Tag Archives: dunlop

People of Lanark County Andrew Dunlop 1944

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People of Lanark County Andrew Dunlop 1944

Mr. Andrew Dunlop, an esteemed and well known resident of Carleton Place and Almonte, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Wilbert J. Porterfield, Lake Avenue West, on Wednesday of last week. Mr. Dunlop was in his 90th year. Mr. Dunlop was a man younger looking than his years and enjoyed good health until his illness, which occurred on Saturday, October 28th. Up until that time he was able to take his walks to the barber shop and enjoyed meeting and conversing with old and new friends whom he met from time to time.

Mr. Dunlop’s passing is widely mourned by his friends throughout the whole district. Born in Paisley, Scotland, in 1885, a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Dunlop, he came to Canada with his parents in 1870, and settled in Guelph, and later at Fergus, Ont. In 1872, the family moved to Almonte where Mr. Dunlop entered the employ of the Rosamond Woolen Company. He remained there 49 years, 40 of them as overseer. In 1922 Mr. Dunlop was forced to retire due to ill health. On September 4th, 1878, Mr. DunIop was married to the former Miss Agnes Lindsay Gilmour, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. James Gilmour at the home of her parents on the 8th line of Ramsay, by the late Rev, Mr. Lougheed.

In 1936 Mr. and Mrs. Dunlop came to visit with their son-in-law and daughter . Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Porterfield, and were only here a short time when Mrs. Dunlop passed away, since which time Mr. Dunlop has made his home in Carleton Place. The late Mr. Dunlop was one of Almonte’s oldest and best known citizens and since coming to reside in this town had made a host of friends. He was well read and kept close contact with current events through his daily newspaper.

The death of his young grandson, Flying Officer Andrew Porterfield, overseas, was an almost overwhelming blow from which Mr. Dunlop never seemed to recover. As husband and father he had met all of his years with a brave heart and cheerful courage and it was always more natural of him to think of others than of himself. Mr. Dunlop lived a full and well rounded life with an abundance of philosophy and good humour that enabled him to endure a great deal and he leaves behind him a good name and the inspiration of a friendship that will be cherished by those who knew it.

During his long years of residence in Almonte, Mr. Dunlop was active in many of the town’s affairs. He was a member of Bethany United Church and was deeply interested in its welfare. He was a member of Mississippi Lodge, A. F. & A. M. No. 147, Almonte, for 67 years and some time ago was given the 50-year veteran jewel and the Past Master’s 50-year medal and was the oldest living member at the time of his death.

Left to mourn are five daughters (Ethel) Mrs. W. J. Porterfield, Qarleton Place, (Gertrude) Mrs. Harry Reynolds, Calgary, (Inez), Mrs. Charles Lay, Toronto, (Olga) Mrs, Arthur T. Roberts, Desplain, 111., U. S. A., (Roberta) Mrs. Grdon Brown, Toronto, also two sons, Mr. Frank Dunlop, Ottawa and Mr. Russell Dunlop, of Calgary, and one brother, Mr. David Dunlop, North Adams, Mass., and one sister, Miss Tena Dunlop of Almonte.

Two daughters, Delcia and (Jessie) L. Thompson, are deceased. The funeral took place from the home of his son-in-law, Mr. Porterfield, Saturday afternoon. A short service was conducted at the home by Rev. D. C. Munro, minister of Memorial Park United Church at 2 o’clock and the cortege then proceeded to Almonte for service at 2.30 at Bethany United Church by the minister, Rev, W. J. Scott. Buried at Almonte Interment was made at the AuKirk Cemetery. The honorary pallbearers were Messrs. George Clement, W. C. Pollock, William Coxford, Robert Hogg, Nelson Washburn and Dr. Kelly, all of Almonte. The active pallbearers were P. S. G. Mac Porterfield, Messrs. George George Buffam, Elmer Walker, Harry Buffam, Elmer Walker, Harry Gilmour, Roy Gilmour, and W. W. Pollock, K. C, Many beautiful floral tributes were received evidence of the high esteem in which Mr. Dunlop was held.


Born in Paisley High Church, Renfrewshire, Scotland on 02 Sep 1855 to Andrew Dunlop and Christina RODMAN. Andrew Dunlop married Agnes Lindsay Gilmour and had 9 children. He passed away on 01 Nov 1944 in Carleton Place, Lanark, Ontario, Canada.

Andrew Dunlop
BIRTH
2 Sep 1855Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland
DEATH
1 Nov 1944 (aged 89)Carleton Place, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
BURIAL
Auld Kirk Cemetery
Mississippi Mills, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
MEMORIAL ID
203007189 · View Source

1911 Census

Name:Andrew Dunlop
Gender:Male
Marital status:Married
Race or Tribe:Scotch (Scotish)
Nationality:Canadian
Age:54
Birth Date:Sep 1856
Birth Place:Scotland
Census Year:1911
Relation to Head of House:Head
Immigration Year:1871
Dwelling No.:60
Province:Ontario
District:Lanark North
District Number:89
Sub-District:17 – Ward 2
Sub-District Number:17
Place of Habitation:Bell St
Religion:Presbyterian
Occupation:Boss Filler
Employer:No
Employee:No
Own Account:Yes
Works at:Woolen Mill
Weeks Employed:52
Hours/Week:60
Earnings:800
Life Insurance:1000
Can Read:yes
Can Write:yes
Language:E
Family Number:63
Neighbors:View others on page
Household Members:NameAgeAndrew Dunlop54Agnes Dunlop53Ethel Dunlop27Olga Dunlop16Delsie Dunlop16Rufuta Dunlop11
Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
April 19, 2019  · 




It’s Photo Friday! In 1952 the Elders of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church posed for a group photo.
Back Row: Poynter, S. Cavers, H. McRae, T. MacCracken, H. Lowry,
L. Paul, W. Armour, N. Featherston.
Front Row: P. Dunlop, A. Arbuckle, Dr. L. Sheine, G. Allan, E. Cram, (not present W. Campbell) Nov. 1952″.
Photo by “Ernie Foote Photographer Box 589 Carleton Place”.

Miss Christena Dunlop –Teacher Church Street School

Fred Dunlop 100 years old

The Band was Amazing but the Coke Driver Let Jack Hastie Down CPHS 1951- Delmar Dunlop

The John Dunlop Burial Site Almonte

The Memories of Dunlop Hill

Sometimes When You Least Expect it– The Dunlop Issue

The Dunlop House — Saturday is the End of an Era in Carleton Place

Remember When? Jamiesons — Now and Then-Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 5

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Remember When? Jamiesons — Now and Then-Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 5
Please PLAY while you are viewing photos

Vintage Photos of the Gals — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 4

Heilans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop – Part 3

The White Pines of Carleton Place — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 1

Did you Know About the Caldwell First Nation?

Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 2

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Vintage Photos of the Gals — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 4

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Vintage Photos of the Gals — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 4

This is Dorothy (née Jamieson) and Warren Dunlop’s wedding in 1943 or 1944.I don’t have all the people identified, but from L-R back row looking at the picture:Minnie Dunlop, Teddy Jamieson, Unidentified, Marion (née Hamilton) Jamieson, Dorothy (née Jamieson) Dunlop, Jean Jamieson, unidentified, Eleanor Jamieson, Bella (née Thompson) Jamieson (the matriarch and all the Jamieson girls’ mother.Jake Caldwell thanks!

Nancy Jamieson — My aunt Dots wedding … so all my Jamieson aunts and my Granny Jamieson. And my mum is 4 in from the left – Marion nee Hamilton …

Doug Caldwell
Doug Caldwell

October 30, 2020 Carleton Pla

Heilans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop – Part 3

The White Pines of Carleton Place — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 1

Did you Know About the Caldwell First Nation?

Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 2

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Heilans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop – Part 3

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Heilans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop  – Part 3

Caldwell Jaimeson Dunlop Family Reunion–The Gastro Pub– Carleton Place October 30 2021

Photo of the day–Found this amazing picture while digging through a box of stuff left by the previous owners… Fairly certain this is Bess Caldwell, circa 1900-1905, ripping around the lawn of Goth Manor on her goat cart. from Northern Gothic in Lanark https://www.instagram.com/northerngothic/ – read-Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans” –read-Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”
Miss Caldwell – Public Archives photo

Built in 1865 by the Caldwell family— (read more here More Tidbits About Lanark Village) and now known as “the Hielans,” this great house is a treasure of the Ottawa Valley, situated in the heart of the village of Lanark on the Clyde river”–read-Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

Did you Know About the Caldwell First Nation?

Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 2

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Sandy Caldwell King of the River Boys

More Tidbits About Lanark Village

The Tale of the Transplanted Higlanders

The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 2

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The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 2
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Jun 1899, Mon  •  Page 5

Read the Clipping above….

Where was the first Darou Bakery? Was it on Bell or Mill Street?

Second location

Photo from Doug Caldwell

So Doug showed me this photo on Saturday and said he had no idea where the second bakery was.. It didn’t take me long to figure it out.

Darou’s second bakery was in the Capital Optical building on Bridge Street which later became Woodcock’s Bakery. One of the senior Jamieson’s confirmed it with : Darou’s was in that building before Woodcocks!

Third location

On the corner of Emily and Bridge Street- read- What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Oct 1928, Fri  •  Page 9
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
31 Oct 1933, Tue  •  Page 21

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Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

The White Pines of Carleton Place — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 1

Woodcocks Bakery

Christena McEwen– The Belle of Beckwith Part 1 -“The Woodcocks”

Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery

Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery



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The White Pines of Carleton Place — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 1

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The White Pines of Carleton Place — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 1

At the end of the Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion Doug Caldwell gave us all an Eastern White Pine to plant and wanted to see Carleton Place full of white pines. It’s also the provincial tree of Eastern Ontario. Something you did not know about Doug… He decided to take a forestry course as a young man and after he graduated he realized that it might not be the future for him, so he went into business.

Did you know that in colonial times, these tall trees were used to make masts for the British Royal Navy ships? Lumbering was the first industry in the Ottawa Valley where white pine trees were cut and sent down river to sawmills built along the Mississippi River at the village site. ( H Caldwell & Sons, Carleton Place, were prominent dealing in white pine planks)

Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

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Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

Last week I wrote about Minnie Dunlop who used to run Darou’s Bakery on the corner of Emily and Bridge Street in Carleton Place. If you had no idea like I and some of the family did: Minnie not only baked her heart out, and ran that part of town like she was in charge, but she was also married to a former mayor from Carleton Place, Andrew Earl Dunlop.

Today, one of the family, Doug Caldwell called me and we had a lovely chat about the town of Carleton Place. He remembers the pool hall really wasn’t the place and Minnie often hauled her son Murray home by the ear after rescuing them from the evils of pool-playing. Oh the horrors! She was a no nonsense woman who believed in the theory that sliced bread was here to stay and purchased one of the first bread sliceing machines to stay ahead of the competition. Doug remembers her telling him to grab a stool and show Carleton Place how its done slicing the bread. He said he was pretty proud doing that job.

Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum- read-In Memory of Mike Moldowan — The Man Behind the Fries

But Doug not only helped Murray, he helped Mike Muldowan at the chip wagon and when he got there early in the morning Mike would give him a large pail of potatoes to peel. I asked him if he ate his weight in chips for payment. He said, “You know I would have, but I remember getting silver coins, Mike never paid in paper!”

His mother Edna Florence Caldwell, was a hairdresser on Bridge Street and his grandmother, Mrs. Jamieson played the organ at St. James Anglican Church, and his two aunts sang in the choir. He also remembers the horse stables in the back of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church. The farmers came to church with their teams and sleighs and it was quite the sight as they parked. When they left they had to unharness everything and regroup, and mumbled and grumbled. But that was not the only place they mumbled in grumbled at St. Andrew’s. In the days that Captain Hooper’s house Raloo Cottage was going to be torn down the citizens of Carleton Place were not happy. Not happy at all! So I asked him,”Did they protest?” He said they protested the way they always did– complaining in front of the churches on Sunday!”

Photo from Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum–Around 1950 the southeast corner of Lake Avenue and Moore Streets looked like this. Originally the site of W.A. Nichols’ Sons Lumber, it became W & S Building Supplies around 1948

He also remembers every year the gypsies–(2021 word Romani) and would set up shop on the corner of Lake and Beckwith near where Nichols Planing Mill was. He said it was quite the event as in those days the stream behind it was quite larger than it is today.

So they mumbled and grumbled about the Levine building across the street, and they muttered about the new Fleming Funeral Parlour opening up on Lake Ave West. Because, that’s the way things were done. His grandfather, Will Jaimeson was a CPR railroad man and he did the Ottawa Brockville run which was a very prestigious run in those days.

Doug remembers being put on top of one of the L carts and having his Grandfather perform a steam show so to speak. His grandfather would holler to start shovelling the coal really fast and once the steam would get up to speed it was a sight to see. So he ran the smaller wheels and then the bigger wheels to show his grandson how much power that Locomotive had. Meanwhile the coal man wasn’t too happy and he would tell young Doug that his grandfather was showing off just because he showed up.

This morning I had a ZOOM chat with Doug Caldwell, as the family reunion is coming up October 30, 2021 at the Gastro Pub in Carleton Place. He told me about the continual arguments he used to have with ‘Jimmy Edwards’ at Edwards Grocery when he went to go pick up a ‘knob of tobacco’ for his uncle on the corner of Coleman and Franktown Road. He was allowed a treat so he wanted to make sure he got the most bang for his money. In those days Jimmy Edwards bagged the candy and they were all in small paper bags. At each purchase Doug would argue with Jimmy saying he was getting cheated as he was not getting a full handful. Doug at the age of 5 would argue up and down but it was always the same result. Jimmy Edwards held the upper hand with those paper bags full of candy. So Doug at age 5 would leave the store muttering, hauling his little wagon down the street on his way to deliver that ‘knob of tobacco’ to his uncle. One day that tobacco got the best of him and he chewed off the corner of that tobacco wanting to see what it tasted like. Well you and I probably have a good idea what it tasted like, and he said he felt like he was poisoned. Worse that that he had to tell his uncle how he lost the corner of that tobacco.

In the end everyone moved away after the war so the family could seek better fortunes, and on October 30th, 2021, the families are all reuniting once again at the Gastro Pub in Carleton Place for a salute to the “Jamieson Daughters”. It’s time for the family to reunite, celebrate and time for the younger generations to know their history. Family reunions are the place where you remember where you came from.

Thanks Doug for the stories!!

Shane Wm EdwardsNever heard anyone call my grandfather “Jimmy”. But in a “Remember When” column in the Canadian by S.C. Ribe in the late 40s, I read a reference to a “Jimmy Edwards” who had taken pictures of some Doukhobours at the train station. Having a copy of that picture I finally made the connection. read-How Many Women Does it Take to Replace a Team of Horses?The Doukhobors

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

– photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum at the Caldwell Jaimeson Dunlop Reunion.

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

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What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
31 Oct 1933, Tue  •  Page 21

I write about community and the history these folks gave us. Sometimes great little stories pop up while you are researching. I was doing a typical geneaology page for the Darou’s and Dunlops who had Darou’s Bakery on Bridge Street in Carleton Place when I came up with Minnie the Hooker’s story. Everyone needs to be remembered so now Minnie is with great joy and happiness.

Where was Darou’s?

Ray PaquetteBeginning at the bottom of Bridge Street in Carleton Place, on the west side: the Texaco station, the Salvation Army Citadel, Levines, Hick’s Grocery, Charlie Jay Shoe Repair, Mae Mulvey’s Candy Shop. Central Grill, Galvin’s Men’s Wear, Carleton Grill ( and the Colonial Bus Lines stop), the Roxy Theatre, Harold Dowdall’s Barbersop, Denny Coyles Esso, Ned Root’s Shoe Repair, Stanzel’s Taxi, Dr. McDowell, Darou’s Bakery. Doucette Insurance, McAllister’s Bike Repair, Oona’s Applicances/Bob Flint TV, Hastie Bros Plumbing, Bruce McDonald Optometrist, Foote Photography, the public restrooms, the Queens Hotel, Woodcock’s Bakery, Lewis Reg’d Ladies Wear, Okilman’s, and Patterson’s Furniture. I probably forgot a business but I’m sure other readers can “fill in the blanks” or take exception to some of the names on the list. More to come when I crossover to the East side of bridge…

BAKERS.
BOWLAND, R. H., Bell street.
DAROU, MRS. A., Bridge street.
JENKINS, W., High street.
SWAN, JOHN, Bridge street.-Carleton Place 1903 Business Directory –Names Names Names

34 Bridge Street Carleton Place The Little Red Brick House
This brick building was built circa 1900 and was the home of Thomas Stevenson and his half sister, Miss Brisland. They took up residence in the early 1930s and first operated the little store next door later known the Central Candy Store, but it was called Thomas Stevenson Grocery. When they extended the store to make living quarters, they sold the little red brick house.
Prior to Mr. Stevenson living here one of the Burgess’s and *John Darou lived here. The parents of Jack the Kidd and *Velma Bryce, Mr. and Mrs. Bracewell, lived in this building as well as Alex and Viola Watson and Mrs. McEwan.
116 Bridge Street  Circa 1870
116 Bridge Street was the home of the Darou’s bakery for approximately sixteen years. Darou’s bakery was later operated by Minnie who was the daughter of the Darou’s and Earl Dunlop. It was under the ownership of the Dunlop’s up until 1957 when Nat Nelson purchased the building and operated a delicatessen with his wife bought the building. The Bridge Street store used to be the home base for Nate’s Delicatessen, which was run by Nelson’s parents. Paul took over when his dad died and operated a photography shop. Paul Nelson cherished, long time member of the Carleton Place Community, passed away Monday, February 28, 2011.
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Aug 1922, Fri  •  Page 6

Who was Minnie the Hooker?

By Garry Bouey Citizen staff writer

Nobody can accuse Minnie Dunlop of misspending her youth. Sure, she shoots pool a couple of times a week and may go dancing once or twice or play bingo. But after all, Minnie is almost 82 and times have changed. Minnie, who lives in a senior citizens’ high rise on MacLaren Street, looks quite comfortable with a pool cue in her hand. “C’mon baby, c’mon baby,” she says, urging the brown ball to its intended destination. “They call me Minnie the Hooker,” she says, and quickly adds an explanation: in snooker, you “hook” your opponents by leaving them without a shot. Not every ball makes it, of course. Snooker is a demanding game and Minnie didn’t take it up until last fall. “My oldest son is 53,” says Minnie, “and when he found out he said ‘Mother, don’t tell me. I never thought I’d live to see the day you’d be playing pool’.

The Dunlops operated Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place until 1953 and lived across the street from a pool hall. If you read below her husband was also the mayor of Carleton Place at one point. ( Read-Tales From McCann’s Pool Room – Rob Probert) Minnie remembers hauling her sons home by the ear after rescuing them from the evils of pool-playing. Now she shoots in a seven-team house league and enjoys it immensely. “I like anything where there’s competition,” she says. “I bowled until this winter but it got too cold to go out. With pool, I can play right in the building.” With partner John Beaulieu, Minnie leads the other six mixed teams in the league, organized . by fellow-resident Maurice Trudeau, Ottawa’s senior citizen snooker champ last year. Next year, Trudeau hopes his league can play off with representatives from other seniors’ buildings. No doubt Minnie will be there.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada29 Mar 1979, Thu  •  Page 1

Jamie DunlopThere were stories about how my dad and brothers and sister worked in the bakery when they were growing up. They delivered bread by horse and cart when they were kids. It was quite a shock to see Minnie on Facebook playing pool. I have the Citizen picture and article from when it came out in the 80s(?). She was no shrinking violet for sure. Thanks for the interest.

Minnie the Hooker’s Husband CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Sep 1960, Mon  •  Page 12

Family

John A Darou 1905 Lanark Village

Diane JudgeMy Mom’s parents were Ida and Charles Darou, owned the dairy in Lanark, my grandmother Ida would order meat & food from there, and they delivered to the Darou home , next to the machine shop, which they owned as well.– read John A Darou 1905 Lanark Village

Upper George Street, Lanark, shop of John P. Leslie, wagon maker. The shop did buggy repairs, general, built new wheels, etc. and was also an agency for the machinery shown in front. Mr. and Mrs. Leslie lived above the shop at the time. Next is the home of James Darou and next the Labelle home–.

