Tag Archives: clocks

Inside The Carleton Place Clock Tower That Does not Toll

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I wrote a blog about the old Post Office in Carleton Place a few months ago, and it makes me sad as the clock does not work. I can only stand there at gaze at its beauty. Have you ever seen the interior and what might make this clock tick? Let’s sneak around the back and go up and see.

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The weight driven clock was manufactured by John Smith of The Midland Clockworks in Derby England. The massive 800 lbs. brass bell located behind the clock tower was manufactured by John Taylor of Longborough. The four stained glass faces of the clock measure 5 feet 6 inches in diameter. The massive J. Smith & Sons weight driven clock has a pendulum which hangs down through the floor, to the attic room below the room that houses the movement.

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The clock mounted in the tower,is a Mansard style copper cupola that has oxidized to its lovely present shade.

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The honour of putting the clock in motion was given to Howard Dack, and his father James H. Dack. They were given custody of keeping the clock running and in good repair. In 1913 they first started its 150 pound pendulum in motion. Unfortunately, after the building went into private hands, the beautiful clock fell into disrepair and no longer runs.

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1962

Photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Colour Photo- Linda Seccaspina

As Time Goes By — The Old Post Office Clock

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Photo of The Old Post Office by Linda Seccaspina 

The old brown limestone building on Bridge Street built in 1897 served for many years as the Post Office and Customs for Carleton Place until the new one was built in 1970. The clock mounted in the tower,is a Mansard style copper cupola that has oxidized to its lovely present shade. In 1913, a town clock tower was added.

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The weight driven clock was manufactured by John Smith of The Midland Clockworks in Derby England. The massive 800 lbs. brass bell located behind the clock tower was manufactured by John Taylor of Longborough. The four stained glass faces of the clock measure 5 feet 6 inches in diameter. The massive J. Smith & Sons weight driven clock  has a pendulum which hangs down through the floor, to the attic room below the room that houses the movement.

The honour of putting the clock in motion was given to Howard Dack, and his father James H. Dack. They were given custody of keeping the clock running and in good repair. In 1913 they first started its 150 pound pendulum in motion. Unfortunately, after the building went into private hands, the beautiful clock fell into disrepair and no longer runs.

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When I was taking photos someone said, “It hasn’t moved as long as I’ve lived here”. Does anyone remember it working?

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Dack’s
115 Bridge Street
Carleton Place, Ontario
(613) 257-1440

Some Photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum