Tag Archives: code

Ferguson Falls 101 — The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

Standard
Ferguson Falls 101 — The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings
With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..
in to Pembroke
It was purchased in 1871 by Peter McVicar and in 1872 Peter McVicar and Richard Haley formed a partnership

and built a mill equipped to run by steam, and oatmeal mill…

Rothwell and Sheppard Genealogy Ferguson Falls

Scoundrels Ruining Ferguson Falls

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

Business Directory for Ferguson Falls 1866

Once A Ribald River Town, Ferguson’s Falls May Be Dying

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

Thomas Hollinger Ferguson Falls Descendants Obituary

Business Directory for Ferguson Falls 1866

Ferguson’s Falls Women’s Institute

Ferguson’s Falls Never Had Any Falls

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters — Part 28–I Didn’t Swindle Money from the Wampole & Co W.H. Brick

Standard
The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters — Part 28–I Didn’t Swindle Money from the Wampole & Co W.H. Brick

101438486_10157436255511886_3163635943450083328_n

“Thou Shall Not Bear False Witness Against Thy Neighbour”

Written by Wampole employee W.H. Brick

On the Code Felt and Knitting Company Limited Stationary

Written in Toronto, March 14, 1907

Copy of Circulation Letter to the Citizens of Perth

101320261_10157436255531886_7793346088487878656_n

In all honesty I could write a Canadian mini series about this 5 page faded letter that was found in an envelope in my Thomas Code Journals. Neatly typed probably by Code’s secretary in defiance with what the Perth newspaper and its citizens were waging against Mr. Brick. A lot of it is fading and it is extremely repetitive, so I typed out the highlights with a hint of sarcasm. I could not help myself. Apologies

Toronto, March 14, 1907

When one disappears out of the blue one day, and money is missing from the great Wampole Medicine Company, one should not write that they have feelings of mingled surprise and interest 9 months later. So instead of letting the local Perth papers complain about you — you feel a 5 page letter of “Truth” is needed to stop the ‘fake news”.

The good people of Perth should know that I, Mr. W.H. Brick will no longer tolerate this behaviour and it will only be discussed in a court of law. No more ‘he said she said”!  “I shall take you all to court.”  Famous last words.

Please note my friends that one Mr. Danner never suffered injury at my hand and had always been the gracious recipient of the hospitality of my home. Now, however, he takes the advantage of “the psychological moment” by never losing an opportunity to condemn me in either public or private. 

Among the false statements Mr. Danner has circulated is the fact that I had robbed Wampole from day one! He was simply jealous that Mr. Wampole and Mr. Campbell respected me more and they failed to notice his remarkable worth. I believe that Danner also said that after my death I would need to answer for the insanity and subsequent death of Henry. K. Wampole. I, W.H. Brick was not responsible for Mr. Wampole’s or anyone’s death.

Then there is also a Mr. Maher who had the audacity to intrude into Hick’s Boarding House unannounced while my wife was seriously ill. He ranted that her dearest husband, me, was going to be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. He is nothing but  a dumb brute! There is also nothing to the truth that over $3,000 was short from a Toronto baseball club when I was treasurer. The gall of the Toronto papers sending copies to the newspapers of Perth! Ladies and gentleman, no other individual has entered a community with more desire to help than I did when I took up residence in Perth.

Suddenly a crash came and I went away as per an arrangement with the late Henry R. Wampole. After that fateful day an event that no man was ever more unjustly or atrociously maligned than myself. Since I have returned to Toronto I have been gathering evidence to clear up the words these gossipers are spreading through the town of Perth.

wampolesproduction1900s-644x531

Photo-Perth Remembered–

First- I did not leave Perth borrowing or attempting to borrow 50 dollars 100 dollars or a million dollars.

Second–I did not leave town without paying my honest debts, except my board bill at Hick’s House. But, I did pay it later, or did I? ( By the way W.H. Hicks left his wife at the boarding house when he left without paying the bills)

Third— That I did not dabble in stocks, place horse race bets or run with women. I also did not lose lots of money on poker games but I did lose a small stake with friends in a private game.

Fourth— That I did not deceive or fool the people of Perth

Fifth — that I did not speak badly or gossip about the people of Perth

Sixth— That I never took advantage or fooled any citizen or firm in Perth

To the Perth physician who told my wife she had no idea how she had put up with me so long– I wish to say we are living happily ever without his advice. 

