Tag Archives: dalhousie

The Tragic Saga of James Frew and Family 1898

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The Tragic Saga of James Frew and Family 1898
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
16 Mar 1898, Wed  •  Page 4

March 1898 Lanark

Word was brought to the foreman that W.C. Caldwell’s mill had been broken into and a quantity of flour,- cornmeal, oatmeal and had been taken away. On going down to the mill about 8:30 that morning he saw that one of the windows in the store room adjoining the mill had been pried up and an entrance had been made there. The doors into the mill had been pried open.

His miller, Mr. Wm. Richardson, told him that he thought about ten bags of flour, one fifty pound paper sack of flour, one bag of a bag of oatmeal and some cummeal had been taken. During that Monday and the following Tuesday he secured sufficient evidence to warrant him in getting a search warrant to search the premise of the prisoner.

The search was made and a quantity of flour, oatmeal and cornmeal was obtained. He noticed that the bag containing the oatmeal, that was found in the prisoner’s house, bore the stamp of his firm whose meal he sold. Mr. Wm. Legary, the next witness, testified to finding a paper bag containing cornmeal while out on the Playfair road early on Monday morning. The bag was found on what he thought the most direct road to the prisoners farm.

Constable James and Webster testified to the result of the searching of ths prisoners house. Upstairs they found four bags of flour, one paper sack of flour, while downstairs they found a fifth bag of flour and some oatmeal. The latter waa in a barrel, while beside the barrel was an empty hag which bore the name of D. R. Boas, and which they thought had contained oatmeal. Tha floor upstairs bore marks of flour dust as though the bags had been emptied or filled there.

They brought the flour and meal back to Mr. Caldwell’s mill, where it was left in charge of Mr. Richardson. The most interesting evidence wss that given by Mr. Richardson, miller, who swore that the flour seized on the prisoner’s premises and returned to the mill was real ground flour. On counting the flour returned, he found it corresponded exactly with that contained in the pile of bags in which the flour was musing. He also identified the bag which contained the oatmeal.

The evidence submitted seemed to point to the prisoner’s guilt and the magistrate accordingly committed him to the county gaol to submit his trial at the spring assure or to be summarily tried before the county judge according as the prisoner may choose. The prosecution are collecting further evidence against him to he submitted when he comes up for trial.

In the afternoon the younger Frew, a youth of not more than ten or twelve yean, appeared before the magistrates, but he was dismissed as no evidence against him was submitted. The boy is a bright and smart looking youth, and it seems sad indeed that he should be brought up under such an unwholesome circumstance.

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The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
11 Mar 1898, Fri  •  Page 4
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
30 Mar 1898, Wed  •  Page 1

W. C. Caldwells Aberdeen Mills, Lanark Ontario. Grist and carding mill. Photo: Ewan R. Caldwell Collection, Negative No. PA-135197. Public Archives of Canada.

James Frew was just trying to feed his family. Not the way to go about it, but he was a few decades older than his wife Susanne who died at an early age leaving him with a very young family. His oldest son had founded a shingles business in his early 20s, died two years before his father was arrested for the robbery at Clyde Mills with his youngest son, Robert. Robert was also stopped in February of 1898 for stealing a ham from John Miller’s butcher shop just before his father came up for trial.

Robert, son was also arrested for the Clyde Flour Mill robbery with his father and then stole a ham from John Miller’s butcher shop just before his father came up for trial.

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
09 Mar 1898, Wed  •  Page 1

Oldest son- Andrew Frew passes away from a cerebral hemorrhage or stroke.

The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Wed, Dec 16, 1896 · Page 5
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The Lanark Era

Lanark, Ontario, Canada
16 Dec 1896, Wed  • 

1891 Census

NAME:James Frew
GENDER:Male
MARITAL STATUS:Widowed
AGE:61
BIRTH YEAR:1830
BIRTH PLACE:Ontario
RESIDENCE DATE:1891
RESIDENCE PLACE:Dalhousie and Sherbrooke North, Lanark North, Ontario, Canada
RELATION TO HEAD:Head
RELIGION:Free Church
OCCUPATION:Farmer
CAN READ:Yes
CAN WRITE:Yes
FRENCH CANADIAN:No
FATHER’S BIRTH PLACE:Scotland
MOTHER’S BIRTH PLACE:Nova Scotia
NEIGHBOURS:View others on page
HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS:NameAgeJames Frew61Alexander Frew22James Frew14Martha Frew12Robert Frew9

The Sad Saga of The Almonte Furniture Factory

The Saga of a James Street Home— Christina McEwen Muirhead

The Continuing Saga of Christena McEwen Muirhead—The McLaren Mill

The Townend Saga is Solved

Fake News and False Reports or- What Happens in Maberly stays in Maberly ….

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Fake News and False Reports or- What Happens in Maberly stays in Maberly ….
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
22 Dec 1909, Wed  •  Page 1

Years ago in the late 1990s I used to do craft shows at the McDonalds Corners Agricultural Hall and I never wanted to come home. I loved the women that volunteered there and I was always met with huge hugs. Even though what I sold was a bit odd for the area ( girls hair clips and accessories in ‘out there’ styles) I was welcomed like I had lived there for years. It reminded me of home and family when I was growing up as a child. I never ever forgot McDonald’s Corners and never will.

It was with great humour that I found this personal ad above from 1909. Something went missin’ from the oven’ as they say and the ‘chickens were squawking’. Now there was one main McDougall in the village so it had to be the daughters of John McDougall. He actually had 6 daughters and 3 sons.

So who started the story about the McDougall sisters? It was also nice for everyone to take their word for it. Did they ever find the fancy work? No, because what happens in Maberly stays in Maberly as they say.

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
23 Jun 1909, Wed  •  Page 1

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
24 Jul 1912, Wed  •  Page 5

McDonalds Corners Agricultural Hall

McDonald’s Corners Agricultural Society

arlene stafford wilson – WordPress.com
McDonald’s Corners Agricultural Hall | arlene stafford wilson- read-Lanark County Dance Halls 1950s, 60s & 70s
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
12 Nov 1919, Wed  •  Page 1

Aunt Susan’s Visit was the beginning before Marching with Aunt Susan. An inspiring story of the fight for women’s suffrage, based on the experiences of a real girl.

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
25 Nov 1914, Wed  •  Page 1
McDonald’s Corners- more Izatt Family pictures Charles Dobie

Dalhousie McDonald’s Corners School

An Email from Alberta about McDonalds Corners

A McDonalds Corners Love Story

McDonald’s Corners at Christmas –Lots of Names

A Little Known Fact About McDonald’s Corners

Ivan and Phyllis McLellan McDonald’s Corners

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

McDonald’s Corners Fair Marks 100th Anniversary 1956 Names Names Names

Ivan and Phyllis McLellan McDonald’s Corners

A STORY OF THE GREAT WAR
The Scott Family of McDonald Corners
During the ‘Great War’ of 1914-1918, in which more than 60,000 Canadians were killed
and 172,000 wounded, nearly every family in the nation paid a price in blood, and some families
paid many times over. The Wood family of Winnipeg saw five sons killed and two more wounded.
The McDiarminds of Toronto lost three of their four boys. The West family of Kingslake, Ontario,
had three sons killed, two of them on the same day.
When the butcher’s bill for the James G. Scott family of McDonald’s Corners, Lanark County, Ontario, was reckoned, it counted, within a– read more click here

I am gobsmacked.. Bob usually gobsmacks me.. but this is amazing. Robert McDonald contributed to the album: 2021-03-22 Sedge Grass Structures.
Admin
· 4h ·
I’ve passed by this spot along McDonalds Corners road several times …. today I met the people responsible for the Sedge Grass Structures. Another visit is in line. Amazing Robert Mcdonald
https://www.facebook.com/groups/264252703737016


Linda Marie Grenier

May 22, 2021  · 


COW SIGHTING – MCDONALDS CORNERS / #PERTH, ON – July 22, 2018
From: Kim Woods

Lost cow on hwy 12 between Playfairville turn off and McDonald’s Corners.

