Tag Archives: david ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 27- John Code and John Ennis

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 27- John Code and John Ennis

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Innisville Mills in background ( old bridge)

In 1876 John Code had been out West for a while ( since 1872) and he decided to come back to Innisville for a visit. John Ennis was running the flour and saw mills at that time and decided he didn’t want all the hard work at that time and was trying to interest someone into renting the mills.

Ennis had an employee at that time called Sam Spender and asked John Code if he would consider renting the property with him. Both Spender and Code went into business with each other and rented the Innisville mills for $850 a year for five years. They told Spender they would try it out and would give it up at the end of the year if they did not do well. Even though they did not do too badly John Code got gold fever once again and left to try out the west once again and the partnership ended.

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John Code –ancestry.ca

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

John Code of Perth and Wild Bill Hickock

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The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 24- Code Family– Built for the Love of his Life

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 25- Code Family– A Letter from Mother

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 26- Mary Rathwell and Eleanor Ennis

John Code of Perth and Wild Bill Hickock

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

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Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

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Last week I posted a story about an Innisville man from the Perth Courier, August 11, 1882. The tale went that David “Kerr” had left his wife and Innisville for Australia, and today I find out he abandoned a young child too. He was indignant and wrote “a letter to the Perth Courier Editior” that being away from his wife for 18 years was not considered wrong. He signed it as “David Kerr”.

I tried to search for this man with the last name of “Kerr’ but nothing was coming up until I did some research about Innisville today and pulled up this.

 

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Clipped from Jackson County Banner31 Aug 1882, ThuPage 7

 

So David Kerr was really David Ennis. Why did he change his name? I don’t know about you, but some folks change their name when they have been in trouble and don’t want the past following them. This story was printed in several American newspapers– about 15 to be exact, and some of the wording was odd in a few papers.

In some it was printed: “the woman remained true to her unworthy husband” and some left out the words “unworthy husband” all together. I guessed it depended how you felt about a woman waiting for her husband– or cared about women at all. The fact that his son was 17 when he came home appears that David left Innisville in 1864 knowing, or maybe not caring, that his wife was carrying his child.

 

historicalnotes

Innisville at one time was called Ennisville but it was later changed to its present name as the mail used to get mixed up with Ennesfail.  A post office was opened in Innisville on June 6, 1851 with Michael Murphy as post master.  The mail left Carleton Place for Innisville every Friday morning.

 

Ennis—Died, at Innisville on Thursday, 22nd March, Mr. David Ennis 1894

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

 

Related Reading

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville