Tag Archives: Drowning

Remembering Stephen Yanor John Forrest Lanark 1962

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Remembering  Stephen Yanor John Forrest Lanark 1962

Hi, I regularly enjoy your bits of local history. I recently recalled a tragic accident that happened on McIlquham’s bridge on the Ferguson Falls road by where Mal’s Camping is. A boy fishing on the bridge was struck and killed by a truck. I think it was likely the summer of 1962. I think his name was David Yaner(spelling might be wrong). Anyway I was thinking that remembering what happened to him(accurately) might be appropriate.

Mike Closs

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Jun 1962, Tue  •  Page 24

Approximately one mile downsteam from Bridge #1 is McIlquham’s Bridge #2. There was a ferry in the early days or some other method of crossing as the settlers and pioneers would have to cross the river at this point when travelling between New Lanark and Carleton Place.

“Naked and Afraid” in Lanark County –McIlquham’s Bridge #2

Down at Old McIlquham’s Bridge

Another Story- When your Number is Up — Hubert Horton

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Another Story- When your Number is Up — Hubert Horton

What would happen, though, if the ambiguity surrounding our own demise were taken away? What if we all suddenly were told the exact date and means of our deaths? While this is, of course, impossible, careful consideration of this hypothetical scenario can shed light on our motivations as individuals and societies – and hint at how to best spend our limited time on this Earth.

This is the second story I have found that someone almost died and then a few years later they passed away. The first story happened in Carleton Place.. read-A Carleton Place Tale to Send Shivers Up Your Arm — The Sad Tale of Margaret Violet King

Once again , they need to be remembered……

Almonte-May 4,1928

A remarkable escape from drowning was the experience on Sunday afternoon of little Hubert Horton, aged two years and eight months, son of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Horton.

Playing with his sister Mary, three and a half years of age, on the bank of the river on the Island opposite the home of his grandfather, M r. Thomas Proctor, little Hubert slipped off a rock into the swollen waters of the Mississippi.

His sister tried to pull him out but she could not reach him and she ran sobbing to tell her parents of the accident.This all took time as she passed by her paternal grandfather’s home, the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Albert W. Horton, the child’s cries attracted their attention, and Albert Junior, the young man who has become well known as the goaltender of the Almonte Hockey Club, managed, between the sobs of the youngster, to grasp the story that his little nephew had fallen into the river.

Albert rushed to the spot and saw Hubert’s hat floating above the water about thIrty-five feet from the shore. He is a strong swimmer and throwing off his coat and boots he dived into the water and soon reached the child.

Meanwhile Dr. A. A. Metcalfe, the nearest physician, had been summoned and as he reached the place Albert Horton had just succeeded in landing the drowning boy. The latter had been about fifteen minutes In the water. The child was taken into his grandfather’s home, but it was two hours before he was brought back to consciousness. 

It was Monday night before he was able to be tak en to his own home. He is now thoroughly recovered. Undoubtedly what saved the little boy’s life was that he was wearing a heavy winter coat, which acted like an air bladder for a time. Fortunately the long rubber boots which he wore, were kicked off in his struggles, or they would no doubt have weighed him down.

 It is curious that his father, Kenneth Horton, had a somewhat similar escape from drowning when he was a child. He was rescued from the river by Mr. Newton. The rescue on Sunday afternoon by Albert H Horton was a particularly fine bit of work! At this season of the year the waters of the river are treacherous and cold and he was severely handicapped with his clothes.

So what happened to young Hubert Horton? He passed away 4 years later from extensive burns from a fire.

Hubert James Horton

BIRTH25 Aug 1925Almonte, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
DEATH11 Sep 1932 (aged 7)Almonte, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
BURIALSaint Marys Roman Catholic CemeteryAlmonte, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
PLOTB084 Grave #1
MEMORIAL ID201158942 · View Source