Walking towards the town of McDonalds Corners, north of Perth

Looking for a Bathurst School House– Can you Help?

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Hi Linda

I was curious if you had any information on a small school that used to be on the Bathurst line west ( what it’s called now but maybe concession 11?) It’s built on part lot 1 Dalhousie township on the western side of said lot and the foundation is still present. We have owned the property for a number of years and have found little info. Sorry that should read part lot 9. Owner of the lot in 1879 was a B. Avery. Owner of the east side of lot 9 was a Cameron. Thanks.

Doyou have any information? Please email me sav_77@yahoo and I will forward it to Dan Hunton. Thank you!


Lanark

1968
Maple Grove Public School (after 1969)
Bathurst S.S. #1 and #15
Bathurst
Tay Valley twp.
1967
Glen Tay Public School
 
Bathurst S.S. #3,4,12,13,15
Bathurst
Tay Valley twp.
1967
Glen Tay Public School
 
Bathurst S.S. #5
Bathurst
Tay Valley twp.
1966
Glen Tay Public School (after 1967)
 
Bathurst S.S. #5,6,7,8,9,10,11
Bathurst
Tay Valley twp.
1967
Glen Tay Public School
 
Bathurst S.S. #7
Bathurst
Tay Valley twp.
1943
Glen Tay Public School (after 1967)
Bathurst S.S. #8
Bathurst
Tay Valley twp.
1944
Glen Tay Public School (after 1967)
S.S. No. 5-10 Bathurst
Bathurst
Tay Valley twp.
1944
Glen Tay Public School (after 1967)
S.S. #11 Bathurst (MacVeigh’s)
MacVeigh Rd., Perth
1967
Glen Tay Public School
S.S. #12 Bathurst
Bathurst
Tay Valley twp.
1967
Glen Tay Public School
S.S. #7 and #18 North Burgess and Bathurst (Centre Scotch Line)
Upper Scotch Line Rd., Perth
1966
Glen Tay Public School (after 1967)
SS#1 – North Burgess & SS#2 Bathurst (same book)
513 Upper Scotch Line Rd., Perth
Tay Valley twp.
1968
Glen Tay Public School
 
S.S. #11 and #14 Drummond (Bathurst)
Bathurst
Tay Valley twp.
1968

Schools on the Bathurst Line

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
06 Nov 1918, Wed  •  Page 5
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
10 Jan 1917, Wed  •  Page 5

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
06 Dec 1911, Wed  •  Page 1

The Real Last Duel– Over a Dog? Bathurst Courier

Drummond, Lanark, Darling, Dalhousie, Bathurst and North and South Sherbrooke –Be Ready to March — 1838

Wartman’s Fence – The Old Barb Wire Fence- James E. Closs

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Wartman’s Fence – The Old Barb Wire Fence- James E. Closs
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Wed, Jun 21, 1899 · Page 1

All the natural aids that farmers had traditionally used for fencing, such as stones and wood, were lacking on the prairies of the Midwest. Without fencing, the fruit of their labors was under constant threat. Any passing herd of cattle or buffalo could simply trample the growing grain or gobble it up.

From 1870 to 1878, newspapers and magazines in the Midwest devoted more attention to the thorny topic of fencing than any other political, economic, or social issue. The product was a cash cow from day one. It seemed inconceivable, ten years after it was invented, that the United States had ever managed without it. It was light and cheap, and easy to install and maintain. 

CLIPPED FROM
The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
05 Jul 1900, Thu  •  Page 10

CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Daily News
Kingston, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
26 Oct 1898, Wed  •  Page 2

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
24 Nov 1909, Wed  •  Page 1

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
29 Jun 1910, Wed  •  Page 8
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
16 Oct 1912, Wed  •  Page 5
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
20 Jan 1915, Wed  •  Page 4
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
01 Dec 1915, Wed  •  Page 1
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
31 Dec 1919, Wed  •  Page 5

Lanark County Dry Stone Fences

Alex Bowes The Lanark Fence Man

No More Wire Fences? John Drynan– 1908

Isobel Foster– Fiddler’s Hill –Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

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Isobel Foster– Fiddler’s Hill –Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings
With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

THEIR first night was spent In hastily improvised wigwams of branches. According to legend, this first encampment was on an eminence ever since known aa “Fiddler’s Hill.” Pestered by mosquitoes and black flies, they were apparently in low spirits. Besides being under a depressing nostalgia, they were probably appalled at the prospect of ever establishing clearances In that heavilly timbered land. The story is that a young fiddler, Alex Watt, rescued them from despair by playing those melodies that stir the heart. Under his wizardry, pulses ofthe wild music of a race that dwelt unconquered be- yond Hadrian’s WalL The black mood of despair passed and Scotland took root in Dalhousie.

Once established on their clearances, these Scots began, to feel the need of former associations and social contacts. Old habits and customs of clan hospitality asserted themselves. They visited about the settlement in companies. While on these visits they brought with them sufficient food to help the larder of their hosts for no single homestead had more than sufficient for its own requirements. According to a record of an interview with James Park (descendant of a Dalhousie pioneer), they frequently stayed for an evening at the Ross homestead where “his wife, Lily, would make tea, read the Bible, and sing Gaelic songs far into the night”.

Stories From Fiddler’s Hill

Fiddler’s Hill— Where the Green Grass Doesn’t Grow in Lanark

Notes of Lanark County Dances and Fiddlers

When Researching — Tragedy Somehow Shows Up- Fair Family- Watson’s Corners

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When Researching  — Tragedy Somehow Shows Up- Fair Family- Watson’s Corners

Died, at Watson’s Corners on Sunday, Feb. 7, the beloved wife of George Fair, aged 51.

When Marion Agnes Craig was born in 1845 in Lanark, Ontario, her father, Alexander, was 30, and her mother, Agnes, was 24. She married George Fair on August 26, 1870, in her hometown. She died on February 4, 1897, in Lanark, Ontario, at the age of 52, and was buried in Watsons Corners, Ontario. Agnes Craig married George Fair in Lanark, Ontario, on August 26, 1870, when she was 25 years old.

Perth Courier, Feb. 19, 1897

Watson’s Corners:  It becomes our sad duty this week to record the death of Mrs. George Fair which took place at her late home on Sabbath morning, 7th inst. After suffering intensely from cancer for months.  On December 15 the deceased underwent an operation and had what was supposed to be at the time all the cancer removed but as time went on it was found that her system was full of cancer which eventually caused her death.  

Deceased, whose maiden name was Agnes Craig, was born in Dalhousie 51 years ago.  Twenty six years ago she married George Fair who survives her and came to live in our village where she has resided ever since with the exception of a few years she spent in Michigan.  The deceased was of a kind and loving disposition and made friends with all with whom she came into contact. 

 During her illness her sufferings were such as pen would fail to describe.  Some time previous to the end she called her loved ones to her bedside and bade them a loving farewell telling them she was going to the home prepared for God’s children where there would be no more pain or sorrow.  

The funeral on Tuesday was very large the church literally packed while many had to remain outside.  Rev. J.A. Leitch preached a very appropriate sermon after which the remains were conveyed to the cemetery and deposited in their last resting place to await the resurrection morning.  Deceased was a member of Zion Church, the Ladies Aid Society and Christian Endeavor Society and also a teacher in the Sabbath School.

Name:Mrs George Fair ( Marion Agnes Craig)
Gender:Female
Age:51
Birth Date:abt 1846
Birth Place:Dalhousie
Death Date:4 Feb 1897
Death Place:Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Religion:Presbyterian
Cause of Death:Cancer

Her husband George Fair was born on October 25, 1830, in New York, USA. He married Agnes Craig on August 26, 1870, in Lanark, Ontario. He died on October 30, 1913, in Palmerston, Ontario, having lived a long life of 83 years, and was buried in Watsons Corners, Ontario.

Her youngest son was accidentally killed in 1901.

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The Windsor Star
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
21 Oct 1901, Mon  •  Page 5
Name:George Levi Fair
Gender:Male
Age:15
Birth Date:abt 1886
Birth Place:Dalhousie
Death Date:18 Oct 1901
Death Place:Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Religion:Presbyterian
Cause of Death:Accidentally Shot Died Instanlty

When George Levi Fair was born on April 22, 1886, in Lanark, Ontario, his father, George, was 55 and his mother, Marion Agnes, was 40. He had four siblings. He died as a teenager on October 18, 1901, in Watsons Corners, Ontario, and was buried there.

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Dalhousie Township Names Names Names –Land Registry Genealogy

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Dalhousie Township Names Names Names –Land Registry Genealogy
Dalhousie Lake –Photo-LCGS acquisition from Chris Allen-“First Camp” 1890
Attendees: (in no particular order) Mrs. Wallace, AC Caldwell. Miss Robertson, Miss M. Wallace, N. Young, Ed Cooper, Miss N. Robertson, R. Robertson, Miss L. Drysdale, Lloyd Robertson, Miss Barrie, Mrs. R. Drysdale, Dr. Lyle
relatedreading

Connor Family Lanark Fire- National Media

The Carleton Place Beanery at Dalhousie Lake

People from the Potter-Bennett Block Fire– A Shocking Find

Fire at Poland

The Steads of Dalhousie Lake

Did You Know About the Rules of the Dalhousie Library? 1828 –The Library Pioneers

Tragedy in Dalhousie Township 1936

“They were Set Down in Dalhousie Township”– Effie Park Salkeld

The Story of Wild Bob Ferguson of Dalhousie Township

Dalhousie Poland School Names Names Names

Dalhousie McDonald’s Corners School

Hoods S. S. #2 Dalhousie

Did you Ever Hear About Hoods Corners?

Dalhousie Lake in Photos –Caldwell Family Summer Vacations

William Millar, Farmer No. 14, 2nd Concession of Dalhousie 1820

George Goodson Pretty Genealogy Part 2

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George Goodson Pretty  Genealogy Part 2
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Oct 1944, Thu  •  Page 12
Agnes Bellamy
I have attempted to scan a locket which was given to my mother, Mary Agnes TER MARSCH (SCOTT) by her mother, Millie SCOTT (PRETTY). The pictures are very small and very old (at least 110 years) and are of George Goodson PRETTY and his first wife Agnes BELLAMY. I wasn’t extremely successful but improvement was difficult.
George Goodson PRETTY (1846-1944)-Agnes Bellamy and George Goodson Pretty==Married on Wednesday, January 21, 1880 in Ramsay, Ontario. He also had a second wife, Janet EVANS.

Above photos-LCGS click here

ancestry.ca-These are George Goodson PRETTY (1846-1944) and his second wife, Janet EVANS, taken early summer, 1940. The infant is Martha Louise TerMARSCH, their great-grand daughter.

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ancestry.ca

Back row: Preston, Dorcas & William Centre: Elizabeth, George G, Groege A, Janet Front: Aldon, & James on Janet’s knees. Millie & Elwood not present for photo.

ancestry.ca

Weyburn, Saskatchewan

A postcard with Daniel & Lavina Pretty on left, son George and Eliza Annie Pretty on right. Taken during a visit by Daniel and Lavina to Weyburn. From the collection of G. Raymond Pretty.

George & Eliza “Annie” (Garvin)Pretty with Annie’s father Joseph Garvin. From the collection of G. Raymond Pretty. ancestry.ca

You can also read Clippings of George Goodson Pretty and Ken Manson– Interview with Helen & Jimmie Dodds, Side 1 -“Did you ever hear the story about the fellow who was shot up Bob Pretty’s there”?

Info below LCGS- click here

Outstanding Personalities of the Ottawa District

Saturday, June 10, 1939

PIONEER MARKS VISIT OF KING AND QUEEN

           George Goodson PRETTY of Tatlock, who 79 years ago planted a tree on his farm to recall the visit of the Prince of Wales, later King Edward VII, marked the most recent royal visit, as seen above. Mr. Pretty is standing nearest the tree on which he has fastened a large framed picture of Queen Victoria. Mr. Pretty is in his 96th year.

