Tag Archives: Dr. Metcalfe

Dr. Metcalfe Guthrie Evoy

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Dr. Metcalfe Guthrie Evoy

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Dr. Metcalfe, who established his practice in Almonte years ago broke into the political forum in 1901.  It had been his four-year battle feud subsequent victory at the polls to achieve public ownership of hydro electric power that had turned Dr. Metcalfe’s thoughts to running for public office. He believed that his idea to consolidate all powers in Almonte on a plan where the Mississippi River’s total supply could be regulated for 24 hours per day would one day become a reality. This plan would be beneficial to Carleton Place, Appleton, Rosebank, Pakenham, Galetta. and all the falls on the Mississippi and increase the efficiency of the stored lakes

Dr. Metcalfe was mayor of Almonte from 1917 to 1919 and in 1924 and in 1929. During his terms as mayor, the streets of Almonte were paved. It took a fight in the courts before the doctor got action on adequate accommodation for high school pupils. The high school had been a building rented from the Almonte Public School Board. Through Dr. Metcalfe’s efforts the building was renovated and a gymnasium erected. The gym, he admits was his pet project, since he had always been keenly interested in  sports.

Also a great horse lover, the doctor was active in sulky racing. Dr. Metcalfe’s entries won many red ribbons at Ottawa and Toronto exhibitions as well as at local and district Fall fairs. Through the years, medicine and politics with Dr. Metcalfe walked hand in hand. He used to travel to outlying rural farmhouses on sick calls by horse. With the aid of two nurses and a flashlight he performed appendix operations on kitchen tables. The doctor helped bring more than 5,000 babies into the world. His assistant was Miss Isabel Guthrie, a niece, who was a registered nurse in Scotland and Canada.

 

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 Jul 1978, Sat  •  Page 62

 

The last of a family of 12, Dr. Metcalfe was born November, 1869, on the homestead on the 8th Line of Ramsay. His parents, the late Hugh Metcalfe and Jean McLean named him Albert after Prince Albert who had stopped at their home for a drink of water shortly before the baby was born. (1860–Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, undertook a two-month tour of Upper and Lower Canada).For two years after he left high school, he taught at McDonald’s Comers, then, went to Queen’s, where he graduated with honours. He took post graduate work at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., and then came to Almonte to set up his practice. He married the former Isabel Mitchell McCallum of St. Andrew’s, Scotland and she died in 1937.

 

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Feb 1957, Sat  •  Page 49

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historicalnotes

 

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Feb 1957, Sat  •  Page 49

 

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`1956

 

 

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Feb 1 1962

 

relatedreading

The Doctors of Almonte … In the First Half of the Century – Archibald Albert Metcalfe

Outstanding Men — Dr. Metcalfe of Almonte

Dr. Archibald Albert “Archie” Metcalfe — The Man with the Red Toupee – John Morrow

  1. Memories of Dr. A. A. Metcalfe of Almonte– Florence Watt

  2. Will the Real Dr. Metcalfe Please Stand Up? Rare Photo Found!!

Murder or Accident — Bates & Innes Flume

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Murder or Accident — Bates & Innes Flume

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Photo-Mappio

 

Sept 6, 1928

Jessie Comrie had been missing since Sunday.  She was a trained nurse and a lifelong resident of Carleton Place. Monday her body was discovered and assumed drowned in a flume in the Bates and Innes Mill.

An object was seen early Monday morning by William Campbell by the flume and an investigation disclosed that it was indeed Miss Comrie lying face downward. The body was examined by Dr. Metcalfe, coroner and he decided an inquest was unnecessary.

 

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Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum-story is: The River Dance of the McArthur Mill in Carleton Place

Miss Comrie had been called late at night to relieve a nurse at James McIntosh’s home and she was enroute there when she fell into a flume. No explanation had been found as to the way the accident occurred although examination of the body revealed many scratches about the limbs. Had it been a possible robbery?

The water was 18 feet deep where she fell in and it is thought that in the darkness Miss Comrie became confused and took the wrong route to the McIntosh home. A sister, Mrs. Peter McDonald was the only survivor of the family who died later in 1931.

For months the citizens of Carleton Place gossiped about what might have happened to Miss Comrie as some could not believe that she took a misstep.

 

Author’s note —In the 1920s to the 1950s a proportion of female homicide victims were generally ignored for the most part.

 

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Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum-story is: The River Dance of the McArthur Mill in Carleton Place

 

 

historicalnotes

1870-Building of the first stone structure of the present Bates and Innes Woollen Mill was begun by Archibald McArthur and was completed a year later.

1909 – Bates & Innes knitting mill, after making waterpower improvements, began running night and day with about 150 employees.  The Hawthorne knitting mill was closed by reason of financial difficulties, and its operating company was reorganized as the Carleton Knitting Co. Ltd.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal28 Mar 1931, SatPage 9

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

related reading

The Saga of Bates and Innes

Roy Bates and His Dog Named Taffy— ahh Paddy

Do You Remember? Memories of the Pengor Penguin

So How Much Time Do You Get for Stealing Wool?