Tag Archives: clippings

Clippings of the Old Albion Hotel

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Clippings of  the Old Albion Hotel
Lost Ottawa
July 5, 2020  · 
No Sunday Driving after you’ve visited this Ottawa watering hole for a pint or three — it’s the Albion Hotel in May of 1957.
First opened in 1871 (although there was apparently previous hostelry on the site dating back to 1844). Now known as the Albion Rooms and part of the Novotel at Daly and Nicholas.
Plus a new looking Chevy passing by … new for then, anyway.
(City of Ottawa Archives CA046463)

It didn’t seem ironic to regulars having a final round at the Albion Motor Hotel that the last day of business at Ottawa’s oldest hotel would fall on Friday the 13th. They know the 140-year-old hotel will still stand as a heritage site in new development slated to start in spring of 1985. But most who came to hoist their glasses in farewell to their favorite watering hole don’t think any bar can live up to to what they consider the “friendliest place in town.” Sure the 50 rooms at the Albion are a little shabby now, and the Rideau Centre across the street makes the modest building pale in comparison. “But where else could you be insulted with such love by your waiter?” said Matt Napier, referring to the hotel’s crusty 72-year-old beerslinger, Ralph Moisan. Napier is now studying in at the University of Windsor, but the former customs officer extended his visit to Ottawa for coffin” of his former Ottawa hang-out. As for Moisan, who worked 30 years at the Belle Claire Hotel on Queen Street before it closed in 1974, most of what he had to say to customers about how he felt about the end of an era at the landmark was unprintable. But there was a trace of a tear in his eye when Moisan finally admitted he looked upon the Albion closing as “losing my second home,” though he insists he can still find employment as a bar waiter “just about anywhere.” Thomas C. Assaly Corp. and Jarvis Freedman, head of Equity Management International Ltd., were given approval by Ottawa Council last week to develop the city block surrounding the hotel. An 18-storey, 243-unit apartment building, 300-room hotel and recreational complex is planned on the site bounded by Daly Avenue, Nicholas, Waller and Besserer streets. The project is expected to cost about $75 million. Ken MacLennan, director of marketing for Assaly, said Friday that close to $5 million will be spent to renovate the Albion, designated a historical site in 1983. “The building will be renovated to the same state as in its heydays during the end of the last century, and will most likely Fred Cattroll. Citizen be turned into a restaurant serving customers at the new hotel,” said MacLennan. At least three sides of the building must remain standing. The fourth wall, facing Nicholas Street, will be torn down since that side of the original building underwent major renovations in the 1950s, when the Albion was owned by former NHL hockey star William Touhey.


CLIPPED FROM
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Apr 1866, Tue  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROM
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Jul 1874, Mon  •  Page 2


CLIPPED FROM
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Jun 1877, Tue  •  Page 4

CLIPPED FROM
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Jul 1874, Mon  •  Page 2
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Jul 1984, Fri  •  Page 43

If you look at my hanging fixtures on my porches (6) and the lights in my 2nd floor TV room (6) they all came from the Albion Hotel..

In July of 1984, Cumberland Township councillor Brian Coburn landed a good deal on a slightly used bar. At the same time, Ottawa collector Ian Macdonald was picking up some mirrors and chairs from the 1930s and an area farmer was buying a 40-year-old baler. But what they really bought were chunks of local history as the Albion Hotel, Ottawa’s oldest, bares its body and sells its soul this week. Because the 140-year-old hotel is to be incorporated in a $75-million hotel and residential complex, everything inside cash registers, pillows, switchboard and bar stools is to be sold, beginning today.

At a sale for dealers Wednesday, most of the larger items, such as stoves, bars and kitchen equipment, were bought. Macdonald is opening a 1 930s-st vie restaurant on Clarence Street in September. “I heard about the Albion closing and thought ‘Hey, that place is the 1930s personified’,” he said while walking out with chairs and octagon tables. Coburn, meanwhile, got a bonus with his buys, which included the $1,700 bar. As he and several helpers dismantled it, dozens of old, rusty coins were uncovered about $10 worth, some dating back to the 1920s. Coburn plans to use part of the bar and refrigerating equipment in his Navan restaurant, the Ballycastle, and save the rest for expansion.