From Rolling Lands of Lanark Nonagenarian Greets Royal Party

           For almost 96 years George Goodson Pretty has been looking out from his home in the Tatlock section of Darling township to the rocky ramparts beyond, out toward the uplands of Lanark township, a community his pioneer grandsires helped settle when England’s military men were demobilized following the Napoleonic and Peninsular wars.

           His father, Daniel Pretty, hailed from Wiltshire, England; his mother, Margaret WARK, from Scotland’s hills, and looking back over the years it seems now that one hundred acres of rough land covered with millions of stones were inadequate compensation and poor gratitude for a lifetime of army service. But military men then knew little of land values and officials who made the allocations apparently cared less.

           That farm in Darling, cleared of stone and overburden, is today productive, but the thick fences made from these boulders, picked by both men and women with infinite patience and toil, provide evidence eloquent and abundant of what some of these earliest settlers endured before they had sufficient clearances to grow even potatoes or corn for their own subsistence.

Tribute of a Pioneer

           This rugged old veteran, who has never been ill a day in all his 96 years, didn’t see the King and Queen but back on his hundred acres in the seventh concession of Darling township as the drums rolled and pomp and circumstance marked the recent triumphal entry of Their Majesties to the Dominion’s Capital, the aged Mr. Pretty did his best to mark the epochal event. He got out a large picture of Queen Victoria and fastened it to a wide-spreading oak tree that stands in front of his premises. That sheltering tree was proudly planted by him seventy-nine years ago to mark the visit to Canada of another member of the royal family, the Prince of Wales, later His Majesty King Edward VII. Today what was then the tiny sapling with but six tender shoots planted in 1860 is now the most majestic tree on the premises. It is still the “Prince of Wales tree” and somehow one fancies King George VI would have been pleased had he been able to pass by the Pretty farm in Darling’s hinterland and see this living if modest monument erected so long ago in honor of his grandsire by a descendant of him who wore the King’s uniform before Victoria the Good was yet upon England’s throne.

Long Life and Happiness

           Asked to ascribe a reason for his remarkable longevity and freedom from the usual ills to which man is heir, Mr. Pretty simply smiled pleasantly and admitted he didn’t know. He has never used tobacco in any form, but he wouldn’t offer that as a reason. He has used liquor sparingly, still makes use of it moderately if he thinks he needs it. He was worked particularly hard all of his life, helped clear the farm on which he dwells, labored long in the lumber camps when lumbermen hereabout found most of their virgin pine in the vicinity of White Lake and Lanark county. He ploughed the rough land with the aid of oxen and he harvested his meager crop with a reaping hook, carrying the hay and grain on two long poles, because in that primitive day there were neither wagons nor hay racks. In fact he remembers distinctly the advent of the first wagon and to his farm came the first binder in all the district. People then walked miles through bush or swale to attend church or they rode on horseback and he muses that folks seemed more anxious in that primitive day to attend these backwoods places of worship than now when motor cars and modern roads have made things so easy.

Women Have No Easy Task

           But perhaps Mrs. Pretty offers a solution to her husband’s unusually long life, in fact she accepts a little credit for it. Good plain food, plenty of work, pay as you go and freedom from worry is her answer. And in all of these attributes to happiness and contentment she has been a splendid helpmate, never one to shun the arduous duties of the farm, she helped pick the innumerable boulders in the fields, she assisted in shingling the house and barns, she cut grain with the sickle and she helped spin the yarn out of which the family clothing was made. With it all she was the mother of nine children. She was an EVANS of Ramsay township, Janet EVANS, Mr. Pretty’s second wife, who is twenty years his junior and at the age of 76 still does all her own housework and helps considerable with the endless duties of farm life. “Less divorces and more children” would be her simple philosophy for a world that seems to have gone a little askew.

           And this elicited the interesting information that Mr. Pretty was one of fourteen children. That’s almost unheard of in this more advanced era. He is the last of the fourteen and he can reminisce long and interestedly on the evolution of locomotion from the stoneboat to the airplane. His intellect is still keen and he marvels at all the scientific progress he has witnessed. He thinks science has in some respect lessened initiative in the rising generation; in his early days they had to know how to tan a hide, convert it into leather and have it ready when the itinerant shoemaker came into the district “whipping the cat,” a term applied to the wandering maker of the family’s footwear.

