Tag Archives: cram

The Three Stone Houses.. thanks Donna McFarlane

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The Three Stone Houses.. thanks Donna McFarlane

Jesse Mackenzie asks:Do you know anything about the 3 stone homes out of the same quarry on old hwy 7?The house next to Fumerton, the next over the Devereux and the house across from them? I’ve been to the quarry it’s spectacular!

From Historian Donna McFarlane

Someone had requested info about the stone house beside Fumertons and I cannot find their message.. that property lot 25 conc 11 was deeded from crown to William Whyte and remained in the white family until at least 1955. wm whyte would be my husband Johns g g g grandfather.

this is mary whyte cram and her husband james d of Thomas

This is Christina Whyte Mcfarlane and her husband William McFarlane

This is Agnes Whyte Mcfarlane and her husband James…she is daughter of Thomas

This is John Mcfarlane and his wife Ellen christina Cram she is daughter of Mary Whyte and James Cram

the above article refers to thomas whyte building the stone house…. Bertie was a granddaughter of his

this is mary McLaren wife of Malcolm whyte mother of Bertie malcolm was son of thomas

Gwladys Williams Menzies– Celebrating a Local Girl who Made Good

The Mystery of the Springside Hall Carriage House Door — Donovan Hastie

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The Mystery of the Springside Hall Carriage  House Door — Donovan Hastie
Photo Donovan Hastie

Another mystery solved about Springside Hall, Lake Ave East in Carleton Place

Hi Linda, I just found out from my dad this weekend that the door in this pic is from the Raeburn carriage house. He used to store his Jaguar there and ended up getting the door with the original hardware. It’s now (since the early 80’s) the main entrance to our cottage. — Donovan Hastie

Photos of the Carriage House

Son of Albert Cram in front of carriage house 1920s- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
carriage house 1920s on side- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Cecil on the Campbell Side of the house. My house in the background.–Photo-Susan McCann ( Carriage House is white building in back)

Susan McCann’s Father burning leaves. Remember those days? You can see Springside Hall with the original fence. When we bought it- it had a white picket fence. Originally, there was concrete pillars with pipes as a fence. The carriage house is in the back and we tore it down in 1988 as it was falling down. You can see the white summer  kitchen on the back of the house. That was not there in 1981 when we bought the home. There was just a hole in the ground where it had been, and we built the stone addition and garage where it was. Photo-Susan McCann –( Carriage House is white building in back)

A Houseful of Whimsy- Springside Hall 1982

The Story of a Local Family -Finlayson- Richard Finlayson

The Sundial of Springside Hall

Then and Now Springside Hall 1920s-1930s Photos

Reusing the Past of Carleton Place — The Morphy’s and the McCann’s

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

My Neighbours –Photos of the Cliff- McCann House and Springside Hall

Update on the Time Capsule in Springside Hall

The Spirits Are Alive and Well

They Once Lived in My Home– The Cram Children — Margaret — Angeline “Babe” and Arthur

They Once Lived in My Home– Arthur Cram

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

The Hi- Diddle-Day House of Carleton Place – Puppets on a String

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Linda Seccaspina

So Where Does the Water come from Under my House?

The Ghost Lovers of Springside Hall – A True Love Story

Do You have an Archaeological Find in Your Carleton Place Basement?

Feeling Groovy by the Lake Ave East Bridge

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

Just Another Day in Fawlty Towers — Part 2 — To Hell and Back

Just Another Day in Fawlty Towers

Dumbwaiter Calamities of Crockery

While You Were Sleeping —-The Storyland Bunny Moves to the Hi Diddle Day House

The Story of a Local Family -Finlayson- Richard Finlayson

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The Story of a Local Family -Finlayson- Richard Finlayson

Aunt Lucinda May Raeburn is in the middle. My grandfather Charles is on the left next to his father James. Catherine (Ruttle) Finlayson is holding my Great Uncle Edgar. I hope to find the location of their farm and would like to know if the home still exists. _ Rick Finlayson (see history below)

Thank you to Rick’s wife Kathleen Finlayson for joining us together.

Text by Richard Finlayson

This all started with my 32 year old corporate attorney daughter visiting us this weekend. My 88 year-old mother, Gloria, had recently given me the Finlayson family portrait above which we believe was taken in 1917.  That was a year that the Spanish flu was devastating North America and it allowed me to give my daughter a historical perspective and how it relates to Covid 19.  She was to be married in Chicago in May but we have postponed the wedding to next year. I told her the stories of the people in the photo.  Your home, Springside Hall in Carleton Place, was a prominent piece of May Raeburn’s (Finlayson) story.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 Jul 1913, Thu  •  Page 10

(Editor’s note– there was a dry spell in 1913 only to have it finally rain on July 25, 1913 the day after the fire. On the 26th there was a hail storm but no damages recorded. “The dry spell has been broken”– Almonte Gazette July 1913 (see more in ‘history’)
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My grandfather, Charles Mitchell Finlayson was born in 1898 and grew up on a farm in Lanark. He was the oldest of six children. He left the Finlayson family farm and attended the University of Toronto graduating from the Ontario College of Pharmacy in 1922.  At that time his goal was to be a doctor but he needed to study an extra year and did not have the funds to complete that extra year. He immigrated to the United States after marrying my grandmother, Gladys Rogers, who was working as a piano teacher and model in Toronto. I actually have some of her work from a Toronto newspaper. She really was quite beautiful.

They had one child, my father, Charles Albert Finlayson who was born in 1930. Gladys Finlayson passed away in 1952 and my grandfather was heartbroken.  I have always felt a deep spiritual connection to my grandfather who passed away in 1961 from a heart attack after running his own pharmacy (with a soda fountain) in Detroit,Michigan.

Rowntree - KitKat - Kit Kat - 10-cent candy bar wrapper - … | Flickr

I am one of three brothers and my memory of our grandfather was one of him being incredibly kind and he loved playing with us and sneaking chocolate Kit Kat bars when our parents weren’t looking. When he passed away, my parents learned from his customers that for years  (especially during the depression) he would nurse patients in the back of his store who couldn’t afford to see a doctor. He had actually set some broken bones and in his own way was an urban country doctor.

As a child I remember visiting Carleton Place at least four times. My parents had a small travel trailer and we would camp on the shores of the Mississippi River. We would rent a boat and fish during the day.  The fishing there was always phenomenal and my brothers and I were always in competition to catch the biggest and the most perch.

This photo was taken in the summer of 1948 by my father  (Charles) who would have been 18 years old at the time. We think that is George Raeburn on the porch. 

 Your home Springside Hall on Lake Ave. East was one that leaves a lifelong impression. In my mind it was a mansion. The fine woodworking and huge porch with the large front yard was awe-inspiring!  My Aunt May was a very prim and proper woman and she had dinners in the formal dining room. She would serve with fine china and silver and linen napkins (serviettes?) Our mother would give us instructions on how to be gentlemen, something we were definitely not used to! To be honest, it felt like we were visiting the Queen and King of England.  I remember there being a secret stairway that was almost like a tunnel ( more on that tomorrow).  For a child that house would be an amazing place. 

I am a very recently retired Captain for American Airlines. My very first flight for American took me to Ottawa and I was amazed that there is an intersection on a primary airway named Lanark.  I could feel the spiritual connection every time I flew over that intersection knowing that all of my Finlayson relatives are there.  Every flight out of Chicago for the next 33 years on my way to London or somewhere else in Europe brought the memories of Carleton Place. 

Heritage Carleton Place
Carleton Place as Rick would remember it.. Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
Can You Fix Downtown Carleton Place by Rebranding? An Op-Ed ...
Carleton Place today Photo- Linda Seccaspina

In 2007 you ( Linda Seccaspina) and I came very close to meeting in person. I had taken a motorcycle trip of Ontario with a group of friends. We overnighted in Ottawa and my friends stayed up late in the Casino there. I got up early by myself and rode highway 7 in an attempt to find the cemetery where my relatives are all buried. My wife and I attended a family reunion in 1981 in Carleton Place and had visited the church where the cemetery was located. I could not find it. I stopped in a Mom and Pop gas station on the edge of town and filled my motorcycle. I asked the man who took my money if he knew of a church that is close by that had an adjoining cemetery . He said, “Yes, you passed one on the way in and  it sits off the road at the top of the curve.  Are you looking for a grave there?” I said, ” Yes, all of my relatives are buried there.” “Whats the last name?” I said Finlayson.  He smiled and said,” Oh yes we know of them. That’s the right one.”

Boyd's Methodist Cemetery in Boyds, Ontario - Find A Grave Cemetery
Boyd’s cemetery

I was amazed that he knew of my family. It made me feel instantly at home. I rode over to the Boyds cemetery and visited with all the members of my family buried there. I sat there on a beautiful sunny day watching the butterflies flying around the headstones and I could feel their spirits. My great Uncle Edgar (my grandfather’s  youngest brother) had been buried there in 1991. I sat there for an hour contemplating. I then got on my motorcycle and rode in to Carleton Place. It had changed so much since 1981. I was determined to find your home if it still existed.

I knew that finding the railroad track was key to my finding Springside Hall. I found the track and parked my Harley and started walking. When I found your home I gasped. It was the home but it looked so different from my memory, the architecturally correct addition you had built was amazing. Of course the limestone fencing threw me for a loop. I walked slowly around the perimeter taking in the home. I stood at the front gate and admired your English garden and the front of Aunt May’s old home. I hadn’t noticed you gardening and when you stood up it startled me as I could tell I probably startled you. I uttered a quick hello and kept walking. An tall American standing and staring at a house in motorcycle garb could be disconcerting at the least. I went back to my bike and rode past your house once more. I told my wife I was a bit angry at myself for not asking the woman in the garden if you knew of my Aunt May and Uncle George. I am thankful to know that you do.

Kind regards,

Rick Finlayson 

Tomorrow!!!–The Case of the Disappearing Back Staircase — Springside Hall — Finlayson Series

When we bought the house in 1981 it was important for me to know about the history and it has taken me years and years to find out. I was lucky to meet May Reaburn at the Fairview Manor with Muriel Simpson one Saturday afternoon in 1982. We did not have cell phones in the 80s and wish I had taken a photo– but we just didn’t do that in those days. I was having a tea at my house and I thought it would be wonderful if May came. Mary Cook and the neighbourhood ladies were going to be there and I knew she would enjoy it. Alas she got sick that day and could not come. I never saw her again, except when I went to her funeral. I was also fortunate to meet Edgar Finlayson a few times also. Thanks to Rosemary Sarsfield our local Clayton and Mississippi Mills historian and author of we found the farm. (author of Clayton history-Whispers From the Past-Clayton Store, Millstreet Books in Almonte and from rose@sarsfield.ca of we found the farm)

Richard Finlayson

 I believe this is a picture of my great grandparents farm home  (James and Catherine Agnes FInlayson) in Ramsey, Ontario taken by my father in 1948. Richard Finlayson



Richard Finlayson
We just put together that this must be the same house that my father took a picture of in 1948. Guessing that my grandfather must have grown up here. I hope this house still stands.



I hope to find the location of their farm and would like to know if the home still exists. _ Rick Finlayson

I found the original farm was lost in a fire in a 1913 fire. Clippings below

Almonte Gazette July 26 1913

Thanks to Rosemary Sarsfield historian and author of Clayton history-Whispers From the Past-Clayton Store, Millstreet Books in Almonte and from rose@sarsfield.ca of we found the farm

After a very successful book launch my... - Clayton Ontario ...
Rose Mary Sarsfield from Almonte High School - Classmates

The one in Bowland’s cemetery would be my uncle Tom Finlayson. He was married to my father’s sister Annie Richards… I should know where they lived but will have to look it up. It was on the Old Perth Road but we were down there a couple of weeks ago and I could not see the old house. I actually was never there when I was young because my aunt was dead before I was born and I think Uncle Tom lived with one of his nephews. They only had one child Meda and she died when she was five.

So here is the land info:Charles and James Finlayson had WLot 8 Con 2 Ramsay and All of Lot !0 Con 2 There may have been two Charles, I am not sure, but Lot 10 went from Charles to James and then to Edgar who was unmarried. My uncle Tom was a brother of Edgar and Tom owned WLot 10 Con 3 Ramsay.–Thanks to Rosemary Sarsfield historian and author of Clayton history-Whispers From the Past-Clayton Store, Millstreet Books in Almonte and from rose@sarsfield.ca of we found the farm.

