Tag Archives: downtown

The A & S Leach Grocery Store Carleton Place January- October 1898

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The A & S Leach Grocery Store Carleton Place January- October 1898
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Oct 1898, Thu  •  Page 7

So who owned this business A & S Leach in Carleton Place and where was it? It was run by Abner and his oldest sister Sophia Leach who was 15 years older than him.. Their father was a widow ( his wife was Alice Salter Leach and died in 1871)and the two siblings ran the store. In 1891 Sophia Leach was 30 and unmarried probably because she looked after the rest of the family as she was the oldest. She died in 1898 at the age of 37 and that is probably why the store closed. The whole family is buried in the Franktown Cemetery.

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Jan 1898, Tue  •  Page 2

The Leach siblings took over the Peden Grocery business in January of 1898 which is where Hastie and Tatlock used to be on Bridge Street, which some call the wrong side of the street. ( don’t ask).Peden also made carbonated drinks there.

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Oct 1898, Fri  •  Page 3

Seven months later in October Abner Leache filed for bankruptcy ( Sophia died August 1898) and Lang & Company from Ottawa bought their stock. Lang & Co were basically in the pork business and London House was briefly a clearing house where they bought bankrupt stock and resold it. It was located on Wellington Street in Ottawa.

Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
19 Oct 1897, Tue  •  Page 8

London House in turn went bankrupt in 1901 and the Larose Dept store on Rideau and Sussex bought the lot and sold them at their stores.

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Jan 1901, Fri  •  Page 8

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Jan 1901, Fri  •  Page 8

1891 Census of Canada

DetailRelatedSource

NameAbnor A Leach
GenderMale
Marital StatusSingle
Age15
Birth Year1876
Birth PlaceOntario
Residence Date1891
Residence PlaceCarleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Relation to HeadSon
Religionengl church
OccupationDry Good Clerk
Can ReadYes
Can WriteYes
French CanadianNo
Father’s NameHenery Leach
Father’s Birth PlaceOntario
Mother’s Birth PlaceOntario
NeighboursView others on page
Household Members6
Enumeration District84

1891 Census of Canada

Name:Sophia Leach
Gender:Female
Marital Status:Single
Age:30
Birth Year:abt 1861
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Date:1891
Residence Place:Carleton Place, Lanark South, Ontario, Canada
Relation to Head:Daughter
Religion:engl church
Can Read:Yes
Can Write:Yes
French Canadian:No
Father’s Name:Henery Leach
Father’s Birth Place:Ontario
Mother’s Birth Place:Ontario
Name:Sophia A. Leach
Birth Date:12 Sep 1860
Death Date:19 Aug 1898
Cemetery:Franktown Public Cemetery
Burial or Cremation Place:Franktown, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Has Bio?:N
Father:Henry Leach
Mother:Alice Leach
URL:https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/199393025/sophia-a.-leach
W. J. Hughes — The Rexall Drugstore on the Corner

Memories of Mulvey’s Candy Store and Joie Bond — Larry Clark

The Carleton Lunch Bar- Carleton Place Tourism of the Past — Keith Giffin

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 1– Canadian Tire to The Moose

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to Milady Dress Shop

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 3- St. Andrew’s to Central School

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to Rubino’s/Giant Tiger

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 5-The Little White House to the Roxy

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 6-The Eating Place to the Post Office

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 7 –Scotia Bank to the New York Cafe

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 8–Olympia Restaurant to McNeely’s–

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 9–Flint’s to the Blue Spot

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 10–

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 11

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12Dr. Johnson Downing and Ferril I Presume? Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12 a

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series –Volume 13

Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign–Dr. Winters 154-160 Bridge Street Carleton Place –Jaan Kolk Files

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series –Volume 14

Mitchell & Cram — History of The Summit Store 1898-1902 –Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series –Volume 15

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series–Volume 16– Newman’s Hall

More Memories of the Maple Leaf Dairy

Clippings and History of Mill and Bridge Street Almonte

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Clippings and History of Mill and Bridge Street Almonte

almonte.com

Photo thanks to Brent Eades of Almonte.com

On the corner of Bridge and Mill Street once sat The People’s Store and the McAdams store– read-McAdams Store Almonte— It burned down and became The Orpheum, then the O’Brien and nowThe Hub. read-Mary Delaney Caught Stealing at The People’s Store

There was a fire in 1911 and that whole corner burned down as it began in the back of People’s store

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 May 1911, Tue  •  Page 1
Thanks to Brent Eades

Almonte and district suffered no great damage as a result of Saturday’s wind of hurricane proportions. The O’Brien Theatre was the only casualty and about one quarter of its roof was torn off.There was also some damage to the ventilators in the building. The matinee was cancelled but Mr. H. R. Davey was able to make temporary repairs and the night show was held as usual — May 1950 Almonte Gazette

may 1960 almonte gazette

Almonte and district suffered no great damage as a result of Saturday’s wind of hurricane proportions. The O’Brien Theatre was the only casualty and about one quarter of its roof was torn off. There was also some damage to the ventilators in the building. The matinee was cancelled but Mr. H. R. Davey was able to make temporary repairs and the night show was held as usual. 

Motoring was most unpleasant and in some sections telephone poles were torn down. The fire brigade responded to four fires on Saturday, three of which were in less than an hour. One was a chimney fire at the home of Mr. James Waddell in New England. Another was a grass fire at the end of Ann St.; the next was at the residence of Mr. Archie Levitan where leaves caught fire in some unexplained way and the fourth was at the home of Mr. Edgar Lowry, corner of Country and Church Streets. This one started from a fire that had been set out several days before and the embers were fanned into life by the high wind.

May 1950

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Jun 1930, Sat  •  Page 21

May 1930 Almonte Gazette

Everything is just about ready for the reopening of the Orpheum Theatre here and the first official showing will be on Monday afternoon and evening next, June 30th. The first picture to be shown will be the First National beautiful, all technicolor, musical comedy story “Sally,” which both on the stage and through the sound screen has proven very popular and entertaining. The management have made a special effort to secure a positive atmosphere with courtesy and pleasure and a sucessful production for presentation.

Mr.  Bruck is general manager and an excellent picture has been procured for the opening day. The new theatre is one of the best in the Ottawa Valley and no doubt will be a great drawing card for Almonte. 

The picture “Sally” will be shown on both Monday and Tuesday of next week, and will be followed by dramatic and musical attractions that will amuse and entertain the large audiences which it is expected  to patronize the new theatre. The program also of the management is to show only features of a high standard which will be superior in quality and of a calibre that will insure a successful entertainment. The advertising pages of the Gazette will from time to time announce the various sound pictures that have been booked for showing here. The new O’Brien Theatre is a commercial enterprise, but it is more. 

This new theatre in Almonte is a testimony to the man whose name ‘it bears; expense has not entered into the construction and equipping of the O’Brien Theatre; only the best in each of the various lines necessary to the building and equipping of the O’­ Brien Theatre was allowed into the architects’ specifications. The result is that Almonte now has a beautiful Movitone and Vitaplione motion picture building, very modern in design, acoustically perfect, and absolutely fireproof. 

The new O’Brien. Theatre is a distinct asset to the town. In addition, the furnishings and the equipment are of the most advanced and approved designs that the world’s markets had to offer, and everything has been laid out to ensure public approval. The old Orpheum Theatre has been entirely remodelled and built; the canopy over the main entrance and the immense electrical sign present an imposing and attractive appearance; there are three entrance doors from Main street into the lobby. In addition there are two exit doors which open on to Bridge street, and these two exits will enable the theatre to be emptied at any time very rapidly. The main theatre building is of brick and concrete and the floors are covered with fresh cement which is a sound deadener. A very modern ventilation system has been installed so as to provide for the free circulation of fresh air continuously. Entering the theatre one goes from the lobby to the main part of the house. The lighting effects in the lobby are modernistic. Particularly artistic photo frame and mirrors decorate both the lobby and foyer. 

These lend a very attractive appearance to this section of the entrance. Going from the lobby one enters the main part of the theatre, with its wide aisles and beautiful, comfortable, upholstered opera chairs, with leather air cushions and upholstered backs finished in wine color. 

Indirect lighting of the aisles is a very up-to-date touch which will no doubt be appreciated by the patrons coming in during the performance. On the stage is a large Vocalite sound   screen equipped with an automatic screen modifier, also electrically operated and controlled. This screen and modifier is one of the new real WS features of the Q’Brien Theatre. The stage back of the Vocalite sound screen has been draped with heavy and artistically finished velour hangings, and the scenic effect will compare with any of the theatres in the larger cities of Canada and the United States. 

The owners of the O’Brien Theatre gave a great deal of time and attention to the question of sound equipment, and after investigating many different styles and makes of machines decided to install the high class Northern Electric sound equipment for both Movitone and Vitaphone in addition to new Simplex projection machines. This newest sound equipment will enable the proper presentation of the bigger and best of the talkies and where feasible the screen will give life size reproduction. 

The main contract for the construction of the new O’Brien Theatre was awarded on a tender basis to M. Sullivan & Son, Arnprior. The architects were Messrs. Richards and Abra of Ottawa, and local firms whose work has assisted in the completion of this fine new building were: Taylor Bros., The proscenium curtains, valances, draperies, carpels and furniture for the O ’Brien Theatre here, and also those in Renfrew, Arnprior and Pembroke, were made and installed by A. J. Frieman, Ottawa. 

Broadloom Axminster carpets, reversible gold French velours, black silk velours and figure silk damasks, all richly trimmed, together with highest grade available. The main contract for the construction of the new O’Brien Theatre was awarded on a tender basis to M. Sullivan & Son, Arnprior. The architects , were Messrs. Richards and Abra of Ottawa, and local firms whose work has assisted in the completion of this fine new building were: Taylor Bros., The proscenium curtains, valances, draperies, carpels and furniture for the O ’Brien Theatre here, and also those in Renfrew, Arnprior and Pembroke, were made and installed by A. J. Frieman, Ottawa. 

photo almonte.com

The theatre was owned and operated by Ottawa Valley Amusements, owned by Renfrew entrepreneur M. J. O’Brien. The Renfrew Theatre was part of a chain that included theatres in Arnprior (now once again associated with Renfrew), and Pembroke, Almonte and Carleton Place.

Marilyn Miller 1929 in Sally which was playing at the O’ Brien

Source: North Lanark Regional Museum
When the Rosamond Hospital in Almonte quickly filled on the night of the accident, the O’Brien Theatre opened their doors rather reluctantly.  When confronted, the owner of the theatre protested opening his doors, claiming he didn’t have any authorization. Nevertheless the doors were removed, and used as stretches for the dead and wounded.
Converted into a temporary hospital and morgue, it is unclear whether the theatre had re-opened by December 31 as advertised in the Almonte Gazette.

Photo Allan Stanley— read-Lottie Barr’s Chips Almonte –Thanks to Allan Stanley

Almonte1925 Gazette

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Dec 1942, Mon  •  Page 12

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Jun 1930, Sat  •  Page 24
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Jun 1930, Sat  •  Page 24
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Aug 1969, Tue  •  Page 37
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Feb 1957, Sat  •  Page 3

Thanks to Brent Eaded

Our pushing young merchants, Messrs. Riddell & McAdam,
have purchased the •People’s Store• property from Mrs. J.T~
Brown, and will shortly remove to their new stand. The price
paid was $5,550. At the sale on Saturday afternoon .Mr. Wm.
Curry, blacksmith, bought the Cowie pump factory and the
residence adjoining, paying therefor.$950. Sept 1890 Almonte Gazette–https://lindaseccaspina.wordpress.com/…/mary-delaney…/

Related reading….

Almonte at Night — 1946

Lottie Barr’s Chips Almonte –Thanks to Allan Stanley

Seeds of Love–Almonte Cinema – Then and Now

Les Portes Tournantes Film Almonte 1987

Santa Claus Parade Almonte 1974 Business Names

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Santa Claus Parade Almonte 1974 Business Names

The management and executive of the Revelliers Drum Corps would like to take this opportunity to extend our heartiest thanks to all the people who helped make our Santa Claus Parade a big success, We take our hats off to the following people who gave generously in the true Christmas Spirit to make this venture a reality:

Almonte Town Council, A lmonte and Ramsay Board of Trade, Almonte Civitan Club, Isabel Hogan, A & B Auto Parts, Lockhart Fuels, Green’s Upholstery, Little’s Barber Shop, Almonte IGA, Gerry’s Golden Eagle, Harry’s Motors, Lee Pro Hardware, Jack’s Shoe Store, Canadian Cafe, D. M, Campbell, Charles Baker, Queen’s Store, Levesque Meat Market, Timmins TV, Stedmans, James’ Smoke Shop, Needham Shoe, Duncan’s Barber Shop, Crest Studios, Johnson Clothing, O’Connell’s P la c e , Rivington’s Electric, McCormick’s Ladles’ Wear, The Village “ In” , P. J. Rooney & Sons, Morton’s Variety Store, United Cooperative, N, T. Sadler Construction, Albert Gale Agencies, Carleton Auto Parts, Burns Pontiac Buick Ltd., Almonte Dairy,, Zephyr Textiles, Almonte Leasing Co., Bowes & Lowry Farm Equipment, Moore’s Plumbing, George Gomme, Almonte Holel, Gorman’s Taxi, Almonte Pharmacy, R. A. Jamieson, Majaury Taxi, Cochran’s Shell, Betty Davis & Associates, THunro’* Esso, Dr. Hanna, J. L. Virgin Insurance, Danline Canada Ltd., Valley Carpet & Flooring, Irving Contracting Ltd., John Lyons Electric. Irene Goodfellow, Galligan & Sheffield, Comba Funeral Home, Pinecraft Ltd., King Koin Laundry, Ross Stanley, Smiths Falls Bottling Works, Wayne’s Barber Shop, P. Dodds, Mrs. Alice McGregor, Metcalfe’s Dairy, Almonte Gazette, Clark’s Dairy, Almonte Flour Mills, Royal Bank of Canada, Bank of Montreal, Roy Brown Insurance.

We also extend a sincere Thank You to the following: The Almonte Fire Dept, for the use of their hall and facilities for serving lunch to the parade participants. The L.O.B.A. for assisting In the preparation and serving of lunch. The Ladies’ Auxiliaries of the Reformed Presbyterian. Baptist. Anglican, Roman Catholic, Presbyterian and United Churches for providing sandwiches for the parade participants. St. Mary’s School for the use of their gymnasium for Santa to pass out treats to the children. R.A. Director Wayne Glardino for securing dressing rooms for the out-of-own corps.