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HORTON, Edward Arthur (Ted) – In hospital, Ottawa, Ontario on Monday, August 24, 1987, Edward Arthur (Ted) Horton, in his 57th year. Dear son of Marguerite (Mrs. Kenneth Horton), Almonte and the late Kenneth Horton. Beloved husband of Margaret Taylor McEwan. Dear father of Mary (Mrs. David Solowjew), Carleton Place; John and his wife Sue, Ottawa; Michael and his wife Linda, Peterborough; Laureen Morrow, Kanata; Maureen (Mrs. Tim Neil), Carleton Place; Daniel and his wife Bev., Pakenham; Christopher and his wife Brenda, Nepean and Shawn of Kanata. Dear grandfather of 15 grandchildren. Dear brother of Mary (Mrs. Ben Kennedy), RR 2, Carp; Rita (Mrs. Eric Julian), Almonte; Elva (Mrs. Robert Aitkenhead), Carleton Place; Carol (Mrs. Gerald Poag) and Marilyn (Mrs. Douglas Ryan), both of Almonte. One sister-in-law Doreen (Mrs. Warren Horton), Almonte. Predeceased by two brothers Hubert and Warren. Friends may call at the Kerry Funeral Home, 154 Elgin Street, Almonte for visiting on Tuesday from 7-9 p.m. and Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Thence to St Mary’s Church for Funeral Mass on Thursday at 10 a.m. Interment St Mary’s Cemetery, Almonte. As expressions of sympathy, donations may be made to the Heart Institute, c/o Dr. W. J. Keon, Ottawa Civic Hospital, 1053 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario KIY 4E9 or the Ottawa-Carleton Public Health Unit, 495 Richmond Rd, Ottawa, Ontario K2A 4A4. Royal Canadian Legion Branch No 250, Almonte service on Wednesday evening at 7:30 p.m. in the Funeral Home.

Related reading

Believe it or Not– William Dedrick of Perth

A Carleton Place Tale to Send Shivers Up Your Arm — The Sad Tale of Margaret Violet King

Carleton Place Was Once Featured in Ripley’s Believe it or Not! Our Haunted Heritage

How Did John Nolan Die? Believe it or not……

Believe it or Not? More Strange Canadian Stories

David Warren — Bates & Innes Accident — Warren Family

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David Warren — Bates & Innes Accident — Warren Family

Everyone needs to be documented.. everyone..

A sad accident occurred on Saturday afternoon when little David Warren, son of Mr. and William Warren, met death in the Mississippi river at the Bates & Innes bridge. The boy had secured permission to attend the Star theatre and was returning from there at about five o’clock, accompanied by a playmate Jackie Harper, when the fatal accident occurred. The boys when last seen before the accident were playing with a  kitten on the lawn before the Bates & Innis mill.

According to the story of Jackie Harper the boys, when passing over the bridge became interested in the water plunging over the stop-log at the edge of the bridge. Boy like, they scrambled into the railing and watched the water take the drop. Intensely interested David leaned over the edge of the railing just a little too far and losing his balance fell into the seething waters.

Jackie, alarmed at seeing his comrades’ predicament ran to Mr. Alexander McDiarmid’s for help which was immediately secured but not before the lad was drowned. The body was recovered in less than fifteen minutes.

David George was the second son of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Warren. Mr. Warren, who is a traveller for the Mount Forest Carriage Co. was at the time of the accident at the firm’s headquarters in Mount  Forest. He received word of the death at 6.30 and by 6.45 was motoring to  Toronto where he took the train arriving here early Sunday morning.

Also read-Clippings of the Robertson Warren Family — Gail McDowell

The funeral was held on Monday afternoon from the home of the child’s parents to the 8th line cemetery, Ramsay. The services were conducted by Rov. Melvin Taylor, assisted by Rev. W. A. Dobson.

The pallbearers were playmates of the child: Jackie Harper, Clara Syme, Lester Kemp, Peter Donald, Lawrence Virtue and Harold Virtue, As the cortege passed the town hall school the pupils formed lines as a last tribute to their departed fellow pupil.

David, who was eight years and eight months old, was the second eldest of a family of five children, the remaining members of which are James, Jack. William and Isobel.

A large number of friends of both Mr. and Mrs. Warren from the surrounding district accompanied the body to the cemetery, and the flower expressions of sympathy were many.

 A large number of friends of both Mr and Mrs Warren from the surrounding district accompanied the body to the cemetery, and the floral expressions of sympathy were many. Wreaths were from Mr and Mrs Stanley McColloch, Tweed; B.Y. Williams and family, Jackie Harper, Mrs Harper and Mrs Jefferson. Sprays from the mother and father; Mr and Mrs W.H. Wood, Ottawa; Mr and Mrs Geo M. Warren; Mr and Mrs F.C. Donald, and Miss E. McLaren, from the little cousins Clara and Myrtle Syme and Helen Naismith, J.H. McFadden and family, Mr and Mrs J.R. Robertson and Miss Olive, and Kathleen Findlay, Cut flowers were received in profusion from Master Harold Lewis, Bert Kingston, Andrew and Russell Cochran, little Lulu and Iona Boale, Miss Edith Hughes, Mr and Mrs Greville Toshack, Mr and Mrs H.M. Snedden, Lena Saunders and little Jennie Saunders and other little school friends.

October 1923– Almonte Gazette

Also read-Clippings of the Robertson Warren Family — Gail McDowell

Picture of
dded by Gary J Byron

Name:David George Warren
Gender:M (Male)
Birth Date:1915
Birth Place:Carleton Place, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Death Date:29 Sep 1923
Death Place:Carleton Place, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Cemetery:Auld Kirk Cemetery
Burial or Cremation Place:Mississippi Mills, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Has Bio?:Y
Father:William James Warren
Mother:Isabella Cochran Warren

His father died 6 years later

1929, Friday January 11, The Almonte Gazette front page
Wm. J. Warren of Carleton Pl. Dead

Well known Sportsman Passes After Brief Illness of Pneumonia
William J. Warren died on Monday at his home in Carleton Place after being ill only a few days. He had been under the doctor’s care for some weeks but his case was not considered serious and a rapid recovery was looked forward to. However, a few days ago he caught a cold that is so prevalent and when he developed pneumonia his strength failed him and he gradually grew weaker until he passed away. He was the son of the late James and Mrs Warren and was born in Carleton Place in 1883. He was one of the best known sportsman in the Ottawa Valley and his keenest delight was in horse racing. During the Old Home Week in Carleton Place in 1924 he was placed in charge of horse racing and it was due to his untiring efforts and his keen wisdom and fairness that the event was such a huge success. He was a familiar figure in baseball and hockey and dearly loved both games. For any years he was a member of the executive of both these branches of sport and during all the years he was a member he never missed a meeting, unless unavoidably absent from town. For many years he was the representative for the Mount Forest Carriage Company and in the performance of his duties he travelled from coast to coast. Of a very jovial disposition he had a host of friends both at home and abroad and it has been said that he one of the best known and most popular travellers on the road. In politics he was an ardent supporter of the Liberal-Conservative party and he will be greatly missed the local councils. In religion he was a devout member of Memorial Park Church and was always active in church work. In the political sphere, in sports, in fraternal circles and in all things pertaining to the welfare of the town, his death had made a void that will be hard to fill. He leaves to mourn his widow, three sons and one daughter, a little boy was accidentally drowned in the Mississippi river a few years ago. Also surviving are on brother George M. of Carleton Place, one sister Mrs W.H. Woods of Ottawa. The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon. Rev J. Osrhout of Memorial Park Church conducted the funeral services at the home and the remains were placed in St. James’ Vault. Mrs Warren nee Isabel C. Snedden, is a daughter of Mrs D. E. Snedden, of Almonte.

His mother died 60 years later in 1983

Also read-Clippings of the Robertson Warren Family — Gail McDowell

983, Wednesday December 12, The Almonte Gazette page 6
Isobel Cochran Warren

One of Almonte’s oldest residents died recently at Fairview Manor at 100 years of age.
Isobel Cochran Warren (nee Snedden) was born on the eighth line of Ramsay township in 1883, and died Dec 12, 1983 after living all her life in this area. Mrs Warren was the daughter of David and Ellen Snedden, both of Ramsay township. She was educated at the Bennie’s Corners school and married William James Warren in 1911. The deceased was a member of the Zion Memorial United Church in Carleton Place. In the past, Mrs Warren represented the Canadian Legion ceremonies as a silver cross mother. A son and a daughter survive Mrs Warren. They are William H. Warren of Rexdale, Ontario and Isobel Robertson of Carleton Place. She is also survived by a sister, Mabel Syme of Almonte. Three children predeceased Mrs Warren, including a son, Sgt Observer James S. Warren who lost his life in the Second World War, and sons David George and John McCullouch. The long-time area resident was also predeceased by three sisters, Laura Snedden, Nell Naismith and Elizabeth Robertson, all of Almonte. She is survived by seven grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. The funeral service was held at the Allan R. Barker Funeral Home in Carleton Place on Dec 14 at 2 pm with Rev Wesley Mitchell officiating. Mrs Warren was buried in the Auld Kirk Cemetery near Almonte and pallbearers were D Kennedy, T. Barnett, D Robertson, G. Greer, K. Robertson and A. Marshall.

Genealogy Clippings Foy Almonte

Clippings of Earl Blakeley from Frank Blakeley

Clippings from Faye Campbell — Cathy Campbell 1978

Newspaper Clippings – Bittle McGlade Kane Stinson Kelley Family Genealogy — Nikki Bittle

Musings and Clippings About the McFadden’s

Ron W. Bates and J.A. Innes took over the woolen mill built by Archibald McArthur in 1871. Located on a man made island in the Mississippi River in Carleton Place, this 4 story stone mill had several owners before they purchased it in 1907. It was built of rubble wall construction – with exterior and interior walls of one foot thick limestone blocks with another foot of gravel between.  The turbine wheels are still visible today, mounted on free standing timbers outside the stone walls to prevent the end of the mill from being shaken and damaged. 

Our calendar features several well known Bates and Innes logos – they were famous for their “OV Brand”, (Ottawa Valley), “Pure Wool Underwear, Weight and Warmth for the Out-of-Doors Man”. 
It also advertises “Velvoknit – Distinguished for its Softness and Fineness”.

During World War One, the firm was busy meeting military needs for blankets, underwear, cloth and knitted puttees. They were the first mill in Canada to use flat-lock seams on heavy rib combinations.
During the Second World War, the mill ran night and day in all departments, providing military blankets, underwear, puttees and and a long run on a 40 ounce knitted duffle cloth, with water proofing treatment that was used in naval pea jackets. The wheeling yarn department turned out tens of thousands of pounds of yarn for the Canadian Red Cross to be hand knit by the women of Canada into warm socks, mitts and sweaters for the men overseas. 

Bates and Innes ceased operations in 1963, due, in part, to the introduction of synthetic fibres. The property is currently for sale and awaits a buyer with vision to restore and operate this historical building. 

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Remembering local Almonte Scouts — Jack Lyons and Harold McGrath

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Remembering local Almonte Scouts — Jack Lyons and Harold McGrath

Almonte Gazette May 1950

The Mississippi River once again exacted its grim toll, when two care-free boys, Jack Lyons age 15 and Harold McGrath, age 14 drowned in its icy waters about 4.30 p.m. on Saturday. Both were members of a Boy Scout patrol which had gone up the river to Andrews’ Point where they planned to spend the night. 

The purpose of the trip was to try tests for proficiency badges. In the group were Assistant Scoutmaster Peter Griffin; Patrol Leader, John Graham; Troop Leader, Donald Pink; Patrol Leader, Billy Ritchie, and Scouts Jerry Sinett, Lenis Davey, Jack Lyons and Harold McGrath. 

About 4.30, the boys entered an aluminum canoe and crossed the river up stream. They were soon lost to sight and there was no other boat at the camp a t the time. Both boys were thoroughly familiar with the river but when they did not return for supper at 7 p.m., concern was felt for their safety. A little later, John Graham returned to camp in a skiff with an outboard motor and he and Mr. Griffin set out to search the upper river. 

They found the empty canoe at the second inlet and realized that the boys were lost. O.P.C. Donald Osborne was notified by telephone at 9 p.m. and at 9.10 the fire siren sounded and 15 boats carrying some 50 men and boys started up river. The search went on all night and at 7.55, Sunday morning, the bodies were found a few feet apart and about 60 feet from shore about half a mile above camp. 

O.P.C. Scott of Perth was in charge of the dragging operations. On hand when the bodies were found was John Lyons, father of Jack Lyons and he assisted in the hardest task that he will probably ever have to do—that of helping to lift the lifeless body of his son into the boat. Harold McGrath, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thosnas McGrath, was 15 years of age. He joined the Scouts when they were re-formed in January, 1948. He passed the tenderfoot test in February, 1948 and received his second class badge in December, 1949. He also received his two years’ service star at the Scout birthday party in January, 1950. 

He was appointed second in command of the Eagle Patrol in October, 1949. Besides his parents, he is survived by two brothers, Harvey and Merville; two sisters, Dorothy and Ethel, all at home. John Francis (Jack) Lyons, son of Mr. and Mrs. John H. Lyons was 14 years of age. He joined the Scouts in the fall of 1949, passing his tenderfoot test in December. He also received his badges and certificates at the birthday party.

He is survived by his parents, two brothers, Patrick of Toronto and Bernard at home; five sisters, Joan, Doreen, Nora, Dora and Lorraine, all at home. Funerals Same Day Attended by large numbers o£ sorrowing friends and relatives, the funeral of John Francis Lyons was held from his late home on Water Street on Tuesday morning at 8.45 to St. Mary’s Church for Requiem High Mass at 9 -a.m. Rev. Canon J. Cunningham officiated.

Fifteen members of the First Almonte Scout Troop, under Scoutmaster A. E. Perfitt and Assistant Scoutmaster Peter Griffin, attended as a guard of honor. The pall-bearers were: Desmond Miller, Wilbert Barr, Bernard O’Neill, Claude Miron, Michael McAuliffe, Wm. Proctor, of Almonte, and Leo McIntyre and Edward Burns of Carleton Place

Interment was in St. Mary’s Cemetery. The funeral of William Harold McGrath was held on Tuesday afternoon at 2.30 p.m. from his parents’ home on Ottawa Street. Service was conducted at 2 p.m. by Rev. H. L. Morrison of Trinity United Church. The large attendance at the service and the lengthy cortege were evidence of the sympathy extended to the bereaved parents and family. The Boy Scouts and Grade VI pupils of the Public School marched in the procession. The pall-bearers were: Claude Miron, John Graham, Desmond Houston, Leo McIntyre, Wm. Proctor and Len Sonnenburg. Many Floral Tributes Among the floral tributes were wreaths from Teachers and pupils of Grade 6, Almonte Public School; Almonte Branch Canadian Legion, No. 240; Almonte Fire Brigade; 1st Almonte Boy Scout Troop; Producers Dairy, Local \o . 12, Almonte; International Operating Engineers, Local No. 869, Ottawa; Producers Dairy Limited and N. Carrie; U.T.W.A., Local No. 104, Almonte; Pupils, teachers and lionald Crawshaw of Almonte Public Schools; Employees of Thoburn Woollen Mills; Menders of Rosamond Woolen Mill, Trinity United Church and the Peterson Ice Cream Co. 

Among the many floral offerings received by the Lyons family were pieces from the Almonte Boy Scout Troop; Almonte Branch 240 Canadian Legion; Employees, I Almonte Public Utilities CommisI sion; Almonte Public Utilities Commission; Almonte Fire Brigade; the Menders, Rosamond Woolen Mill; Almonte Rosamond Memorial Hospital Medical Board; Nursing Staff, Rosamond Memorial Hospital; Employees Thoburn Woollen Mills; Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Brown and Employees of Strathbum Dairy; Producers Dairy Ltd.; Producers Dairy, Local 12, Almonte; Mr. Ernie Bigelow, Lines & Cables Accessories; Mr. A. S. Robb, Munderloh & Co., Ltd; Stedmans Store; The Women’s Card Club; Carleton Place. Chums 21; Carleton Place Chums 3; The Neighbours and the Peterson Ice Cream Co.

As so often happens in drowning accidents, the two boys were good swimmers but the icy water apparently was too much of a shock to them when they were thrown out of the canoe. When found the light aluminum craft was floating in an upright position. There is some difference of opinion, as to whether it would right itself if it had capsized. The fact that two pairs of rubber boots were in the canoe when it was found would lend credence to the theory that the craft didn’t turn over.

 It may be that one boy lost his balance and was thrown out and the other jumped in to save him. There were no witnesses to the accident and no one will ever know exactly what happened. Almonte Gazette May 1950

related reading

Joseph Wooldridge Phillip Low- Near Drowning 1963

HIGH SCHOOL CADETS RESCUE CHILD IN RIVER

Debbie Dixon and The CPR Bridge Incident in Carleton Place–Linda’s Mailbag

What Happened on the CPR Railway Bridge?

Remembering Robert George Wilson Glen Isle 1942

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Remembering Robert George Wilson Glen Isle 1942

On the 13 Jul 1942, Robert G. Wilson, 14-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Scott Wilson of the eighth line of Ramsay, was accidentally drowned today while wading in the Mississippi river at Glen Isle. With another teen-age companion, Robert Rivington, young Wilson, a poor swimmer, was wading in the river when he fell into an eight-foot hole in the river bottom.

Rivington, who (managed to reach shore, sounded the alarm and John Cram of Glen Isle and Elmer Reid went out in a boat. After a search Cram managed to recover the body, but by then it had been in the water about two hours. Dr. A. Downing, coroner of Carleton Place, ordered the removal of the body to the Combs funeral home, Almonte. His parents moved to the district 18 months ago from the West, where they had farmed.

Name:Robert George Wilson
Gender:Male
Age:14
Birth Date:1928
Birth Place:Watson Sask
Death Date:12 Jul 1942
Death Place:Ramsey, Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Father:William Scott Wilson
Mother:Thelma Caroline Wilson
Certificate Number:023360

1942, Thursday July 16, The Almonte Gazette, front page


Glen Isle Scene Of Sad Fatality Ramsay Boy Drowned While Swimming In Mississippi River


Robert G. Wilson, 14, son of Mr and Mrs W. Scott Wilson of the 8th line of Ramsay, was drowned Sunday afternoon while swimming in the bay at Glen Isle, about two miles from Carleton Place. The youth, accompanied by a neighbour, Robert Rivington, of approximately the same age, was wading into the river when he stepped into a hole and sank out of sight. The Wilson boy was a fair swimmer and it is thought he got excited when he suddenly found himself in deep water. He is said to have gone down three times.

The Rivington lad held his footing and got safely ashore. He immediately went for aid but it was some time before he found anyone. John Cram and Elmer Reid, both of Glen Isle, guided by Rivington, rowed to the spot where the Wilson boy went down but it was almost two hours before the body was recovered. Artificial respiration was applied but when Corner Albert Downing, Carleton Place, arrived he pronounced life extinct.

Robert Wilson was born in Watson, Sask., and moved here with the family some years ago. He was popular at the High School in Almonte where he was in attendance. He is survived by his parents and a brother and sister, Lennox and Kathleen. The funeral, which was largely attended took place Tuesday afternoon from the family home to the Auld Kirk Cemetery, with Rev W.J. Scott of Bethany United Church, Almonte conducting the service. Six young friends of deceased acted at pallbearers, namely, Billy Pierce, Jack Gilmour, Jerry Guthrie, Jimmy Metcalfe, Billy Naismith and Bobby Rivington. Among the floral offerings were pieces from the Almonte High School pupils and pupils of S.S. 6 & 7, Ramsay, and the U.F.W.O. The sympathy of the whole community goes out to the bereaved parents and the brother and sister.

Documenting History — Lawrence Timothy Madden

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Documenting History — Lawrence Timothy Madden

I document history good or bad, because every single person needs to be remembered.

July 22,1954

Lawrence Timothy Madden, son of Mrs. John Madden and the late Mr. Madden drowned in the Mississippi River, two miles above Almonte, about 5.45 Monday evening while bathing with his brother, Desmond, 22 years old, an employee of the Hydro Electric Power Commission of Ontario, who was home on vacation from Niagara Falls. 

The victim couldn’t swim at all and the older brother was such an indifferent swimmer that when he saw his brother slip into deep water ahd disappear, he felt it better to get help than to try to rescue him himself. He ran to the home of Jas. B. Turner whose farm borders the river and help was sought in Almonte by telephone. 

Mr. Don Berry whose father is caretaker of the town hall, heard the call that had -been sent the provincial police, detachment stationed here, and having a fast motor boat was able to get to the scene quicker than others who were forced to go around by road and drive through & long lane across fields to the river bank. Mr. Berry was able to locate the body lying face down in some ten feet of water. 

He brought it to shore and by this time Provincial Police Constable J. A. Ellis and others had arrived. Dr. O. H. Schulte had been called and the Provincial officer, the doctor assisted by others tried artificial respiration for some time but decided it was no use. 

The accident, which happened so simply, was a great shock to everyone -who knew the Madden family. The boys left home on the 12th line of Ramsay expecting to take a dip before supper and it is said when they did not return on time the mother had a premonition of evil. Dr. J. A. McEwen, Lanark County coroner of Carleton Place was called and decided that an inquest was unnecessary. 

The young man who met death so tragically had attended high school here until early in the Spring when he decided to stay at home and help his brother, Joe, with the farm work. He was a member of St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Church and of the Holy Name Society.

Deceased is survived by his mother, six brothers and three sisters, namely, Joseph on the farm; Desmond of Niagara Falls; Gerald, also with Hydro; Leo (his twin), Bernard and Raymond at home; and Misses Mary of Ottawa; Kay of Almonte and Dorothy at home. The father, John Madden, died ten years ago. The funeral was held on Thursday morning a t 10 o’clock from the family home in Ramsay Township to St. Mary’s Church, Almonte, for requiem mass. Interment was in St. Mary’s Cemetery.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Jul 1954, Thu  •  Page 7

When Lawrence Timothy Madden and his twin brother Leo Michael were born on August 3, 1936, in Ramsey, Ontario, their father, William, was 40, and their mother, Loretta, was 40. He had seven siblings. He died as a teenager on July 19, 1954, in Almonte, Ontario, and was buried there. His father William John passed away on December 24, 1943, in Almonte, Ontario, at the age of 48.

Remembering Britt Thurston

Remembering the Past — No Swimming in the River Before the 24th of May Weekend and Other Things

Remembering Art Smith — Clippings

Remembering Bob France

Remembering Rosy Robertson

Remembering Doris Blackburn

Remembering the Littlest Hobo

Remembering Carleton Place’s The Gibson Sisters

A Sad Tale from Sadler’s Creek -Emotional Content

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A Sad Tale from Sadler’s Creek -Emotional Content
Gordon Van Dusen jr age 6 drowns in Almonte pond Dec.19, 1952 -
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Dec 1952, Sat  •  Page 1

I try to have a buffer zone when it comes to tragedies. Usually 50 years. This happened 68 years ago and I am documenting this for history and genealogy sake.

But what was strange about this is someone from ancestry.ca sent this to me and asked me to document it. It was a sign and it is now recorded.

