Tag Archives: dalhousie lake

Canadian Girls in Training

Standard
Canadian Girls in Training

 

20664979_10155148613211886_1128016444134794698_n.jpg

Photo- Lanark & District Museum

The Explorers who met on Thursday evenings in the United Church in Cowansville, Quebec worked on getting stars and eventually the “E’ pin which promoted you to C.G.I.T. The C.J. I. T. gals wore cool middy blouses and navy  blue skirts and their meetings opened with devotion and singing followed by a small “business” meeting. Then meetings would proceed with a social portion, often consisting of games or crafts and treats. I wonder if I could say that mission statement today.

 

 

CGIT was established in 1915 by the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA) and the major protestant denominations in Canada as a means of promoting Christian living in girls aged 12-17. The CGIT movement was started by four young Canadian women: Winnifred Thomas, Olive Ziegler, Una Saunders, and Constance Body.

As World War One continued overseas Thomas, Ziegler, Saunders, and Body looked at the lack of leadership roles available to young women at home and the need to provide service opportunities for girls.  The four women formed the Canadian Advisory Committee on Co-Operation in Girls’ Work, financed by the YWCA, to study the interests and needs of female youth.

The Committee and CGIT movement was female dominated in its leadership and argued that girls should have opportunities equal to boys to serve their country in wartime and that training opportunities were needed for female self-betterment.

 

Sandy Dobie– I remember having to iron those cotton blouses. If you were a young teen in a small town you likely belonged.

Sue Johnston– I was a CGIT gal….loved the uniform

The years 1916-1917 saw the Committee attempting to determine what style of education would be most useful for Canadian girls.  The overwhelming majority of existing scholarship on religious youth education was focused on boys and the Committee hoped to design a program that reflected the needs and wants of female youth.  The first CGIT program was published in 1917 in a booklet called “Canadian Girls in Training — Suggestions for the Mid-Week Meetings of Sunday School Classes, Clubs, etc., for Teen-age Girls”.  The booklet’s popularity greatly contributed to the establishment of the CGIT movement nationwide.

The YWCA financed the CGIT movement for the first five years while it worked to become established on local, provincial, and national levels. By 1920 CGIT groups were being run across Canada and emphasized providing young women with the same opportunities that were available to young men, training girls for humanitarian service, and providing a safe space for personal and religious growth.

CGIT also served as leadership training for many young girls and the movement flourished with local groups being organized. In 1933 there were 40,000 members in 1100 communities across Canada. Retreat weekends, summer camps, leaders’ councils, and conferences sprouted up across the country providing additional leadership and skill building opportunities.

The early years of CGIT saw discussions of working with the Girl Guides of Canada however it was decided that the values of the two groups did not align.  CGIT disliked the emphasis Girl Guides placed on the accumulation of badges and competition.  Rather CGIT maintained that activities relating to physical, intellectual, religious, and service development should be undertaken for their own enjoyment and value. A Girl’s Standard issued by the CGIT provided guidelines for girls to measure themselves by and after 1920 the CGIT Purpose summed up the goals set by the organization:

As a Canadian Girl in Training
Under the leadership of Jesus
It is my purpose to
Cherish Health
Seek Truth
Know God
Serve Others
And thus, with His help,
Become the girl God would have me be.

 

In the 1930s the CGIT broke ground with its inclusion of sex education and its use of The Mastery of Sex by Leslie D. Weatherhead to provide appropriate sex education.  This education was often framed around the need to provide guidance for future wives and mothers.  However this emphasis on family life was frequently paired with sessions on vocations, talks from professional women, and the promotion of post-secondary education.

Author’s Note– I don’t think I remember sex education in my small rural town:)

 

15941503_1370020829709734_6410483792843882116_n.jpg

This another photo from Kathleen Anne Palmer-O’Neil.. this is a Girls’ Conference, Iroquois Ontario, November, 1928. Looks like the CGIT (Canadian Girls In Training) to me? Anyone remember that? I know I was in them briefly.–Charles Dobie Photo

CGIT did not aim to radically change female roles in Canadian society.  Rather it aimed to promote female influence in already accepted female spheres.  It placed considerable emphasis on the role of women in Christian education, the home, and the community. CGIT provided spaces for women to engage in self-discovery, intellectual pursuits, and community leadership roles.

Membership declined nationwide following World War II but continued to thrive in numerous small communities. The community anniversary I participated in was one of those regions where CGIT continued to thrive through the 1950s and 1960s. After 1947 the movement was under the direction of the Department of Christian Education, Canadian Council of Churches. In 1976 the organization became an independent ecumenical body and is now supported by Canadian Baptist Ministries, Presbyterian Church in Canada and the United Church of Canada.  

The decline in membership can unsurprisingly be linked to the decline in mainstream church membership. Parents and youth are looking outside of the church for extracurricular activities, and leadership opportunities for young women can be found in a diverse range of organizations today.–by Krista McCracken

 

 

 

historicalnotes

img.jpg

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  04 Mar 1970, Wed,  Page 39

 

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Feb 1959, Thu,  Page 20

 

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Mar 1947, Fri,  Page 27

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

 

Among the Strangers There Was…

The Eaton’s Sewing Girls

September Morn and the Dancing Girls?

Anyone Know anything about The Whoop La Girls Camp

You Better Work it Girl! Cover Girls of Carleton Place 1965

 

 

unnamed (1)

Advertisements

So Which One Room School House Became a Pig Barn?

Standard
So Which One Room School House Became a Pig Barn?

 

unnamed-60.jpg

The flags no longer proudly fly above the former one room school house nor does the teacher ring the bell for recess. The teachers from the old, one-room schoolhouses deserve a lot of credit for the wonderful work they did under difficult working conditions in the days of yesteryears.

The teacher would try to have a lot of work on the blackboards for the various grades before the day began. As soon as the children were settled, they began with the recitation of The Lord’s Prayer as good Christian morals were very important to the folk in the community.

The older pupils would have their work laid out for them so they could work alone from blackboard materials while the teacher concentrated on the younger children who were more dependant on direction and explanation. The week’s monitors would have brought in a pail of fresh drinking water from the rusty old pump at the school well. The dipper would be in the pail and everyone drank from it, sharing whatever germs were active in the little community. Some older boy would put an extra stick of wood in the stove to warm the room up.

What happened to some of those one room school houses that once scattered Lanark County? By the 1950s, the days of the one room school house were numbered. The introduction of rural school busing resulted in school closures as sites were amalgamated for efficiency and cost effectiveness.

 

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal20 Jul 1979, Fri[First] RevisionPage 3

In April of 1965 trouble was brewing and the pot was over flowing. Mrs. Nino Manzon of Carleton Place had been carrying on a paper war since January against the townships eight schools.  In 1965 Margaret Manzon’s children were attending Tennyson School in Beckwith Township. Declaring the rural one room school “antiquated”, she began a campaign to bring modern educational facilities to the area.

Most of them were sold at tender except the sole survivor of a one-room public school that once formed the backbone of childhood life in Appleton. The little brick schoolhouse in Appleton was leased by the North Lanark Historical Society for $1 a year. Tragically that beloved schoolhouse burned down in 1973– but was rebuilt and stands today as the North Lanark Regional Museum.

Most of the schools became private homes except for one located near Casselman. (Prescott Russell school board) That school which became a pig barn, and two in Leeds and Grenville were used as storage sheds. Most were snapped up for about $500 each depending on the location, age and condition. One sold for as much as $13,000,  yet one located on Dalhousie Lake waterfront property went for a mere $250. *That particular school house had sat vacant for 20 years. ( Please see Alice Gilchrist’s comment below)

historicalnotes

 

*Dalhousie Lake School-

“yet one located on Dalhousie Lake waterfront property went for a mere $250. That particular school house had sat vacant for 20 years” can you identify this schoolhouse please. Not aware of any schoolhouse on Dalhousie Lake waterfront ….. closest I can think of is former S.S.#4 and it is a mile away from lake”. Alice Gilchrist
Author’s Note- I try to do a lot of research in my writings but nothing beats personal recollections. So I believe Alice..:)

 

 

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal20 Jul 1979, Fri[First] RevisionPage 3

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal09 Jul 1980, WedValley EditionPage 3

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

The Fight Over One Room Schools in 1965!

 

The Carleton Place Beanery at Dalhousie Lake

Standard

duncan-dalhousie-lake (1).jpg

No information is known about this photo other than these men were on Dalhousie Lake, Lanark County. Photo: Charles Dobie Collection from Ruth Duncan

 

There is a story that has gone around the town of Carleton Place about four young lads that went camping on Dalhousie Lake and became remembered during a certain summer a long time ago. They scoped out the area around the lake and decided to camp some distance away from five or six campers that had come from Kingston. After they put everything away their stomachs began to rumble so they got a fire going in the sand and put  a pot of beans to boil on the fire.

By this time their method of cooking had tweaked the interest of a few nearby campers and they came over to see what the lads were up to. When they told the onlookers they were cooking beans in the sand that really got everyone’s interest as no one had seen that before. The group of folks which had gotten larger at this time watched the boys pour off the water and add generous slices of salt pork and molasses to the pot on top of the beans.

Things got interesting as the boys dug a hole, put in the covered pot, and covered it over with sand. They built a fire on top of it and kept it going all day long. That evening when they removed the pot from the sand all the campers came back to see how things had turned out. Some people even began to laugh thinking what on earth had these boys done.