The Almonte High School for the use of their gymnasium for change rooms. Mr. Carman Noble and the OPP for assisting, with traffic direction. The jolly man, Santa Claus, for taking time out of his busy schedule to participate in our parade. Almonte Legion Colour Party, Vem McDougall, Town of Almonte, Ramsay Fire Dept., Almonte Snowmobile Club, Almonte Girl Guides, Almonte Lions Club, Hedley Stewart, Keith Drynan, Cyril Greene, Almonte Power Boat Club, Mississippi Hotel and Valley Air Conditioning, 1,000 Island Queen— sternwheeler riverboat, Almonte and District High School, Ye Olde School Sports Centre, McCormick’s Ladies’ Wear and the Almonte Hotel for their active participation In the parade. A group that deserves special mention is the Almonte Civitan Club. This community-minded service club provided the manpower for the menial tasks that were necessary. They helped Santa pass out treats, helped serve the parade participants and most important did a superb job of cleaning up the various facilities. Keep up the good work — you are an A-l group of fellows. Last but by no means least we wish to extend special thanks to Mr. Art Smith for acting as parade chairman.

1968 Santa Parade Almonte

Almonte’s Santa Parades Looking for Photos

Christmas Social Notes from Pakenham 1933

McDonald’s Corners at Christmas –Lots of Names

Christmas Social Notes from Pakenham 1933

Pakenham Santa Claus “Chicken Pox” Parade — Wall Street Journal

Downtown Smiths Falls 1887

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Downtown Smiths Falls 1887
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In 1887 in Smiths Falls, while Capt. Harden of the Salvation Army was conducting a service at the corner of Main and Beckwith streets, he incidentally made some plain statements about drunkenness and drunkards. A man who was drunk in the crowd, hearing remarks along this line, resented same and slipped up and struck Capt. Harden In the face, knocking him down. The captain of the Army would not prosecute the offender, who nevertheless was charged with disorderly conduct and fined $5 and costs, amounting to $10.30.
In 1887 Rideau lodge, No. 241. I.O.O.F., Smiths Falls, had a membership of 62. Today the membership reaches over the 400 mark and within the past 12 years two other branches of this order have been instituted in Smiths Falls-Chimes Rebekah lodge No. 155 and Liberty Encampment No. 67. ‘ Changes of Time.
In 1887 Mr. Wm. Lavender came home from California and brought with him a horned toad.

 

In 1887 in Smiths Falls, twenty-one firms and businesses were advertisers in the local newspaper, then called the Rideau Record. In the personnel of these firms or businesses there has been an outstanding change during that time. Today, out of that number there is not one of these men connected with a business here today, and an onlooker through these Arms’ names finds that today there Is only one case where the son’s name appears. The following is a list of firms and advertisers.

 

Former Advertisers. The following ‘ads” are taken from the flics of the Rideau Record of in 1887:

 

Graham & Foster,” the only noted cheap, cash, ready-made clothing, dry goods and millinery store In Smiths Falls

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O. Carss. general Insurance agent, representing fire, life, marine and accident Insurance
Frank Clark, sole agent for the Rathburn Lumber Co. Parties building would do well to see our stock before buying
J. Washburn’s special cost sale. Is strictly a cash sale
The Wardrobe House, second to none
M. Ryan, contractor and builder
Miskelly and Begley, a large stock of glassware and lamp goods to choose from
Mr. Horace Carley, agent for Brockville Steam Laundry
R. W. Steacy Jewellery store, where the seeker for good value in jewellery and silverware should call
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Geo. Steele, planing mill, custom planing and sawing
A. G. Foster, the Town Tailor, his clothes are unsurpassed in style and quality
Garrett’s Vienna Bakery– headquarters for all tropical  fruits in season and choice confectionery-
Dr. J. S. McCallum, as usual we have a complete stock of every, thing in the drug line, of the flnest and most reliable kind
McKimm and Loucks, have the very nicest stock of boots and shoes ever shown in Smith Falls;
Lindsay and Gilday — new goods and new prices;
Bryson Graham and Co., every department’ crowded with new goods– comparisons invited;
Lockwood and Miner, front street livery;
W. Corbett, large stock of monuments. . head stones, fencing, etc.;
Carss and Corbett building lots for sale;
Jas. Murray– a great drive in groceries

A 1978 Walking Tour of Mill Street Almonte

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A 1978 Walking Tour of Mill Street Almonte
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Found in a 1977 newspaper article  in the newspaper article
102 Mill St., Baker’s Jewellery, was built in 1868 by Brown & MacArthur Dry Goods. Note the quoins (contrasting corner blocks) typical of this area. ( formerly Keepsakes and now Cashmere & Rose)
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94-96, Morton’s & The Couple’s Corner, built in 1905. The verandah overhanging the sidewalk represents the one-time fashion along all Mill St. The nine-foot passageway was built to allow for animals and carts passing to the rear courtyard.
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95, Rooney’s Pool Hall was erected in 1835 as the home of Almonte’s first citizen Daniel Shipman. In 1859 it became a hotel– Almonte House. Alterations through the years sadly obscure its original United Empire Loyalist tradition.
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88-90, typical of the 1870s, once housed the Sons of England meeting hall on the third floor.
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83. c.1875, retains fine old glass, woodwork and roof-edge metal cresting.
86, Superior Restaurant, shows the old “boomtown” front, an early 20th century design for an illusion of spaciousness.
The 1890 local sandstone building with clock tower was a post office designed by Dominion Architect (1881-1897) Thomas Fuller who designed Parliament’s original Centre Block. 78. a white and -red brick style dominant in the 1870s.
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71, Teddees, old law offices, possibly built around I860. In 1915 the third floor housed the Almonte Citizens Band.
70-72, James Tobacconist. Note upper brick corbelling, moulding above windows, cast iron pillars.
62, Bank of Montreal, built in 1906, uses stone to effectively accent softer materials. Stedman’s. known as Mr. Forgie’s Brick Building, built about 1873 was first occupied by Forgie, a merchant.
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Artist’s drawing of the portion of the McArthur Block at 63 Mill Street which once housed the Almonte Gazette. It first appeared in the Gazette’s Christmas edition dated December 25, 1891. Thanks to the scrapbooks of Lucy Connelly Poaps
61. the block including the Almonte Gazette, was built 1885 by Wm. MacArthur, a local tinsmith.
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Thanks to the scrapbooks of Lucy Connelly Poaps1949 outside of Josh’s Restaurant (McCormick’s style shop) Kay Julian Norma Barr Jean Blakely-
36-38. Lee’s and McCormick’s. was Murphy’s North American Hotel until 1878. Note the west wall with its two superimposed old ads.
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Kerry’s and the Pharmacy, an 1883 building, once owned by members of the Shipman founding family. Pinecraft, on the corner, occupies this part of the original Rosamund Mill complex dating to 1862. Its 5-sided rugged stone design set the early building fashion here, as was followed by the 1863 structure across from it. On the way out of Almonte, you might like to stop for refreshment or a meal at Mama’s Place, a roadside steak house and tavern.

The Former Businesses of Carleton Place — Notes Part 1- Historical Clippings

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The Former Businesses of Carleton Place — Notes Part 1- Historical Clippings

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I have been cutting archived newspaper articles for over 2 years. I will be adding from time to time new ones as I go through them.