The baler was used by hotel staff to crush and package paper and cardboard. The new owner intends to use it to bale wood shavings in his horse barn. Al Cohen, of Cohen and Cohen wreckers, handling the sale, said at least 100 dealers visited the hotel Wednesday. He predicted the hotel, at Nicholas and Daly streets, would be swamped today. For those wanting memorabilia, Albion Hotel blankets are selling for $5, while tavern chairs are going for $25. A sign promoting happy hour has a $2 price tag while another proclaiming the hotel’s ‘Showgirl Revue’ will cost $49. Black and white televisions are selling for $25, while glasses are 50 cents and red lounge chairs are $19. While some shoppers had history in mind, others were there strictly on business. Steve Valois, general manager of Capital Food Equipment, was eyeing a gas stove that had a $1,500 price tag.

He said the company, which specializes in used restaurant equipment, could turn the stove into a new-looking appliance by cleaning and sandblasting it. Thomas C. Assaly Corp. and Jarvis Freed-man, co-owners of the hotel, plan to build an 18-storey, 243-unit apartment building, 300-room hotel and recreational complex. The Albion was designated a heritage site in 1983 and $5-million is to be spent renovating the hotel. Construction is to start next spring, 1985.

Lost Ottawa
August 23, 2013  · 

Friday night’s alright … for the Albion Hotel at 1 Daly Street, shown here in 1875, shortly after it opened. The Court House and Jail across the street provided a steady stream of customers.

I never drank there, but I believe this place became, shall we say, rather notorious in more recent decades. Now it has regained respectability by being incorporated as a wing of the Novatel Hotel.

Barry Augerahhh, the big “A”, safest bar in town, ’cause that’s where all the cops and judges from next door drank.

Andrew Bartholomew ChaplinThe Albion was a watering hole for the members of NDHQ’s Directorate of History that was lodged on the fourth floor of the Ogilvy Building in the 1970s.

Lost Ottawa

September 3, 2015  · Raymond Bjornson shares this picture described as the Albion Hotel, a favorite Ottawa watering hole.No source, or date, alas.

Tania LevyThe portion of the Albion incorporated into the hotel, as its restaurant/bar is still there. It used to be Trio and was renamed The Albion Rooms recently. They make an excellent Caesar!

Not Hogwarth’s —- It’s Hoggards of Ottawa! Besserer Street History

The Brunswick Hotel — The “dollar-a-day” Huckell Hotel — (Murphy-Gamble Limited)

From Carleton Place to “the Laff” — The Life and Times of Peter Prosser Salter

British Hotel Pakenham –Mrs. McFarlane

Hotels of Early Carleton Place

Did You Know we Once Had a Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel

A Piece of Almonte History for Sale –A. H. Whitten- Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel — 1990s More history

Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

Meeting Your Neighbours — Paul Latour and The Almonte Hotel

Food Review of the Smorgasbord at The Queen’s Royal Hotel 1947

What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

Documenting Some Queen’s Hotel Photos

The Little White Country Church in Prestonvale- The Buchanan Scrapbooks

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The Little White Country Church in Prestonvale- The Buchanan Scrapbooks

The Buchanan ScrapbooksWith files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

In his diary, Rev. William Bell, first Presbyterian minister in Perth, speaks of Armstrong’s Corners, the hotel, the blacksmith shop, and the first winter road across the black ash swamp.  He also reports the serious accident he experienced during February, 1857.  Driving a borrowed horse and cutter to Lanark, the horse ran away while going down the steep hill at Stanley’s and struck a stump with such violence as to break the shafts from the cutter.  Mr. Bell was thrown against the stump, cutting his scalp.  He reported in his diary that four men rushed from Mr. Armstrong’s blacksmith shop and carried him into the house where his wound was dressed by Mr. McNichol and Mr. Armstrong lent him new shafts and harness which enabled him to drive back to Perth– read more here..Where was Prestonvale?

Read more here about Prestonvale–Where was Prestonvale?

Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum– read more here ..Where was Prestonvale?

This is the Old Baptist Church located in Drummond Township near Prestonvale, Ont.

Feb. 28, 1873 – Last Saturday the corpse of D. McPherson, who had lived in this section for 29
years, came into the Union House from the Mattawa. Mr. McPherson had been dead for over
three weeks but until Saturday no means of bringing his body for interment could be found. It
appears that he had been working in some of the shanties where his services were no longer
required and he was provided with and a quantity of money. On his way here he got on a
‘spree’ in which condition he kept himself until his pocket was empty. From some of the
numerous effects of that fatal cup he died and this adds another to the long list of deaths from
strong drink. Deceased was over 50 years of age and was interred at Prestonvale Cemetery.


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 May 1955, Mon  •  Page 34

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Jan 1897, Sat  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada03 Mar 1932, Thu  •  Page 4

Putting Leckie’s Corners Back on the Map — The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

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Putting Leckie’s Corners Back on the Map —  The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings
With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

Photo below from Tweedsmuir History Book 1– Ramsay W.I.

Remembering Leckie’s Corners 1887

Stories of Ramsay Township– Leckies Corner’s – James Templeton Daughter’s 1931

Remembering Leckie’s Corners 1887

Tidbits About Ramsay S.S. #9 The Tannery School

The House on the Hill — Up the 8th Line of Ramsay — Jaan Kolk Files

Some Cold Hard Facts- First Tailor in Ramsay and a Cow Without a Bell

Memories of the Original Road Gents Steve Villeneuve

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Memories of the Original Road Gents Steve Villeneuve

Ross MunroI remember that car club, think they use to meet around where the Barley Mow is today

Colleen MontgomeryRoss Munro My brother Bev was part of that group.

Ross MunroColleen Montgomery I remember that too, Bill Southwell, and Rob Clement, that come to mind as well

George MetcalfeRoss Munro Warren Hummel, Doc McGrath, Peter Martin Pin (Dolly’s brother) Karl Grosleg and possibly Grant Chaplin

Ross MunroGeorge Metcalfe Bob(Pin) McClymont, Slip and Don Dodds maybe too?

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Oct 1999, Tue  •  Page 37
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Oct 1999, Tue  •  Page 37

Remembering Norine Duhn — Thanks to Elaine MacLean

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Remembering Norine Duhn — Thanks to Elaine MacLean

Thanks to Elaine MacLean for all the information

My sister Norine Duhn worked for the town of Almonte. Her monument is outside the old town hall by the water. I have an old article on her but she was very well liked in the community. She started girl’s basketball and the little girls played in a basketball tournament the weekend after she died. Not sure if you knew her. She died at age 32 – 27 years ago! There will be a lot of newpaper articles on her. I moved to Almonte 1.5 years ago and live in Mill Run.

Elaine MacLean

Norine Duhn Commemorative Tree

In Almonte, Ontario, just west of Queen Street between the Riverwalk and the south bank of the Mississippi River stands a tree accompanied by a plaque commemorating Norine Duhn.

From what I found, she contributed to her community. She coached for the Naismith Minor Basketball Association (NMBA). She participated as a long time volunteer organizer of the annual Terry Fox Run in Almonte. The Almonte District High School annually presents the Norine Duhn Community Involvement award. She must have died before her natural time as she predeceased both her parents, Arther and Nora Morphy.

The plaque originally went up and a tree planted at the Naismith Museum. There will be a photo of Steve and her little son Nicholas at the tree planting. When the museum shut my dad had moved to its current spot – not sure if the tree was or not. Will upload a photo of monument for you as I have a shot. It will have a year on it.

Many people would remember her. She organized the Terry Fox Run and started a youth centre. The girls who played basket ball called themselves Norine’s Dream Team.

Almonte Curling Club–Norine Duhn Award Presentation | Almonte Curling Club

It’s hard to imagine a town recreation event that hasn’t been touched by Norine Duhn. From snow volleyball  to shuffleboard the recreation programmer helped provide joy to so many in and around Almonte. Her job brought her into contact with many people in this community. 

Her cheerful and friendly manner brought her many friends, friends now saddened by the news of Norine’s death Saturday at the Ottawa Civic Hospital. The 32 year-old native came to Almonte in October, 1988. While her experience at that time had not included recreation her organizational skills and enthusiasm for her job made her a town favourite very quickly. “She just was such a helping person and a caring person about everyone. She worried about other people rather than herself. She couldn’t do enough for everyone; said Jean Neilson, who has worked with Norine for several years on the local and district seniors games. 

“She went above and beyond the call of duty. Norine was more than a recreation programmer.’ Her extra effort to make this a better community in which to live made her a friend to all. “I think she cared about everybody, no matter what program it was : kindergym all the way up to the older folks. The recent death of recreation programmer Norlne Duhn has shocked  and saddened the community.

Mr. McKay said his and Norine’s family had become good friends over the years. Mayor Dorothy Finner’s son who went far beyond what any job description would call for. “She certainly was a very special person, • she said. “We’re going to miss her.” Mayor Finner said Norine’s gift was her cheerfulness and constant desire to improve the town and what it had to offer its residents. “She’s going to leave a very, very big gap”. Almonte Gazette March 29, 1995.

Additional Reading

Remembering local Almonte Scouts — Jack Lyons and Harold McGrath

Remembering Etta Whitney Carleton Place

Remembering Robert George Wilson Glen Isle 1942

Remembering Megan Whitney of Carleton Place

Remembering Evelyn Clark — Larry Clark

Remembering Councillor Theresa Fritz

Remembering Gerald Kirby

Remembering Britt Thurston

Clippings of Ralph Monette

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Clippings of Ralph Monette

Don Duncan–I believe that wall clock was being accepted by Ralph Monette the Reeve of Ramsay Township and hung in the old Council Chambers for years. 1973-1974. My first term on Ramsay Council. I wonder if it is still in the Mississippi Mills Council chamber?

With memory kicking in and additional research I have determined that after Reeve and Warden George Hilliard died suddenly 3 Feb, 1975 and because it was at the beginning of the council term, an election was called between Ralph Monette and Ronald Robertson. This is a photo of the newly elected reeve being presented, on behalf of the Township with this engraved wall clock from the Hilliard family in memory of Reeve Hilliard. This clock should still be on the wall of the Mississippi Mills Council Chamber. If someone wants to check that out it would be appreciated.

Linda Nilson-Rogers Didn’t Ralph Monette have the Curly cone moved to down by Sadler’s Building supply? I worked for him as a teen there. Please read-

Mill of Kintail Conservation Area
February 6, 2019  · 
Taken in 1967, this photo shows Ralph Monette and his father Wilbert taking a coffee break during construction of the Cloister on the Hill. This area is now a popular venue for many weddings every year.The Cloister on the Hill was build to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the birth of R. Tait McKenzie. (1867-19380

Ralph and Dawna Monette started this family business in 1983 in Carleton Place. The original product catalog featured about 20 items for rent! In 1998 they retired from the business after equipping their sons to lead the operation. That same year a second location opened in Perth, in 2001 Smith Falls, and in 2007 in Stittsville.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Jan 1999, Sat  •  Page 29
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 Nov 1972, Wed  •  Page 5
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Mar 1975, Tue  •  Page 2

Can you add anything to these memories?

War Time Homes Carleton Place 1946

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War Time Homes Carleton Place 1946

Homes built by Wartime Housing Limited in Peterborough, 1943,” Photographer J.B. Scott, Library and Archives Canada,

Ottawa and. the larger municipalities were “no more congested than the average”, and perhaps even less crowded than some of the smaller centres such as Smiths Falls where 2.700 families were jammed into 1.946 housing units, and Carleton Place where 900 units were occupied by 1,100 families. 1947

Soldiers marched from across Ontario and Canada into military training centres and then sailed to the war theatres of WW2. Women and men at home also marched, right into new sprawling factories to produce war supplies, munitions, aircraft, and ships. Even before the war, the country faced a severe housing shortage and as workers rushed into cities to fill jobs, especially in eastern Ontario, there was nowhere to call home

Architects drew up plans for small houses, some with four rooms, others with six. Ranging from 600 to 1,200 sq. ft., the single-level and one-and-a half-storey homes were quick to build and cost-efficient. Named Victory Houses, they were also dubbed Strawberry Box homes due to the boxy, fruit container shape.

In 1946 the Town of Carleton Place required at least 25 homes. Wartime Housing was going to be asked to be built on town lots located on vacant propertyies: on Boyd Street, about or opposite from the High School or Lake Avenue.

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 Aug 1946, Sat  •  Page 7

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Sep 1946, Sat  •  Page 22– Various Carleton Place Homes no street mentioned ( not war time homes)

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
31 Aug 1946, Sat  •  Page 25

Herriott Street History — Rachel McRae Joann Voyce

The Renting Racket of 1942

Larry Clark
A small correction-it is Beth Slade being chased by Eliza Brazier, Beth’s grandmother.

Kathy DevlinI grew up on this block. Where the barn was there were 3 wartime houses built in the late 40 ‘ s and my family bought one of those houses on Herriott St

Marilyn WhiteLinda Seccaspina there are photos and written work by Dave Findlay that he did a few years ago. I sent some pictures for him. They should be at the museum. I grew up in a wartime house on Lake Ave. E.

Wartime Homes in Carleton Place on Herriott Street

Judson Street — Clippings History and Photos

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Judson Street — Clippings History and Photos
Carleton Place Museum photo– The Baird and Riddell Wagon-Judson Street? With the pile of stones on the site of the library? There is a train going behind the house in the picture and that is now where the trail is that goes through the middle of town. thanks to Toby Randell.

Baird and Riddell Wagon from the Main Street

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Sep 1888, Wed  •  Page 2

Was Beating Anything from Baird & Riddell of Carleton Place Illegal?

103 Judson Street- Toby Randell

January 25 at 6:26 PM  · Just for context, here is the original shot not zoomed in on our place. Now you can zoom in on the other structures or the people and wagon– we went and got the history of our house dating back to the late 1800’s from the land registry. The land was originally owned by the grandson or great grandson of Edmond Morphy. I can’t remember which it is of the top of my head. Still cool to have the history and the photo. Toby Randell

Closeup

103 Judson Street With the pile of stones on the site of the library?

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Feb 1905, Wed  •  Page 3

It’s the only picture we have of the entire house. The larger picture still shows surrounding houses with fire damage from the fire that took out most of the downtown core. Our house was rebuilt, and we know this due to documentation of a $7000 insurance policy at the time–1910ish.

On that map our place would be # 30 owned by John McDonald. His brother was Peter McDonald that lives beside him. So the history was original land transfer to the Morphy family May 3 1871 A mortgage was put on the the land 1878 by WF Morphy and held by Edward George Malloch A deed was registered and a sale between William F Morphy and Jane Low McDonald who we believe was married to John McDonald. In March of 1881. The house stayed in her name until 1910 when a QC deed was registered, likely after the fire and the property changed hands to his daughter Annie E McDougall for $5. It gets odd from there as in oct of 1912 John died in April, a probate was executed by estate of John to 3 people Jessie McDonald ( who we could never track down) Annie McDougall his daughter who it seemed already owned the property?? And Annie’s husband James B MacDougall. In December of 1913 the property transfer to Jessie who kept it until September of 1932 when he sold it to John Swayne for $5000 and he owned it until 1988 when I assume he passed away. So during the fire it was owned technically by Jane Low MacDonald– Toby Randell

Judson Street Fire 1910

From here the fire was carried across the market square ( Memorial Park) to the magnificent residence of Mrs. James Gillies ( Memorial Park and Library) at the corner of Franklin and Judson streets. This house was on fire long before places nearer to the fire were burned.

Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Judson Street damage in fire of 1910

From the Gillies’ house the fire came back along Judson street, meeting the fire coming the other way, an entire block being consumed before the fires met. First from the Gillies house to take fire was St. Andrew’s manse, occupied by Rev. J. J. Monds. (Bank of Nova Scotia Parking Lot) The church was a couple of blocks away, out of the fire route, and escaped.

Next in line on Judson street came John McFarlane’s frame residence, Samuel Dunfield’s residence, Francis Gallagher’s residence and J. A. Gordon’s residence turning into Albert street and taking Robert Gordon’s residence and the house owned by Mrs. Code occupied by W. H. Hamilton which there completed the line of burning on the Albert street side, meeting the fire coming from the Wilkie residence. On the east side of Judson street the places burned were the brick residence of John McDonald, frame dwelling of Peter McDonald, frame dwelling owned by Ed. Bradford, C. P. R. conductor, Ottawa, and the brick residence of John McLeod. Mr. and Mrs. McLeod are old residents of the town and were out watching, the fire thinking their own house was safe. They, therefore, did not save anything. Sparks were then carried over two hundred yards to the stables and outbuildings of Samuel Torrance. They were burned but the house was saved. 

Nee builds after the 1910 fire

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Jun 1911, Wed  •  Page 2

Judson Street History

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
19 Feb 1942, Thu  •  Page 19
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Tue, Dec 20, 1898 · Page 2

She lived at 30 Judson Street and died before the fire.

The Gazette
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
14 Nov 1939, Tue  •  Page 6

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Apr 1904, Sat  •  Page 10

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Oct 1971, Thu  •  Page 68
James married Mary Elizabeth Flett in 1886 and together they had five children: Margaret, Elizabeth, Arthur Roy, Horace, and Howard. They lived at 146 Judson Street, Carleton Place.

Front: Horace, Mary, Howard, James Morton
Back: Margaret, Elizabeth, Roy all from the Roy Brown Society
Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

This photo of Bessie Brown (1890 – 1971 ) was taken in June of 1914. She’s showing off a flower arrangement she made as an entry in the first annual Carleton Place Horticultural Society’s flower show. The show was held at the Carleton Place Town Hall.
Bessie has used an old Taylor Brother’s wooden crate as her container. The Brown’s home was on Judson Street, not too far from Taylor’s Hardware Store. We happen to have just such a crate in our collection!
Vintage Photo from Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
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This action shot was taken on Judson Street, looking north from Franklin Street towards Mill Street. The scene is almost unrecognizable today. Howard Morton Brown and his brother Horace have added a sail to their wagon and are about to fly away!
Their home is the red brick home to the left of the photo, and is still standing today as 146 Judson. All the other structures we see in the distance were various mill outbuildings on Mill Street, and none remain. The big frame building with two chimneys was McDonald and Brown Woolen Mill.
The log fence to the left enclosed the Brown’s corn field! They kept many chickens and cows behind their property, and their red barn is still standing and visible from Mill Street. There are so many great details in this photo, taken about 1908

Photograph courtesy of Carol Nicholson.
Roy Brown with his mother outside their home on Judson Street, Carleton Place, 1917-1918. Roy returned home for the winter of 1917-1918 and spent time with his family over the holidays. He returned to Europe on January 30, 1918.
This house at the corner of Judson and Franklin streets has certainly changed over the years. It’s always fun though, for us to identify houses we find in old photo albums! The “before” photo is of Arthur Burgess, Arthur Cram (brothers-in-law) and Alfred Cram (who died tragically in a motorcycle accident in 1929). Note the front entrance (and thus the street address) has been moved from Judson to Franklin Street at some point. If anyone knows who lived in this house in the 1920’s we’d love more information. Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Marge Mitchell —My Aunt lived on Judson Street and the train tracks were about 60 feet from her house…there were so many trains whizzing by everyday. We loved seeing them and ran up to the station and sat on the benches and watched these mighty iron beasts. Such a fabulous memory of old time Carleton Place.

Read all about the 1910 fire in related reading below

Aftermath of the 1910 Fire- May 19 1910

More Clippings Found About the 1910 Carleton Place FireThe Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

The Lost Photos & Words- Carleton Place Fire 1910

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!- Volume 1- Part 2

Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire

The Lost Photos & Words- Carleton Place Fire 1910

The Hysteria and Overbooking of Hayley’s Comet 1910

The Revelliers Drum Corp — Clippings

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The Revelliers Drum Corp — Clippings
January 1971

Almonte 1974-The management and executive of the Revelliers Drum Corps would like to take this opportunity to extend our heartiest thanks to all the people who helped make our Santa Claus Parade a big success

Chris Gordon Drum line practice on the foundry floor (Revelliers, or as they were then, the Junior Trumpeters).  My mum worked in the office, my grandfather, Sid Stanfield, worked in the foundry.

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum‎-This photo was taken during the Carleton Place Centennial Parade on July 1, 1967. The Revelliers are marching by what is now the Granary building. We are looking forward to the 150th parade coming in July 2017!
TUESDAY this morning on Tales of Carleton Place-A few pictures this morning of the Carleton Place and Almonte Revelliers with Art Drader as Director.. The book of memories of Arthur Drader was put together by Audrey Drader for Father’s day. Trevor Smith
John Larose sent this in.. This crest is from when my sisters and brother were in the Revelliers
No photo description available.
A few pictures this morning of the Carleton Place and Almonte Revelliers with Art Drader as Director.. The book of memories of Arthur Drader was put together by Audrey Drader for Father’s day. Trevor Smith
Penny TraffordThat is Randy Trimble holding the trophy, my brother Dale behind him and my brother Logan behind Dale. And that’s my Dad Fred Trafford walking with the boys. Sean Redmond playing the trumpet. My brother Dale confirmed some more names. Brian Dickie, then Terry Gollinger behind Logan and on the other side he think it’s Michael Quartermain – Kirk Armstrong – Jamie Hunt. 1969
A few pictures this morning of the Carleton Place and Almonte Revelliers with Art Drader as Director.. The book of memories of Arthur Drader was put together by Audrey Drader for Father’s day. Trevor Smith
A few pictures this morning of the Carleton Place and Almonte Revelliers with Art Drader as Director.. The book of memories of Arthur Drader was put together by Audrey Drader for Father’s day. Trevor Smith
A few pictures this morning of the Carleton Place and Almonte Revelliers with Art Drader as Director.. The book of memories of Arthur Drader was put together by Audrey Drader for Father’s day. Trevor Smith
Memories today– A few pictures this morning of the OYB Lampliters with Art Drader as Director.. The book of memories of Arthur Drader was put together by Audrey Drader for Father’s day. Trevor Smith