Janet LockyerI remember some Darou’s of Lanark, in the late 1960s, dad build a cottage on the Clyde river, near the bridge dump. Jim Darou and sons had a cottage down at the point and Jim and my dad sure managed to get into some fun situations.. Thanks for giving me these memories back, had a chuckle remembering. There was one time that my dad, from the city, went off with Jim Darou to get corn for a corn roast. Jim been the leader of this expeditation, said why pay for corn, he knew where they could get it for nothing. Off they go, hours later they return, muddy, dad pants were torn up and they are laughing away. Jim took dad to a farmer’s field, surrounded by barber wire of course. They climbed the wire got lots of “free” corn. We boiled it up, smothered it with butter and salt and nearly broke our teeth trying to eat it. Dad and Jim just laughed and laughed watching us trying to eat COW corn. There really is a difference between the corn, one for humans and one for cows.

Paul MilotteI remember it being called the Cow bridge as well. If memory serves me right it was used to let Cows cross the river as part of the old Plant farm. It was a huge dairy farm back in the day and the Darou family dairy business bought milk from them. The main building of the Plant farm is the old Caldwell mansion that is now a bead and breakfast. Anybody remember the Red barn behind the main house? I think the same family converted the the old mansion into a nursing home after the farming operation had stopped.-Primitive Bridges –Where was this Bridge?

staff at Darou’s-
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Mar 1939, Thu  •  Page 21

Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery

Cake By the Mississippi — The Bowland Bakery

Lorne Hart– The Old Towne Bakery — A Recipe is Just a Recipe

Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Bill Jenkins- Riverman and Wedding Cake Maker?

Remembering the Smells of Heaven on Earth —Davidson’s Bakery

Twenty Five Cents a  Plate at Mrs. Laurie’s Bakery and Confectionery

What do McLean’s Bakery and Morris Green Have in Common?

Aitkenhead Bakery Ottawa, OntarioBefore there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Fred Dunlop 100 years old

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Fred Dunlop 100 years old
Fred Dunlop and daughter Joanne Rajguru at Union Hall Almonte with his 1941 airforce photo 

Rose Mary Sarsfield Happy birthday Fred! This is the photo of the veterans from Union Hall. Fred is one of them along with his brother Nelson and sister Edna.

Joanne Rajguru sent this to me this week. Monday, June 15th is her Dad's 100th birthday. Really it is the summer of his 100th.
Sanjay with dad
Things you might not Know about Fred

Fred Dunlop still lives on Townline Rd E Carleton Place in his own home. 

He was born on Wolfe Grove Road Almonte June 15 1920

He is the 9th of 10 children 

Parents were descendants of Scottish presbyterians –William Dunlop & Annie McKay [Middleville]

He did farm labour as a teen for George Robertson and Neil McIntosh

He also spent 2 summers out west harvesting grain 

He later worked  CP Bates & Innes Woolen Mill 13 hr shifts making blankets

He worked at a Canadian Locomotive Company operating a lath

Joined Air Force in 1941, stationed in Moncton  4 years Technician for Aircraft Navigational equipment

After war jobs included:

Watch maker in Pembroke

Machinist in Renfrew

Instrument Technician in Ottawa 

Married Dorothy Smyth in Nov 1953,  built a house himself on Veteran’s Land Act  1/4 acre, Ottawa 

He built and sold two cottages  Rideau Lake, Perth & house in Ottawa

He also supervised construction of house for his Sister Alice McIntosh of Almonte

He worked many years for Computing Devices, Bells Corners while they raised a family  2 daughters and 2 sons –(Joanne,Debbie,John & Scott)

Grandchildren living in many places include Mrs.Kate Wilson in Vancouver,  Dylan Rajguru Victoria,  Darcy Rajguru Toronto, Mrs. Rebekah Depler Kansas ,  Adam Rajguru Montreal,   Anisha Rajguru of Bali Indonesia,  Shannon Alexander & Jessica Galloway,  Ottawa, and John & Katrina Dunlop in CP.

Fred is the last living of all his siblings!  

Some of Fred’s Nieces and nephews include Brian Drummond, Allan McIntosh,  Carol  Berger, Dolly Tashock , Howard  Dunlop of Almonte area , Barry Drummond of Winchester.  Wayne Drummond of Belmont, Donald Cooper  & HELEN JOHNSTON of Carp..,  Steve Drummond of Innisville–

Clayton Ontario History

Posted by R. S. Dunlop: My father, Fred Dunlop, who was born in Union Hall and now lives in Carleton Place. He was out today pruning the row of trees at the back of his yard–

One of my favourite photos May 11 , 2016.. with a 50 year promise made to the Dunlop family. A moment I will never forget in my lifetime. Fred is standing beside his son Scott holding the ribbon on the left in the brown jacket

Happy 100th Birthday: 100 Years Loved, Say Happy Birthday and Show ...
Did you know Fred? If you did can you comment with some memories? Thank you.

Real Arsenault

Image may contain: 1 person, text that says 'Alexander Tsang 5h Happy birthday. On behalf of Edmonton. United Services Institute and Edmonton Salutes Committee, Thank you for your services. 1'


Wayne Drummond My Uncle Fred. Great sense of Humour

Theresa Morin Don’t know Fred, but, Happy 💯th birthday to you!!

Dawn Jones Happy happy birthday!!!

Thelma Dowdall Happy Birthday Fred

Heather Moat Hi Fred; Happy Birthday great man was Mr Dunlop’s homemaker for some time,enjoyed his company! All the best

Barbara James Richardson Happy Birthday to Fred

Maureen Evans Happy a Birthday Fred!

Joanne Rajguru IF ANYONE WOULD LIKE TO MAIL OR DROP A CARD TO DAD for his 100TH BIRTHDAY … PLS MSG ME FOR ADDRESS. HE LIVES IN CP BUT IS VERY ISOLATED. THANK YOU. Joanne Rajguru🥳 

Sandra James Angell Happy 100th Birthday Fred !

John Morrow Fred Dunlop is my grand-uncle, the youngest brother (and second youngest sibling) of my maternal grandmother Effie Ann Robertson, née Dunlop, formerly Cooper. He is the second of the family to reach his 100th birthday, his brother Norman achieving that milestone on January 11, 2008, and dying December 27, 2010, 15 days short of his103rd birthday I was able tp arrange an honorary membership for Uncle Norman in the Dunlop Clan Society based in the United States, but was unable to make a similar connection for Uncle Fred.

Stuart McIntosh I worked with and for Norman in the sixties…nice hardworking man. His sister, Alice was married to Neil McIntosh; again a wonderful hardworking person who donated incredible energy towards church, community and family – especially the McIntosh Clan of which her son is Chieftain. I recall Norman cutting wood at Alice’s during sugar making… very proud to have known them both.

Carol McDonald Des and Jean Moore , my parents knew him.wishing Mr Dunlop a Very Happy Birthday, hope he enjoys a very special time!
Shelley Munro
 Happy birthday Fred!

Susan White Happy Birthday to you Fred, and many more! 

Louise Miles Yes i know Fred through is son John. My dad, Tex Morris knew him too. Happy birthday Fred🎂🥂. Can we say, many more.???

Real Arsenault—From soldier to soldier, have a safe birthday on your 100th survival year, Fred.
Thank you for your years of service.

Linda Nilson-Rogers Thank you Fred! Happy Birthday!

Mike Jones Happy birthday sir

David Coot-

David Coot —Happy Birthday Uncle Fred. Wishing you a great day. As we were not in touch much, I am your sister Effie’s second youngest son. It’s a great milestone to reach the age that you’re at.

Stuart McIntosh Would this be the same Fred Dunlop with the sunglasses in this pic(taken on grain excursion) standing with Bill McIntosh? Clayton Ontario History
Clayton Ontario HistoryStuart McIntosh Both men were working on the Steele family farm on the 8th line of Ramsay when they decided to head west for the harvest.
from Whispering in the Past ( History and Tales of Clayton, Ontario Rose Mary Sarsfield-available at Clayton Store, Millstreet Books in Almonte and from rose@sarsfield.ca
from Whispering in the Past ( History and Tales of Clayton, Ontario Rose Mary Sarsfield-available at Clayton Store, Millstreet Books in Almonte and from rose@sarsfield.ca
from Whispering in the Past ( History and Tales of Clayton, Ontario Rose Mary Sarsfield)–available at Clayton Store, Millstreet Books in Almonte and from rose@sarsfield.ca