Long a Municipal Councillor

           For years George Pretty served well as municipal councillor in Darling township, he still manifests an intelligent interest in municipal affairs and in the larger field of politics; one of his treasured missives is a letter received a few days ago from Hon. Dr. Manion bearing felicitations on his long and useful life. But sitting there with him gazing toward the distant hills of what was once historic “Granny Cummings’ Corner”, [Ed. Note: Now called Watson’s Corners] one fancied he was not thinking so much of the fleeting foibles of a wearied world as of this spreading oak planted by him in formative days and with which he has grown old – a lovely tree that mayhap recalled to his mind the subtle lines of a poet:

          “I think that I shall never see

           A poem lovely as a tree;

           A tree that looks at God all day

           And lifts her leafy arms to pray.”

                              -R.A.J.

OBITUARY

(from an Ottawa

Newspaper?)

George G. PRETTY Passes On Here in His 101st Year

           A life that had spanned a century and was filled with memories of days when Canada was a struggling young nation ended yesterday with the passing of George Goodson PRETTY of Darling township in his 101st year. His death occurred at the home of his son, William PRETTY, 38 Glendale Avenue.

           The “grand old man of Darling township” was born in the Tatlock section. That part of the township was settled by his father, Daniel PRETTY of Wiltshire, England, and other pioneers demobilized from England’s armies following the Napoleonic wars. His mother, Margaret WARK, came to Canada from Scotland’s hills. His boyhood was filled with the hard work and healthful living of the farm, one of a family of 12 children. He is the last of that family.

           Educationed in that district, Mr. Pretty continued to live on the family homestead and in 1880 he married Agnes BELLAMY of Clayton, Ont. who died three years later. In 1886 he married Janet EVANS, also of Clayton, whose death occurred Feb. 4, 1943. The late Mr. Pretty left his farm soon after and came to Ottawa, where he has resided with his son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. William PRETTY, ever since.

Served Community

           For years he served his community well as municipal councilor in Darling township and was also a school trustee. Even after he ceased taking an active part in these things he continued his keen interest in them and in the larger field of politics. One of his treasures was a letter from the late Hon. Dr. R. J. Manion bearing felicitations on his long and useful life. When the Prince of Wales, later King Edward VII, paid a visit to Canada in 1860, Mr. Pretty planted an oak tree on his farm to commemorate the event. When King George VI and Queen Elizabeth visited Canada, Mr. Pretty was not able to see them but he got out a picture of Queen Victoria and hung it on the tree which had grown to sturdy proportions, in an observance of the great event.

           A man of genial personality and splendid character, Mr. Pretty never used tobacco in any form but he did use liquor sparingly, he told a reporter when last interviewed. He was proud of the hard work he had done during his long life. He had helped clear the land on his farm, labored long in lumber camps when lumbermen thereabout found most of their virgin pine in the vicinity of White Lake and in Lanark county. He ploughed the rough land with oxen and harvested his meager crop with a reaping hook. He saw the first wagon in that district and to his farm came the first binder. He walked or rode horseback for miles to attend church. The farm he labored so hard to build up is still in family hands. His son, Aldon, resides on it.

           Surviving, in addition to Aldon and William, are four other sons, Ellwood G. PRETTY of Ashton; R. Preston PRETTY of Chicago; George A. PRETTY of Clayton, and James E. PRETTY of Carleton Place; three daughters, Mrs. Joshua SCOTT of Renfrew, Mrs. Dorcas COUR of Kansas City, Mo., and Mrs. William TRAIL of Lanark; seventeen grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, several nephews and nieces; three sister-in-laws, Mrs. Lewis PRESCOTT of Smiths Falls, Mrs. Kate YOUNG of Western Canada, and Mrs. Richard EVANS of Kemptville.

           The body is resting at Young’s undertaking parlors, Lanark, from where the funeral will be held to Guthrie United Church, Clayton, on Friday for service at 2 p.m. Burial will be in Clayton cemetery.

Stories From Fiddler’s Hill

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Stories From Fiddler’s Hill
Fiddler’s Hill

I have written stories about Fiddler’s Hill yet I had never seen it before. I guess I had this romantic vision of this hill on the 3rd concession of Dalhousie of a fiddler named Alexander Watt keeping the settler’s safe that night from the wolves. Not only did he fiddle for safety but everyone knew the land was scarcely usable for agriculture. Seeing the vast expanse of untamed wilderness ahead of them from the top of the hill, they became discouraged. They did press on the next day, and came to another hill the following night where some settled and founded the community of Watson’s Corners, visible in the distance from this hill. Fiddler’s Hill— Where the Green Grass Doesn’t Grow in Lanark

So when Jennifer Ferris turned the corner off the highway she said,”|Oh by the way this is Fiddler’s Hill!” I said, “What?”

It is definitely a hill when you coast down the hill away from it or drive back up– but it was not what I was expecting. But still another thing off my bucket list.

I found this very tragic story about Fiddler’s Hill.. but there is so much love I put it here for posterity

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 May 2004, Wed  •  Page 25

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 Apr 1999, Fri  •  Page 81

Fiddler’s Hill— Where the Green Grass Doesn’t Grow in Lanark

The Preaching Rock of Lanark County

A Giant’s Kettle in the Middle of Lanark County

Something I did not Know About –Mississippi Madawaska Land Trust — From High Lonesome to Blueberry Hill

Where Are They Now? Paul Keddy of CPHS 1970

Notes of Lanark County Dances and Fiddlers

The Church On the Hill in the Middle of Hood

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The Church On the Hill in the Middle of Hood
July 2020
2001

St. James Church, located at Hood, Ont., was built around 1860, located at lot 16, concession 3, Dalhousie Township.

This church is no longer being used.

Ferguson’s Cemetery PlaceGenealogical Resource
    Alternate Cemetery Name: St. James Cemetery; Hoods Cemetery County/District/Region: Lanark County Historical Township: Dalhousie Current Municipality: Lanark Highlands Historical Municipality: Hood Lot: 16 Concession: 2 Denomination: St. James Transcription Status: Transcribed 1994 Registration Status; Registered Additional Notes: 1 stone beside St. James United Church…
The Ontario Genealogical Society
OGS Cemeteries

Robert “Wild Bob” Ferguson

1866 – 1889

Buried in the Ferguson Cemetery, Dalhousie Township

Friday August 23, 1889 The Perth Courier

Tragedy at Calabogie Lake Fatal Row Between Two River Drivers The Inquest

Kingston Ont., August 15 – “I’ll fight that fellow or I will be in hell tonight.” These were the remarks of an enraged river man in the village of Madawaska on Tuesday night. About eight o’clock he was shot and after great agony died yesterday about 11 o’clock . It was Edward McLaughlin, river driver, who shot Robert Ferguson and killed him.

Madawaska is a small village in the Kingston and Pembroke railway, fourteen miles from Renfrew. Both men were employed at High Falls by E. B. Eddy, Hull Que. On Tuesday Ferguson and McLaughlin went down from High Falls to Madawaska, and were soon intoxicated. Ferguson, ugly when in his cups, interchanged some blows with McLaughlin, but they were speedily separated. Ferguson, however, was not satisfied, he was most violent in his threats. The blustering river driver could not be pacified. Read the rest here– CLICKThe Story of Wild Bob Ferguson of Dalhousie Township

*Hood’s School Info–Anyway, you posted some information about Hoods School ( by the way this school was  just outside of Watson’s Corners at the corner of Sugar Bush Way and concession 3 – across from St James Church.) This school was attended by my mother and her siblings as well as her father and his siblings. The Paul family ( my mother’s family) still lives on Sugar Bush Way.

Thanks for letting me share.
Mary Beth Wylie
(daughter of Eileen Paul, granddaughter of Ray and Minnie Pretty Paul and so on… )

Did you Ever Hear About Hoods Corners?

The Tragic Life of Mary Paul–Hood’s Settlement- Mary Beth Wylie

Did you Ever Hear About Hoods Corners?