Ramsay Township,
Lanark County, Ont.
1918 Directory

Names are listed in the order published — most of them are in alphabetical order by first letter only, but some may be completely out of order. Please use the “Search” function of your browser to look for all occurrences of a name. Obvious errors have been noted at the end of the line [in square brackets], but numerals, especially “5” and “6”, are sometimes impossible to tell apart in the photocopies.


SCHEDULE OF POST OFFICES
         for
   RAMSAY TOWNSHIP

  1. Almonte
  2. Appleton
  4. Blakeney
  5. Clayton
  6. Carleton Place



NAME                No  P.O. DES. CON.  LOT
Aiken John           1   1    O   12      2
Aikenhead Matthew    2   1    O    9  10-11
Aitken James Jr.     3   1    O   12      2
Aitken James         4   2    O   11      1
Aitken Duncan        5   1    O   10     14
Allen William        6   1    O    8     15
Anderson Wm.         7   1    O    8     12
Andrews John         8   1    O    9     13
Armstrong Wm.        9   1    O   10     21
Armstrong John W.   10   1    T    6     24
Arthur Orel         11   4    O   11     26
Arthur Thos. S.     12   1    O    8      5
Arthur James M.     13   6    O    1      5
Arthur Wm. G.       14   1    O   10     24
Bain Daniel Jr.     15   1    O    3     16
Bain Daniel Sr.     16   1    O    4     16
Baird Robert M.     17   2    O   10      3
Barr Thomas         18   5    O    2     23
Barker James A.     19   4    O   10     25
Barker Robert       20   1    O    7     21
Barker Alex.        21   4    O    9     27
Bell Edgar          22   2    O    8      3
Bellamy John E.     23   5    O    2     23
Bickford W. H.      24   1    O    9     13
Bingham Oswald      25   4    O   10     26
Black John          26   2    O   10      3
Black Daniel J.     27   1    O    5     10
Blaney Walter       28   1    O   12      9
Boaz Charles        29   5    O    2     22  [name might be "Boes"]
Bowes John          30   1    O    8     22
Bowes James         31   1    O    7     15
Bowes Thomas        32   1    O    7     11
Bowland H. M.       33   5    O    1     17
Bowland Wm. J.      34   6    O    3      1
Brydges Charles     35   1    O   12     10
Brydges Wllbert     36   1    O   12     12
Buchanan John A.    37   4    O   10     25
Buchanan G. W.      38   2    O   10      2
Bulger Justis       39   5    O    1     22
Burke Charles       40   1    O    8     19
Burns Wm. J. [?]    41   6    T    6      5  [possibly a second blotted initial]
Camelon James       42   1    T    7     16
Camelon Arch        43   1    T    7     17
Camelon David       44   6    O    4      6
Camelon David       45   1    T    7     19
Camelon John        46   4    T    9     24
Cannon John         47   1    O    7     12
Carnochan Wm.       48   1    T    8     21
Carnohan Robert     49   6    O    3      7
Cavers Edgar        50   2    O   12      4
Chapman Joseph      51   1    O    8      6
Chapman George T.   52   6    O    8      4
Cochrane Alex. A.   53   1    T    7     22
Cochrane Peter      54   1    O    6     23
Cochrane Wm. L.     55   1    O    5     24
Code Matthew        56   6    O    2      7
Coleman Wm.         57   6    O    8      6
Colquhoun Arch      58   1    T   11     21
Corkery James       59   1    O    3     10
Coulter Charles     60   5    O    2     25
Cox Wm.             61   4    T    9     25
Cox W. H.           62   6    O    7      3
Craig Thos. Sr.     63   1    T    8     18
Craig Adams         64   1    O   10     11
Cunningham John     65   6    O    7      1
Curtis Thomas       66   6    T    1      6
Darling Fred A.C.   67   1    O   11     16
Devine Edward       68   6    O    9      2
Devine Hugh B.      69   6    O    7      7
Dezell James        70   6    O    1      1
Doherty Ernest      71   1    O   10     13
Donaldson David     72   6    T    7      4
Doucett Geo. H.     73   6    O    3      5
Dowdall Jas. E.     74   2    O   10      3
Dowdall Hiram       75   6    O    3      6
Dowdall Charles     76   6    O    2      3
Drummond Sam        77   1    O   12      9
Drynan James        78   1    O    9      7
Drynan John         79   1    O   10     15
Drynan Wm. J.       80   5    O    3     27
Drynan James        81   5    O    2     26
Duncan Edmund       82   1    O   11     10
Duncan Alex. S.     83   1    O   10     11
Duncan Wm. J.       84   1    O   11      9
Dunlop W. G.        85   1    O    1     16
Elliott Philip J.   86   1    O    1     13
Erskine John L.     87   5    O    1     23
Evans Richard       88   5    T    2     22
Evans Abraham       89   5    O    1     20
Fenlon John         90   4    O   10     25
Finlayson Thos. W.  91   1    O    2      8
Finlayson Chas.     92   1    O    2     10

James Finlayson was born on May 9 1866, in Ramsay Township, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada. Catherine was born on September 21 1867, in Drummond Township, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada.Charles had 5 siblings: Verna Agnes Finlayson, Thomas Albert Finlayson and 3 other siblings. 

Charles married Gladys Irene Finlayson (born Rogers) on Wednesday January 14,1925, at age 26 in York, Ontario. Gladys was born in 1906, in Bristol, Somerset, England.They had one son: Charles A. Finlayson.

1087-25 Charles Mitchell FINLAYSON, 26, druggist, Ontario, 51 Harcourt Ave., s/o James FINLAYSON (b. Ont) & Catherine Agnes RUTTLE, married Gladys Irene ROGERS, 18, music teacher, England, 34 Wiley Ave., d/o Albert ROGERS (b. England) & Daisy Lydia TONKIN, witn: James R. GARVIN of 85 Boulton Ave & Evelyn UNDERWOOD of 20 Earlscourt Ave., 14 Jan 1925

8260-97 John M. FINLAYSON, 33, farmer, Ramsay twp., Drummond twp., s/o Charles FINLAYSON & Mary SMITH, married Maria A. RUTTLE, 33, Drummond, same, d/o Thomas RUTTLE & Lucinda MARTIN, witn: Charles FINLAYSON of Ramsay twp & Emma RUTTLE of Drummond, 28 April 1897 at Drummond twp

6638-95 (Lanark Co): James FINLAYSON, 29, farmer, Ramsay twp., same, s/o Charles & Mary, married Catherine RUTTLE, 28, Drummond, same, d/o Thomas & Lucinda, witn: John M. FINLAYSON of Almonte & Maria RUTTLE of Innisville, 23 Oct 1895 at Drummond twp

#006650-95 (Lanark Co): Thomas R. WATCHORN, 23, yeoman, Lanark twp., same, s/o Henry WATCHORN & Nancy TAYLOR, married Mary A. FINLAYSON, 16, Lanark twp., same, d/o William FINLAYSON & Amelia CUNNINGHAM, witn: Ethel CODE of Carleton Place & Charlie FINLAYSON of Ramsay twp., 13 Nov 1895 at Lanark twp

James Finlayson– Boyd’s Cemetery Drummond

For more Finlayson’s click here

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Jan 1991, Fri  •  Page 65

S.S. No. 14 Ramsay – Greig’s School

In 1826, a long builting was found on Rea’s lot. Early teachers, Mr. Huggart and Joseph Rea, lived in a house in Greig’s field. James Greig sold one quarter acre on the eighth line, Lot 10, Concession 7, Ramsay for $4.00 and  a frame building was put up. Andrew Greig sold another quarter acre of land in 1878 to enlarge the school grounds. Mrs. Pearl McCann created history when she became the first married female teacher in 1942. When S.S. No. 5 only had 5 pupils, the Board decided to amalgamate the two schools from 1945-1947. In 1963, the school was destroyed by fire and students had to temporarily attend S.S. No. 2 Ramsay. On June 30, 1960, many former students and teachers celebrated the 100th anniversary of the school. In 1970, pupils from S.S. No. 14 moved to Naismith Memorial in Almonte and the school property was sold to Edgar Finlayson for $4,500.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Jul 1983, Sat  •  Page 65

The Grieg School– The Fire and Mrs. Pearl McCann

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Jul 1976, Mon  •  Page 30
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
1961

 - http://The Ottawa Journal Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 06 Aug 1971, Fri • Page 29
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Sep 1946, Fri  •  Page 19
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 May 1954, Mon  •  Page 18

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 Mar 1940, Sat  •  Page 14
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 May 1922, Sat  •  Page 3
Finlayson – Richards(10 September 1924)A charming wedding was solemnized at St. George’s church, Clayton, on Wednesday of this week, the ceremony taking place at 5 o’clock in the afternoon. At that hour, Mr. Thos. W. Finlayson, a prosperous young farmer of the 2nd line of Ramsay, led to the altar Miss Alice Annie Richards, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Richards, who reside a couple of miles or so from the groom’s home. Mr. H. E. Goode, of Ottawa, was groomsman, while Miss Rath, a cousin of the bride, gracefully performed the duties of bridesmaid. Rev. Robt. Turley, incumbent of the church, tied the Gordian knot in the presence of relatives of both families and a number of personal friends. At the conclusion of the ceremony an adjournment was made to the home of the bride’s parents, where a sumptuous wedding dinner awaited them, which was done full justice to. At the conclusion a couple of hours or so were spent in pleasant social intercourse, and later the newly wedded couple repaired to their home, accompanied by the goof wishes of the company for a long and prosperous voyage o’er the matrimonial sea. The gifts to the bride, who is popular with a large circle of friends, were numerous, many of them costly, and all of them useful. Since the above was place in type a Clayton correspondent sends the following additional particulars;  The bride, who was tastefully dressed in white silk with an over dress of point d’esprit and white hat to match and carrying a bouquet of cream roses, entered the church leaning on the arm of her father. She was followed by her bridesmaid, Miss Mildred Rath, who wore a pretty dress of white batiste trimmed with lace and insertion and large leghorn hat, and carried a bouquet of pink roses. The groomsman was Mr. Goode of Ottawa. After the ceremony the bridal party and guests, which numbered about fifty, drove to the home of the bride’s parents, where a sumptuous dinner was served. A toast was proposed by Rev. R. Turley to which the groom replied. The bride’s going away dress was brown eoline with hat to match.

Meda Finlayson

On Saturday morning, Jan. 1st., the brittle thread of life which binds the soul and body were severed and death took from our midst dear little Anna Meda (Finlayson), only child of Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Finlayson of Ramsay. She was only 5 years and 9 months old, and her sudden passing away was a tremendous shock to both parents and community, as she was just three days ill. She was a very bright, cheerful and cunning child, and a great favorite with those who knew her. Just before death she repeated every word of a little prayer her mother had taught her. The funeral took place Monday, Jan. 3rd, from her father’s residence to St. George’s cemetery. The service at the house was conducted by Rev. Mr. Merrilees and at the grave by Rev. Mr. Brunet. In spite of the inclemency of the weather there was a very large funeral over seventy carriages being in the cortege. The floral tributes were: Wreaths, from Mr. and Mrs. Finlayson, parents of deceased; spray, from Mr. and Mrs. Mack Richards, spray from Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Finlayson and James and Mack Richards, uncles of deceased. The sympathy of the community goes out to Mr. and Mrs. Finlayson in their bereavement. Tender Shepherd thou hast stilled, Now Thy little lamb’s brief weeping, Oh, how peaceful, pure and mild, In Thy loving arms ’tis sleeping, And no sign of anguish sore, Heaves that little bosom more.

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A Houseful of Whimsy- Springside Hall 1982

Do You have a Hidden Room in Your Home?

What Did Adam Dowdall Find in My Carleton Place Yard?

The Sundial of Springside Hall

Then and Now Springside Hall 1920s-1930s Photos

Reusing the Past of Carleton Place — The Morphy’s and the McCann’s

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

My Neighbours –Photos of the Cliff- McCann House and Springside Hall

Update on the Time Capsule in Springside Hall

The Spirits Are Alive and Well

They Once Lived in My Home– The Cram Children — Margaret — Angeline “Babe” and Arthur

They Once Lived in My Home– Arthur Cram

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

The Hi- Diddle-Day House of Carleton Place – Puppets on a String

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Linda Seccaspina

So Where Does the Water come from Under my House?

The Ghost Lovers of Springside Hall – A True Love Story

Do You have an Archaeological Find in Your Carleton Place Basement?

Feeling Groovy by the Lake Ave East Bridge

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

Just Another Day in Fawlty Towers — Part 2 — To Hell and Back

Just Another Day in Fawlty Towers

Dumbwaiter Calamities of Crockery

While You Were Sleeping —-The Storyland Bunny Moves to the Hi Diddle Day House

Norman Cram and Ed Sibbitt –The Rest of the Story — Lots of Genealogy

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Norman Cram and Ed Sibbitt –The Rest of the Story — Lots of Genealogy

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I love getting photos that folks have and try and tell their story. Thank you to all that do and please keep sending them in. We know now the rest of the story. Thanks Joyce Sibbitt for this photo–

 
I’m not a Cram…. but I came across this picture just the other day.. A picture of Ed Sibbitt (my grandfather)and Norm Cram
 

NORMAN CRAM

 
 
Norm was the brother of Albert Cram and born in either 1871. The name of Albert might sound familiar as he was once mayor of Carleton Place and they lived in my house Springside Hall ( Hi Diddle Day) on Lake Ave East. Norman worked with his brother in their woollen business they had on Campbell Street. In 1884 to make way for the building of a new flour mill the John F. Cram tannery and wool plant was removed to Campbell Street after fourteen years of operation on Mill Street. In 1886 the new tannery of John F. Cram and Donald Munroe was destroyed in a fire loss of over $10,000.
 
 

 

Albert E. Cram – 1867/1929

Mayor of Carleton Place – 1909 & 1910 – Wool Dealer – Manufacturer

 

An automobile accident in July of 1912  was responsible for the death of one of the best known phyelctana In the Ottawa Valley—Dr. Daniel Muirhead. of Carleton Place. He was out driving on the North Gower road in company with Mr. Norman Cram, of Carleton Place, and was proceeding at a fair speed, when one of the wheels, caught in a rut in the road throwing the steering gear out of order. 

The machine swerved and overturned into the ditch crushing Dr. Muirhead under the weight. Fortunately for Mr. Cram he jumped from the car or undoubtedly he would have met with the same fate. Dr. Muirhead was terribly injured and expired within thirty minutes before medical aid arrived. 

Mr. Cram, who is well-known woollen manufacturer with his brother Albert had been touring the Kemptville district during the day purchasing wool, and they were on their homeward journey when the fatality occurred. The scene of the accident is on a side road just west of John Geddes corner, where the road is in a very bad state. At one point they had to enlist the help of a farmer to move the automobile out of a hole. 

The deceased friends were immediately acquainted with the sad news, and Coroner Dr. Danby of Richmond subsequently viewed the body. Dr. Muirhead was fifty years of age. and unmarried, but his brother Mr. W. J. Muirhead, a hardware merchant of Carleton Place, survives. Mr. Cram is a brother of ex-Mayor Albert Cram of Carleton Place.

Norman was a bit of a dandy and there were a few notations like this one below. This was on the front page of the Ottawa Citizen September 21, 1921:

Norman Cram, of Carleton Place, who is charged by P.C. George Finlay with driving an auto, while intoxicated, upon a public highway, was remanded until Monday, bail being allowed at $50 cash. ($718.46 in 2020)

Norman Cram died on the 18th of March 1930 in Ottawa.

Norman McLeod Cram, son of the late John F and Margaret Cram and brother of the late Albert Edward Cram of Carleton Place died Tuesday morning at an Ottawa hospital after only a short illness. Mr. Cram was born in Carleton Place in 1871 and his whole life was spent there. Upon the death of his father he entered the firm of J. F. Cram and son of which he was the head of at the time of his death. March 21, 1930 Almonte Gazette

 

Did you know Angeline Cram, daughter of Albert and niece of Norman Cram’s first name was Norma, named after her uncle Norman Cram?

 

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It is quite possible Norman is in the middle here. Waiting at the Carleton Place Depot- Photo-Rod Anste.

The Short but Illustrious Life of Dr. Daniel Muirhead

 

house

Morphy Cram House

 

Charles Edgar Sibbitt

 

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Photo–Vintage Carleton Place & Beckwith This clipping is from a school scribbler that was kept by Louella Edith Drynan (nee Shail). THEN

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NOW- Bridge and High Street

Years ago Mayor Eldon Henderson received this photo (news clipping) from the Victoria Archives in British Columbia that had been in their files for many years. As it was a Carleton Place, Ontario photo the archives felt it should be in our local photo collection.

He was confused at first, but after finding out where the store had been located Mayor Henderson began a contest for the general public. The winning location answer received a free one year subscription to The Review. Do you know where it was in Carleton Place? It was on the corner of High and Bridge Street where Mr. Campbell once had his store. I have sat here examining the buildings to the side and amazed how this building transpired over the years today. Who would have known? How did the photo end up in British Columbia? Keep reading…

From Joyce Sibbitt--Some interesting history for sure. A few corrections. Ed Sibbitt was Charles Edgar (not Edward)  I know my dad Louis Edgar Sibbitt was born in Winnipeg Manitoba Feb 1906. Some further info from my sister, Evelyn, on the reasons that picture may have ended up in the BC archives— I can only think that it had something to do with them being first in Minnesota, then in Winnipeg. I don’t think that they ever went further west, though Nanny (Eva Rose neé Davis Sibbitt) did have a brother, Frank who was stationed in Victoria, before he left to seek his fortune in the Canadian Yukon, then NWT gold rush, before dying in Vancouver (not sure of the date of his death off the top of my head). It is possible that the clippings were sent to him, and thence to the BC archives… Eva Davis Sibbitt was Charles Edgar Sibbitt’s wife.

And this is why the above photo from the Victoria Archives in British Columbia that had been in their files for many years ended up there. Charles Edgar Sibbitt moved West and that is where his memories ended up, and that is why the Victoria Archives in British Columbia had the photo.

 

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Eva Davis Sibbitt was Charles Edgar Sibbitt’s wife. Here she is 16 years of age 1896- Photo Joyce Sibbitt

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Jul 1968, Thu  •  Page 40

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CLIPPED FROM

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jan 1944, Fri  •  Page 2

 

 

READ

How Did A Carleton Place Photo End Up at the Victoria Archives?

relatedreading

 

Robberies in Carleton Place — Mr. Ed Campbell of High Street

*Bill Jenkins- Riverman and Wedding Cake Maker?

*Before and After in Carleton Place–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Posting

 

CRAMS

Dr.Cram and Dr. Scott Drowning 1907 –Cram Genealogy

They Once Lived in My Home– The Cram Children — Margaret — Angeline “Babe” and Arthur

They Once Lived in My Home– Arthur Cram

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

More “Clippings” on the Local Crams

The Rosamond Christmas Party 1863-or- When Billie Brown and I Slid Down Old Cram’s Cellar Door

After I Read an Obit About Mrs. William Cram I also Found Out

So What Really Happened to Samuel Cram?

Donald Cram — Nobel Prize for Chemistry

Searching for Elizabeth Cram–Updates on Andrew Waugh

Searching for Joey Cram of Carleton Place

I Now have Part of Joey Cram

Peter Cram of Beckwith Perth and High Street in Carleton Place

Genealogy Chatter- Willard and Margaret E Simpson Cram

 
 
 
 
Cram’s Tannery was located at Sussex and Campbell Streets, and owned by Albert E. Cram, who lived at 77 Lake Avenue East. This quote is from the “Do You Remember When?” newspaper column, written in February 1953 by Leo McDiarmid (he wrote under the pen name “S.C. Ribe”):
“Joe Schwerdtfeger, Pete Lever, Steve Jones and Billy Garland, who were employed at Cram’s Tannery, could whisk the wool off a sheep pelt while you were saying ‘Jack Robinson’. The pelts were put into a curing vat, the wool baled up and shipped, a lot of it to the United States.” Carleton Place and Beckwth Heritage Museum

The Sundial of Springside Hall

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The Sundial of Springside Hall

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Around the beginning of the 1900s the Crams moved into my home on Lake Ave East in Carleton Place called Springside Hall by the original owners the Morphys. There was a sidewalk on the left that people could come and stroll the grounds, but no sundial.

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I would say in the 1910-1915 era, the Crams invested in a concrete sundial as you see here on the circular median in the driveway.

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Here are the Crams on the porch in the dead of winter with the sundial in full view.

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Here Mrs. Cram stands beside the sundial with the McNeely/Bracewell home in the background. The top of the sundial remained until the Reaburns sold the house to Mr. Faulkner. When we bought the house everything was stripped by Mr. Faulkner including the top of the sundial. We bought the house with a hole in the roof and a light bulb left.

Richard Finlayson
Your home has such an interesting history.  The black and white picture is how I remember it from my childhood. Tall stately trees that provided tons of shade in the summer. I also remember the sundial! I had totally forgotten about that.  My brothers and I would totally make up an imaginary times like its 3:37pm. Lol.  I’m glad I could share my memories with you

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A pond was built with a fountain and this is how it looks today.

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So what is left of the sundial? It sits in the backyard of my mother in law still catching the suns rays.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USA

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

relatedreading

Then and Now Springside Hall 1920s-1930s Photos

Reusing the Past of Carleton Place — The Morphy’s and the McCann’s

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

My Neighbours –Photos of the Cliff- McCann House and Springside Hall

Update on the Time Capsule in Springside Hall

The Spirits Are Alive and Well

They Once Lived in My Home– The Cram Children — Margaret — Angeline “Babe” and Arthur

They Once Lived in My Home– Arthur Cram

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

The Hi- Diddle-Day House of Carleton Place – Puppets on a String

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Linda Seccaspina

So Where Does the Water come from Under my House?

The Ghost Lovers of Springside Hall – A True Love Story

Do You have an Archaeological Find in Your Carleton Place Basement?

Feeling Groovy by the Lake Ave East Bridge

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

Just Another Day in Fawlty Towers — Part 2 — To Hell and Back

Just Another Day in Fawlty Towers

Dumbwaiter Calamities of Crockery

While You Were Sleeping —-The Storyland Bunny Moves to the Hi Diddle Day House

The Hidden Things We Find from the Past

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The Hidden Things We Find from the Past

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Once upon a time it was a magnificent home. The shrubs where the horse tack was was on the right.

 

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My grandfather Crittenden sold it in the late 50s and it slowly fell into diisrepair.

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It became Enterprise C.B.G. and then was torn down after years of neglect. Photo from Agnes Rychard who used to live on the second floor.

 

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This is what’s left now. Photo 2016

 

Years ago when I lived in Cowansville, Quebec there was something I found one day and it interested me for as long as I lived in town. Hidden in the side shrubs of my Grandfather Crittenden’s home there was a cement pillar with a ring. I knew it was once used to tie horses, but it still fascinated me. For years I used to used to imagine what kinds of horses they used to keep and how grand it must have been to see the former occupants use fancy carriages.

 

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Stone Pond 1981 — now it is buried.

 

I have a small stone pond down at the bottom of my back yard built when the house was built in 1867, but it is now buried with sand.  My late husband covered it so the kids wouldn’t get hurt. One day I will get someone to dig it out, or maybe some day someone else will find it. There was also a remainder of some small stone pillar on the Argyle Street side near the fence and I immediately thought it might have been for a horse, or maybe it was a monument for a deceased pet.

 

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To my surprise it was none of the above, and thanks to the gift of photos from Jennifer Fenwick Irwin from the collections of the Carleton Place Beckwith and Heritage Museum I found out what it was. It was some sort of garden flower pedestal. There is only part of it left (seen in the hostas) so I figure the rest of it is underground like the pond.

 

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Here is it what it looked like around 1910-1920 Cram family home Springside Hall in Carleton Place-Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Never forget that your home and your ancestors hold keys to some family mysteries. What have you found?

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

relatedreading

The Mystery of the Masonic Rock – Pakenham

The Mystery of the Almonte Post Office Clock –Five Minutes Fast and other Things….

Marvin Arnold Walker — Another Ron Bos Genealogy Mystery

The Mystery of the Alfred McNeely’s — Were there Two?

Another Lanark County “Murdoch Mystery” –Elfreda Drummond of Ashton

They Once Lived in My Home– The Cram Children — Margaret — Angeline “Babe” and Arthur

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They Once Lived in My Home– The Cram Children — Margaret  — Angeline “Babe” and Arthur

CramAEResidence (1)

 

September 28, 1936

The entire block headed by Lake Ave East and sidelined by Campbell Street, Argyle and Lisgar Street in Carleton Place was once owned by the Morphy and Cram family. The family stone home was built by the Morphys, and additions were made by the Crams and Seccaspinas. Behind the house, facing Lisgar Street, held hundreds of raspberry bushes and a small stone pond which is now buried over with sand at the bottom of my property.

The Cram family ran the local tannery where the Senior’s Citizen building on Sussex Street is now located. Their family consisted of  a son Arthur (Art) who was killed in a motorcycle accident on High Street in July of 1929. His friend, Don Moffatt, was badly injured. They Once Lived in My Home– Arthur Cram.

CramAE

The patriarch, Albert Cram, born in 1867, died in 1929, at the age of 62,  almost one month later after his son died. He was the mayor of Carleton Place for two terms–1909 & 1910.

 

 - A. E. Cram Dies At Carleton Place Former Mayor...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  20 Aug 1929, Tue,  Page 20

 

The Cram’s two daughters were: Constance and Angeline (Angelene), who was also called “Babe”. After their parent’s died the two girls sold the Lake Ave East home and moved to McArthur Ave. into the home formerly owned by Franklin Abbott.

 

 - In- STONE RESIDENCE, large grounds, attractive...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  13 Feb 1939, Mon,  Page 20

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 - Lawson Cram - CARLETON PLACE, Sept 27.-...

September 28, 1936

Margaret Constance Cram

Donald Lawson was born on 13 Apr 1903 in Brooklyn, Kings, New York. He died on 11th Feb 1979 in Charlotte County, Florida.

Donald married Margaret Constance Cram, daughter of the late Albert Edward Cram and Edna Ella Constance Grant, on 26 Sep 1936 in the Lake Ave East home called Springside Hall in Carleton Place, Ontario, Canada. Margaret was born in 1907 in Carleton Place, Ontario, and was a graduate of Branksome Hall which was an independent girls’ school for day and boarding students from Junior Kindergarten to Grade 12 in Toronto that was founded in 1903. She also attended McGill University in Montreal, however there is no record of her graduating. The marriage ended in divorce. Margaret died on 27 Dec, 1975 in Carleton Place, Ontario, Canada at the Cram girl’s residence on McArthur Ave.

 

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 - Miss Margaret C. Cram and Donald Lawson to Wed...

Clipped from The Brooklyn Daily Eagle,  07 Sep 1936, Mon,  Page 15

 

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“Springside Hall”

 - LAWSON, Margaret Constance Crum Suddenly at her...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Dec 1975, Wed,  Page 40

Miss Angelina “Babe” Cram

 - k Death Accidental Of Miss H. Smith .....

 - Brown and Vincent Clost, both of Carling...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  22 Nov 1935, Fri,  Page 16

 - Lindsay Girl's Skull Is Fractured in Carling...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Nov 1935, Tue,  Page 1

 - y Hanna Curran Ferns and early Summer flowers...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  05 Jul 1943, Mon,  Page 8

 

 - short- Pem- Issue Badminton Draw At Carleton...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  22 Jan 1935, Tue,  Page 15

 

I could not find much else on  Angeline “Babe” Cram, but it seems she remained a spinster. Her sister Margaret never remarried, and she died in their home on McArthur Ave. “Babe” Cram however might have remained a spinster, but she was quite the badminton player in Carleton Place where I found several notations about her. No matter how hard I tried nothing was mentioned about Angeline was mentioned after 1942. She was still alive in 1975 so come Spring I will go check the United Cemetery.

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

They Once Lived in My Home– Arthur Cram

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

What’s Changed in Your Home in 40 Years?

Update on the Time Capsule in Springside Hall

Time Capsule in the ‘Hi Diddle Day’ House?

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

The Morphy Cram House — Springside Hall

The Hi- Diddle-Day House of Carleton Place – Puppets on a String

The Ghost Lovers of Springside Hall – A True Love Story

Glory Days in Carleton Place– Linda Seccaspina

So Where Does the Water come from Under my House?

Do You have an Archaeological Find in Your Carleton Place Basement?

Feeling Groovy by the Lake Ave East Bridge

The Spirits Are Alive and Well

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

 

CRAMS

More “Clippings” on the Local Crams

The Rosamond Christmas Party 1863-or- When Billie Brown and I Slid Down Old Cram’s Cellar Door

After I Read an Obit About Mrs. William Cram I also Found Out

Donald Cram — Nobel Prize for Chemistry

Searching for Elizabeth Cram–Updates on Andrew Waugh

Searching for Joey Cram of Carleton Place

I Now have Part of Joey Cram

 

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
Yesterday at 1:27 PM  · Almonte  · 

It’s Photo Friday. The Mississippi Golf Club was established in 1915 on the former Patterson Farm in Appleton. In 1934, Angeline Cram and friend were photographed practising their swing in front of the old stone clubhouse. It burned to the ground in 1997.
— at Mississippi Golf Club.

The Dogs of Lanark County–Alex Cram

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The Dogs of Lanark County–Alex Cram

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Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum-Photographer Annie Duff

 

In doing research for the Bridge Street, Carleton Place series I found some funny notes made by Marjorie Whyte. I have mentioned before that the Mississippi Hotel had quite the characters boarding there during the time Walter Mcllquham owned the hotel. Mcllquham doubled the room capacity to 56.

There was a Mr. McCabe who was tall, had a huge moustache, and always dressed in gray. Even though the gentleman was grand in appearance he was considered what one would have called a ‘derelict’ in those days. McCabe was often seen hanging around in the doorways of vacant stores muttering to himself.

Then there was Bill Green who wore an eyepatch and was one of the night clerks. If you remember the story about the fire in the Mississippi Hotel the devastating blaze it was caused by a defective south-end chimney right beside Bill Green’s room. Last but not least was Babe Morrison who played on the local Carleton Place hockey team.

However, one of the oddest characters living at the hotel was Alex Cram who was best known by the two-tone shoes he wore. Cram owned a fine British Bulldog that sported an odd collar and tag. It read:

“I am Alex Cram’s dog- who the hell are you?”

 

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum-One of the Schwerdtfeger sisters (Hazel? or Gladys?) poses in the snow with her dog Perky in front of their home at 68 Lake Avenue West sometime in the 1960’s.

 

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Perth Remembered–PERTH WINTER CARNIVAL 1958
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Another great action shot of the Dog Sled Races shown here at the corner of Foster and Gore Street. Correction from yesterday’s post, (thanks to the keen eye of Brian Gilhuly to notice the correct church, I then researched the building to the left). So after the research, that is indeed St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church shown to the right in the background and James Brother’s Garage (Fred Frizell was mechanic there) to the left background. This building was bought by Bell Canada and demolished in 1962. Bell switching station is in that location now.-Perth Remembered
Bonny Dee Hamilton– I remember when they came down Harvey St. I also remember someone leaving their car door open a VW beetle and a team going into that car. What a mess they had untangling the dogs. –Perth Remembered
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A day of liesure and time for an outing 1905. Pictured ready to go for a drive in a dump-cart in the yard at Joe Ebbs’ farm, are, from left; Miss Sarah McCoy, Mrs. Thomas Ireton (who brought her knitting along), Mrs. Albery, young George Ireton the driver and Harold Albery. Between the two boys is their dog.-Perth Remembered
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Perth Remembered–Some of the Merchants of Perth advertising for the 2nd Pre-International Dog Derby, January 1955.
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Carleton Place Canadian files–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

historicalnotes

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 Horrors! We came across a dog poop sitting right on the Boulton Brown millstone! Who did that???
Not one of OUR dogs.
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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

So What Really Happened to Samuel Cram?

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So What Really Happened to Samuel Cram?

 

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Photo taken at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

I saw this display at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Friday night and became intrigued. What had made this clever, former school teacher in Beckwith drown? Surely there had to be more to the story. Nothing came up for awhile until I found it searching for something else. It was said he had sadly committed suicide.

 

December 3 1915-Almonte Gazette

Samuel Cram, an aged and esteemed resident of Carleton Place, was found drowned in shallow water near the power house Monday morning. He was 78 years of age and a few years ago underwent an operation on his head. Since then he has been a sufferer from neuralgia, although he was able to go about.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal29 Nov 1915, MonPage 2

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Peter Cram of Beckwith Perth and High Street in Carleton Place

Searching for Elizabeth Cram–Updates on Andrew Waugh

Peter Cram of Beckwith Perth and High Street in Carleton Place

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Peter Cram of Beckwith Perth and High Street in Carleton Place

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1920-02-27-01-Almonte Gazette

Brief mention was made last, week of the death of Mr. Peter Cram, one of our oldest and -most prominent citizens, which sad event occurred on the 18th instant, after a brief illness, of heart failure, although he had never fully recovered from the effects of a stroke that he sustained some 18 months previous.

Mr. Cram was born in Beckwith, in January, 1831, being a son of the the late James Cram, whose farm was that at present owned by Mr. Fred M. Cram, and who was a son of one of the earliest of the township’s settlers. The subject of our sketchsipent his early days upon the land, and shortly after the gold find in California joined a party of some half dozen young men from this locality– the Teskeys and Moffatts being of the party—and in 1852 travelled across the continent to the golden state.

A couple of years later he returned and in company with his brother, the late John F Cram built a tannery at Appleton, and made a success of it, later on adding wool-pulling as a branch of their business. While living at Appleton Mr. Cram was married, his wife being Margaret Campbell of Drummond, their marriage taking place in April, 1857.

Five children blessed their fireside, two sons and three daughters. One of the latter died in Perth, at the age of 14 years. The others survive—J. A. C., at home; John W., assistant king’s printer, Regina; Mrs. George Watters (Mary) and Mrs. Wm. Findlay. (Annie)

Mrs. Cram predeceased her husband, passing away in 1909, two years after celebrating their golden wedding. The business partnership at Appleton was dissolved by Mr. J. F. Cram withdrawing and coming to Carleton Place, and some years later Peter sold out and removed with his family to Perth, where they resided for some years, coming to Carleton Place in 1882, and a couple of years later purchasing the property on High Street, on the top of the hill, where his home has since been until the last.

He was a great reader, possessed a wonderful memory and could quote whole sections of history or chapters of the Bible at will He was a versatile writer, and on occasion could use this faculty in a masterly fashion. He always took a keen interest in public affairs, and for many years was a member of the Board of Education and also a member of the town council.

In religion, he was a Presbyterian, and the services at the funeral, which took place on Saturday afternoon were conducted by Rev. Mr. Monds assisted by Rev. Mr. Forsythe.  The pallbearers were four nephews, Messrs. Ro’bt. Cram Westboro; Colin McIntosh, A. E. Cram and F. ‘M. Cram, and Messrs. Ro&t. Patterson and Wm. Baird. Interment w as made in Pine Grove cemetery.

Mr. J. W. Cram arrived from Regina on Saturday morning in time for the obsequies. We will miss the kindly smile and friendly greeting and long in vain to hear the ring of jovial laughter and to feel again his genial presence but with the poet can say

“Cold in dust the perished heart may die, But that which warmed it once can never die.”— From C.C.

historicalnotes

A Cyclopaedia of Canadian Biography: Being Chiefly Men of the Time …, Volume 2

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Read the rest at A Cyclopaedia of Canadian Biography: Being Chiefly Men of the Time …, Volume 2

The new fire engine was unable to save the inflammable new tannery and wool pulling plant of John F. Cram and Donald Munro, burned in 1886 with a fire loss of $10,000.

By 1840 Cram families owned seven different lots on Beckwith concessions 10, 11 and 12.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal11 Jan 1900, ThuPage 2

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal22 Mar 1900, ThuPage 7

 

May 27 1892

Somebody in Carleton Place discharged
a rifle at random, and the ball
whizzed between Mr. and Mrs. Peter
Cram, who were standing in front of their
house. The ball ploughed up the ground
for quite a distance.

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Searching for Elizabeth Cram–Updates on Andrew Waugh