 - At last a barber has opened up In tha enop...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Jun 1900, Mon,  Page 6

 - i Mr. Andrew Keilson ' is enlarging,...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  26 Jul 1898, Tue,  Page 8

 - t j , , ' club. Miss Miller, of Bridge street,...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  13 Aug 1901, Tue,  Page 2

 

 - The drain hi front of Mr. Matth1es barber shop...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  09 Jun 1899, Fri,  Page 4

 - .. Carleton Place (Special to The Journal.) '...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  20 Oct 1899, Fri,  Page 4

 

 - Mr. E. A. Leech has purchased the business...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Apr 1910, Mon,  Page 5

 

 - Adjoatmant of oialma arising from Wedneaday...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  19 Feb 1906, Mon,  Page 5

 

 

 - Dr. T. R. Paterson is fitting up his dental...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Jun 1898, Sat,  Page 9

 

 - Th nubile "maLrket" aotutp fc-avliw fc-avliw...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  28 Aug 1905, Mon,  Page 3

 

 - Lanark Mr. George B. Moore has Just placed In,...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Dec 1906, Fri,  Page 12

 

 - ! A couple of boys, supposed to have nrst...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  29 Aug 1899, Tue,  Page 3

 

 - Mr. and Mrs. W.I J. Hughes have gone to Boston...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  27 Sep 1910, Tue,  Page 12

 

 - MILKING MACHINE and 6-can 6-can 6-can milk...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Jul 1946, Thu,  Page 20

 - Miss Christine GJertrum. ' from Flesherton, Is...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  17 Feb 1899, Fri,  Page 6

 - scarce. , Mr. Keyes, burnt out yesterday, wHi...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  07 Dec 1897, Tue,  Page 6

 

 - . Mr. R. G. Zabalan wUl shortly remove remove...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  10 Feb 1898, Thu,  Page 4

 

 - Mr. Richard Zabalan Is selling out his stock in...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  20 Feb 1900, Tue,  Page 7

 

 - Mr.lUanirs has named his Lake Park cottage...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Aug 1899, Sat,  Page 8

 

 - Mrs. Ei. A. McGregor has removed her restaurant...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Oct 1898, Tue,  Page 2

 

 - You Lee, one of our Chinese laundry-men....

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Feb 1900, Wed,  [First Edition],  Page 8

 

 - a very pleasant Mr. Stewart Oliver ot Dr....

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  07 Sep 1898, Wed,  Page 8

 

 - Mr. Wm. Jenkins haa placed a new bread van on...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  11 Jun 1898, Sat,  Page 2

 

 - NOTICE TO CRtDITORS. Ia the matter oi CHARLES...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  15 Mar 1890, Sat,  Page 3

 

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Sat, Apr 23, 1887 – Page 4

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Thu, May 5, 1887 – Page 3

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Tue, Feb 1, 1887 – Page 3

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Tue, Jun 21, 1904 – Page 7

The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Sat, May 20, 1899 – Page 6

 - Warren- Mr. llenree intends to remove anoruy...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  08 Sep 1905, Fri,  Page 11

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Carleton Place Business–Lloyd Hughes List

Comments Comments Comments–Documenting History

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 1– Canadian Tire to The Moose

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to Milady Dress Shop

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 3- St. Andrew’s to Central School

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to Rubino’s/Giant Tiger

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 5-The Little White House to the Roxy

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 6-The Eating Place to the Post Office

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 7 –Scotia Bank to the New York Cafe

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 8–Olympia Restaurant to McNeely’s–

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 9–Flint’s to the Blue Spot

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 11

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12

 

Dr. Johnson Downing and Ferril I Presume? Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12 a

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 5-The Little White House to the Roxy

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Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 5-The Little White House to the Roxy

 

 

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Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Read in the series

Carleton Place Business–Lloyd Hughes List

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 1– Canadian Tire to The Moose

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to Milady Dress Shop

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 3- St. Andrew’s to Central School

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to Rubino’s/Giant Tiger

 

 

67 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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10 years ago

 

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Now 2017

67 Bridge Street Carleton Place

Built circa 1870 the original owner was William Cram  and at one time the exterior material of this building was clapboard. The renovations through the years removed a veranda across the front and the doctor’s office was at the far end. The gingerbread decoration that was on the gable window that faces Bridge Street was also removed.

It was the home and office of Dr. Albert Downing and his son Rupert and Dr. Ivan James moved in with his family after Dr. Downing moved to Mill Street. Dr. James then moved to Dr. Preston’s old house at 104 Bridge Street and Dr. Charles Ferrill who was an eye, ear, nose, and throat specialist moved in with his family. His wife’s maiden name was McCreary and the oldest daughter Mabel married Percy Hay and the younger daughter Alice married Jack Stewart.

The entrance to Dr. Ferrill’s was off of Albert Street and for a short time the local telegraph office for the CPR operated out of a small section. Later the building was made into tow apartments but is now a hair salon called Techniques For Hair and its official entrance is at 3 Albert Street.

 

58 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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Then–Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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The 80s-Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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The 2000’s –Photo from –The Forgotten Photos of Carleton Place by Mike Jeays

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Now

58 Bridge Street Carleton Place (circa 1870)

A white frame building stood halfway between Bridge and Victoria Street with a painting of a large black horse on the Bridge Street side.  Marj Whyte says it was called the Abe Lewis Livery Stable.

In 1824 the Crown granted Edmond Murphy the corner property  located at 58 Bridge Street.  His wife sold it after Edmond died and the property went through a number of owners including: James McDiarmid, Allan McDonald, John McEwen, Archibald McArthur, and John Burke Esquire.

Albert Lowe purchased the corner property where Mr. Mozzarella’s stands now from John Burke in 1906 and ran a horse livery business. When the small structure was not suitable for Lowe’s purposes; he undertook the construction of a two story brick building on the property.

Later on the property became the site of one of the first garages in Carleton Place that was  operated by Norman Bowland and Stanley Shannon. They bought it in 1925 for $4500, and Stan and his wife Viola Hart lived over the garage. There was a long lunch counter in the same building, but at a separate entrance run by Clifford “Clicker’ Peden. Later John Griffin ran the business until the building was renovated and a larger restaurant was  opened. Tammy Marion said– The red building use to be a restaurant ( I forget its name) in the mid to late 70’s – that belonged to the Fallack’s in CP. Their daughter was Barbara Fallack if memory serves me right and I used to go their for lunch from school.  Jo-Anne Drader Nelson replied- It was The Embassy and it was the best place to go for fries and ice cold bottle of Coke.

Grant Campbell’s Law office also had an entrance on College Street. There were many changes and owners, and for an in depth read please click on The Central Garage in Carleton Place by Terry Skillen. Terry’s father, Alfred Skillen, was once the owner and operator and later sold the building to Mr. John P. Andres in the summer of 1956 for $12,000.00. After that, the red brick building was no longer used commercially to sell and repair automobiles.

The building  was demolished in 1985, and a small take out restaurant was built on the vacant land at called Katchups. Mr. Mozzarella’s now occupies this location.

related reading:

The Central Garage in Carleton Place by Terry Skillen

 

62 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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Photo of Marching Saints from Bev Hurdis from Carleton Place

 

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62 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870 and 1958

This present two storey single detached building at 62 Bridge Street with a long rectangular façade once housed a men’s clothing store for nearly 140 years. Founded by Patrick Galvin in 1846 (1816-1896) on Bell Street, he moved to the present location when Naploeon Lavallee owned the larger building that would contain the Galvin Tailor shop.

James Coleman’s shoemaking shop was in this building and a hotel that was operated by Robert Metcalf. The first building used to stand next to Bennett’s on Bell Street. In 1872, the shop moved to where the McNeely barbershop was in the Greig Block.

The Galvin Block included the former Roxy Theatre and Allie’s Coffee Shop. The business was set up in the lunchroom and later expanded to “eat in” where the theatre was located. Shortly after they moved to the site next door to the Galvin Building 62 Bridge. There was also a small jewellery business next door run by Fred Mason. The store continued to be operated by the Galvin family–James S. and James’s son J. Lambert. The store was also a dry cleaning business for a Smiths Falls company and Kaye Hamilton worked as a seamstress in the Galvin tailoring business. In 1958 the J.L. Galvin business, which was  a 112 years old,  was sold to Howard Johnson.

