Tag Archives: code mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 14- Code Family–Letters from Mother Elizabeth Hicks

 

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Innisville circa 1890s

My Dear Son,

I told Mary when she was going away to speak to you for a little money. She must have forgotten. David Ennis has gotten the line fence made and I have to pay half of it, and Mr. Ireton and his man are at this one at home today and both needed very much to be done.

Very affectionately yours,

Mother

Excuse- mail is waiting

(I assume the mailman was waiting for her note while she wrote it)

 

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Innisville, December 14, 1892

My Dear Son,

I am sure you will think it very strange that I now wrote to thank you for your kind present. I now write and thank you very much indeed as they are beautiful and we needed them so much as we did not get any in the fall.

I often pray God to bless you and prosper you for you have always been good and kind to your Mother, and not alone to me but to all the rest as well: your *brothers and sisters. I suppose I need not expect you out at Xmas as I hear through the line that Jennie (Thomas Alfred’s wife) is not coming home until after the New Year. They will likely want you to go down to Ottawa.

Emily was up to her grandfather’s funeral also Uncle Abe and Tom and Eddie and now hear Thomas. I would like if you could come out at Xmas and I will not give up yet and I will be looking for you.

I am greatly troubled with rheumatism in my shoulder, my hand shakes and I can hardly write. I hope you will excuse my writing.

From Mother (Elizabeth Hicks Code-she died 3 years later)

 

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Family Records as taken from the Family Bible (more later)

William Code and Elizabeth Hicks married 27th February 1849 by Reverend Mr. Harris at Perth, Ontario. William Code, died at Innisville 21st October 1868. Elizabeth Hicks, wife of William Code died at Innisville 23rd October 1895.

Births

John Code born 22nd January 1850

Margaret Code born 1st February 1852

Thomas Alfred Code born 9th June 1854

Mary Elizabeth Code born 20th October 1858

Robert George Code born 20th October 1858

William Abraham Code born 27th February 1861

James Richard Code born 17th January 1864

historicalnotes

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Funeral Invitation that is also in the journal I have- Leslie Clan

Shore Brae to St. Clement’s Churchyard Aberdeen, Scotland

 

Photo- Perth Remembered

Note—When the post office opened in 1851 a clerical error resulted in the community being called Innisville. The error was never corrected.

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

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In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

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How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed. Read-More Local Treasure Than Pirate’s Booty on Treasure Island

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading.jpg

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 3– Genealogy Ennis

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4a – Innisville the Beginning

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4b – Innisville — Coopers and “Whipping the Cat” 1860-1870

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4c – Innisville — Henry York and Johnny Code

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4d – Innisville — “How We did Hoe it Down”!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 4e – Innisville — ‘Neighbours Furnished one Another with Fire’

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 5- Code Family– “Hawthorn Mill was a Failure, and the Same Bad Luck has Followed for at Least 50 Years”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 6- Code Family– “Almost everything of an industry trial character had vanished in Innisville in 1882”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 7- Code Family–“Thank God, no member of my family has disgraced me or the name!

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 8- Code Family– “We got a wool sack and put him inside and took him to the bridge”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 9- Code Family –“I had much trouble in saving myself from becoming a first class liar”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 11- Code Family –“I continued with bull dog tenacity for 12 years without salary”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 12- Code Family–“Had I the course to go over again I would evade outside responsibilities beyond my share, even if it cost more”

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 13- Code Family–S. S. No. 17 Drummond, Innisville

 

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

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The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 2– Perth Mill

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Original letter typed up in 1929 and sent to Andrew Haydon from the journal I purchased.

Perth, Ontario,1929.

The subject of this narrative (Thomas Alfred Code) was born June 9th, 1854 on the banks of the Mississippi in the township of Drummond, Lanark County. He had a varied experience in the early days, principally on the farm being in full charge for our years previous to embarking in business. He received a limited education in the local village school, and spent a winter term at the Grammar school in Perth.

In the year 1876, in his 21st year, Mr. Code rented a small carding mill in Perth. A year later he removed to a  small building on Mill Street owned by the Hon. John Haggart.

Owing to the ever changing conditions in the local custom trade, it was deemed necessary to make some shift to keep step with the times. The people were gradually changing from the homespun to the factory-made article.

As the building of the Canadian Pacific Railway was in contemplation, a railway contractor, the late Mr. Hugh Ryan suggested that there was an opening for the knitted goods: Mitts, socks etc. This was adopted without any previous knowledge of the art. About the year 1880 the plant was removed to the present location, and the knitting has continued up to the present time.

In the year 1897 the Gemill Mill was taken over by the Perth Woollen Company, the principals being the Hon. John Haggart, Geo.D. Ross from Montreal, and Mr. Code. After a few years of indifferent success making tweeds, flannels, etc. a plant was installed for manufacturing pressed felts, and continued to make a limited range until the year 1920. At this time the holdings of the Hon. John Haggart and Mr. George D. Ross were taken over by Mr. Code. The Perth Felt Co. Limited and the Tay Knitting Mill were then re-incorporated and operated as one, under the name of the Code Felt & Knitting Co. Ltd.

 

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An addition was then added for the manufacture of fine piece felts, which greatly enlarged the field for the company’s product. The mills are managed jointly by Wellington Douglas and Allan L. Code. The former has had a life-long practical experience in every department of the mill. The latter served in the Royal Flying Corps in France. He has since taken a course at the Lowell Textile School, and has applied his time to the development of the mills.

Mr. Code, the founder is spending his fifty- third year in harness without interruption,– a feat equalled by few.

Thomas Alfred Code

This poem was on the other side of the page opposite the narrative from Thomas Alfred Code

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historicalnotes

Photo- Perth Remembered

History

The first industrial process on the site was operated by the Kilpatrick family beginning in 1842 and established as a tannery shortly thereafter.  In 1882 a new owner, Thomas Alfred Code, established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including: carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts. Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998.

 

51 Herriott – The Code Mill is actually a collage of five different buildings dating from 1842. T.A. Code moved to Perth in 1876, and bought this property by 1883. Code spent 60 years in business in Perth. The business started with a contract to supply the North West Mounted Police with socks, and continued for many years manufacturing felt for both industrial and commercial uses.

Code Felt Co today– Click here..

 

Screenshot 2018-03-08 at 14.jpg

In the 1883, Mr. T. A. Code established Codes Custom Wool Mill with a range of processes, including:  carding, spinning, fulling, shearing, pressing, and coloring of yarns. In 1896, its name was changed to the  Tay Knitting Mill, and it produced yarn, hosiery, socks, gloves, sporting-goods, sweaters, and mitts.  Another change came in 1899, when a felt-making process was introduced and the mill was renamed  Code Felt. The company continued to operate until the closing of the factory in 1998. The following year, John Stewart began a major restoration and introduced new uses for this landmark. This impressive limestone complex with its central atrium now has an interesting mix of commercial tenants.-Perth Remembered

s-l1600.jpg

How did I get this?

I purchased this journal online from a dealer in California. I made every attempt to make sure the journal came back to its rightful location. Every day I will be  putting up a new page so its contents are available to anyone. It is a well worn journal full of glued letters and newspaper clippings which I think belonged to Code’s son Allan at one point. Yes there is lots of genealogy in this journal. I am going to document it page by page. This journal was all handwritten and hand typed.

How did it get into the United States?  The book definitely belonged to Allan Code and he died in Ohio in 1969.

Allan Leslie Code

1896–1969 — BIRTH 27 MAR 1896  Ontario—DEATH JUN 1969  Mentor, Lake, Ohio, USA

 

Andrew Haydon.jpgAndrew Haydon- see bio below–He was the author of Pioneer Sketches of The District of Bathurst (Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Ontario) (The Ryerson Press, 1925) and Mackenzie King and the Liberal Party (Allen, 1930).

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

The Original Thomas Alfred Code and Andrew Haydon Letters – —Part 1

What Went Wrong with the Code Mill Fire in Innisville?

Shenanigans at the Hawthorne Mill?

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Heritage Carleton Place— Photo–May Cornell on Mississippi with Hawthorne Mill in Background

People are happy the Hawthorne Mill is being renovated and loved again. I really had to laugh when I saw these. Don’t forget to go visit the mill on Saturday– 

An Invitation to the Old Hawthorne Mill

 

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Photo by Robert McDonald Photography

Dale Costello– So happy the restoration of this timeless building will evolve into something which brings back vivid memories for those born and raised in Carleton Place. My heartfelt thanks and congratulations to Mr. Thorbjornsson and team in seeing through to successful completion. This historic building was on my path to the canoe club and passed by it thousands of times. Thank you sir.

Jeremy Stinson– If I recall correctly, that usually meant trespassing if that was on your path. Statute of limitations has surely passed, but I remember getting scolded for taking the direct (north side of the building) route.

 
Dale Costello–I pulled out my transit every time I walked by to be certain I wasn’t on mill property. You can’t be too careful. Chief Cornell complimented me for being a law abiding citizen.
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Dale Costello–Jeremy, ya gotta go to the top of the heap.
Ray Paquette– Gee, I never thought of it as trespassing! Wasn’t it an extension of Emily Street? I wish I had a nickle for every time I used that route on my way to the swimming pool.
Ray Paquette —Obvious, Herb didn’t see everything that was going on!?!?!?!
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Blaine Cornell- Careleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
Ray Paquette —One of my buds was the police chief’s sonson Blaine. May have interceded on occasion.
Joann Voyce More than one occasion if my memory serves me correctly….

 

Author’s note– You tell them Joanne!!! 

 

 - I Ur. W. H. Matthews, the retiring bead...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  20 Oct 1899, Fri,  Page 4

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

 

relatedreading.jpg

 

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

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