The Carleton Place lads had the last laugh and gave each bystander a saucerful of the hot baked beans. Immediate shouts of “By George these are delicious”  rang through the night air and the boys were now the “candy kids” of the campground. Each day for the balance of the week they baked a pot for the campers and in turn the recipients kept the lads supplied with homemade pies, ice cream and some even slipped in a few cigarettes on the side.

 

 

historicalnotes

Cheryl added: in the story From the Files of The Canadian — Who is This? Where is This?

My Uncle Harry Majore made the sand-baked beans for the annual Bean Supper at St. Declan’s Church. I remember going behind the drive shed and watching Uncle Harry work around the pots of beans. The aroma was amazing! It was always a fun time, with great food, home-made pies and games. It was also a time to visit the graves of my relatives. Thank you so much for writing about this area of Lanark County!

My Uncle Harry Majore made the sand-baked beans for the annual Bean Supper at St. Declan’s Church. I remember going behind the drive shed and watching Uncle Harry work around the pots of beans. The aroma was amazing! It was always a fun time, with great food, home-made pies and games. It was also a time to visit the graves of my relatives. Thank you so much for writing about this area of Lanark County!

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

 

Related reading

We’ll Never See a Woman Again Like That-Irene Crosbie

 

 

 

Knitted Mittens for the Dionne Quintuplets–Mary McIntyre

Standard

 

14639595_10154337556156886_8879301402128312355_n.jpg

Author’s Note–Mrs. Mary McIntyre was once called the ‘grand old lady’ of Dalhousie Lake. Mother of Mrs. Walter Geddes she lived to be over 100 years of age. In her 101th year she knitted  5 tiny pairs of mittens for the Dionne Quintuplets. She lived for years with her her daughter who gave her a birthday party every single year.

 

Perth Courier, Sept. 16, 1932

Almost a Centenarian:  Mrs. Mary McIntyre

 

After a curved or crooked course of many miles through rocky channels, past dense forest growth of birch, poplar and ever green trees where cultivated farms alternate with rocky barrens and hills the wide Mississippi river comes to a formidable crisis in its path at the high falls of the Mississippi where the leaping stream furnishes the greatest water power for the hydro development between the Ottawa river and the Trent system.  A mile or so further down the wild water furnishes a minor power for the saw and roller mills of Walter Geddes; then after a rapid descent past high picturesque hills, one finds peaceful rest for a time on the broad expanse of Dalhousie Lake.  On the wide beach of the lake and backed by all kinds of native trees and shrubbery have been built neat summer cottages owned by holiday people from far and near on the hill just above stands the home of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Geddes overlooking the lake and cottages and hills and farms which border the beautiful lake.

In this comfortable and hospitable dwelling an aged lady finds a welcome home.  This is the mother of Mrs. Geddes, Mrs. McIntyre, of whom we were privileged to see and converse with a short time ago.  Mrs. McIntyre was born in North Sherbrooke in 1834 and is now therefore 98 years old—an age somewhat remarkable as life comes and goes in this sphere.

With the original settlers about 1820 came the representatives of two Highland clans—Duncan Ferguson of Argylshire and Alexander McDougall from Perthsire.  Soon after their arrival in the new land,  a son of Ferguson married Miss Violet McDougall and to them a daughter, in 1834, was born, the subject of this sketch.

The parents could speak little or no English only their native Gaelic and the little daughter, taught in this parental home, could speak it fluently and in fact never wholly forgot it to this day.  Association with lowland neighbors and teaching in school brought her a knowledge of the Anglo Saxon tongue and this practically became her thinking language.  Here we must mention that the first schoolhouse in North Sehrbrooke was built at Elphin in 1834 in the east half of Lot 10, 2nd Concession.

Mrs. McIntyre has seen the greatest growth in the township in farm cultivation and improvements through many a year of hardship and privation of the settlers until the original cabins have been changed into comfortable farm homes and the very primitive log school houses succeeded by ones of frame and brick all over the two townships.  And so the course of progress along life’s highway has been the history of her own life—the sickle, scythe, cradle, mowing and threshing and binding machines and the kindred working implements have all passed before her life’s work on the farm; and it is a pleasure to know that in her daughter’s home she has found congeniality and affection after life’s burdens have been laid down.

Mrs. McIntyre can yet put a neat patch on a garment and another patch on that even better than the first, so say her friends.  In her girlhood days there was no bridge across the Mississippi in the two townships and their way to market at Perth or Lanark involved much hardship that we can hardly imagine now.  She has walked to Perth, rode there on oxcarts, on horseback, on rough sleds and cutters—and in motor cars as well—and she has heard and seen the airplanes flying far above.