Tag Archives: curling

Clippings of the Charles Street Curling Club

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Clippings of the Charles Street Curling Club
Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
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In 1921 a covered rink with three sheets of natural ice was built on Charles Street as a new home to the Carleton Place Curling Club. This photo was taken in 1994 shortly before it’s demolition. A 1988 engineer’s report had indicated it was no longer structurally sound, and construction of a new facility on Patterson Crescent was underway. That building is still in use and includes four ice surfaces, a lounge and change rooms.

Early curling took place on the frozen Mississippi River in the 1860s. During the 1880’s, the hardwood floor of the Drill Hall was flooded for use as a curling surface. The Carleton Place Curling Club was formed in 1886, and a two sheet covered rink was built into the end of the Drill Hall on Beckwith Street. This was destroyed by fire in 1910.

The first record of curling in the Carleton Place area is of games between men’s teams from Almonte, Ramsay Township and Carleton Place on the Indian and Mississippi Rivers in 1860. During the 1880’s the hardwood floor of the drill hall was flooded for a curling surface.

Jeffrey JacksonThis is club I leaned to curl in during high school. Great memories.Jimmy Miller did the iceI believe we were the first high school team to get to the regionals fromCarletonPlaceTerry Kirkpatrick Mike Peckett Dale Machin and me–Wonderful time

Lila Leach-JamesI had my very first curling game there as well! Seems like a long time ago!


Heather Armstrong
M Terry Kirkpatrick I sure do-It was like a backwards skipping

Robert Bell
4h  · 

How many still have their pins?

From The Carleton Place Ladies Curling Club 1924-1980 thanks to Carleton Place Curling Club

The Carleton Place Ladies Curling Club 1924-1980 thanks to Carleton Place Curling Club
M Terry Kirkpatrick
September 12, 2018  · 

Mom (Dorothea MacIntyre Kirkpatrick) and Dad (Murray Kirkpatrick), Jim Peden, team that won the Lady Gilmour Trophy for Carleton Place Curling Club – late sixties early seventies:
Jean Perkins found this and sent it to me for The Tales of Carleton Place
LES ELLES DU NORD added a new photo to the album: Plaisirs d’hiver.
January 29 at 4:18 PM ·
Winter pleasure
Curling

Women’s curling club in Carleton Place, Ontario in the early 1900. S. Beautiful Archive Picture!
Kevin ArmstrongThe names are not in order from left to right either. G Maclean should be J Maclean .
1896 and 1897 Curler- Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum-Ladies have been an integral part of the curling program since 1924. However it was not until the early 80’s that ladies became full members of the club and assumed positions on the Board of Directors. They had their own separate club until that time. The first female president served for two years beginning in May of 1989“. — Photo- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
Rosemary Albert Sanders
September 19 at 6:47 PM  · 

Winchester Curling Club dress up for Woman of the World Bonspiel 🥌🥌🥌
Carleton Place Curling Club.. Clipped from The Ottawa Citizen, 13 Dec 1958, Sat, Page 12
Ted Hurdis
December 19, 2016  · 

Check out this little blast from the past that i got given to me. I assume Findlay foundry did these ash trays for the curling club.
RUNNERS-UP IN GOVERNOR GENERAL’S FINALS – Carleton Place rinks saw their dreams of reaching the Governor General’s Trophy finals for the first time shattered last night by the combined efforts of Jack Bradley and Tiny Herman of the Ottawa CC. The Carleton Place curlers dropped a 32-14 decision to the OCC in the final round of the Ottawa District playoffs on Rideau ice. The finalists, left to right, front: W. Morphy, W. S. McCauley, E. Buffam , J. Miller, skip; back: C. Williams, W. Findlay , J. Courroux and H. Baird, skip. (Journal Photo by Dominion Wide)

Kyle McCulloch32-14? Never seen a score line like that for curling.

Jeff BrennanKyle McCulloch Two game total, likely 12 ends. Possibly using irons, not granite stones.

1970-Blasts from the past
Linda Seccaspina
Admin  · March 16, 2019  · 

Ted Hurdis

Related Reading

Who was This Person? Carleton Place Curling Club Fundrasier 1990s

1947 Almonte Curling Club — Thanks to Mary Scissons

The Mississippi Curling Rink After “The Island”

The Mississippi Curling Rink After “The Island”

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An early curling picture from curlinghistory.blogspot.com— This is not from Lanark County- but in the late 1800s they used to curl on an outdoor rink was made on the Mississippi River opposite the fairgrounds

 

1942

A group of curling enthusiasts formed a club under the name of Mississippi Curling Rink Ltd. They raised funds, acquired a mortgage and built a new three-sheet rink on the “market” facing onto Brae Street, which they rented to the Almonte Curling Club (ACC).

1970

During the summer, negotiations were continuing with the Mississippi Rink Co., Ltd.(see today’s story on the old Almonte rink) But, to the chagrin of ACC members, the company sold the property to a commercial firm and liquidated the Limited company. Therefore, there was no place for the members to curl.

 

December 16, 1954, The Almonte Gazette

Renovated Rink With Artificial Ice Is Formally Opened By Local Curler’s On Wednesday

Following a short ceremony on Wednesday evening, when veteran curler Mr. J. H. Martin cut the ribbon and president M. R. Young threw the first granite, the Mississippi Curling Club was declared open for its 101st season. Mr. Young presided over a large gathering of members of the men’s and lady’s clubs which filled both rooms. He explained the chain of events leading up to the climax of curling in Almonte, a renovated rink with three sheets of artificial ice, a new second storey club room with a modern kitchen for the ladies and men’s club room newly decorated. ”

When the installation of artificial ice was talked of in April,” said Mr. Young, “this one and that one offered to give $100.00 However another man said “I’ll give a thousand dollars.” and that gave the club the heeded encouragement. He gave credit to canvassers and special praise to the building committee who had given most generously of their time. The building committee is composed of Mr. M. R. Young, chairman, J. L. Erskine, S.R. Sissons, Major J. H. W. Currie, and Murray Comba. The next speaker was Mr. W.A. Metcalfe, who expressed great pleasure in the fact that the Mississippi Curling Club’s greatest need, the installation of artificial ice, was now attained.

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Men curling in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, in 1909-Wikiwand

Mr. Metcalfe assured the audience that it was in large measure due to the untiring efforts of their president, Mr. Young, that the present happy state was reached. Mr. Young, he said, had stood by curling in good days and the bad days and is now in his 19th term as president. He called on Mr. James Miller of Carlton Place, District Representative of the Caledonia Club who brought greetings from the mother club and also extended his personal congratulations.

The next speaker was Mr. George L. Comba, who traced the history of the Mississippi Curling Club from its humble beginnings 100 years ago to today. Mr. Comba he was indebted to Mr. G. W. Willoughby of Ottawa, former resident of Almonte, who is now in his 96th year, for much of his information of the early days.

Mr. Willoughby was an ardent curler as was his father before him, and was able to recall many interesting incidents. Curling began here, said Mr. Comba on the mouth of the Indian River and wooden blocks were used as stones. Later, an outdoor rink was made on the Mississippi River opposite the fairgrounds, and the first closed rink was on a site on or near the present fairgrounds.

The next rink was on “The Island” (see today’s story)  a combination building which housed the skating rink as well as the curling rink. That building was outmoded the present structure was then erected at Brae Street. This was operated successfully for a growing membership which brings the club up to date. A point stressed by Mr. Comba that should be of principal pride to local curlers, is that the Mississippi Club stands in 6th place on the roster of the Caledonia Club. He said the present membership has great traditions to maintain, but predicted continued success through co-operation for the next hundred years.

 

historicalnotes

December 16, 1954–During the evening a sing-song was enjoyed with Mrs. Harry Walker at the piano and Mrs. R.A. Jamieson, Mr. Martin Maxwell, and Mr. George Rodger leading. Mrs. Doris DeSadeleer contributed a humorous solo. “This Old Rink Was Getting Shaky” with Mrs. Harry Walker as accompanist. At the close, Mr. Young thanked the Lady’s Club for their efforts and all others who had assisted, with special thanks to Mr. Arthur Lockhart who gave his time in painting free of charge, and also Mr. Charles Finner for bringing his PA system

Almonte Curling Club History-click here

MAYOR GEORGE L. COMBA WHO presided over the civic administration of Almonte during the most depressing period in its history. He will probably be returned to office by acclamation at the nominations Friday nigh

COMBA, George L. – At Almonte on Tuesday, May 21, 1957, George L. Comba, beloved husband of Emily Mason, father of Murray Comba, Almonte; (Emily) Mrs. Donald Blanchard, of Bristol, Quebec; and brother of (Jean) Mrs. David Rankin, Trenton, New Jersey; (Phyllis), Mrs. Emil Zarella of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Charles of Calgary, Alberta, and William of Port Arthur. Resting at his home, Church St., Almonte. Funeral service Friday, May 24, at 2 p.m. at the Almonte United Church. Interment Auld Kirk cemetery. Masonic service at his home, Almonte, Thursday evening, May 23, at 8 o’clock. In lieu of lowers please send contributions to Naismith Memorial Hospital Fund.

Ex-Mayor of Almonte, George L. Comba, Passes – A well-known resident and one-time mayor of Almonte, George L. Comba died in hospital Tuesday of last week after a short illness. He was 66. Born in Pakenham, he was a son of the late Charles Comba and Sarah Jane Dunlop. He was educated in Almonte schools. Prior to enlisting in the RAF in the First World War, Mr. Comba was a prospector in British Columbia. While overseas in 1917, he married the former Emily Louise Mason at London, England. He returned to Canada in 1919, and opened a furniture and undertaking business in Almonte. Mr. Comba left the furniture business in 1943, and carried on with the undertaking business with his son. Mr. Comba at one time was mayor and reeve of Almonte and formerly warden of Lanark County. He served as secretary-treasurer of North Lanark Agricultural Society, and had been secretary of Almonte Public School Board and East Lanark High School Area for 37 years. He was honorary president of the Canadian Legion, Almonte Branch, and a charter member of that organization. He was also director of the N.L.A.S. He was a member of the United Church, Granite Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, past patron of Eastern Star, belonged to the Shriners of the Ottawa Temple; was a member of Almonte Curling Club, Almonte Lawn Bowling Club, Gemmill Park Commission and Almonte Library Board. He leaves in addition to his wife, one son, Murray, Almonte; one daughter, Mrs. Don (Emily) Blanchard, Bristol, Quebec;. two brothers, Charles, Calgary, and William H., Port Arthur; two sisters, Mrs. David (Jean) Rankin, Trenton, N.J., and Mrs. Emil (Phyllis) Zarella, Gerard College, Philadelphia. The body rested at the Comba Funeral Home, Almonte, from where the funeral left to Almonte United Church for service at 2 p.m., Friday, May 24. Rev. J. R. Anderson officiated. Burial was in Auld Kirk.

 

Related reading:

Perth Courier, Feb. 15, 1889

Mr. James Templeton, 85 years of age, while on a visit here, made an appearance at the Perth curling rink and played for a time with much skill.  He has been a curler for 67 years—an ordinary man’s lifetime.

Perth Courier, March 6, 1885

Mr. F. B. Allan was the winner this year of the gold medal presented for the yearly competition by Mr. William Lees, M.P.P. to the Perth Upon Tay Curling Club.

 

Related reading:

The Almonte Skating Rink on “The Island”

 

Want to read about the Carleton Place Curling Club?

Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 150th Birthday – Part 6– Fire and Ice

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 150th Birthday – Part 6– Fire and Ice

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The basic facts from Parts 1-5 are from the flyer that I added on too which were passed out on January 1: Carleton Place-A Valley Town at Confederation 1867 by the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Parts 6 on– are facts I am personally researching and doing as a 150 challenge… 

 

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FACT–Did you know we used to have fire boxes in Carleton Place?

Fire Alarm Boxes–where are they now? In the old days, with wooden houses built close together, and lit by whale oil or gas jets, the threat of fire was constant and very great. Thus, the fire department as well as the police department had boxes. Police boxes were coloured blue, and fire alarm boxes coloured red and both operated similarly, via telegraphy, before the public phone system was thought sufficiently reliable to entrust with life-and-death matters. A citizen broke the glass cover and pulled a little hook, which telegraphed the box location to the authorities.

The installation apparently began in in the 1880s. At the time, few people had telephones, and many fires were reported by children or neighbours that ran to the fire station to report a fire. The system was seen as a great step forward in bringing safety and security to all citizens. The alarm transmitter consisted of copper wire mounted in a glass case with a nickel frame, which received calls from public alarm boxes and relayed them via telegraph lines to the nearest fire station. This informed the station manager exactly which alarm box had been rung — but did not provide any information on the nature of the emergency.

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                The Ottawa Journal, 15 Jun 1976, Tue[first Edition]

 

 

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                     The Ottawa Journal, 23 Dec 1957, MonPage 21

 

FACT–Did you know that the Carleton Place Curling Club began in 1886?

The  Carleton Place Bonspiel Team,  were the winners of the C.C.C.A. Trophy, 1896-97. In 1903 Carleton Place curlers, with William Baird and Dr. D. A. Muirhead as skips, also won the Lanark County Curling League cup.

Cold winters drove curling indoors and the bigger clubs began to build indoor rinks after 1840. By 1900, Canadian curling clubs had moved almost exclusively indoors. Indoor rinks, and later, modern ice-making technology brought the sport closer to an art form, eliminating snow, ice bumps and much of the luck that had previously made up the game.

In Lanark County, contracts for erecting drill halls were let early in 1866 at Carleton Place and Almonte.  Construction of the Carleton Place armoury was aided by the promise of a £50 grant by the municipality.

It was built by William Pattie on the Beckwith Street site of the recently demolished skating rink bordering the park which then was the village market square. During the 1880’s the hardwood floor of the Carleton Place drill hall on Beckwith was flooded for a curling surface. .

In 1909 a roller skating rink with a new skating floor was re-opened at the militia drill hall on the market square. Supported by its hand hewn beams, it remained a useful memorial of the perils of the 1860’s until destroyed. Tragically that year the curling rink, the militia drill shed all burned during the Great Fire of Carleton Place.

Carleton Place Curling Club information:

The Carleton Place Curling Club (CPCC) was formed in 1886 with a two sheet covered rink built on to the end of the Drill Hall. A fire in 1910 destroyed this structure and put an end to curling in Carleton Place until 1921 when a new covered rink was built on Charles St. with three sheets of natural ice.

In 1956 the CPCC entered the modern age of curling by purchasing granite stones. This made the game easier to play and thus more pleasurable. The club also became incorporated in the same year and the next year, 1957, saw the installation of artificial ice and a large increase in membership.

In 1994 the present club was built on Patterson Crescent with four sheets of ice and all the modern equipment such as rink heaters, dehumidifiers, de-ionized water and good lighting to make it more pleasant to play in. A large well equipped lounge was also built for after game chat, parties and rentals.

Ladies have been an integral part of the curling program since 1924. However it was not until the early 80’s that ladies became full members of the club and assumed positions on the Board of Directors. They had their own separate club until that time. The first female president served for two years beginning in May of 1989“. —

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Photo-Public Archives Photo–also at Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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