When Howard Johnson took over the ownership of this building, he constructed a news building that now sits at 62 Bridge Street.  Johnson, his wife Mae and their daughter occupied an apartment over the store, and Gordon and Marion McAllister lived in the other apartment.

Howard Johnson’s Men’s wear operated at this location until 1995 when it became Paul’s Men’s Wear. In 2006 it was sold and Wisteria a new business began to operate.

 

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Gayle and Janice from Wisteria

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal12 Apr 1958, SatPage 5

Related reading

When the Saints March By Howard Johnsons

You “Gotta Shop Around” in Carleton Place — Wisteria

People of Carleton Place, Ontario — Gail Sheen-MacDonald

The Determined Fashionable Women of Carleton Place

 

66 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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66 Bridge Street Circa 1860

The building has one off centred entrance but at one time there may have been two entrances to this building as the brick where the second possible entrance was is a different colour compared to the rest of the brick on the façade.

Mr. Steen (from the Winchester area) owned this brick building and Mr. P.G.N Frizell who lived on Lake Ave. East operated a small grocery store.  Later Percy Hardy operated his photography studio and in the 1930s Fred and Lib Stanzel occupied it as a lunchroom and had living quarters upstairs. It also use to house a clothing store that I can’t seem to find a mention of.

Clifford Peden bought the building and made it into upstairs and downstairs apartments where he and his wife Donalda and son James lived in the upstairs apartment. Mrs. Rena Paul and then Mrs. Gladys Lashley lived downstairs. Keith Giffin said: “My uncle Clicker Peden lived there after he retired and converted the lower part to apartment. My cousin Jim Peden lived there for awhile and the Giffins  ran the lunch bar for number of years called The Carleton Lunch Bar”.

Norma Jackson- One memory I have is going to the restaurant with my Mom and having pigs in a blanket

Donna Mcfarlane- Howard and Allie Neil ran the restaurant there for awhile when I was in high school then Mrs Mcgregor had it.
Valerie Edwards– I will always remember my Dad taking me there, I think we sat at the counter, for a hot chocolate after the Remembrance Day ceremonies, each November 11. So much so, that each Nov. 11 I take a thermos of hot chocolate with me & find some place to sit after the crowd has gone.

This building is now a residence and for many years the citizens will remember it as the Colonial Bus Stop and restaurant.

 

68-74 Bridge Street Carleton Place

 

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68-74 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870 and 1970

This property at 68-74 Bridge Street housed a theatre that was known as the Star,
Roxy, the O’Brien, and the Odeon. In 1919, the name of the theatre was the Star
Theatre and they ran three features a week and the Kids Matinee was a dime and adults a quarter. At one time the theatre was operated by a committee of town businessmen who hired the projectionists: Sam Ventura and Louie Reuben, the ushers: Sam Saunders the caretakers, and even Marguerite Saunders who sold the tickets.

In the days of silent films Laura Burrows who lived on William Street was the piano player at the front of the stage and she provided the sound effects. Later the theatre was sold to Mrs. Jenkinson and her son Warren operated it. At time Smiley Gravelle was the projectionist and Rossie Moore Doyle sold the tickets.

 

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Photo from Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

In 1951, the theatre was the Roxy and the  cost for adults was 40 cents, students 30 cents, and children 15 cents.  The 1940’s and 1950’s was the heyday of the film industry and they used to have an manager of amateur night. Peter Pan and Heidi were some of the films that showed at the Roxy and Dick Maloney a popular comedian of the time also made an appearance at the Roxy.

In the 1930s, there was also a Chinese restaurant and laundry operated by Kelly’s
as well as Rosenberg’s jewellery was also on this site too. The theatre building came down in 1970s when McDermid bought the site along with the Chinese Laundry and also the small brick building which had been a restaurant at one time but was later Howard Dowdall’s Barber Shop. The restaurant was called Giffin’s. Here are some comments:

At one point the clapboard of the new building was brown but in 2006 it became green. There is presently a dentist and offices ( CP Rental) at 68-74 Bridge Street. The original buildings were replaced in the 1970s when McDiarmid bought the site.

Lynne Johnson Dr. Barry used to practice out of that building. And Dr. White??

Linda Gallipeau-Johnston Dr. White and Dr. Jamie Fullerton – all 3.

Kari Clarke –My father Karl Bruun ( lawyer ), Dr. Wayne Barry ( family doctor ) and Dr. Dean McDiarmid (dentist ) built the building. They used to joke and call it the ” will, pill, and drill ” building. They were good friends for many years.

Elizabeth Edwards— My dad, Shane Edwards ran his law practice in this building.

Related reading

The Star Theatre–or Funny Things Said in a Local Theatre

More Memories of Rossie Doyle

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Read in the series

Carleton Place Business–Lloyd Hughes List

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 1– Canadian Tire to The Moose

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to Milady Dress Shop

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 3- St. Andrew’s to Central School

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historicalnotes

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Carleton Place — A Valley Town at Confederation 

In Canada’s Year of Confederation, the busy sawmill village of Carleton Place had a population of about 700 people. Many citizens were sons and daughters of the Scottish emigrants who had settled the area in the 1820’s.Most of the town’s buildings stood on the north side of the Mississippi River, with only about 12 houses on the south.

Shops on Bell, Mill and Bridge Street were open from 6 am to 10 pm and the average work day for laborers was 11 hours! Want to know more about what Carleton Place (formerly Morphy’s Falls) looked like in 1867?

Read more in the Carleton Place Community Information Guide or stop by the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum and check out their summer exhibition.

 relatedreading

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to Rubino’s/Giant Tiger

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Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to Rubino’s/Giant Tiger

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Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Read in the series

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 1– Canadian Tire to The Moose

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to Milady Dress Shop

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 3- St. Andrew’s to Central School

45 Bridge Street Carleton Place Ontario

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45 Bridge Street Carleton Place Ontario

This building started out as Leslie’s China Store operated by Mrs. Leslie circa 1890.  There was a fire in 1915 that I still cannot find but later R.R. Powell operated a grocery at this site. The first of two Powell Grocery locations opened and  chose the Leslie Building, next to Comba’s furniture store.

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24 Sep 1913

Mr. Powell was the Sunday School Superintendent and he had three main interests in life: his business, his family, and the Methodist Church (Zion Memorial), which he attended regularly and was a lay preacher. It was a family run store and each helped in the store and he also employed Roy Whyte of Lake Ave East as a delivery boy. The oldest girl was Gladys. (Mrs. John Lashley and her sister Olive was a very popular CPHS teacher) Fern worked as a civil servant and Bert went to college and never returned to Carleton Place.

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Olive Powell

 

This is a partial story from Mary Cook

“It was obvious that many of his customers from his Steven’s days like the young Powell, because his store flourished, and they moved their business to Powell’s Grocery without hesitation.  By this time, Robert was married and the father of four children.  Gladys Lashley, a daughter, remembers that her father bought some stock from an Almonte store when he first opened his doors.  “It was whale meat.  We have no idea why he would stock that, but I remember these cans of whale meat” she recalled.

The store was right across the street from Central School (the site of the present Post Office), and the young Powell children were expected to go to the store at recesses and noon hours to wait on customers. Robert and his young son Bert would go through the town early in the morning to pick up orders from the houses.  They would scurry back to the store to fill the orders, and then Bert would deliver them…free of charge, of course. Robert Powell believed in honest service, and would not sell as much as a banana if it had a bruise on it. 

Mrs. Powell helped augment the store’s profit by doing home baking.  Pies and cakes baked in the Sarah street kitchen of the Powell home ended up in the Bridge street store.  Cakes sold for 30 cents, and pies for a quarter. 

The store was closed on Wednesday afternoons.  That gave the staff a break and Robert time to fill shelves and do the countless other jobs necessary to keep the business running smoothly.  However, Saturday evenings often saw the workers at the store until after 11 o’clock. 

In 1941, after more than a half century in the grocery business, Robert Powell decided to call it quits.  He sold the business to his long time employee and good friend Gordon Lancaster, whom he knew would carry on in the honourable fashion which had become a tradition.

In 1941, after more than a half century in the grocery business, Robert Powell decided to call it quits.  He sold the business to his long time employee and good friend Gordon Lancaster, whom he knew would carry on in the honourable fashion which had become a tradition”.-MARY  COOK

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal27 Oct 1954, WedPage 15

Kiddytown also operated at 45 Bridge Street by Mrs. Dorothy Crawford then Ruby Griffith (James). After Kiddytown left Waugh’s Second Hand store was a this site and a karate school in the 80s. In 2006, 45 Bridge Street was a real estate company owned by Brenda McDonald Roe and is now for rent.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal11 Apr 1956, WedPage 15

Ted Hurdis I think every kid in town shopped there with their parents. Kiddietown had a bit of a monopoly back then.

Marilyn White For sure. Mrs. Griffith ran it .

Jeremy Stinson I seem to remember Kiddytown where the Blossom Shop is now… Can anyone confirm?

Linda Gallipeau-Johnston There was a kiddy clothing store there in the 80’s ran by a Mrs. Baird but not Kiddytown.

Dale Costello As a new teen, I washed their windows weekly. 50 cents and Mrs. Crawfor ran the store.

Nancy Hudson
Mrs. Crawford opened the very first Kiddytown store in CP in the sunporch of her house on Beckwith St. next to the parking lot behind the Olympia Restaurant. My mother shopped for clothes for me there. It then moved up onto Bridge St. next to Comba’s I shopped there for my children’s clothes. Mrs. Townend and Mrs. Griffith worked there

Related reading

Update on Miss Powell from CPHS- John Edwards

Glory Days of Carleton Place- Dear Miss Powell by Terry Kirkpatrick

Glory Days in Carleton Place-Sherri Iona (Lashley)

49-51 Bridge Street Carleton Place Ontario

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Comic Book Day Photo Linda Seccaspina

49-51 Bridge Street Carleton Place Ontario

49 Bridge Street’s original building was destroyed in the great 1910 fire and the structure at that time was Mr. McEwen’s. Until 1946, this lot sat vacant and according to Marj Whyte, it was a vacant lot up until the middle of the 1940s when William Irwin built the bowling alley.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal19 May 1910, ThuPage 1

The lot remained vacant with a foundation of the McEwen store that had burned in the fire of 1910. The fire had been discovered at the rear of the building at the corner of Bridge and Albert Streets in the heart of the town.  This building was occupied by Cameron Brothers and W. Singleton & Son and there is considerable doubt as to which side of the premises the fire originated.  However, it is generally believed that the fire started from a box stove at the back of the meat shop.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal19 May 1910, ThuPage 8

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This is a undated vintage picture of the back of Central Garage with the late Frank Robertson and late Ken Robertson of Carleton Place as children. The photo would have been taken in the late 1920’s. A view of the Masonic Lodge on can been seen in the background.

Up until the construction of the bowling alley there was a large billboard erected in the empty lot. In 1960, Laurie Melrose purchased the bowling alley from William Irwin and changed the façade on account of vandalism.  Current Visions Bowling Centre is a place for fun for the whole family, featuring a six-lane, five-pin bowling alley. They also serve food, snacks, and slushies.

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Related reading:

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!- Volume 1- Part 2

Vison’s Bowling is One of the Top Tag Words in Carleton Place

Who was One of the Million Dollar Bowler’s of Carleton Place?

53-57 Bridge Street Carleton Place Ontario

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Wayback When–Photo-Masonic Lodge, St. John’s No. 63, located at 55 Bridge Street.
This newspaper clipping from 1979 shows the building in the 1920s- This is an interesting photograph of Johnson’s “Nickel Theatre”. (Admission was 5 cents.) “She Was His Mother – A Big Human Drama” seemed to be the main attraction of the day. The theatre was located in the Masonic Temple Building, later the Carleton Place Canadian newspaper offices, and most recently, the home of Apple Cheeks Consignment Store. Pop in to the store and gaze up at the black tin ceilings – the one remnant remaining of the theatre today…Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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photo-carleton place and beckwith heritage museum

THEN

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NOW

 

53-57 Bridge Street Carleton Place Ontario

The Masonic Lodge building was built on Bridge Street in 1887 and rebuilt in 1911. This building has gone unchanged throughout its history except for minor repairs and renovations.

The first temple was built in 1887, but a fire in 1910 destroyed it and many other buildings in the area. The original location was on Albert Street between Bridge and Beckwith streets. There was an attempt to form a Masonic Lodge in Carleton Place in 1822, but it is not before December 20, 1842 that there is first record of the Lodge. The lodge was known as the Morning Star Lodge.

James Bell entered into the Lodge January 20th , 1843. The meetings would take place at Manny Nowlan’s tavern. At Manny’s tavern at the corner of Bridge and Bell Streets, the Charter was drafted in November 1842. W.M. David McNabb established in 1860 that when the Lodge moved to their new location that there would be no ale or intoxicating liquors were to be allowed in the new Masonic Hall (Hurd’s Hall). St. John’s Masonic Hall on Bridge Street 1865-70 was later the Town Fire Hall and used as a garage to house the hearse for Patterson’s funeral parlour.Meetings occurred at Dr. Cornell’s Hall from 1870-87.

In April 1872 the Lodge became St. John’s #63 under the Grand Registry of Canada. Some of the roles that the Masonic Lodge fulfilled included Masonic Funerals, laying cornerstones, and charitable deeds. Brother Dr. Preston laid the cornerstone of the ‘new’ Masonic Temple on September 14, 1887. Until the fire of 1910, the ‘new’ Hall was subject to many complaints, which included the outer walls of the building being wet so, the bricks crumbled because of the frost; there was a need for new ventilation, new cornices, and new eaves trough, and the new ventilation let rain in May 1895. The list of defects grew continually and was recorded each year.

By 1900, the Lodge purchased the Leach lot where the present Temple stands on Bridge Street facing College Street. The Temple had the first cornerstone placed April 20, 1911. In 1919,  location was the premises of a moving picture theatre and a grocers and prior to the 1930’s there was a Nickel Theatre and confectionery.

The right side where Apple Cheeks is now located was the Nickel Theatre, and according to Marg Whyte they got in for 5 cents and saw a news reel, a cartoon and a feature movie. Saturday’s feature was usually a Tom Mix or Keystone Cops which was really popular with the kids. After the movie some of the kids went to left side of the building where Caldwell  Bankers is now located to Ed Keys Ice Cream Parlor. They handed over their money to Bertha Rose and Marjorie (Douglas) Rintoul for either a large scoop ice cream cone for 5 cents or a 15 cents sundae with peanuts and maple syrup. Marj remembers the high ceilings, the wide bladed ceiling fans, and the glass topped tables.

There is nary a feather to be found on Bridge Street now where the Roxy Theatre once stood. But, once upon a time in your great grandfather’s days Jack Hoey ran a feather factory in part of the once theatre.

With a few eager employees and a ready supply of feathers from local farms it became one heck of a  feather heaven. It was said that the grounds of the  building was quite the site. Because the back doors were kept open in case a cool breeze might find its way into the hot factory, the huge fans inside blew tons of feathers around, and many found their way outside. It was considered feather heaven.

Some said there would be feathers sticking straight up in the grass surrounding the building. For a long time, some folks thought that feathers grew outside.

The Carleton Place Canadian took up residence in the Masonic building in the 1930’s after the Nickel Theatre closed down and the owner Mr. Cliff lived on the corner of Lake Ave East and Campbell Street where the McCanns, Nephins once lived (Sweet Family lives there now). After Mr. Cliff left Mr. F.A. J. Davis took over with Asa Roe as assistant editor.

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When the ice cream shop vacated the building it became the office and repair shop of Beatty Washers and the manager was Dan Craig and his salesman was Gordon Bassett. That site later became the liquor store  in 1945 when they moved from their former location on Bridge Street in the old Munro Archery Shop with Leo McDiarmid as manager and Harold Robertson as the clerk paying a monthly rent of $45.

“I remember the liquor store being across from the Carleton Place Post Office- You had to go fill out a form to get your liquor”.-–Anonymous

Later Ed Larimer had a printing shop, and Gerald Coleman a real estate office. Now the Masonic Lodge still resides upstairs and Caldwell Bankers is on the left side and Apple Cheeks is on the right.

Related reading:

Investigating the Basement of the Carleton Place Canadian – If These Walls Could Talk

Oh Turkey Feathers!

Nothing But the Cooler Left in Carleton PlaceLarry Goldstein and The Roxy Theatre of Carleton Place

An Unpleasant Ride? Masonic Lodge– St. John’s No. 63,

Memories of the Carleton Place LCBO

Mysteries at the Carleton Place Masonic Lodge

61 Bridge Street Carleton Place

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1970s

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Later

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Now

61 Bridge Street Carleton Place

At one time there was another open space with a billboard as the property was one of the casualties of the 1910 fire.  Then two separate buildings were built and the smaller part was at one time a dry cleaning establishment, and then a barbershop that was operated by Ab Leach and then after a salon by Adeline Valiquette.

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Tony Rubino operated a fruit and vegetable business in this location and they lived over the store, and an outside staircase off of Albert Street granted the access to the apartment. They later had a large warehouse on the corner of Mill and Beckwith and it was called Rubino Bros Produce and had a business in Perth.

 

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Photo Adin Daigle

 

This business changed hands many times, and some of the owners included: Dave McNeely, George Weir,  the Costellos, and the Roy Browns.  There was also a ladies dress shop that Vicki and George Fletcher operated before they moved next to the Olympia Restaurant and later again to the J.P. McLaren Drug Store.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal07 Nov 1979, WedFinal EditionPage 19

Rubino’s still owned the building and remodelled it to bring Carleton Place Carleton Place’s first IGA store and managed by Maynard Argue and Winter Hicks was his assistant. Argue’s Grocer first ran their business in the 1950’s and 60’s selling everything from produce and eggs to canned goods and cleaning supplies in the old Granary location.

In 1979 the IGA moved to the Carleton Place Mews and the now empty store became a Giant Tiger then Scott’s Dollar store. In 2006 this Bridge Street location became the home of a video and game rental store and now  is a pet store.

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related reading

Memories of Argue’s Food Market?

What’s in a Picture?- Mill Street– Ray Paquette

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Read in the series

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 1– Canadian Tire to The Moose

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to Milady Dress Shop

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 3- St. Andrew’s to Central School

 

carletoncl1 (1).jpg

historicalnotes

18300844_1840399019321788_4228835598836555343_n.png

Carleton Place — A Valley Town at Confederation 

In Canada’s Year of Confederation, the busy sawmill village of Carleton Place had a population of about 700 people. Many citizens were sons and daughters of the Scottish emigrants who had settled the area in the 1820’s.Most of the town’s buildings stood on the north side of the Mississippi River, with only about 12 houses on the south.

Shops on Bell, Mill and Bridge Street were open from 6 am to 10 pm and the average work day for laborers was 11 hours! Want to know more about what Carleton Place (formerly Morphy’s Falls) looked like in 1867?

Read more in the Carleton Place Community Information Guide or stop by the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum and check out their summer exhibition.

 
 
 
 
 relatedreading
 

Kristi LeMaistre

Almonte in the Twenties

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Almonte in the Twenties-Earl Munro – Almonte, Ontario

We see a lot of changes in Almonte since those far-off days. Perhaps the greatest of all are along Mill Street. Turkey Fair was an annual event, taking place on or about December 10th each year. There was generally sleighing by that time of the year. Some years fowl had to be brought in by buggies and sometimes a few automobiles were still running as some of them kept going until the snow got too deep. Roads then were only kept open for horse drawn vehicles during winter months. Some fowl was brought from Darling, Bellamy Road and surrounding country. Some came as far as twenty miles or more.

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Photo- advertisement- January 1920- Almonte Gazette

 

The turkeys, chickens, geese and ducks were bled and feathers removed but they were not eviscerated except on request. Many buggies parked along the sidewalks, but West’s yard was the main parking place. Mr. West bought fowl, also Chas. Hollinger from Ferguson’s Falls as well as buyers from other places. The town was patrolled by one policeman, but others were sworn in for the Agriculture and Turkey Fair. A few of the Police officers in those days were Wm. Watchorn, Joe Burnett, Jas. Cochrane and Wm. Peacock.

Mr. West’s store was perhaps the busiest in town. He ran a General Store, also taking in exchange farm produce, wood, etc. Matt Ballentyne, Miss McFarlane and Miss O’Keefe were some of the employees. Beside West’s store was Wylie’s feed store operated by W. A. James. Wm. Waddell had a small store, then the Rexall Drug Store by M. R. McFarlane. Wilfred Snedden, Wilbert Connery and Raymond Robertson served their drug apprenticeships there, and perhaps many others. Next was W. E. Scott’s furniture and funeral parlour. The Standard Bank, formerly the Sterling Bank was next along the street.

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Photo- advertisement- January 1920- Almonte Gazette

 

H. H. Cole ran a grocery stores, also a Men’s Clothing Store. His son Ben looked after the clothing part. J. F. Patterson’s Drug Store was on the next corner along Mill Street. Meredith and Graham Ireton, Ed. Carey, Bill More, Geo. Bowland and others served their drug apprenticeships with Mr. Patterson. Knight Bros. Hardware was bought out by N. S. Lee in 1925 and is still in operation, although enlarged some by taking over the former drug store.

We will list some of the business places of that day further along the street, but not all in order. Taber’s Ladies Wear, Merchants Bank and later bought by W. H. Stafford. (It had once been owned and operated by John McKinnon), McLean’s Bakery, Woosley’s Barber Shop, M. R. Young Men’s Wear, Clement Bicycle Shop, Dr. McGregor, dentist, and Taylor Bros. Hardware (they opened a Garage on Bridge St. in 1928 with Cliff Robertson as manager.)