HicksHouse-1 (1)

The Hicks House later the Perth Hotel– Perth Remembered

To the boarders at Hick’s Boarding House that gossip incessantly about me– I know they dare not say this to my face. To the editorial comments by a local barrister of Perth I saw “Pshaw!”

To those that have defended me in Perth it leaves me room to return even though I have a crushed and bleeding heart.

Scrapbook Clippings of Wampole

 -

The Gazette
Montreal, Quebec, Quebec, Canada
04 Mar 1905, Sat  •  Page 1

 -

Thomas Alfred Code Journal

29216054_10155639791476886_1338412320258260992_n1

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 24- Code Family– Built for the Love of his Life

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 25- Code Family– A Letter from Mother

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 26- Mary Rathwell and Eleanor Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 27- John Code and John Ennis

Do You Remember End’s Grove?

Standard
Do You Remember End’s Grove?

30414756_157436964928188_1334703865106268160_n-1

From Archives Lanark

 

 

At one time, many years ago, large picnics were held in “Ends Grove.” While the women made appetizing lunches under the trees, youngsters and men folk played games or frolicked In the water. Today the breeze whispers through the grove much smaller and much thinner.

Beside the river was the neat cottage of Miss Bertha Moore, a retired civil servant who was with the National Defence treasury. Miss Moore who spent each summer here, was a direct descendent of James Ennis, for whom Ennisville, now Innisville, was named.  James Ennis built his grist and flour mill at the west end of the old bridge and his home on a hill at the east end, where the George Crampton house once stood.

Farmers came with bags of grain on their backs to be ground at the mill, gone now except for part of the stone foundation.  Mr. Ennls owned both sides of the river and while most of the land has since changed hands, “the grove”  was never sold. It was handed down through the family to Miss Moore who was the fourth generation to inherit what was once part of a Crown grant.

Across the river on the north side, was the woolen mill, owned by Abraham and George Code. It was a three-storey frame mill, powered by water. There was a dam with a slide in the middle for timber to pass through and two open flumes that carried water to the mills on each side of the river. Spring floods sometimes tore out part of the dam and occasionally took out part of the long wooden bridge.

Across the river from Miss Moore’s cottage, where the Kilfoyle cabins stood, raftsmen had their camp with tents for the men, a cook tent and a big dining tent. It was a popular hangout for many a youngster who got a generous sample of the cook’s savory smelling food.  Miss Moore always called attention to a tall pine tree at the water’s edge. It leaned out over the river and nodded slightly down river.

Raftsmen of the Edwards Lumber Company and other firms used to tie their boom rope to this tree, Miss Moore said and this explains the post office. The hotels then were the McGarry House, next to the Churchill place and the Maclaren House, which became Kilfoyle’s store. The McGarry House at Innisville was kept by Julia McGarry. She was said to have been quite a personality, and  more than one person has referred to her as “a character.” Being about the only Catholic in a strong Orange town, she attended mass at Ferguson’s Falls, a couple of miles up the river. After her husband died, some of the men used to row her boat to the Falls to attend mass.

One day Mrs. McGarry had trouble getting someone to row her to church. All the Catholics gave some excuse.  “Never you mind” she told them haughtily. “I’ll get some of the Orange boys to row me.” And so they did– because she was a real lovable person.  Unlike Ashton which had two churches and three other former churches, Innisville had none.

Holy Trinity Church of England was closed here many years ago and the Anglicans now worshipped at St. John’s at “the corners” on the highway where you turn off to go to Ferguson’s Falls and Lanark. About a mile and a half down this road is Boyd’s United Church and “Boyd’s Methodist Cemetery.” The Methodists did not seriously object when church union came about in 1925 but they got a secret satisfaction in seeing the name “Methodist” preserved in the cemetery sign. Said one man: “I’m glad we got the sign up before the church union came in”.

A disastrous fire wiped out most of the business section of Ennisville as it was known 90 years ago. Among the buildings reduced to ashes was a grist mill, a sawmill and a hotel situated about where McManus’s store  once  was. The heat from the fire was terrific. The Churchill home across the street was saved and still stands, but to this day you can still see marks, on the house where it was blistered by heat through wet blankets placed to protect It. Innisville was never the same. Innisville went down in size until it began to become popular as a summer resort. Many Americans from New York state know it better than a lot of people in Ottawa.

 

88993620_510131792981796_7923082769733779456_n

It’s my great grandparents on their wedding day in April 1907 Walter White and Susanna Pearl Morris. The White family lived in Innisville.–Lorraine Reynolds Patoine

 

 

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 24- Code Family– Built for the Love of his Life

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 25- Code Family– A Letter from Mother

Mr. Code’s Mill Explosion in Carleton Place

 

***************************************************************************

Looking For Information —Jim White Innisville Orchestra and …..

A Poem about Innisville–By Mrs. Edith Bolton

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 25- Code Family– A Letter from Mother

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 25- Code Family– A Letter from Mother

21M1OzZfN7L.jpg

I had previously printed two other letters from his Mother, but I found this one tucked away in the journal- Original posting–The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

Innisville, November 11th  (no year)

(No idea who Jessie is)

My Dear Son,

As I am sitting here all alone tonight I thought I would drop you a line. I was glad to hear to hear you went up to see the last of Jessie once again. My poor dear child I am very sorry she was taken from us so soon. My dear, if you had only known her, she was the soul of kindness, you would have only known her to appreciate her. I have lost a good child as she was always that to me.

I know it is very foolish for me to grieve so much for her, for at the best my time will not  be very long, but she showed me every respect when I was there last winter. They are the kindest people I have ever known. I hope that poor Jim will get on staying with them for awhile anyhow, poor fellow. He is well respected there and keeps good company, and I believe poor Jessie did not forget him at the last.

One thing we cannot say that he was a slighted husband for whatever he said was alright with her and what she said was the same with him. I often thought you might have driven out with Jennie ( Leslie maiden name T. A. Code’s wife) and the baby ( Dorothy Leslie Code later Mrs. T. R. Caldwell, Oshawa) while Jessie was well. It would have shown her a little respect if nothing else. Tell Dorothy she has a grandma in the country who thinks as much of her if not more than any grandchild she has, but I don’t see much of her. Remember me in the finest manner to Jennie, and if she had known Jessie better she would be sorry for her too.

From your Affectionate Mother.

 

authorsnote)

After I read this, I knew that it does not matter what era or year it is, Mother’s think the same. Elizabeth Hicks Code, Thomas Alfred’s mother, was not happy the way the death of this dear girl she loved was handled by her family. Sentences like: “if she had known Jessie better she would be sorry for her too” proved to me that Elizabeth was unhappy the way her son had handled Jessie’s death, and these gentle words she wrote was how she felt. These days, maybe more emphatic words would have been used, but that was the sign of the times.

genea

Dorothy Code- Thomas Alfred Code’s daughter, he also had a son Allan.
Canada Census, 1911
Name Dorothy Code
Event Type Census
Event Date 1911
Event Place Lanark South Sub-Districts 1-37, Ontario, Canada
Gender Female
Age (Estimated) 19
Marital Status Single
Religion Presbyterian
Relationship to Head of Household Daughter
Birth Date Jun 1892
Birthplace Ontario
Household
Role
Sex
Age
Birthplace
Thomas Code Head M 57 Ontario
Dorothy Code Daughter F 19 Ontario
Allan Code Son M 15 Ontario
Barbara Hutchinson Housekeeper F 42 Ontario
Maggie Gamble Domestic F 22 Ontario
Mary Stewart Domestic F 44 Ontario

Dorothy married T. R. Code in England and lived in Oshawa.

historicalnotes

  1. Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpgIn the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembereds-l1600.jpg

    How did I get this?

    I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

    How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

    Allan Leslie Code

    1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

    Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

 

1856journal-wool-manufacturing_1_70c4804ce147025919e12f28eedefdd4 (1)

Hand written insert or advertisement for an ad to be placed in a newspaper owned by James C. Poole. Paper my have been Lanark Herald or the Carleton Place Herald, Lanark County, Ottawa, Canada. A & G Code were clothing manufacturers in Innisville, later in Perth

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

relatedreading

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 24- Code Family– Built for the Love of his Life

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 23- Code Family–Brother John — John Code Goes West

 

31292660_10155725784551886_4255663663727247360_n.jpg

 

As I have previously written, after the death of my father William Code in 1868 my brother John Code took charge until 1872. In that year he left for the West and Mother retired in the red brick house near the river on the south-east side of Innisville. From then until 1876 I was in charge with the exception of a few months during the winter of 1874.

I admired how John left after writing to Billy Quinn, who had also departed from Lanark a few years previous to join those seeking their fortune in gold. Billy had mentioned that gold had been found near the town of Helena, Montana by four gold miners who had struck it rich at the appropriately named “Last Chance Gulch.” John had decided that I was old enough to take over, and he at the age of 22 left the train station at Perth with his good friend Bill Ennis. The trip from Perth to Brockville was $1.50 at that time, and the whole trip cost him about $150.00 to Montana.

He didn’t write a lot, and Mother worried, and I guess I did too.  Last Chance Gulch would prove to be the second biggest placer gold deposit in Montana, producing some $19 million worth of gold in just four years. Overnight, thousands of miners began to flood into the region, and the four original discoverers added to their fortunes by establishing the town of Helena to provide them with food, lodging, and supplies. But unlike many of the early Montana mining towns, Helena did not disappear once the gold gave out, which it inevitably did.

John reached Helena in 1872 working odd jobs along the way and Mother finally heard from him in July  in a letter that was written and posted in May. Mother asked me to mail him a copy of the Perth Courier so he could keep up on the comings and goings of the area. Bill Ennis eventually left the area in October of 1874 to seek another adventure  in the state of Washington leaving my brother in Montana.  An interesting fact is that in 1888 Helena, Montana had more millionaires per capita than any other city in the world and sad to say that my brother John Code never became one of them.

bbc86390-2095-43d0-bd15-3421fda0f7a6.jpg

Mary Maria Butler (1st wife) Family were merchants from Harper and Perth and John Code- ancestry.ca

John did return to Innisville in 1877 and married Mary Butler and had 4 children, but sadly Mary died in 1892 at their home in Perth. Five years later he took another wife by the name of Isabel McKinley from Scotch Line who blessed him with another 4 children. My brother joined me in co- founding the Golf Club in Perth and dabbled in the insurance business as well as being the Treasurer of the County of Lanark for many years.

Author’s Note- John Code died at the age of 82 in 1932

 

51352996-bb0c-41fa-927b-4d4cef374eba.jpg

John Code –ancestry.ca

 

2ff54d2b-027e-4189-bc8e-87b55915c0be.jpg

John Code and Mary Marie Butler and Isabella Mary McKinley

Perth, Drummond Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada–ancestry.ca

 

 - ! Treajnrer 38 Yean j i mr 1.'- 1.'- JOHK OODR....

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 18 Dec 1928, Tue,
  3. Page 2

 

 - Lanark Treasurer ; Resigns His Post John Code....

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 20 Nov 1928, Tue,
  3. Page 3

Son Howard Code

 - Harold M. Code Ottawa Lawyer Dies at Perth...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 14 May 1941, Wed,
  3. Page 2

 

 

historicalnotes

 

  1. Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpgIn the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembereds-l1600.jpg

    How did I get this?

    I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

    How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

    Allan Leslie Code

    1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

     

    Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

  2. Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

    relatedreading.jpg

 

 

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 18- Code Family–Family Records from the Family Bible

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 19- Code Family–“Michell was never known to have any money, excepting at or after tax sales”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 20- Code Family–“Whither Are We Drifting?”– The Perth Public School

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 21- Code Family–Franktown Past and Present Reverend John May

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

 

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 17- Code Family–“A reaper with the sickle and danced all night”

 

30443462_10155694217961886_2422463530352508928_n.jpg

Aunt Ann, before passing on was a slim, slender girl in her teens, and it was not until the later years of her life that she became stout. It may be interesting to some to be informed that Aunt Ann was considered one of the best dancers amongst the girls of her day. To work all day in the house, or in the fields, and dance all night was a common occurrence on the part of the girls of Aunt Ann’s time. Would or could the girls of today do it?

These were the days when the sickle was the sole means of cutting the grain, and Aunt Ann declared she had many a time bound grain into sheaves all day after a reaper with the sickle and danced all night. These were the days when a jar of good whiskey was brought to the fields and placed at one end of same. It became a case of keen competition when more than one reaper was engaged to see which could reach the jar first. These were the days when whiskey was pure and unadulterated and left none of the ill effects experienced today by thirsty ones. The fact that all drank of it more or less without injury would seem to indicate that if  the brand is A1 it is quite in order to take a little for the stomach’s sake.

The writer has a large sized photograph of Grandma Codd which he prizes very much. It was passed on to me and every time I gaze upon the fine old face the words come to my mind that were commonly used to express the appreciation of his friends that “Johnnie Codd’s word is as good as his bond.” This would seem to be a very good testimony of the character of the man and one not often used in these days of stress and struggle. My fondest recollection of Grandfather or Granda, as he was always called, is of occasions when he rode we younger ones on his knee and sang to us that appealing song, the last line was:

*”Oh Jennie put the kettle on and we’ll all have tea!”

Of Grandmother Codd the writer has no information; as stated in the beginning of the family history, as she was Mary Ann Nugent, and judging from the large- sized photograph which used to hang in the old home of the family at Innisville, she must have been a kind and good woman.

