretty much any law it wants with regard to municipalities. But it’s not gonna take the bait here. Needless intervention in politically charged municipal shitshows isn’t really this government’s thing

So you don’t lose your seat if you’re convicted of a crime, but you do lose your seat if you go to jail?

A member of council is disqualified from holding office if, at any time during the term of office of that member, he or she” would not be eligible to vote if a municipal election “was held at that time.” (The Municipal Act, which applies to all other Ontario municipalities, has the same clause.) The moment you cease to be an eligible voter, you’re disqualified from holding office and your seat is declared vacant.

Because people in jail can’t vote?

Exactly. Ontario’s Municipal Elections Act specifies that “a person who is serving a sentence of imprisonment in a penal or correctional institution” is barred from voting in municipal elections

 

Huh. Well, what if the mayor, say, gets arrested in a bar fight and is kept in a cell until morning?

Nope. It has to be imprisonment “pursuant to a conviction,” says Mascarin. “Not just jailed overnight because they’re holding you.” He offers the example of the G20. “If you had a council member out there and he was put in a holding tank with everybody – that wouldn’t qualify, in my view.” It has to be imprisonment as a sentence that flows from a conviction.

What now?

Linda says- We wait for the conclusion of the vote October 22, 2018

And until then?

We go back to laughing and crying.

Linda says: If you can’t fix stupid you Vote it Out!

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Got Something to Say About this Election?

Carleton Place Politics: Discussion And Debate–CLICK

The Squeaker Election — November 1980 Carleton Place

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The Squeaker Election — November 1980 Carleton Place img.jpeg  - Lady Luck to decide who's mayor By Bob Marleau... November  1982 Melba Barker is out to prove once and for all nice gals don’t have to finish last or even in a tie. Two years ago, when voters here were asked to choose their new mayor on the basis of style and personality, the battle ended in a dead heat. Barker and Allan Code each received 1,007 votes, forcing a lottery type showdown in which Barker was awarded the chain of office by the luck of the draw. Squaring off again, Barker and Code agree voters will have to make their decision in terms on style not issues. But both predict the electorate shouldn’t have any trouble picking a winner this time around. “The present mayor has had two years to prove what she could do for Carleton Place” says Code. “She’s been a nice lady but she hasn’t got the job done.” “I’m flattered he would even go that far,” replies Barker. “But I’m running on my record and I’m confident that if people look at the accomplishments they’ll support me.” Barker, a housewife and mother, lists improved streets and sidewalks, new police facilities, a swimming pool and playground among her achievements. Code says he could do an even better job by taking a more aggressive approach in attracting new business and industry. “Sometimes, niceness doesn’t work,” he says. “I just feel that with my leadership and experience, I’m the best person for the job.” A car dealership owner with 13 years experience on council, Code says he would work to restore good relations between the town and its downtown merchants, a relationship he claims “soured” under Barker during the mainstreet revitalization project. Barker acknowledges the project had a disruptive effect but says the mainstreet improvements will pay off. I In addition to the mayorality race, the town’s other two top municipal jobs are on the line. Brian Costello, who sucessfully made the jump from council to deputy reeve two years ago, is trying to move another step up by challenging veteran Bruce Sadler for reeve. And Ormond Giles, unseated in 1980, is running against incumbent councillor Trudi Dickie in an attempt to regain the deputy reeve-ship. In addition to council and school board races, voters will be asked in a referendum whether they favor disbanding the town’s old park board so a single authority can be established to look after all recreational matters.

The Ottawa Citizen

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Nov 1982, Wed  •  Page 3 Lady Luck will decide this town’s next mayor Monday, when a name is drawn out of a hat, ending the vote deadlock discovered by a judicial recount Wednesday. County court Justice John Ma-theson spent nine hours recounting the votes cast Nov. 10 for Melba Barker and Allan Code, and declared a dead heat. Each polled 1,007 ballots, the first tie for the mayor’s job in the town’s 161-year history. Barker, 32, was initially declared the winner election night, with a slim majority of 1,012 votes to 1,005 for Code. Outgoing Mayor Ted LeMaistre finished third, with 332 votes. An error discovered the next day changed Barker’s victory margin to four votes, dropping her to 1,009. Code applied for a judicial recount. During Wednesday’s recount. Justice Matheson discovered two extra votes for Code and two less for Barker, setting the stage for the draw, as set forth under the Municipal Election Act. While the two tied candidates have two days to decide whether to seek a judicial recount by the Supreme Court of Canada, both indicated Wednesday they are prepared to try their luck. The Municipal Election Act directs that the names of the tied candidates be written on separate pieces of equal size paper and placed in a box. The name drawn is the winner’s. Barker, a two-term council member, would become the first woman mayor in the town’s history should her name be drawn. “I’ll be glad when it’s settled,” she said from her home late Wednesday. “It has been a suspenseful situation and I certainly was hoping it wouldn’t be that way (a tie).” Code, 48, a 13-year council veteran, was less than enthusiastic about the draw. He doubted he’d seek a Supreme Court recount. Town clerk and chief returning officer Keith Morris said there is no alternative to the draw. CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada20 Nov 1980, Thu  •  Page 2 Luck will decide what the voters didn’t when a draw is held tonight to pick the town’s new mayor. The names of Melba Barker and Allan Code will placed in a hat with Lanark County warden Lyall Binglcy to draw the winner. The draw will take place at 7.30 in the auditorium of the town hall. The unusual procedure became necessary when a judicial recount showed each candidate deadlocked with 1,007 votes. Ted LcMaistre, the incumbent mayor, finished a distant third in Nov. 10 municipal elections.
CLIPPED FROM

The Ottawa Citizen

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Nov 1980, Tue  •  Page 3 It’s time for perennial Carleton Place mayoral candidates Melba Barker and Allan Code to put their rivalry aside. We’d like to see them exchange friendship rings.

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 03 Jan 1983, Mon,
  3. Other Editions,
  4. Page 3
To Leonard Echlin, reeve of Lanark Village: The resources to retain the offices of a certain provincial ministry in its natural location. For Allan Code, who lost the job as mayor of Carleton Place by the luck of the draw: A winning book of Wintario tickets. For Melba Barker, who won the job as mayor of Carleton Place by the luck of the draw: A losing book of Wintario tickets. To Tom Cossitt, the Conservative MP for Leeds who’s been having trouble getting the government to answer his questions: Three copies of the book “Success Through Transactional Analysis.” For your favorite elementary or secondary school teacher threatened with losing hisher job because of declining enrolment: A weekly increase in the birth rather than bank rate.

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 15 Dec 1980, Mon,
  3. Other Editions,
  4. Page 3
CARLETON PLACE (Special) Allan Code, who lost out to Melba Barker in the now famous draw for the mayor’s chair, still doesn’t know if the town will be picking up the tab for his lawyer’s fee for the official recount that preceded the draw. Code said the bill for $750 should be paid by the town since it was an error in tabulation that forced the recount. Barker said she considered her lawyer’s bill her responsibility and she will be paying for it herself. Both contenders were advised to have lawyers in attendance at the recount, which was presided over by County Court Judge John Matheson. Code said he has already paid the lawyer’s fee and he has written to the judge, who will make the final decision on who is to pay the cost, but he has yet to receive an answer.
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The Ottawa Citizen

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Jan 1981, Tue  •  Page 4 In 2010 Wendy LeBlanc became Carleton Place’s second mayor. Former mayor Melba Barker held the position for 11 years, beginning in 1980. Since 1919 when Carleton Place had their first mayor, Dr. Preston (we had reeves before that) there have been only 8 women in municipal power. relatedreading

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

  1. It’s Hard for Women to get into Office in Carleton Place — 1974 –Mary Cook

  2. Carleton Place is Like Kansas of the United States

It’s Hard for Women to get into Office in Carleton Place — 1974 –Mary Cook

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It’s Hard for Women to get into Office in Carleton Place — 1974 –Mary Cook

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By Mary Cook Citizen special correspondent CARLETON PLACE (Special) February 22 1974

Those people who are directly-responsible for the welfare of the county of Lanark, the elected representatives, would concur the county is a beautiful place to live in, the urban centres modern and progressive, the people alert to new ideas and keenly aware of the need for continuing progress. In the most part they would be right, however there is one area in which the county is completely backward – that is in the electing or appointment of women to municipal or community office.

A recent survey within town offices in the county found the town of Almonte was the most progressive in appointment of women to town positions. After a recent resignation of a council member a woman was appointed to fill the post. The direct opposite is true in the town of Carleton Place. It is next to impossible to get elected by public ballot in this town of 5,000 let alone be appointed to any board of any significance if one is female.

Two women ran during the last municipal election and both trailed at the polls miserably. Only one woman was ever successful at the Carleton Place polls and that was more than *20 years ago. Of the 46 appointed people to eight different town boards only five are women and those five have been strategically placed on boards which have little or nothing to do with the actual workings of the town.

Two of the five are on the library board, a nice quiet place, where the main concern is to keep the shelves stocked with good books and the library working within its allotted budget. One woman is on the community centre board and two are on the committee which jointly handles parks and recreation.

The hospital board always been male dominated with the president of the hospital auxiliary the only woman allowed into the group. Almonte boards contrast greatly in that not only does the board have several female members, its chairman is Mrs. Barbara Potvin, a dynamic leader who carries on the hospital business in a manner enviable to many other boards and organizations.

Perhaps the glaring example of discrimination appears in the Industrial Commission of all three towns. A woman has never been part of this committee which operates much like an exclusive private club. In Carleton Place council has no control over the committee’s appointment and until it is notified by the Industrial Commission is unaware of who a new member might be. No one seems to know how or why new members are chosen but women on the Industrial Commission so far have been strictly taboo.

All male committee Almonte has one female on its planning board and Perth has two but again Carleton Place hasn’t made the leap from an all male committee since the start of the board many years ago. Perth’s lone female councillor, Mrs. M. R. Church, headed the polls in the last municipal election and although most of the council appointed committee members are male, Mrs. C. C. Inderwick heads the historic Preservation Committee and the Perth Museum board.

The rural areas are not much different from the three urban centres. Marilyn Tufts, from North Elmsley, and Eleanor Brady, of Bathurst, are the only elected representatives from 12 townships in the county. In the rural areas very few women have ever sought public office which accounts for the scarcity in those regions and rarity are women appointed by rural councils to sit on committees. No one has a pat answer as to why women are so scarce on the government scene. Carleton Place Mayor Eldon Henderson said he has tried on many occasions to get women to run for public office with little success. Allan Code, deputy of Carleton Place, said he would like to see more women politically active but doubts they are really interested.

However the fact remains that few women are chosen for appointed jobs which would directly affect the basic running of the town. There is no woman on the Industrial Commission so questions asked directly relating to the employee’s families such as school, shopping and housing are answered by men. One civic minded female from Carleton Place sums up the situation this way. “Women have a lot to offer but for some reason men are terribly afraid they might lose some of their prestige if they open their doors to women in public office. This situation isn’t so prevalent in big government or larger urban areas but it’s almost an illness in the smaller communities”.

She asked to remain anonymous she doesn’t want to jeopardize her chances of ever being appointed to a committee or being elected to public office.

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authorsnote)

Here is your Carleton Place question today. How many women have been in Carleton Place government? Only 8 since 1919 when Dr. Preston became the first mayor (before that there were reeves)

Linda Seccaspina

 Theresa Fritz

Wendy LeBlanc (mayor)

Linda Schmidt

Melba Baker (mayor)

Barbara Walsh

Trudie Dickie

Geneva Anne Tripp (1952)

Also read-

The Hurtful World of Women in Politics– Christa Lowry

Documenting the First Female Councillor in Carleton Place

 - Carleton Place CARLETON PLACE-(Special) Reeve...

This is Tara Grigg Gesner reporter for the Metroland Media Group– Iconic Ottawa Valley author Mary Cook and myself at the Waterside for the Waterside Carleton Place Senior of the Year awards last week. Mary wrote this in 1974 and things have changed for women but not enough.

Carleton Place is Like Kansas of the United States

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Carleton Place is Like Kansas of the United States

 

 - Wets'- on BeverageJloom Vote CARLETON FLACZ,...

l   first column  read down                  |

 - Sixty percent, of the polled vote was heeded to...

 

Bill Prime was the youngest Mayor of Carleton Place. He was 31. He also worked as assistant manager of the Brewer’s Retail store.

 

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 13 Nov 1952, Thu,
  3. Page 3

 - Carleton Place Mayor Gets Promotion ARltrrO...

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

James J. Hands – Dies in Perth — Former Mayor Accidentally Drowns in House Bath

Thomas Raines Almonte — US Confederate Soldier Mayor and Dentist– Biological Mystery!!!

Samuel J. Berryman Last Survivor of 1866 Militia–Genealogy

They Once Lived in My Home– Arthur Cram

Don’t Bring Your Guns to Town!

Mrs. James Lawrie and Her Ginger Beer

“One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer” in Lanark County

Mississippi Hotel Beer — Brading’s Beer

The Big Beer Store Heist in Carleton Place

Signs Signs– Nothing but Roadscape? A Humorous Look at Election Signage

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Signs Signs– Nothing but Roadscape? A Humorous Look at Election Signage

 

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When the leaves begin to float down this year the local campaign signs will begin sprouting in population. It’s also the season when the partisans of various political candidates agonize waaaay too much over who has more lawn signs. In fact some campaigns think of little else but their signs—at the expense of the actual work of winning over voters.

The annual sign routine is predictable:

    • Candidate Joe gets his signs up first, causing the supporters of Candidate Jane to freak out.

 

    • Jane overcompensates by trying to put up twice as many signs as Joe, escalating the sign wars.

 

    • Now it’s Joe’s supporters’ turn to freak out, so Joe orders another 100 signs to catch up, making Joe and Jane roughly even.

 

    • Both teams suddenly realize that if they put TWO signs on each property, it looks like they have double the support! Then they realize that three is better than two. And four is better than three. (Five, however, makes the property owner look crazy.)

 

    • Jane’s cousin gets caught with a trunk load of stolen Joe signs, creating a bunch of bad publicity for Jane.

 

    • Meanwhile, the local zoning enforcement officer (a member of Jane’s campaign committee) decides to enforce a little-known local law, requiring Joe to take down his signs because they are 3.25 inches too tall.

 

After the first week of this annual ritual, voters stop even seeing the signs, as they become just another feature of the roadscape.

Finally, after months of sign wars, your local election occurs. The votes are tallied. Turns out that having more signs had nothing to do with who actually won. The outcome could be predicted as reliably with a coin flip. Because no one—well, almost no one—decides which candidate to support because of a sign. Or do they?  Maybe yes or maybe no… What’s your comment?

 

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Vote for Linda Seccaspina

https://www.facebook.com/Vote-for-Linda-Seccaspina-Carleton-Place-Council-2018-1082255855285857/