Looking for Information on the Native Fort Farm of Fred Sadler of Almonte

relatedreading

Down at Old McIlquham’s Bridge

Joseph Wooldridge Phillip Low- Near Drowning 1963

Dr.Cram and Dr. Scott Drowning 1907 –Cram Genealogy

Robert Drader Bill Shail Saved from Drowning May 28 1957

Tales from the Mississippi Rapids

A Carleton Place Tale to Send Shivers Up Your Arm — The Sad Tale of Margaret Violet King

Spring 1909 Pakenham — James Lunny William David Story

Stories of the Mississippi River — Elk, Rice Beds, and Corduroy Roads

The Sad Tale of Alexander Gillies and Peter Peden

The Dangers of the Mississippi River-Arnold Boner 

HIGH SCHOOL CADETS RESCUE CHILD IN RIVER

Murder or Accident — Bates & Innes Flume

The Tragic Death of Dr. Mostyn Shocked the People of Almonte

The Appleton Incident 1954

Debbie Dixon and The CPR Bridge Incident in Carleton Place–Linda’s Mailbag

What Happened on the CPR Railway Bridge?

Joseph Wooldridge Phillip Low- Near Drowning 1963

A Record of Drowning — River Falls and Cisterns

Dr.Cram and Dr. Scott Drowning 1907 –Cram Genealogy

John Alan Hope Swayne — Local Hero

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John Alan Hope Swayne — Local Hero

 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Mar 1927, Wed  •  Page 11

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 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Mar 1927, Wed  •  Page 4

genea

img - 2019-12-07T105740.194.jpeg

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NAME: Annie Pretty
GENDER: Female
MARITAL STATUS: Single
AGE: 14
BIRTH YEAR: 1907
BIRTH PLACE: Ontario
RELATION TO HEAD OF HOUSE: Daughter
FATHER’S NAME: Daniel Pretty
FATHER BIRTH PLACE: Ontario
MOTHER’S NAME: Caroline Pretty
MOTHER BIRTH PLACE: Ontario
RACIAL OR TRIBAL ORIGIN: Scotch
: Ontario
DISTRICT: Lanark
DISTRICT NUMBER: 97
SUB-DISTRICT: Carleton Place (Town)
SUB-DISTRICT NUMBER: 50
CITY, TOWN OR VILLAGE: Town of Carleton Place
: Antrim St
MUNICIPALITY: Carleton Place Antrim St

relatedreading

Down at Old McIlquham’s Bridge

Joseph Wooldridge Phillip Low- Near Drowning 1963

Dr.Cram and Dr. Scott Drowning 1907 –Cram Genealogy

Robert Drader Bill Shail Saved from Drowning May 28 1957

Tales from the Mississippi Rapids

A Carleton Place Tale to Send Shivers Up Your Arm — The Sad Tale of Margaret Violet King

Spring 1909 Pakenham — James Lunny William David Story

Stories of the Mississippi River — Elk, Rice Beds, and Corduroy Roads

The Sad Tale of Alexander Gillies and Peter Peden

The Dangers of the Mississippi River-Arnold Boner 😦

HIGH SCHOOL CADETS RESCUE CHILD IN RIVER

Murder or Accident — Bates & Innes Flume

The Tragic Death of Dr. Mostyn Shocked the People of Almonte

The Appleton Incident 1954

Debbie Dixon and The CPR Bridge Incident in Carleton Place–Linda’s Mailbag

What Happened on the CPR Railway Bridge?