My mother, Elizabeth hicks was born at Enniskillen, County of Fermanagh, Ireland and came to Canada in 1842. She lived in Perth until her marriage to William Code. my father on the 27th of February, 1849.

The widowed mother of Elizabeth Hicks came to this country with her two daughters (Elizabeth and Mary), the latter becoming James Kerr. The foregoing will explain the connection between the Kerr and Code families and show how an intimacy and friendship of a lifetime came about.

Mother (Elizabeth Hicks) had three brothers, namely, James, Robert, and William, and all lived in Perth at the time of their death. For many years Robert at Ferguson Falls held the position of Postmaster and conducted a small store. Some years before his death he removed to Perth.

Mother died at Innisville on the 23rd October, 1895, at the age of 72 and was buried in Elmwood Cemetery, Perth.

Father died at Innisville on the 21st of Novemeber 1868, at the age of 49 and was buried in St. John’s Church burying ground near Innisville. Mother expressed a wish to be buried in the cemetery at Perth. There was a strong bond of affection between Mother and her brothers, and particularly between her brother William and herself.

Much more might be added to what has been written, but it is hoped enough has been related to form the basis of a more detailed story which one of the present generation may some day write.

Tomorrow: Family Record as taken from Family Bible and amended by W.A. Code

 

historicalnotes

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 16- Code Family-“The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall”

 

s-l16001.jpg

Of the four brothers who came to this country it is only necessary in conclusion to allude to John, he being the grandfather of the generation in which the writer is included. When the brothers reached Canada Grandfather Codd secured work at his trade in Montreal, and continued to work there until after John and William were born. He then with his family left Montreal and sojourned in Kitley for a time, where George was born. About this time Grandfather Codd and three or four others formed a party and determined to seek land for themselves. At that early day in the history of this Canada of ours, this was not an easy matter.

Very fair progress was made until Perth was reached, only a few unpretentious houses representing the County Town of today. Three miles north of Perth, about where the John Doyle home is situated, all further progress by oxen and wagon had to be abandoned. This was the first wagon that had been brought through the country and it was naturally quite the curiosity.

The land first taken by Grandfather Codd did not prove satisfactory, it have been drawn in the district now called Scotch Corners. The next lot drawn was the farm owned by the Willows family, and here the rest of the family was born. (The writer is not altogether sure of the foregoing paragraph as he was told that the farm taken by grandfather was known as the Thomas Jackson lot which he had given up.)

The farm afterwards settled upon by Grandfather Codd at Innisville was purchased from a retired British soldier who obtained it from his government in recognition of services rendered late in the war.

It was told to the writer that when Grandfather Codd with his family reached the banks of the Mississippi after their laborious journey from Perth they were confronted with the problem of just how to ford the river. The woods on both sides were dense and trees grew close to the water’s edge. They appear to have made the crossing where the old woollen mill stood, for there was a small island in the centre of the river just below where the slide used  to be. (at the dam) This island was swept away by the rush of water at this point some years ago, which accounts for the hole or basin that be found there today. Black Bass and other small fish used to be caught in this hole in the good old days, and may possibly still be caught there.

Uncle George told the writer that as they forded the stream, the water being somewhat swift and reaching a little over their knees, they found it most difficult to make headway owing to the fish that filled the river from bank to bank. The fish would shoot back and forth and at time hit their legs causing them to fall. With Aunt Ann, who was a little girl, on his shoulders, Uncle George had a most anxious time getting across the Mississippi River, and when they reached the Island he was greatly relieved. After a brief rest they reached the other shore in safety.

There were three daughters and six sons in Grandfather’s family: the daughters being Ellen, Ann, and Bessie. The sons were: John, Richard, George, Abram Thomas and William. Abram and Bessie were twins. The writer may not have the names just given in the order of their birth, but that will not matter of the purpose of this short family history.

Tomorrow: Aunt Ann

 

historicalnotes

 

It went as far as incorporation by the Legislature of the Mississippi Navigation Company in 1809, with the authorized capital of $100,000, to build locks at Innisville and Ferguson’s Falls and carry on a shipping business. The chief freight was expected to be sawn lumber and iron ore, which was to be towed by barge to Carleton Place, and to go from here by rail to American markets. The steamer, the Enterprise, was built for this purpose, and then the lock-building scheme was abandoned.

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

29683909_10155686802946886_8253487774817058816_n.jpg

 

Thomas Alfred Code spelled it Twomley in his journal, but on an ancestry site it is spelled Twamley. Since a’s and o’s look similar in handwriting I will go with the latter but will transcribe the same way he did.

 

The Great Great Grandfather of John, Thomas, George and Abram Code or Codd as was the original name was a Mr. Twomley, whose marriage to Lady Lynden, a lady in high social life, was quite romantic. The story condensed as follows: While driving one day as was her custom, Lady Lynden had occasion to call at a wayside house– for a drink of water– as the story states. While about to alight from her carriage, Mr. Twomley who happened to be near at hand, politely offered his assistance. The lady accepted the offer and in fact, had fallen in love at first sight.

Shortly after returning home Lady Lynden penned a delicate note to Mr. Twomley confiding her love for him, which elicited a reply to the effect, that although he (Mr. Twomley) valued her love and condescension to the highest degree, yet his circumstances on life were such as to debar a union with one of her high station. To this reply Lady Lynden appears to have paid no attention but, on the other hand, assured Mr. Twomley that she had ample means for both. Their marriage was soon happily consummated and a son and daughter were born of this union, the daughter eventually marrying Mr. Codd, grandfather of the brother’s name.

The grandmother of the wife of John Codd (who was Mary Ann Nugent) was a Miss Thompson, a English lady. The circumstances surrounding to this young lady’s marriage to Mr. Nugent were similar to those of Mr. and Mrs. Twonley, in as much as it was an affair of love. Although very young and wealthy, Miss Thompson seems to have been afflicted with ‘the divinest passion of the human heart’ to such a degree as to consent to a runaway marriage. Of this union was born a daughter, and as the daughter Mary Ann as she was called is the only one of the family of direct interest to the narrative I shall confine myself to her connection therewith.

Mary Ann Nugent, in the course of events, married John Codd (Grandfather Codd), one of the four brothers name above. One of the brothers of Grandmother Codd went to the Canadian North West where he became a fur trader among the Indians. Having been appointed to the position of Chief Trader of the North West Trading Company, Mr. Thompson no doubt found himself in a way to take himself a wife, and so adopted the usual method resorted to by white people in that then far off land. But, Mr. Thompson was more fortunate than many of his white brothers in this particular, for the daughter of a prominent and wealthy Indian Chief deigned to link her future with his. (A white woman was unknown in these wilds at the time).

For a wedding portion the wife of Mr. Thompson was favoured in a manner novel, and I fancy more substantially than are the brides of the present day. When the happy pair were united the new Mrs. Thompson was asked to step into one side of the scale used for weighing the immense quantity of furs handled at that time,and as she did so her proud father poured gold into the opposite side until the bride’s weight was equalled.This is a wedding portion which would probably be acceptable to many grooms of today.

Author’s Note– Was Thompson’s wife really Charlotte Small?

Tomorrow the Codd/Code Brothers

 

historicalnotes

* Author’s Note-According to Wikipedia-On 10 June 1799 at Île-à-la-Crosse, Thompson married Charlotte Small, a thirteen-year-old Métis daughter of Scottish fur trader Patrick Small and a Cree mother. Their marriage was formalized thirteen years later at the Scotch Presbyterian Church in Montreal on 30 October 1812. He and Charlotte had 24 children together five of them were born before he left the fur trade. The family did not adjust easily to life in Eastern Canada; they lived in Montreal while he was travelling. Two of the children, John (aged 5) and Emma (aged 7), died of round worms, a common parasite. By the time of Thompson’s death, the couple had been married 69 years, the longest marriage known in Canada pre-Confederation.

Death Notices from The Christian Guardian, 1836-1850, by Rev. Donald A. McKenzie.
CODD, Mrs. Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Codd, was born in Ireland, and came to Canada in 1820 with her husband and family. She is buried at Boyd’s Settlement, Lanark Twp., October 20, 1839, in her 65th year: survived by her husband and numerous children and grandchildren. (January 1, 1840, p. 39, 0) read more here..

*Lady Elizabeth Twamley (1774-1839) married Thomas Codd (1773-1852 ). She was born at Croneleagh (also spelled Cronelea Crownalay) Townland, while Thomas was from nearby Mullahullen (also spelled Munahullen Mungacullin). Thomas was said to have “married the boss’s daughter.” Indeed, the Twamley’s were landowners and the Codd’s renters.

John Codd (Mary Ann Nugent) has never seemed to gravitate in people’s minds to this family, but when you look at it as a whole picture, he could hardly be otherwise. The family story in John’s household was that “a Mr. Twamley, while working  as a carriageman at an estate, met Lady Lyndon, and they were smitten – and became the grandparents of the four Codd brothers who set out for Canada.” The four brothers, who set out at various times, meeting up between 1820 and 1822, would be Abraham (who settled in Ramsay Twp. near George, George who settled in Beckwith Twp. John who settled in a number of places – perhaps Beckwith, Lanark and finally Drummond near Innisville, and (perhaps) Thomas, for whom there is evidence of  a sort – and who apparently moved on to Western Ontario.  Read more here..

 

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

 

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

 

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

29389283_10155649422056886_286379146462887936_n.jpg

 

I had become acquainted with the Ryan family, who lived next to the mill I operated in 1876. It appears the boys in the mill would put a nail on the end of the pole and pick the apples of their trees. The Ryans would come to me to remonstrate. This was about the time that the building of the Canadian Pacific Railway was in the air. *Mr. Hugh Ryan was a railway contractor, and one of the big men of the day. We happened to meet about the year 1879 or 1880 and he suggested that I turn my yarn into socks.

That idea from Mr. Ryan furnished me the germ that led me into the knitting game. I immediately procured some machines in Georgetown, Ontario. I obtained permission to inspect a small mill in the locality, came home and started experimenting in a room in what is now the *Maloney Block. Later I built a small frontal addition on the Haggart premises, and commenced making what has been known ever since as the Code Sock. We are still making it today in 1929 with very little change. Like everything else I attempted it when I had no previous experience. Had I had the experience I might have been broader, but caution was the keynote.

This article, being about the first of its kind machine made, was much in demand, and I operated the little plant night and day for a time. Messrs. Gault Bros. of Montreal took my output for two years paying me cash every month. This made it easy to finance; previously I had found it difficult to finance the buying of wool.

About the year 1882 I received notice from Edward Elliott, Barrister, that Messrs. McLaren & McNee who operated the Haggart flour mill at the time, requested him to give me notice that they had first right to the water and that I would have to close down until the next *freshet. I went to see Mr. McLaren (later the honourable Peter) and I remember his stern reply,

“I do not know you!”

Notwithstanding that I had done his portaging years before under his own eye, I remember him swearing at the old wagon I drove. I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

This was the time of the Winnipeg boom, and the fever was in the air. Being closed up by McLaren was a great loss to me. The *Kilpatrick Tannery was for sale, and I bought it for $2750. I made the necessary alterations, and with more room the change– as I see it– was all for the best. I still continued the sale of socks, mitts, yarn and druggett blankets in the mill, which practically paid the overhead. With experience I could handle almost any machine in the mill, and this made that part of the overhead much less. From time to time I found it necessary to make variety as the home market being limited and competition was growing.

I went to Winnipeg in 1883, going by the U.S route. When I was there I saw what was called a German fulled sock. This sock was a solid fulled fabric, the leg reaching to the knee stringed and tasselled. I learned that this article was made at the *C. E. Wakeman & Co. in Pontiac, Michigan. On my way home I called at this place, but admission to the mill was refused. Later in the day I chased up a knitter from this mill and bargained with him for ten dollars to give me the information I sought. I then bought 11 machines, and on the arrival of the machines in Perth I knit the first pair myself. The following season, having bargained with three firms to take my output. I sold the Ames Holden Co, from Montreal, goods to the value of $16,000 and the other two firms took the output. Having the initiative I landed with about 84 numbers or styles in mitts and socks. Some of them were specials, and the maker to some extent fixed the price of specials.

Later I invented the Code Loop Sock which I patented. This had a long run. Rumpel of Berlin from Kitchener, Ontario undertook to make it so I sued him. He paid me a royalty for 5 years.

Next-  The Perth Woollen Company is Formed-1897

 

historicalnotes

 

*RYANHUGH, businessman and philanthropist; b. July 1832 in County Limerick (Republic of Ireland), eldest son of Martin Ryan and Margaret Conway; m. 20 March 1858 Margaret Walsh in Perth, Upper Canada, and they had four sons and four daughters; d. 13 Feb. 1899 in Toronto.

In 1841 Hugh Ryan immigrated with his family to a farm near Montreal. At age 18 he took a construction job on the St Lawrence and Atlantic Rail-road, an experience that would lead him to make public works, especially railways, his life’s work. Many of the family moved to Perth in the 1850s, where Hugh and his brother John formed H. and J. Ryan and obtained contracts to build two sections of the Brockville and Ottawa Railway.  Read more here..

*Maloney Block Perth-Aug. 23, 1946 – MESSERS RICHARD MILLS and WILFRED HORROBIN purchased the Maloney Block on Gore Street.

*fresh·et

the flood of a river from heavy rain or melted  snow–

*The first industrial process on the Code’s Mill site, was a tannery owned by the Kilpatrick Family in 1842.  A town plan for 1863, shows the outline of the factory, similar to the building which now stands there.

*HOSIERY. — Gottlieb Hecker und Soehne, Chemnitz, Germany. Application filed May 24, 1883. …FULLED KNIT WOOLEN GOODS.–C. E. Wakeman & Co., PontiacMich. Application filed April 27, 1883.

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

Standard
The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

 

29133968_10155629197276886_4165745126066356224_n (1).jpg

 

In the Springtime of 1876, April 21, I came to town (Perth) having rented the McPherson carding mill as associate with my Uncle George. He was supposed to have the capital, but after a few days he got homesick and I decided to continue, feeling that to turn back would mean defeat and that I would never get anywhere.

The executors of the property trusted me to go ahead. I bought the yarn stock for 159 dollars and 60 cents on time. During the next two weeks business was good and I paid for this in full. As terms were cash I was enabled to finance. There was a shingle mill in connection. I bought the shingle stock and cut it into shingles, but I had much trouble in getting rid of the shingles.

I continued carding rolls for home spinning: charging four cents when oiled at home, and six cents per pound for spinning, deducting one pound in ten for loss; much of the wool was hand picked or semi washed.

Customers were strong on getting their own wool back in the yarn as each person thought that his wool was better than the others, but they did not always get it. I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar as customers wanted to know when their work would be ready, and if not careful in promising trouble followed– sometimes with a severe chastisement.

In the autumn of 1876, together with a party, I went to *the Centennial at Philadelphia, Pa. We lodged in Germantown and had a rate one dollar a day. We were away 6 days in all, and altogether it cost me 28 dollars and a half. I was called the boy of the party, but I do not think it cost the others much more if anything. Of course we did not have Pullman accommodation.

When the custom season was over I was asked by the executors of the estate what I would give for the property where I was. I named 3000 dollars. Shortly after I was advised that the property had been sold to a *fellow elder at the figure that I had offered. I felt that I had been used, and naturally I was disappointed, however I resolved not to be outdone. I rented the small frame building at the south side of the stone flour mill and put in a water wheel. I installed carding and spinning machinery of a primitive character, and got into operation about the first of June 1877.

I got my share of the custom, and after two seasons, my opposition ceased to operate. The same executors came to me and asked me to buy the machinery. I told them I had no money, to which they replied that they would trust me. At the same moment one A. D. Disher– representing the McLaren Lumber Company at The Pache, province of Quebec– was on his way to buy the machinery. He was told that I had bought it so he came to me and asked if I would sell, and at what price. I named 1000 dollars for the cards, hand jack spinner, and the picker. He put his hand in his trouser pocket and produced one hundred 10 dollar bills. This happened without any banter whatsoever, and the deal was verbal.

I immediately went to the law office of F.A. Hall and paid off the claim. I had left a Judson roll card that had been operated by my Uncle Richard on the Haggart premises many years before, which together with some other equipment I had for 100 dollars. Without opposition the struggle was not so strenuous for a year or two, but the evolution had started from the homemade to the factory made.

Next- The Ryan Family and the Evolution of Socks

 

 

historicalnotes

*In celebration of America’s one-hundredth anniversary of independence, the Centennial Exhibition took place on more than 285 acres of land in Philadelphia’s Fairmount Park May 10-November 10, 1876. Close to ten million visitors (9,910,966) went to the fair via railroad, steamboat, carriage, and on foot. Thirty-seven nations participated in the event, officially named the International Exhibition of Arts, Manufactures, and Products of the Soil and Mine. The grounds contained five major buildings: the Main Exhibition Building, Memorial Hall (Art Gallery), Machinery Hall, Agricultural Hall, and Horticultural Hall. In addition to these buildings, approximately 250 smaller structures were constructed by states, countries, companies, and other Centennial bureaus that focused on particular displays or services.

 

*Of possible interest, a notice in the Courier in August 1872 announced that John Drysdale of Glen Tay had come to work in the carding mill of McPherson Wool in Perth. The Drysdales had a connection to the Adams family, and a man by the name of Drysdale was injured in the woolen mill fire of 1870

 

 

 

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

When Newspapers Gossiped–David Kerr Innisville

Kerr or Ennis? More about the Innisville Scoundrel

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?