Hi Linda,As I posted on the site, Fred is my 2nd cousin, 3x removed. I found out about a month or so ago that I had a set of 5G grandparents that had settled in Lanark Co in 1821, they (Andrew Smith 1778-1845 & Margaret Smith 1786-1871) came over on the George Canning and according to the published history I’ve received they settled on Lot 10, Con 5, Ramsay Twp, Lanark Co).Their daughter, Jane Smith (1805-1889) married Alexander Stevenson (1805-1888). Their oldest daughter, Margaret (1830-1897) is my GGG grandmother. Her sister, Euphemia (1842-1928) married John Liddle Dunlop (1837-1914) and they are Fred Dunlop’s grandparents through his father, William Dunlop (1873-1957) and mother, Anne Alice McKay (1878-1953).I’ve joined the Lanark Co Genealogical Society where I met Fred’s nephew, Don Cooper and his wife, Fran.All the best,Patrick LengyelWinnipeg Canadajwplengyel@shaw.caPS – Margaret married Thomas McFarlane and homesteaded in Mayborough, ON, then East Wawanosh, ON (Huron Co) and a third and final homestead in Carberry, MB (which I am going to visit in 2 days for the first time). Their oldest daughter married my great-great grandfather, John McDonald, in 1878 in East Wawanosh, they moved west with her parents to Carberry and then north to Dauphin in 1894 to their own homestead. From there the trail goes to Prince Alberta, SK and then Flin Flon, MB, where I was born in 1964 to one of their descendants.

Thanks to the town of Carleton Place for this wonderful citation.

The Band was Amazing but the Coke Driver Let Jack Hastie Down CPHS 1951- Delmar Dunlop

The John Dunlop Burial Site Almonte

The Memories of Dunlop Hill

The Dunlop House — Saturday is the End of an Era in Carleton Place

A Fond Farewell to Clayton Kenny in 2016

The Name Game —The Dunlops and the North Industrial Park

The Day the Cheque Company Bounced in Carleton Place

Update on The Dunlop- Industrial Park Issue

Sometimes When You Least Expect it– The Dunlop Issue

Come Join us TODAY– Celebrating a 52 year old Promise Finally Being Kept

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Today–May 7th 10 am

The dedication for the new Dunlop Business Park will be at the existing Industrial Business park sign on the corner of Townline where The Brick was once situated. It will be a combination dedication for both the Dunlop and Walsh Business Parks. It will take place today Saturday May 7th. Dunlop Park at 10:00am and Walsh Park immediately following.
angelo1
Eva Dunlop 1900 and the Adam Dunlop house

When I first walked into the Dunlop home last year with Jennifer Fenwick Irwin from our museum I felt an immediate great sense of responsibility for its legacy and the family that lived there for generations.

Leaving a legacy means leaving behind something that people will remember you by. A family tree such as the Dunlop/Kennys and the Walsh’s is more than just names and places. These ancestors were real people with vibrant lives of their own

I care passionately about history, and our Lanark County ancestors have made an impact on me. Ask yourself– Whose life do you want to positively impact today?  Stay focused on making a difference to others.  People who have been supported and moved by you are the ones who will carry on your legacy.

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What you leave behind is not what is engraved on stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others. As family genealogists we don’t want to face the fate of the dinosaurs. We are a vibrant breed and we need to share our love for family history with the next generation.

angelo2

Without a sense of caring, there can be no sense of community, and this gesture by the town of Carleton Place has provided so much goodwill to our community. As Ralph Waldo Emerson once said:” Every book is a quotation; and every house is a quotation out of all forests, and mines, and stone quarries; and every man is a quotation from all his ancestors. 

Thank you also goes to Jerry Flynn, Volundur Wally Thorbjornsson and Brian Doucett

Carleton Place- I am so proud of you today – Thank you.

Elaine Drummond-So very proud to say, Walsh park is being named after my grandparents, Keith & Barbara Walsh . They both influenced my life in so many ways, as I was privileged enough to grow up living right across the road from them…

angelo

 

Tomorrow would have been Angelo’s 66th birthday— We miss you. Thank you for always believing in Carleton Place.

 

Come Join us– Celebrating a 52 year old Promise Finally Being Kept