A Record of Drowning — River Falls and Cisterns

Spring 1909 Pakenham — James Lunny William David Story

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Spring 1909 Pakenham — James Lunny William David Story
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In 1909 there occurred a tragedy which shocked the district of Fitzroy and Pakenham, a tragedy in which a well known citizen lost his life, and a youth barely escaped with his. James Lunny was attending High School in the Pakenham village, to which he had been driven by his father Hugh Lunny, and it was understood that he would come home with Mr. Story.
William David Story went to the village later in the day and had been deep snow that winter, and the breakup was late. On April 7 came a warm south wind and the snow melted rapidly. Creeks tributary to the Big Creek which flows into the Mississippi, became raging torrents.
Mr. Story and James Lunny started home after school, and found out upon reaching Moreton Flats, that the water was quite high. It was flowing across the road, but they took a chance in crossing. The force of the current upset the buggy and they unhitched the horse, in which in the confusion broke loose and gained safety.
Story clung to a tree breast deep in water and Lunny clung to the buggy, which lodged on its side in a wire fence on a knoll. In the meantime, others had gathered. J. J. Groves, of Ottawa,  later attempted a rescue, but failed.
Night came on and the weather became colder and the creek continued to rise. The boatmen time and again came near the marooned men, but were unable to attempt a rescue, because of the swift current.
At last, after nightfall, as the great bonfires lighted the tragic scene Dr. E. W. Gemmill of Pakenham  and Joseph Gavan of Pakenham presently attempted a rescue, but not a complete one. Story had fallen into the stream and drowned before rescuers could get to him and Lunny lapsed into unconsciousness and was reached just in the nick of time.
William David Story was an uncle of John Story, former warden of Carleton county and  reeve of March township and the Lunny’s continued to farm in Pakenham.
historicalnotes
September 22, 1846 – At Pakenham Mills, George Parker, in company with three of his sons,
varying from six to eleven, went into the river to bathe; the second boy slipped off a rock into
deep water; the father immediately plunged after him and although a good swimmer he was
forced to let go the child after being sunk repeatedly. Several expert divers including Indians
used every exertion to recover the body but did not succeed until nearly 10:00 at night on
account of the depth of the water and uneven bottom of the river.
May 6, 1870 – A sad accident
happened on the Mississippi near
Pakenham. It appears that two
young women, Miss Dunfield and
Miss Connery had been visiting
some friends across the river and
were being taken home in a canoe
by a young man named McKibben.
On the way across the women
became frightened and the canoe
upset. The young man grasped at
the branch on a tree nearby but with
two young women clinging to him
unfortunately the branch gave way
and the three were borne away in
that position. They floated with the
current for some little distance and
then disappeared. Parties have
been busily engaged in dragging
the river for the bodies. One was found on Sunday and another on Monday but up to the time of
this writing the third body has not been found.
genea
Name: James Lunny
Gender: Male
Marital Status: Single
Age: 10
Birth Day & Month: 15 Jul
Birth Year: 1890
Birthplace: Ontario
Relation to Head of House: Son
Father’s name: Hugh A Lunny
Mother’s name: Margaret E Lunny
Racial or Tribal Origin: Irish
Nationality: Canadian
Religion: Roman Catholic
Province: Ontario
District: Lanark (north/nord)
District Number: 80
Sub-District: Fitzroy
Sub-District Number: D-1
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members:
Name Age
Hugh A Lunny 54
Margaret E Lunny 45
Mary A Lunny 15
Thomas B Lunny 14
Hugh E Lunny 12
James Lunny 10
Margaret A Lunny 8
Peter A Lunny 4
Name: William David Story
Gender: Male
Marital Status: Single
Age: 28
Birth Year: abt 1863
Birthplace: Ontario
Relation to Head-of-house: Son
Religion: Church of England
French Canadian: No
Father’s name: James Story
Father’s Birth Place: Ireland
Mother’s name: Annetta Story
Mother’s Birth Place: Ireland
Province: Ontario
District Number: 83
District: Lanark North
Subdistrict: Fitzroy
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members:
Name Age
James Story 74
Annetta Story 72
Margaret Story 30
William David Story 28
Thomas J Story 25
Emma Eliza Story 14

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Joseph Wooldridge Phillip Low- Near Drowning 1963

Dr.Cram and Dr. Scott Drowning 1907 –Cram Genealogy

Robert Drader Bill Shail Saved from Drowning May 28 1957

Stories of the Mississippi River — Elk, Rice Beds, and Corduroy Roads

Joseph Wooldridge Phillip Low- Near Drowning 1963

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Joseph Wooldridge Phillip Low- Near Drowning 1963

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Clipped from The Ottawa Citizen, 17 Apr 1963, Wed, Page 5
Two boys clung desperately to a small clump of trees on the Mississippi River here Tuesday as raging spring water sucked their powerless light boat to the brink of 100-foot-long Almonte Falls. Area persons who know the river well say the two would certainly have been battered to death on rocks had they not kept their grip until rescue came. Philip Low, 12, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Low, and Joseph Wooldridge, 14, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Wooldridge, grabbed the overhead branches as they drifted past shortly after the motor of the boat quit. They hung on for ‘ 25 minutes. Too scared to yell They clung tenaciously while Joseph cried for help. Philip said afterwards he was too scared to even yell. Terry Roberts, a teenager, heard their pleas while crossing a nearby bridge and ran to a restaurant operated by Philip’s father. Mr. Low and Joseph Kean jumped in the Low boat and then picked up Fire Chief Durward Washburn in front of the town hall, where he had run to pick up a coil of rope. The men made their way cautiously to the clump of trees and then threw the rope to the boys, who tied it to their boat’s anchor chain. Mr. Kean said afterwards the boys surely would have been killed if they had lost their grip and allowed the boat to go over the falls. There are three other sets of rocky falls a short distance downstream. The river at this point is known as “Little Niagara”. Joseph said all he could think about was how terrifying it would be to have to ride the boat over the four falls.

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Almonte Gazette April 18 1963

relatedreading

The Tragic Death of Dr. Mostyn Shocked the People of Almonte

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