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Photo- advertisement- January 1920- Almonte Gazette

 

Eugene O’Reilly had a store on the corner of Mill and Brae Streets and they closed out their business in 1928. Later on J. H. Proctor opened a boot and shoe store, also a harness shop in the back part of the building. On the other corner of Mill and Brae was the Bank of Montreal, then Smolkin’s store, Jas. Cochrane’s Men’s Wear, W. James Barber Shop, George Eades Boot and Shoe Store (Needham and Son, bought out Geo. Eades later on), A. B. Lotan’s Butcher Shop and on the second floor of some of these buildings were four places of business – A. Allan, tailor; R. A. Jamieson, lawyer; T. R. Patterson, dentist; Greig & Greig, lawyers. Mr. Pittard’s printing office was next. He once was editor of the Almonte Times paper. Then was W. D. Lea’s bakery and Laura and Nellie Hogan’s Millinery shop. Though the Hogans now are retired from business they will long be remembered, not only for their millinery work, but also for the kindness they showed to all who called at their shop.

Further along Mill street was Peterson’s Confectionery, Ivan Duncan’s Barber Shop, Telephone Office, W. Lawford’s Store, James Moreau’s store, then the Dominion Store. The last store on the block was Fred Robertson’s, who sold out to Wm. Pimlott in 1928.

 

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White & Thoburn stores from almonte.com

 

Across Mill Street on the corners was Rooney’s Pool Room and Barber Shop. Doyle Bros. had a store next door. Further down Mill Street Dr. Johnson had his dentist office and then James Hogan’s Pool Room and Barber Shop. The Post Office was next. It was a busy place, Wesley Horton hauled the mail from the station to the Post Office and vice versa. Dr. J. T. Kirkland was the Postmaster, Mrs. Kirkland also worked in the post office, as well as May Eades, Annie Laurie and later others were employed. Maurice and Mary Kirkland helped during the Christmas holidays. Mr. Pollock looked after the Customs Office on the second storey of the post office building. Mayme Laurie was his helper and later on Miss Scott worked for him.

On Little Bridge Street was the Thoburn Mill, Dr. Kelly’s house and office, Ben Baker’s store, and a Chinese laundry. Then along that side of Mill Street were some apartment buildings. In the Nontell block on the ground floor was a cafe and also a store run by O’Kilman’s. George Glickman bought him out in 1925 and later on a Mr. Evoy took over the store and Mr. Glickman moved across the street. On the second floor were two apartments, one of which was occupied by the Nontells. On the top storey a long hall ran the length of the building with a row of rooms along the back and another row facing the street. Most of the rooms were rented by millworkers. The writer had a room on the back row in 1927 and ’28 for $1.50 per week. Louis Peterson had a front room rented. He worked long hours making ice cream at his plant which was further down Mill street (no eight hour working days then). George Comba’s funeral parlour was next, then the Gazette office. Next was the Penman knitting mill, which employed a lot of help. Mr. Bert Gunn was superintendent for a number of years. Across from Lee’s Hardware were two houses. In one J. H. Proctor had his harness repair shop and D. L. Woods had a photo shop in the other. Chas. Black operated a garage across from Harry’s Motors. The building was taken down a long time ago. In the back part of the next building was Peterson’s Ice Cream plant, in the same location, but on a much smaller scale than at the present time. However, it must pay to advertise. The following is an advertisement that appeared in 1925 in the local paper –

“The talk of the town” – our new ice cream, purest, richest and most delicious ice cream you ever tasted. Try some, order some. Peterson’s Confectionery.”

 

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Photo- advertisement- January 1920- Almonte Gazette

 

J. B. Wylie’s feed store was next. It was burned down. Next was the Yorkshire Mill and between there and the stone bridge was a building that had been used as a blacksmith shop, cobblers shop, etc. That pretty well takes in the business places on Mill Street in the twenties.

Below is a notice that might be of interest to some – “Notice: All drivers of Motor Vehicles must keep to the right hand side of the street while in Almonte and must be on the right hand side when they stop their cars. The by-law under which this order is issued will be strictly enforced. W.W. Watchorn, Chief Constable, 1925.”

The following item is rather humorous – Women may be as able as men at automobile driving, but we as expert pedestrians always jump faster and further when we find ourselves in the path of a woman driven car. Anon.

The farmers for miles around hauled stove and cord wood to town. Some town people had bush lots in Wolfe grove and cut and hauled their own wood. Robert Giles, Mr. Nontell and some others had circular saws and did sawing for man people. Wood and coal were the fuels used for heating and cooking. Thos. Leishman hauled coal to No. 1 Mill and other places in town. He had a brake on one of the wagon wheels to help hold back the wagon on the hills. Ernie Little looked after the hauling of the freight, while the Waddell men did the express. Eddie James did a lot of work for the town with his team, including the sprinkling of the streets in summer to keep down the dust. There were six mills in town, all working, plus Whylie’s flour mill and Young’s planning mill.

Radios were in use in those days, but attachable ear phones had to be used.

The question is often asked “How did people manage without so many thing that are in use now and taken for granted?” Half a century ago there was no pasteurized or homogenized milk, no waterworks in town, except some private systems operated from their own wells or cisterns, no television, no ploughed road for automobiles, no snow tires, no school buses, no gas or electrically heated homes. However, in the humble opinion of the writer, the majority of the people were happier and more contented than they are now, even with all the comforts and luxuries of this fast moving day and age.

Earl Munro – Almonte, Ontario.

Author’s Note: I found this on the web and have no idea what date Earl wrote this. If anyone knows please let me know. 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

 

Saying Goodbye to Cathie Hawkins McOrmond

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I wrote about Cathie Hawkins McOrmond  awhile ago, and now I must write that today, Friday, is her last day at work for “Downtown Carleton Place”.  McOrmond’s Facebook page used to be consumed with town events squeezed in between her family’s photos. Now there are mostly inspirational posts, as Cathie chose to work her last 8 weeks as Project Manager for the Carleton Place BIA after her job became null and void in the restructuring of things.

I am not going to get specific about the colour of the grass on either side,  but an unplanned departure is never good news. The greatest test of courage on earth is to bear defeat without losing heart, and that is what Cathie has done. Today, let us celebrate Cathie as a friend, mother  and the never to be forgotten face of downtown Carleton Place.

You might not know that Cathie initially wanted to become a social worker when she was in High School. Sadly, the wayward youth of the Ottawa Valley did not have privy to her talents, and instead, the town of Carleton Place acquired Cathie to cheer lead us on at all our local events for the past decade.

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Cathie has lived in Carleton Place since her high school days, and her family is very active in the community. The business graduate has many notches in her belt: teachers aid, life skills trainer, Crime Stoppers, Commodore at our local Canoe Club, and the list goes on.

Whether or not you agreed with her sometimes– you could always see the passion she has for our community.  Makim Gorky once wrote that only mothers can think of the future- because they give birth to it in their children. Cathie’s mother used to be a volunteer tuck shop coordinator for the Carleton Place Hospital. She had encouraged her daughter to volunteer there also, as  she felt it would give her a sense of community.

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There is no doubt in my mind that losing Cathie is a loss, but hopefully we can learn something from it. As Rocky McDonald-  former chair of Downtown Carleton Place, formerly the Business Improvement Association (BIA) said to the Carleton Place and Almonte Gazette:

“Though, I do want it to be said I loved working with Cathie every second,” McDonald noted. “She is an amazing individual.”

“She really does have the town at heart,” he continued. “Unbelievable…that woman cares more about this town than, honestly, town hall cares about this town.”

To be a champion, you have to see the big picture. It’s not about winning and losing; it’s about every day hard work and about thriving on a challenge. That is and always will be Cathie–as an old Japanese proverb says: “Fall seven times, stand up eight”.

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Related reading:

McOrmond excited for future beyond Carleton Place BIA

Cathie Hawkins McOrmond — She’s Just a Small Town Girl