Tag Archives: dairy

Langtry’s Dairy Carleton Place Larry Clark

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Langtry’s Dairy Carleton Place Larry Clark
All Photo’s are from Larry Clark
Looking for something else in my garage, found this. I would have tried to place them in the Langtry blog but would have had to do it one at a time, so sending to you to do with as 
you will.
Maple Leaf Dairy -249 Bridge Street Carleton Place–Joann Voyce added When this picture was taken this was Langtry’s Dairy/ The building to the right was the Beer Store— Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Historical Museum

Nancy Hudson– First met Fred when he used to delivery milk to our home in Innisville. He was a really nice man. Remeber when the dairy was first Langtry’s and later Rintouls. read-Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Angie Ballantyne–My grandparents Naomi Loton and Gordon Langtry used to run that dairy and lived upstairs. I have an old milk bottle!

What did you Buy at The Dairy?

More Memories of the Maple Leaf Dairy

Cold Milk Ice Cream and Butter —- Carleton Place

When I Say Whoa–I Mean Whoa–The Dairy Horse

What Did you Like Best about the Maple Leaf Dairy? Reader’s Comments..

Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Remembering Milk and Cookies –Metcalfe Dairy

No Milk Today–My Love has Gone Away

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk?

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

What did you Buy at The Dairy?

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Angie BallantyneMy grandparents Naomi Loton and Gordon Langtry used to run that dairy and lived upstairs. I have an old milk bottle! 😊

The question was: Go back in time.. What are you going to buy at the Dairy today on Bridge Street?

Kevin St JeanI believe paul dulmages dog shopped there

Jo-Anne Drader NelsonWas the dog a black lab ? I remember seeing him all over town when I was young. He just went wherever he wanted. Very nice dog.

Terry LathamCould have been Duke he used to wander all over town. Stop in for a visit at some places. All I had to do is stop and ask if he wanted a drive home and he would jump in my truck if he did. Or just walk away if not.

Cathy DulmageHe stopped there every day for a treat from Mr Veenstra. Also he stopped at the bottom of Argyle St to drink from the stream every day and many other places

Paul HodginsI remember Duke in the water going after orange balls that sank but he would dive down and get them every time Amazing dog Duke was ❤🐕

Gail Sheen-MacDonaldMilkshake for my bother, sister and me, an ice cream cone for my mom and a quart of buttermilk (uggh!) for my dad.

Brian Giffin5 cent ice cream cone after church

Sandy HudsonIce cream

Leslie Garagan.25 would get me a big bag of mixed candies.

Bj LayComic books, video games, !!! Thanks Fred!!!

Janine McDonald AzzouzCandy on route to the movie at the Town Hall.

Lorraine NephinMilkshake.

Kathy DevlinA bag of penny candy or maybe be a popsicle

Mark Pyegrade 7 Carambeck,walk down and buy sweet tarts…

Linda; from Gord CrossMore Memories of the Maple Leaf Dairy–Ray Paquette2 hours
A lot of your younger followers would probably be unable to identify the people pictured on the steps, I can only name three: Ray Morrell, Isobel (Nesbit) Bryce and Joann (Waugh) Cullen….

Jo-Anne Drader NelsonIn line on a Friday night to buy a bag of mixed candy. Fred must of had a lot of patience. Every kid picking out each candy. 4 mojos ,2 blue whales etc …. Lol

Ruth Anne SchnuppDefinately an ice cream cone !

Toby RandellGrowing up, as soon as you walked in on the right was a wall of penny candies. That was the go to, but a close second would have been an ice cream cone.

Toby RandellTotally forgot the giant freezies.

Bill ConallThree-scoop ice cream cone. Fifteen cents

Shannon ToshIce cream cones

Norma JacksonTiger tail ice cream

Sonya SpurwayIce cream !!!!

Sandi Shaw

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Ted HurdisPenny candy and ice cream

Donna Griersonmilkshake

Brianna Ryan1 cent candies😍

Kate HurdisCandy, marbles and pogs

Cathy PatersonPop candy ice cream

Amanda WaterfieldRenting videos games is what I remember doing

Mel StanzelI had a milkshake after finshing my paper route . milk shake made by the eldest Nesbitt girl

Tom MontreuilOrange sherbet cone and milk shake cups for drinking whiskey

nna LeMaistreChocolate milkshake 25 cents

Phil HallahanThose maple toffee cones

Jane ChurchillPenny candy and chocolate milkshakes; picking up smokes and Coca Cola for my mom when I was only about 5 or six years old 🙂

Karen Frances RintoulJane Churchill I remember going and getting Velveeta mac & cheese and the popcorn you shake on top of the stove and then going to your place. I don’t even know how old I was.

Kimberly Townend-WillettsI loved the smell, I can still remember it even though I was 2 years old.

Heather DormanFuzzy peaches from the 5cent candies because I’m a high roller 😂I once tried to buy candies with my moms silver dollar and he called my mom 😅

Yvonne RobillardOmg, moved here 1983 but visited from 1980,didn’t recognize the dairy, but did get ice cream there from fred veenstra!

Phyllis BensonIce cream cone

Joanna LucianoPre-scoop tools; remember the cylindrical shaped ice cream portion set in the cone??

Jeff RobertsonVideo games. Bigfoot candies and always shooting the shit with the owners!

Bonnie AdamsI could always get a Saturday Citizen there on Sunday

Angela BigrasIce cream

Sandra DakersYou’d be surprised what a big bag of candy you could get for 10 cents

Beth NolanMy grandparents lived o Heriotte Street..my grandfather and I went to the Dairy after supper and got ice cream cones for each of us, for my grandmother and Uncle Allan….I use to run down to buy milk if my grandmother needed some…..then I’d go to Millers stable on the back street to see the horses

Carly DrummondWe used to rent Super Nintendo games from here & get their cheap candies!

Adam DowdallI would buy marbles there

Keith DrummondI grew up living a block away from the Dairy since I was 2 (1965). I don’t recall seeing all of you there 😃 but Fred was the only owner I knew of. Twenty five cents did go a long way back then.

Keith Drummond hey neighbour, I saw you there and at my house many times!! 😉Jane Churchill

Dave WhiteIce Cream

Danielle TreffA banana and chocolate popsicle, and an N64 game for the weekend

Larry DelargeIce cream

Wesley ParsonsFlavored toothpicks and 10cent chocolate popsicles

Rebecca ChampagneAs a child I would go here countless amount of times. I remember buying Garbage Pail Kids cards. They all came with a stick of gum. I would also rent Nintendo games there as well.

Pam McCauleyCandy

Elizabeth SmithGiant licorices. One time, my friends and I convinced Fred to sell us a full bag of the penny candy. 800 gummy bears

Kaylea White100 sweetish berries

Thelma SavardIce cream you would go with a bowl and it would be filled up for supper dessert can you imagine now going with a bowl?

Marjorie GawThelma Savard awesome

Megan KerryCandy on the way to swim practice

Alana FlintMaple Walnut Ice Cream and Salt ‘n Vinegar Chips for dipping in the ice cream!

Cody Smithson$1.00 pepperoni stick and a $1.00 can of pizza pringles. Fred never charged me tax and would always have a fresh news paper for me to take back to my grandfather.

Lyann LockhartAny candies that were 2 for 1cent and 3 for 1 cent. Mojos , green leaves , gum balls and caramels but they were 2 cents.

Allison VaughanDidn’t go there often but recall getting candies there

Laurie Stearns-SmithA little brown bag filled with as many candies as a quarter would get me. It was surprising how much you could buy.

Bill LemayMy dad smoked Buckingham cigarette s choke a horse

Amanda KatFill a paper bag with 5 cent candies 

Bill BrownHot summer days as a kid – ice cream – candy

Andrea McCoyGood stuff. 15 cents bought enough

So what has happened to the Dairy?

Zoe Whitney-HandI used to buy .25 cent candies and milk for my parents, it was recently renovated into two newer apartments on the bottom where the store was and the original two up top

Related stories

More Memories of the Maple Leaf Dairy

Cold Milk Ice Cream and Butter —- Carleton Place

When I Say Whoa–I Mean Whoa–The Dairy Horse

What Did you Like Best about the Maple Leaf Dairy? Reader’s Comments..

Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Remembering Milk and Cookies –Metcalfe Dairy

No Milk Today–My Love has Gone Away

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk?

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

More Memories of the Maple Leaf Dairy

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More Memories of the Maple Leaf Dairy
Linda; from Gord Cross


Merrill Fisher, a good friend then and now, sent me these pictures of the dairy.
Can anyone name all those on the steps of the dairy in 1955?
Joann Voyce

Isabel Nesbitt Bryce, Joann Waugh Elva Ford Ray Morrell possibly a Giffin

Julia Waugh GuthrieJoann Voyce , just seen this picture and noticed Aunt JoAnn right away. I love these pictures
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Carol KwissaYes my aunt Joanne Waugh -Cullen on Isobel’s left shoulder and I also recognized Elva Ford

Susan Thompsonthe woman on the left hand side looks like my aunt Maryanna Giles Dunlop
Sylvia GilesYes Maryanna Giles-Dunlop front row left and her friend Isobel Bryce next to
Her!!!
Sherri IonaLook at the sign above the door! Smoking advertisements were so prevalent.

Larry ClarkI knew the 2 guys in the doorway (not the one holding the cone) Dave Splane comes to mind for the one on the left but probably not right!

Anne CramptonBubba look how beautiful your mom was.

1967– 6 cents of whipping cream–October 15, 2020 · Wendy LeBlanc

I have so many memories of ‘The Dairy’ as we kids of the 1950s called it; it was around the corner from our home on James Street and we either shopped there or at least walked by it every day. The following are some random memories as they come to me:When Dad first came home from WWII, he didn’t go immediately to the promised job at Findlay’s Foundry, but worked delivering milk for the dairy for some months. Our milk was delivered daily from The Dairy, but occasionally Mum would send us over to buy a quart of milk; I clearly remember carrying the empty glass bottle with 2 dimes and a penny in it to buy the milk, which at that time was not homogenized. Mum either poured the cream off the top for another use or vigourously shook it to give us wonderfully rich whole milk.On Sundays following attending Church at Memorial Park United, we stopped off at The Dairy to buy a brick of Neapolitan ice cream, our staple dessert on Sunday noon. Very occasionally, we would walk over to The Dairy with a bowl and come home with it full of scoops of dipped ice cream for a special treat (we had only an icebox, so couldn’t store ice cream).In the 1960s, my sister Kathryn worked at The Dairy and brother Wayne and I expected extra large ice cream cones from her, and I am sure she gave them to us in fear – not of losing her job, but of us. Peggy Mace and I stopped at The Dairy almost daily on our way back to school after lunch to buy penny candy; Mrs. Saunders was working there and was very patient with us as we carefully and slowly selected our treats. While we were there, a well-dressed man (I think I know who it was but hesitate to say as I am not certain – but definitely a town business man) came into The Dairy every day and drank down a glass of Alka Seltzer; now that must have been some kind of a lunch he went home to! Our childhood neighbourhood territory was small, but our lives were enriched with businesses like The Dairy and the people who owned and worked there.Dale Costello Great memories, and stories of Maple Leaf Dairy. We were big time in CP with two dairies. Many a chocolate shake hand made by Ray Morrels mom. My Uncle, Lorne Aitken delivered bottled milk, and I helped on Saturdays– You can get Wendy’s book at the Carleton Place museum

Ruth Anne SchnuppI remember they had the biggest cones for 10 cents !

Kathy DevlinI remember taking empty pop bottles in to cash out for a bag of penny candy, pixie stix, licorice , mojos, green leaves

Jim McKittrickGreat summer jobs for 3 years 1 in the dairy and 2 summers delivering milk for Bill R ( 1965 66 and 67 )

Sherri IonaNana would send us off with a 25 cents . . . . Popsicles, ice cream, milkshakes. . . . What memories!

R.D. LackeyAmazing place as kids loved going there rent games 5cent candy’s a place like this need to come back

Carol McDonaldI worked after school and weekends and some summer days when Mrs Saunders would take holidays for Bill and Ethel Rintoul and babysat their kids some evenings. Buttermilk was served by the glass , big ice cream cones were served to a line up of people especially on Sundays and many milkshakes all different flavours, penny candy, very busy most days!

Jan McCarten SansomDoug B. McCarten ..I remember ice cream cones and milkshakes, and especially time spent with my best friend Katherine Langtry, watching cartoons Saturday mornings in their home upstairs .. wonderful memories !

Doug B. McCartenJan McCarten Sansom in addition to all that I remember a Sealtest sign with feet LOL

John ArmourI got my milkshakes everyday (even through winter). Mrs. Nephin made the best ones.

Sandy FredetteDon’t know when it was originally built, but do know it’s being renovated now… my grandson is helping out on the project.

Jane CarnegieWent there daily on my way back to school for penny candy…would ho back after school with pop bottles to cash in for chips and more candy!

Derek Bowker

I remember walking home and stopping in for penny candies! Got BUSTED shoplifting when I was just a little kid! Parents got called and I had to go back and apologize! Life lesson!!!Renting Nintendo machines and games for the weekend! That place was LEGENDARY!!!

Meghan PookThe Dairy! We’d sneak off of Carambeck’s yard during lunch and buy 5¢ candies. I remember the heavy fridge door made of wood with latch style handle. That’s where the small cartons of chocolate milk were. The older gentleman who worked there usually reminded me of a cross between Mr. Dress-Up & Mr. Rogers in appearance but always struck me as stern. Probably b/c he was dealing with a gaggle of random school kids streaming through buying less then $1 worth of product. I loved the miniature brown paper bags we used for the candy. I loved the way the bell sounded when you entered. I loved the way it smelled in there – like dust and tobacco and something sweet. Good times.

Meghan PookThe Dairy! We’d sneak off of Carambeck’s yard during lunch and buy 5¢ candies. I remember the heavy fridge door made of wood with latch style handle. That’s where the small cartons of chocolate milk were. The older gentleman who worked there usually reminded me of a cross between Mr. Dress-Up & Mr. Rogers in appearance but always struck me as stern. Probably b/c he was dealing with a gaggle of random school kids streaming through buying less then $1 worth of product. I loved the miniature brown paper bags we used for the candy. I loved the way the bell sounded when you entered. I loved the way it smelled in there – like dust and tobacco and something sweet. Good times.

Brian Giffin5 cent ice cream after church

Related reading…

The Duff Dairy Diphtheria Scare

Cold Milk Ice Cream and Butter —- Carleton Place

When I Say Whoa–I Mean Whoa–The Dairy Horse

What Did you Like Best about the Maple Leaf Dairy? Reader’s Comments..

Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Remembering Milk and Cookies –Metcalfe Dairy

No Milk Today–My Love has Gone Away

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk?

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

Almonte the Creamery Town 1900….

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Almonte the Creamery Town 1900….
Producers-Dairy-And-Flour-Mill almonte.com

December 1900

A Gazette scribe dropped around to the Almonte Creamery on Water street the other day, and found the manager, Mr. J. C. Jackson (a graduate of the Kingston Dairy School), and his assistant, Mr. Frank Ferguson, busy as nailers, packing up the product for the day. Mr. Jackson kindly showed the quilldriver around the premises, pointing out the process of manufacture, and showing the advantages it possesses over the ordinary dairy system.

 One strong point is its cleanliness. When the work of separating the cream had been accomplished the accumulation of extraneous matter that settled within the cylinder was something surprising, and was in itself a strong creamery, in which; the best of modern machinery and appliances have been installed, and everything seems to work to a charm. The upper story is used as a storehouse for butter boxes, etc.

The old boiler and engine have been removed, and ones are in their place, and furnish ample power for the purposes required. The receiving vats, the twin cream vats, the butter worker, the separator and the immense churning machine is the bets that money can buy.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Jul 1900, Thu  •  Page 1
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Feb 1904, Fri  •  Page 7
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Aug 1973, Fri  •  Page 3
mer Intercollegiate curling champion.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Feb 1975, Fri  •  Page 19

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Oct 1927, Thu  •  Page 2
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Jul 1900, Thu  •  Page 1

The sudden death of Clare T. (Pete) Syme of R.R. 1, Almonte occurred a, the Almonte General Hospital at 12.30 a.m. on Monday, May 13, 1974, following but a few hours’ illness. He was 61. Clare farmed on the home farm at Bennie’s Corners, and also operated a milk truck route for several years, and for the fast two years was employed with Lindsay Farm Equipment in Almonte. Born in Ramsay Township on May 15, 1912, he was a son of Mrs. Mabel (Snedden) Syme, and the late, Peter T. Syme. He was a member of the United Church. He is survived by his wife, the former lone Boal, whom he married at Pakenham on June 10, 1942; his aged mother, Mrs. Peter T. Syme; a daughter Marilyn (Mrs. James Naismith) of Pakenham; a grandson, Matthew; and one sister, Myrtle (Mrs. Tom Nugent) of South March. Clare attended school at Bennie’s Corners on the 8th line of Ramsay and continued on in high school in Almonte. He was always ready to participate in sports during these years. He loved the game of ball and always found time to play the game. He used to practice at home on the farm by getting his younger sister, Myrtle, to throw the ball as hard as she could either at him or to either side and he would field it and fire it back at her, and through time Myrtle also became a most capable player and used to give Clare some tough hard throws to handle. As years went by, and particularly after the 1939-45 war when the different softball leagues got organized again, Clare helped organize and coach the “Almonte Garage” team which was sponsored by Gordon Hill in 1945, until 1948, and was then sponsored by George Gomme as “Gomme’s Lumber Kings,” which continued until about 1952, during which time they were North Lanark League champions on different occasions. Clare continued playing with other teams, some in Almonte and others in Pakenham until his early 50’s, and was always ready and willing to teach the younger players the many aspects of the game and fair play. He was a most capable umpire and performed this duty for many years. His personal contribution to the game of ball in this area has been unmeasurable, and he always did it most willingly. As a curler, Clare started with the old irons and continued on with the granites, and was President of the Almonte Curling Club on two different occasions. He was later presented with an honourary life membership pin by J. C. Smithson, the then president, for his contribution to the Almonte Curling Club in particular and curling in the valley in general. Clare represented Centre 24 in the Ottawa Valley as Centre Convenor for many years, which was a large responsibility and was most capably handled by him as he understood the many problems and pitfalls involved in scheduling the many competitions and events throughout the Centre. One competition that Clare was responsible for founding was the 10-pointer Mixed Bonspiel and was restricted to the Almonte curlers, except during the few years that Pakenham had ice problems, at which time they were included. All area curlers will understand and remember the great success this particular event became and the fellowship it created at the club level. In curling as in other sports, Clare always played to win, but in the event of a loss he took it gracefully and as a good sport but be would be ready for the return match. Clare really liked people and always had time to say “hello,” have a chat about last night’s hockey game or bet on tomorrow night’s game, and even give odds on certain occasions. Our community will miss this great sportsman and his contributions. The funeral was held from the Kerry Funeral Home, 154 Elgin street, Almonte, on Wednesday, May 15th, at 2.30 p.m., with burial at Auld Kirk Cemetery. Rev. A. C. Dodds of Pakenham United Church conducted the funeral services. Pallbearers were Arthur Munro, Percy Timmins, Wilfred Lindsay, Jack C. Smithson, Donald Lockhart and Bill Boal.

Remembering Milk and Cookies –Metcalfe Dairy

No Milk Today–My Love has Gone Away

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk?

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

The Duff Dairy Diphtheria Scare

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 May 1899, Mon  •  Page 7

The diphtheria bacterium was first identified in the 1880s and in the 1890s diphtheria antitoxin was developed in Germany to treat victims of the disease. The antitoxin is prepared after horses are injected with increasingly large doses of diphtheria toxin.

The board of health will probably report to-night ( May 1, 1899) whether due precautions were taken to secure immunity from the diphtheria case reported at Beckwith. It is believed here that Beckwith township may have a board of health, but it is not in a strong healthy condition at present .

The similarity in a name and location of residence in Beckwith, where there has recently been a death from diphtheria is said to be a misguided rumour and that it should be contradicted. It is not at the home of Mr. William Duff of Lakeside Dairy that the disease appeared, neither are the families related, nor is there any intermingling between them. Mr. Lewis Duff, of the Lakeside Dairy, has fully recovered from a severe case of pneumonia

Since the sickness occurred in the unfortunate family of Mr. W. H. Duff, and for some time previous, there has been no association in any way between any members of the two households. It is in this general interest that it should be made known that the dispenser of milk or other commodities, who are around town dally in their usual avocations, are entirely free from the slightest prejudicial taint la sanitary matters.

There is much sympathy for the family of Mr. W. H. Duff, of Beckwith, in which two more of the children have been laid up with diphtheria. Doctors reported the next morning that they were recovering. The Beckwith board of health will probably report tomorrow whether due precautions are being taken to secure immunity from diphtheria infection for the rest of Beckwith. A doctor has stated that diphtheria is six times as fatal to school children between the ages of five, and ten years as any other disease.

An outbreak of diphtheria is threatened in the local school and within the past thirty days eight cases have devoid amongst the pupils. The trustees and school authorities are at a loss to account for the outbreak of the dreaded disease, and they are positive that the sanitary arrangements or the school building are not accountable for it. Precautions are being taken to prevent the further spread of the disease.

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 Jan 1900, Wed  •  Page 3
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Oct 1901, Fri  •  Page 7

Orena Villa of Beckwith — Boy do I feel Stupid– Duff Williamson and McNeely Genealogy

Hay Look Me Over! Big Bill Duff

The Female Artist from Carleton Place That Never Went Viral

The Cottages of Mississippi Lake — Carleton Place Ontario

Cold Milk Ice Cream and Butter —- Carleton Place

The Diphtheria Scare Fake News?

Diphtheria in Carleton Place

Life in The House of Industry

Dark Moments in Ottawa History- Porter Island

Think the Smallpox issue on Outlander was far fetched?

Smallpox in Carleton Place — Did You Know?

The Great White Plague

From cholera to yellow fever: A short history of disease outbreaks in Halifax

When I Say Whoa–I Mean Whoa–The Dairy Horse

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When I Say Whoa–I Mean Whoa–The Dairy Horse



Lost Ottawa

· August 24, 2017 ·  

The Clark Dairy Man, delivering the milk somewhere in Ottawa in his horse-drawn wagon.

Unfortunately, no date on the picture. Going by the chassis, it would seem to be late 40s or early 50s.

I’ve heard that the horses would move along the street by themselves as the milkman went door to door, so the milkman didn’t have to return to the wagon again after every household. One of those ancient rhythms …

(CSTM CN-4986)

This week I posted about Dairy horses on Facebook and people loved the memories. No story of the Clark Dairy in Ottawa could be complete without reference to their very fine horses, which was the pride and job of Mr. Clark and every member of the staff in the Dairy.

In the the 1920s when the Clark Dairy began business they started in a very modest way. Their plant at the corner of Bronson Avenue and Imperial in Ottawa was small, but sufficient for the business they then enjoyed. Their delivery system consisted solely of two wagons.

In the 1930s, a handsome new two-storey building teemed with activity; and thirty-five wagons were needed to cover the city, with seven handsome streamlined motor wagons.

Bottles– Adin Wesley Daige-
Carleton Place Underground

The barns, situated many blocks from the Dairy plant, were just as fresh and spotless as busy hands could make them. There 34 splendid horses: Percherons and Clydesdales were as meticulously groomed as any local society beauty. They stood like sentinels as “the white stockings” gracing their legs were soaped and washed and hooves polished. Coats were combed and brushed until they glistened. The barn included five splendid prize winning animals and the famous Dark Secret, a prize winning champion of the Central Canada Exhibition, and four consecutive times a prize winner at the Royal Winter Fair, in Toronto.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Nov 1938, Sat  •  Page 27

Every day was a show day for the Clark Dairy horses, and the horses knew the route better than the drivers. The red and white delivery wagons were kept immaculate. Clark Dairy was a self sustaining concern, having its own staff of painters, horseshoers and mechanics, so that every necessary job was given attention. Mr. George J. Scandrett. the office manager, had a wide experience in the dairy business and was a former member of the Ontario Milk Board.

EQUESTRIA SPORT HORSESHOES REVERSIBLE 4-RING CURRY
how to curry hooves

The Clark Dairy horse handlers felt that horses were a lot like humans in feelings and habits. They knew when it was time for their feeding, they also know when it was time for them to return to the stable. The handlers also had to know what types of shoes the horses wore in the various seasons. A Dairy horse’s shoe was made of hard rubber around a steel form. Some horses wore their shoes longer than others and some wore their shoes out in two months. When the streets were icy in the winter time, the horse wore a special type shoe with prongs that dug into the ice for a firm hold. These kept the horse from falling. But, often times, the horse slipped even with these shoes on. They had to curry them each day to keep them looking nice and had to be extra careful about their shoes. Walking on pavement everyday of the week was hard on a horse until he they get used to it.

The Clark Dairy horses were said to be the best in the business, as they knew every stop on the route and it took them only two days to learn a new customer stop. They had one horse that apparently had too much fire for a Dairy horse and smashed up the first five wagons he was attached to. As a last resort they sent him to a mud clogged Ottawa Street usually handled by a two horse team. That horse was a good worker for the Clark Dairy and did his job for two horses and never lost a minute starting up just as the milkman returned from the porch. Horses of course could master terrible roads, which was a bane to the delivery service.

Photo- Adin Wesley Daigle-
Carleton Place Underground

The Dairy horses got bushels of presents every Christmas from the Clark Dairy customers. Lumps of sugar, carrots and apples and even when there was sugar rationing the horses were thought of first before family along the route. Bakeries were a great favourite of the delivery horses and sugar buns were fed to some every day. On Sundays these business were closed and some of these horses would not budge waiting for their treat and they would stamp their feet on the sidewalk demanding their sugary treat.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Jun 1939, Sat  •  Page 25

According to the Ottawa Citizen there was a Clark Dairy horse, back in 1946, who every day peered expectantly through the windows of the post office canteen in the basement of the Langevin Block, to the great amusement of civil servants. The horse had a reason for his Peeping Tom tactic. Seems the driver used to scoop up a handful of sugar cubes from a convenient bowl on the canteen counter, with which to treat his faithful horse. The animal nuzzled the window pane daily to remind him! 

Good delivery horses were scarce and eventually they disparaged the horse and saluted the automobile. The blacksmiths that worked for the Clark Dairy ended up changing oil and greasing trucks. Although the automobile certainly eliminated piles of manure that clogged some streets, it introduced a whole new set of global carbon complications. In the end the demise of horse power and the ascent of the automobile illustrated two characteristics of energy transitions: they don’t always solve problems and rarely perform as advertised.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Feb 1946, Wed  •  Page 13

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This horse’s name was very racist so I cut it off the photo. Champion of Clark’s Dairy-one of the string of Clark’s Dairy horses entered at the Ottawa Exhibition for competition this week. Retired from the regular routes, XXXX won trophies in last year’s stock show at the exhibition. (Photo by Little).The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 Aug 1948, Tue  •  Page 6

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Aug 1936, Tue  •  Page 14

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Apr 1941, Sat  •  Page 28

photo-Ross Dunn 1959
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 May 1938, Wed  •  Page 14
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Oct 1963, Sat  •  Page 5
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jun 1929, Fri  •  Page 12
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 May 1929, Thu  •  Page 1
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Sep 1950, Fri  •  Page 43
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Sep 1940, Tue  •  Page 3
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Nov 1909, Tue  •  Page 1


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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Aug 1935, Tue  •  Page 9



Carleton Place Dairy Horses
No photo description available.
Belle the horse driven by “CCB’ for the Maple Leaf Dairy- 1948-1951- Carleton Place and Beckwith Museum… many stories.. click and start here.. Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairyhttps://lindaseccaspina.wordpress.com/2016/03/25/treasured-memories-of-fred-and-the-maple-leaf-dairy/

Bill Crawford Harold Forbes & Flossie delivered our milk from the Carleton Place Dairy. I remember feeding her carrots from our garden, and apples from our neighbours tree.

Norma Ford Bill Crawford – your post brings back so many memories of Harold Forbes and his milk wagon. Holding onto the back bumper in winter and sliding with the ride. Harold stopping and chasing us away. He always gave us a ride first until he figured we were too far from home. Happy memories.

Jaan Kolk16 hrs · EditedEastern Ontario history has enough Clark’s Dairies to make your head spin. Linda.

In 1913, John Clark of Eastview took action to force Clark’s Dairy Ltd., which had taken over the business of Patrick Clark of Lake Deschenes to change it’s name (“Silver Springs Dairy Farms” was chosen.)

In 1919, H.J. Clark was manager of Clark’s Dairy, 185 Lyon Street, before he moved to Smith’s Falls to form Clark’s Sanitary Dairy there.

In 1920, Clark’s Dairy – said to have it’s origin in the 1850s – was merged into Producers Dairy and the Clark Dairy name disappeared from Ottawa until Harry J. Clark returned from Smiths Falls to start a new Clark’s Dairy in Ottawa. (According to Bruce Elliott, Harry’s brother Albert “Ab” Clark operated a separate firm from his farm at City View.)

I hope I’ve made that clear enough so someone can explain it to me 😉

Here is Citizen note from July26, 1920, on the old Clark’s Dairy merging into Producers. (E.W. Clark was Harry’s uncle.)

Cold Milk Ice Cream and Butter —- Carleton Place

What Did you Like Best about the Maple Leaf Dairy? Reader’s Comments..

Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Remembering Milk and Cookies –Metcalfe Dairy

No Milk Today–My Love has Gone Away

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk?

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

Cold Milk Ice Cream and Butter —- Carleton Place

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Cold Milk Ice Cream and Butter —- Carleton Place

photo-Adin Wesley Daigle
Photo-Carleton Place Underground
Keith Giffin

October 9, 2015 ·  

Carleton Place Dairy 
photo-Carleton Place Underground
Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
CLIPPED FROM
The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
20 Jun 1921, Mon  •  Page 3

Carleton Place Dairy Tokens, 1930s–Dairies, as well as other local merchants, within the U.S. and abroad often used a token system. When customers would make advance payments to the dairy or milkmen themselves, it would be exchanged for tokens. The customer would then place a token and the empty milk bottles out for the milkman who would exchange the empties and tokens with freshly filled bottles of milk.
The token system was useful for dairies as a low-cost form of advertising. It also aided in establishing loyalty among customers as the tokens could only be redeemed at the issuing business. This ensured dairies had money ahead of providing the milk.

Keith Giffin One of the reasons they changed from money to tokens , the money would freeze in the bottle in the winter time. And do you remember if you didn’t bring your milk in right away it would freeze, pushing the cream and top out of the bottle. Home delivery was great.

photo-Carleton Place Underground

Patty Baker I have some lovely old bottles found on Bridge St by my Dad when he demolished an old garage & built a new one in the 70’s!

Tim Neil you won’t find many pop bottles. We spent our childhood searching the bottom of the river for pop bottles we could cash in for gas money for our cedar strip boat

Ted Hurdis Tim Neil us too , we snorkeled from the park to the main street bridge.

David McNeely Around the Main Street bridge was the best spot.

Dan Williams If you wanted beer bottles the place to look was out in front of Sandy Walker’s boat house.

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Hay’s Shore at the foot of the Second Lake, was James Duff’s farm from about the 1840’s. William (Bill) Duff ran a farm and a retail dairy on the shores of Mississippi Lake. Duff’s Dairy on the 11th line was later taken over and sold to John Hays in 1918. Big Bill did a big business in Carleton Place, and *Fred Hunter of Carleton Place was once quoted as saying it was real milk, as there was no such thing as pasteurization  in those days

Read Hay Look Me Over! Big Bill Duff

PERCY HAYS

Memories of Joan Stearns–My hubby Jerry as a student actually delivered milk, by horse and wagon with Wayne Richards. For the Carleton Place dairy when it was owned by Percy Hays.

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

After returning home from WWII, Kenneth Robertson worked for a short time delivering milk for the Maple Leaf Dairy. This photo was taken about 1947 at 359 Franktown Road. The house is today the office of Morrow Auto Sales. Wendy Leblanc

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum·  

The Hay family supplied milk to the Carleton Place Dairy on Moore Street for many years.

Dale Costello I remember the horse drawn milk wagons at Carleton Place Dairy. My mom worked the counter for Percy Hay. Milk with a couple inches of cream on the top, ready for my morning cereal.

Peter Iveson Percy Hay from Hays shore 9th line.When I was living at the corner of Albert and Beckwith 1957 to 1960 we used to have milk delivered by horse and wagon at 6am. You put your token in the empty milk bottle between your inside and outside door.One morning we heard a loud clank,my mother looked out the window and saw Jacky McIntyre on his way to work at Larry Goldsteins.That morning we didn’t get our milk.

Joann Voyce I lived on the other side of town and mine was delivered by Maple Leaf Dairy and the Langtrys

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum·  

Can you identify the location of this photograph? It was taken in 1950. Written in pen on the reverse: “Ground owned by Carleton Place Dairy, was kept cut and cleaned by Bunny Townend and Percy Hay.” Sign on building in the background reads “Nichols Coal & Coke”.

Jane Hughes-Labron This photo taken from Carleton Place dairy lot which is behind the photo taker.This lot became a Used Car Lot and housed an Ice Vending machine. To the right of Rail Way flags was a White Rose Service stn.I believe to the left of the old truck was the C.P. freight bldg. behind the billboard

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Apr 1959, Sat  •  Page 52
Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk ...
Allan Street Dairy

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk ...
Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk ...
Deaths (03/04/03)
COLEMAN, Horace Korry R.C.A.F. Veteran Dairyman The family of Horace (“Hod”) Coleman are saddened to announce the passing of their father, quietly and peacefully, one day prior to his 82nd birthday at Calgary, Alberta on Sunday, March 2nd, 2003. Dad is survived by his daughters Reverend Margaret and Liana (Gallant) and his son Ron (Kathy Nephin). Dad will be very much missed by his loving grandchildren Genevieve, Jamie, Joshua, Justin and Emily (Gallant) and Travis and Peter (Coleman) as well as by his brother Dr. Lloyd Coleman, Guelph, and his sister Lenore (Motherwell), Ottawa. Dad was predeceased by our loving mother Jean (McNeely) and recently by his son-in-law Deacon George “Bing” Gallant. Owner and operator for many years of Coleman’s Mississippi Creamery in Carleton Place, Dad’s fondest memories were of travelling throughout the Ottawa Valley, the dairy farmers that he loved to visit and the many friends he made in Carleton Place through enjoyable years of curling and golf. Interment of his ashes will be at a family ceremony at Elmwood Cemetery, Perth, in the Spring

Wayne Richards? Wayne once delivered milk and butter from the Carleton Place Dairy. 
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Apr 1959, Sat  •  Page 52

THE MAPLE LEAF DAIRY
read the stories about the Maple Leaf Dairy below.

Linda Gallipeau-Johnston We occasionally came down here to the McNeely’s to buy our milk out of a milk house

Norma Ford Loved it. Although it was separated first and you still had to shake the milk bottle to mix the cream from the top. Home made butter and buttermilk – yum good. It was disappointing when my Grandpa had to sell his cow because of his age but still remember the tast

What Did you Like Best about the Maple Leaf Dairy? Reader’s Comments..

Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Remembering Milk and Cookies –Metcalfe Dairy

No Milk Today–My Love has Gone Away

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk?

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

What Did you Like Best about the Maple Leaf Dairy? Reader’s Comments..

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What Did you Like Best about the Maple Leaf Dairy? Reader’s Comments..

 

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Photo from- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

Maple Leaf Dairy -249 Bridge Street Carleton Place–Joann Voyce added When this picture was taken this was Langtry’s Dairy/ The building to the right was the Beer Store

 

Jayne Graham Best ice cream cones..

Dawn Jones Fred Veenstra. Such a nice man. Always so helpful.

Angie MacDonald Cromlich Fred was a nice fella. I looked very forward to stopping by, whether it be with mom, my grandma, or running over from my aunt and uncle’s house that was across the street – I would walk in with a couple quarters and walk out with a bag full of penny candies. He was also open Christmas Day. Our family tradition was sharing scratch tickets….. The adults would have us kids running back and forth to buy more scratch tickets with our “winnings”. Ron MacDonald

Jo-Anne Drader Nelson On a Friday night all the kids in town would be on a mission. It was movie night at the Townhall. First stop was The Dairy. Kids would be lined out the door. We would all take turns choosing our penny candies from behind the counter. Fred would put them in small paper bags. You could get a lot of candy for a few cents back then.

Sandy Hudson Had many an ice cream from there!

Beth Sweeney I worked at the Maple Leaf Dairy when I was a very young teen (50 cents/hr) scooping icecream, making milkshakes. I don’t consume either of these to this day. Too exhausting selling so many for so long! Fun times tho! Bill Rintoul was the owner way back then. He kept alot of us neighbourhood kids employed over the years. Good memories.

Rick Redmond I remember a couple of the girls that worked there. From scooping ice cream, over time, their right arms got very strong, and they could beat a lot of guys at arm wrestling.

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Photo from- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

 

Mary Jane Lancaster When I was about 6 I was sent to the Dairy for my Mom’s smokes but mom forgot to give me my 10 cents for mixed up candy.
I took a chocolate bar.
When I left Fred called my Mom and told her what I did.
I ate the chocolate bar quickly on the way home.
When I got in the house Mom looked at me and marched me right back to the store
Fred met us at the door with a mop.
I mopped the whole store. When I was finished Fred said “there we are even “
I learned my lesson .
You have to earn
Your chocolates.
I never took anything without paying since☺
Thanks Fred!

 

Debbie Lynch My son took a couples if tomatoes out of a garden I made him take his money over to pay for it….don’t think he took anything that didn’t belong to him

Toby Randell Likely was there everyday from the age of 6 to 14. Penny candies, ice cream, video game rentals, movie rentals. Fred was a great guy!

Sarah Russo We would visit my grandma every Friday night and on the way we’d stop at The dairy to buy a bag of chips and a drink to take with us. I looked forward to it each time ☺️ Fred was always so friendly 😄

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Photo from- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

 

Paul Bergsma I used to live down William St. RIP Fred. What a cool place to go to rent Nintendo games and grab a Coke out of the old fridge.

Gail Grabe I worked there for 2 summers in High School scooping ice cream, on the weekends people would be lined up out the door. A nickel for one scoop and a dime for two. Frank McCutcheon was the owner and I was paid $.35/hr. Farmers would bring in milk cans, it was pasteurized and bottled in the facility on the side.

 

Wendy LeBlanc I have so many memories of ‘The Dairy’ as we kids of the 1950s called it; it was around the corner from our home on James Street and we either shopped there or at least walked by it every day. The following are some random memories as they come to me:

When Dad first came home from WWII, he didn’t go immediately to the promised job at Findlay’s Foundry, but worked delivering milk for the dairy for some months. Our milk was delivered daily from The Dairy, but occasionally Mum would send us over to buy a quart of milk; I clearly remember carrying the empty glass bottle with 2 dimes and a penny in it to buy the milk, which at that time was not homogenized. Mum either poured the cream off the top for another use or vigourously shook it to give us wonderfully rich whole milk.

On Sundays following attending Church at Memorial Park United, we stopped off at The Dairy to buy a brick of Neapolitan ice cream, our staple dessert on Sunday noon. Very occasionally, we would walk over to The Dairy with a bowl and come home with it full of scoops of dipped ice cream for a special treat (we had only an icebox, so couldn’t store ice cream).

In the 1960s, my sister Kathryn worked at The Dairy and brother Wayne and I expected extra large ice cream cones from her, and I am sure she gave them to us in fear – not of losing her job, but of us. Peggy Mace and I stopped at The Dairy almost daily on our way back to school after lunch to buy penny candy; Mrs. Saunders was working there and was very patient with us as we carefully and slowly selected our treats. While we were there, a well-dressed man (I think I know who it was but hesitate to say as I am not certain – but definitely a town business man) came into The Dairy every day and drank down a glass of Alka Seltzer; now that must have been some kind of a lunch he went home to! Our childhood neighbourhood territory was small, but our lives were enriched with businesses like The Dairy and the people who owned and worked there.

Dale Costello Great memories, and stories of Maple Leaf Dairy. We were big time in CP with two dairies. Many a chocolate shake hand made by Ray Morrels mom. My Uncle, Lorne Aitken delivered bottled milk, and I helped on Saturdays.

 

milk11

Photo from- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

 

Sandra Dakers An awesome place for penny candy!

Cathy Paterson We used to go there as kids

Dale Costello Choices. Dairy on one corner, and the beer store on the other.

Pam McCauley A regular ‘go to’ place for my family – for years and years and years

Patti Antle Schopp Worked there for a year.

Karen Lloyd We had tokens that were left in the top of the bottles, for payment, no money was used, Rintouls owned it as I remember .

Julie Aldham I worked there…. Scooping ice cream

Sherri Iona My Nana would send us down to get milk and give us a quarter to get candy, a drink or popsicle. I remember the fake candy cigarettes! Plus I remember have shakes and the floats.

Bill Brunton Ice Cream Cones and those Candies. I also remember getting sent down to the Dairy from where we Lived on Moffatt Street for Smokes. That was a big part of that side of Town for a long time.

Sherri Iona Ah yes ice cream. I remember having first creamsicle flavour there!

Bill Brunton Licorice and those little red cinnamon things. It would be cool to see a picture of the inside of that place around 1975. Bubble gum newspaper’s and magazines. It was a cool store.

Jim GordonOne of my fondest memories of the Dairy was in the summer with the upstairs windows open ( where the Langtrys lived) listening to Ralph playing the piano. Also to Ray Paqette, yes, Wayne did deliver for them, and back then he wasn’t “ wandering Wayne

 

dairy

Photo from- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

 

Ray Paquette Didn’t Wandering Wayne deliver milk for the Langtrys when they owned the dairy?

Joan Stoddart He might have worked there but he helped my dad deliever for the Carleton Place Dairy in the 50’s


Norma Jackson I loved their tiger tail ice cream cones, liquorice and orange

 

Kimberly Townend-willetts I used to love those, some people think I’m strange when I describe that icecream, doesn’t sound appealing to them at all….lol

 

Glenda Mahoney My Dad always bought his on line lottery fron Fred. Fred faithfully ran my Dad’s numbers every Wednesday and Saturday. About 2 months after my Dad passed I went into the dairy and Fred asked me about my Dad’s tickets. We had completely forgotten about it. Fred was still running the tickets waiting to hear from us. Between free tickets and little cash wins i think it was $24 I owed him. That was customer service.

 

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Photo from Google Image-Inside Ottawa Valley

 

Bernie Johnston Edwards I remember when one of the first game consoles (Nintendo Super I think) had a popular game come out around Christmas. Zelda I think was the name of it. Couldn’t find it anywhere in Ottawa. My friend’s son wanted one for Christmas. I walked into the Dairy and sure enough Fred had some. Made that young lads Christmas.

Hazel Stewart-Huneault Popsicles.. 5 cents
Believe it was the Rintouls back then or maybe the Veenstras.

Elizabeth Edwards My dad would take us and we would get giant licorice pieces for 25 cents each.
My friends and I once bought 800 gummy bears from him for 8 dollars so we could play *chubby bunny.
He sold “spice girl bubble gum” and when I was buying a couple pieces, he let me have the cardboard case. I thought he was the coolest.!

authorsnote)

TOP DEFINITION
Chubby Bunny
A game. Here’s how to play

1. Stuff some Marshmallows in your mouth.
2. Try to say “Chubby Bunny”

3. Repeat until you can not pronounce Chubby Bunny coherently.
Chubby Bunny


Jessica Racey Going in and taking forever to decide on what penny candies I wanted.

Katie Weaver loved going in there on a friday night after school and renting our VHS for the weekend and getting penny candies.

Barbara Plunkett Maple. Leaf. Diary. Was. A. Wonderful. Store


Wendy Healey Loved stopping at the Dairy for an ice cream when we took a trip into town. I remember the cement steps were so worn they had a curve in them. As soon as the door opened you were greeted with all sorts of candies on display. A treat for all kids back then.

Brian White the best milk shakes in town

Patricia M Mason Leduc 100% agreed

Donna Marie Cleary My first job was at the Maple Leaf Dairy in the early 80s.

Janice White Yep always loved going there for there penny candies. They used to deliver milk to the gate at my grandmas and went to pick it up for her and take it to her

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

Remembering Milk and Cookies –Metcalfe Dairy

No Milk Today–My Love has Gone Away

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk?

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

Remembering Milk and Cookies –Metcalfe Dairy

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16388370_1716081835084816_4257039142539803194_n (1).jpg

Taken at Babe Leishman’s King street Almonte Ontario– Photo from the collection of John Metcalfe

William Arnold (Barny) Metcalfe was born in Almonte and farmed and operated his dairy on the outskirts of Almonte housing development (Metcalfe Park) built on the
farm in the 2000’s. Metcalfe’s Dairy was located on King St. next to present day Naismith School. Two Almonte dairies delivered milk daily (except Sundays)

16388424_1716101895082810_8570497360913033684_n

Almonte Ontario Metcalfe’s Dairy-Photo from the collection of John Metcalfe

 

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Photo- Collection of Darryl RicePhoto from Ontario Dairys

Metcalfe’s Dairy, Almonte, round red 1⁄2 pint, – reverse “There is no substitute for milk products”

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Photo from Ontario Dairys

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Photo from Ontario Dairys

historicalnotes

Return of Convictions for the Period Ending Dec. 13, 1898

E. Lambert, $20–Deteriorating Milk

Perth Courier, Oct. 17, 1877

A notable want in Perth is about being filled up.  Mr. William Mortimer has made arrangements for getting the milk from the dairy of C. A. Matheson and will serve it out to customers delivered at their door this winter and from then on.  The arrangement will be commenced in about a month from this date.  Meantime, Mr. Mortimer will call around to find out who may wish to become customers.  The milk furnished will be first class  as Mr. Matheson’s cows are notably excellent ones, while, coming from his dairy, the milk will certainly be the pure article.

Perth Courier, Nov. 30, 1888

The Hopetown Cheese Factory closed 20th November having been in operation 5 months.  The last shipment of cheese was made 13th Nov. but the patrons were settled with on the 20thnotwithstanding the trouble with gassy milk in the fore part of the season which reflects great credit on the cheese maker Mr. McVeigh that not one number of cull cheese was made the goals having always brought the highest prices at the time of sale.  The committee for engaging a cheesemaker for the ensuing year have taken no action yet in the matter not knowing whether to hire a cheesemaker on salary or commission.

Perth Courier, June 9, 1899

John Fraser of Scotch Corners is fixing up a house likewise which looks well; John Fraser finished up an ice house and cold storage this spring to keep his Saturday night and Sabbath milk in with fresh meat, butter, etc.,–it answers the purpose well and he is now building a silo for his corn; and our neighbor Archie McLean is also building a silo and shed to his bank barn; James W. Moodie is shingling his barn anew;

 

Perth Courier, September 9, 1898

It is reported here that O’Brien, the man recently arrested in Winnipeg and now on his way east in charge of Chief McGowan of Smith’s Falls, is a bigamist  with more than an average record of female conquests.  Up to the latest advice, the prisoner has been charged with having no less than five wives one of whom is the daughter of a prominent farmer and dairy man of this section.  O’Brien spent several winters in the vicinity of North Augusta and was looked upon as quite the ladies man.

Perth Courier, Jan. 20, 1933

Mr. and Mrs. James Allen, Erwin Apartments, Gore Street, quietly celebrated their Golden Wedding anniversary on Thursday of this week.  On Jan. 19, 1883, Mr. Allen was married to Janet Ann Wilson at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Wilson, Sr., Scotch Line, by the late Rev. Malcolm MacGillivray of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, Perth.  The groomsman was  Abraham Ferrier and the bridesmaid was Martha Wilson, afterwards married to Mr. Ferrier and since deceased.  After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Allen resided on the Scotch Line where he conducted a blacksmith business up to 1913 when he sold the business and he and Mrs. Allen came to Perth to reside on Foster Street.  Mr. Allen was the representative of a firm dealing in dairy supplies and also represented several cheese factories as salesman on the Perth Cheese Board.  Mr. and Mrs. Allen lived for four years in Winnipeg but returned to Perth three years ago.  Their union was blessed with two sons, Ray (or Roy?)  Allen of Winnipeg and the late Melville Allen.  Mr. and Mrs. Allen are enjoying splendid health. At the time of their Silver Wedding anniversary 25 years ago, Mr. Allen was a reeve in North Burgess.  The Courier of Jan. 1, 1908 stated in reference to the reception at their home:  “A large number of their friends and relatives were present and made the evening pass pleasantly, all wishing Mr. and Mrs. Allen felicitations and the hope that they will live to enjoy their Golden Wedding event”.

JOHN BRADY – At St. Francis Hospital, Smiths Falls , on March 31, 1966 , the death occurred of John Brady, following an illness of several months.  The late Mr. Brady was born on June 7, 1876 , on the third line of Bathurst , a son of the late Patrick Brady and Mary Hogan.  During his early life he conducted a dairy business in Perth , later farmed near Balderson.  For the past twenty years, he resided in Perth .  On September 19, 1899 , he united in marriage to Clarah? Theresa Young at St. John’s R.C. Church by Rev. Father Davis.  To this union were born eleven children, two daughters and nine sons, of whom eight survive: (Marie) Mrs. Charles Doyle, Perth, (Aileen) Mrs. Owen Woodward, Detroit; Hugh, Perth, Patrick, Detroit; Edward, Casterville; William, Verona; Arthur, Smiths Falls; Francis, Kingston.  Predeceased by three sons, Daniel, Philip and James.  41 grandchildren, 37 great grandchildren, a sister Mrs. Daniel O’Neil, survives.  Deceased sisters and brothers were; Mrs. Samuel Crawford, Mrs. Peter Jackman, Mrs. John Mackler, Mrs. Louis Pennett, Daniel, William, Thomas and Richard.  The late Mr. Brady was well known and a highly respected citizen, a member of St. John’s R.C. Church .  His largely attended funeral took place from Blair and Son Funeral Home on Monday, April 4th to St. John’s R.C. Church , where Requiem High Mass was sung by Msgr. H.J. Farrell at 9 a.m. with Father Thomas Brady and Father Shea, in the Sanctuary.  Many spiritual and floral offerings testified to the respect in which he was held.  Pallbearers were: James Brady, Patrick Brady, Lawrence Brady, Edward Pennett, Arnold Jackman (nephew) and Jack Brady, (grandson).  Those from a distance attending the funeral included, Rev. Father Collins, Chesterville; Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Brady and son, Jack of Detroit; Mr. and Mrs. Owen Woodward, daughter Debora of Detroit; Mrs. Thomas McGarry, North Bay; Mrs. Mary Raino, Toronto; Mr. Arnold Jackson, Toronto; Mr. Tom Williams, Toronto; Mr. and Mrs. J.T. Doyle, Toronto, and many others from surrounding distances.  ( 14 Apr 1966 pg 14)

 

Oatmeal Cookies to go along with the milk

Oatmeal Drop Cookies—Remember–Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

adapted from Betty Crocker’s Cooky Book

Image result for betty crocker cookbook oatmeal cookies

Makes about 36 cookies 

  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1 1/4 cups sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/3 cup molasses
  • 1 3/4 cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 cups rolled oats
  • 1/2 cup chopped nuts
  • 1 cup milk chocolate (such as Lindt), cut into coarse chunks

Procedure

  1. Heat oven to 350 degrees (original recipe calls for 400, but I found that 350 worked better for me).
  2. Mix butter, sugar, eggs, and molasses thoroughly.
  3. Stir the flour, soda, salt, and cinnamon together; blend in bit by bit with the wet ingredients until incorporated.
  4. Stir in oats, nuts, and chocolate. Use either a cookie scoop or spoon to drop dough by rounded spoonfuls about 2 inches apart on a lightly greased or parchment-lined baking sheet.
  5. Bake 12-15 minutes, or until lightly browned. (original recipe calls for 8-10 minutes at 400 degrees)

 

Related reading:

A SLOWER PACE OF LIFE (all about dairys)–By an Almonte ‘Native’ –The Millstone

Treasured Memories of Fred and the Maple Leaf Dairy

No Milk Today–My Love has Gone Away

Do You Remember Anyone Dying from Home Delivered Milk?

Remember These? The Neilson Dairy

When Corn Doesn’t Grow- Neilson Chocolate Will

In Memory of Wandering Wayne –Wayne Richards

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun