Tag Archives: clippings

1874 in Almonte and Clayton — Ahearn Smith Menzies Monaghan McFarlane

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1874 in Almonte and Clayton — Ahearn Smith Menzies Monaghan McFarlane

Almonte Gazette 1874. Taken from the Perth Courier

Novmember 1874

CLIPPED FROMOttawa Daily CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada26 Nov 1874, Thu  •  Page 3

Bridge Street December 1874

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Ottawa Daily Citizen

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada28 Oct 1874, Wed  •  Page

CLIPPED FROMOttawa Daily CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada27 Jun 1874, Sat  •  Page 4

I love the last line… Where are all the purchasers to come from?? LOLOL

Almonte Brass Bandon Mill Street 1910- Almonte.com

from almonte.com

CLIPPED FROMThe Kingston Whig-StandardKingston, Ontario, Canada24 Aug 1898, Wed  •  Page 3

Mr. Young and Mr. Bond- Almonte History 1870s

Clippings of Almonte in the 1870s

Almonte 1859 Business Directory

Almonte in the Twenties

The Morbid Economy of the 1800s

Clipping of Hotel Cecil McDonald’s Corners- Hotel and Funeral Parlor

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Clipping of Hotel Cecil McDonald’s Corners- Hotel and Funeral Parlor

The building at left says “Hotel Cecil”. Formerly The Glasgow Arms–which was rebuilt after a fire by William Locks and became Hotel Cecil. This is now (2020) a private home.
Note the illegible writing on the roof of the building across the street, which seems to end with ” . . . Store” Izatt postcard Charles Dobie

I wonder if anyone spent Canada Day at the Cecil Hotel in McDonalds Corners? Mr. King had the first hotels at McDonald’s Corners as early as 1853. William Jackson ran the hotel out of his residence until 1909 but then decided the undertaking business was a more profitable business. He initially bought Andrew Wilson’s business and then took over William Geddes business and William Jackson Jr., his son, took over the lock stock and barrel in 1940. The family also ran the rural mail out of McDonald’s Corners and the stage to Snow Road Station


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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
02 May 1906, Wed  •  Page 1

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
30 May 1906, Wed  •  Page 4


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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
28 Feb 1906, Wed  •  Page 8

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
24 Mar 1909, Wed  •  Page 4
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
18 Mar 1908, Wed  •  Page 1

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
28 May 1913, Wed  •  Page 5

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
22 Apr 1914, Wed  •  Page 5

The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
09 Jul 1919, Wed  •  Page 5


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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
10 Jun 1914, Wed  •  Page 4
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
07 Oct 1914, Wed  •  Page 1

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
21 Oct 1914, Wed  •  Page 4

Connie Jackson

Folklore has it that my Great-Grandpa was fighting the existing council to keep his liquor licence at the Hotel Cecil. When it was voted down he jumped up and heatedly exclaimed that he would bury every last one of them and stalked out of the meeting. He quickly converted his hotel into a funeral home and apparently kept his word😳. I always wanted to find the attendance to said meeting to see if there is truth to the story.

According to my father, William was the originator of the rural route service for the region.

Tales of Our Roots


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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
02 Jun 1909, Wed  •  Page 1

The Family of
William Purdon & Elizabeth McDougall,
McDonalds Corners, Ontario

Back row, L to R: William H. Purdon, Violet (Purdon) Stewart, Duncan Purdon, Christina (Purdon) McIntyre and her husband Malcolm McIntyre, Mary Elizabeth (Purdon) Dahlka, William Purdon and Agnes T. Purdon.
Front row, L to R: Elizabeth (Lizzie) Clement, Elizabeth (McDougall) Purdon, Jim Clement (a brother of Lizzie), Jane (Purdon) MacDonald, Anna Jeannette Waite (on chair), Isabella (Purdon) Waite, who is holding Violet Erma WaiteCharles Dobie photo

Photos and Clippings of Dorothy Meehan- Brunton– thanks to Lizzie Brunton #2

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Photos and Clippings of Dorothy Meehan- Brunton– thanks to Lizzie Brunton #2

Hi, so I’m going through a closet of old boxes , photos, letters etc from my Mom and Dads former home. So my Mom wrote lots of letters, stories, and got quite a few published. Here is one of the “Almonte is; The Friendly Town”. I kind of laughed because I saw a post about the water tower in Almonte the other day. I’ll send a pic of the scrapbook stories. I have so many pics and stories!

Lizzie Brunton

Lizzie BruntonOkay, here goes, my Nanny, my mom (striped hood far right), my aunt Stella, my uncle Gerald (I believe), aunt Kitty, aunt joanna, or Marion, and maybe Sam as a baby!!!


Lizzie Brunton— awesome picture of Mom and her contagious smile.

Photos and Clippings of Dorothy Meehan- Brunton– thanks to Lizzie Brunton #1

Let’s go Racing Boys — J. A. Brunton –Where was This Sign?

Annie Bella Brunton & Adam Wesley Jones

What Happened to Bill Brunton’s Roof in Carleton Place?

The Runaway Bridesmaid From Rosebank to Huntley (Meehan)

Photos and Clippings of Dorothy Meehan- Brunton– thanks to Lizzie Brunton #1

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Photos and Clippings of Dorothy Meehan- Brunton– thanks to Lizzie Brunton #1

Hi, so I’m going through a closet of old boxes , photos, letters etc from my Mom and Dads former home. So my Mom wrote lots of letters, stories, and got quite a few published. Here is one of the “Almonte is; The Friendly Town”. I kind of laughed because I saw a post about the water tower in Almonte the other day. I’ll send a pic of the scrapbook stories. I have so many pics and stories!

Lizzie Brunton

Read the story here..HIGH SCHOOL CADETS RESCUE CHILD IN RIVER

Read- Old St. Mary’s Almonte — Clippings Photos and Memories


Family love from Lizzie Brunton–Hi. I got together with a bunch of my cousins yesterday. It was fantastic. My Mom was the oldest of seven from Almonte. You’ve mentioned Joanna Meehan Harrington that is one of my Moms sister. So, we were at my Aunt Marion McGahey’s in Kemptville. Marion is the last sibling left. It was such a delight to all be together again. I wanted to tell you, I’m not sure why.
There was my Mom Dorothy Meehan Brunton, Gerald Meehan -fiddle player, Donnie Cochran- he was killed tragically by the train in Almonte when he was just a young boy (my Nanny and Grandpa Meehan adopted him as a baby), Stella Meehan, Kathleen (Kitty) Meehan Thibert, Marion Meehan McGahey, Joanna Meehan Harrington, and Shirley Anne Meehan. They grew up on Country Street and called it, “The Backroad”. I should mention my grandparents names, Stella Scott Meehan and Norbert Meehan–So many great stores and history. A legacy.

Lizzie Brunton

 

Let’s go Racing Boys — J. A. Brunton –Where was This Sign?

Annie Bella Brunton & Adam Wesley Jones

What Happened to Bill Brunton’s Roof in Carleton Place?

The Runaway Bridesmaid From Rosebank to Huntley (Meehan)

Appleton Map and Odds and Ends — Clippings of Appleton

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Appleton Map and Odds and Ends — Clippings of Appleton

Map of the Appleton Community 1930-1940, Drawn from Memory

Date:

1930-1940

Location:

Appleton, Town of Mississippi Mills, Ontario, Canada

Credits:

North Lanark Regional Museum (Library)


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Apr 1900, Sat  •  Page 11

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Apr 1935, Sat  •  Page 2

One whose memory carries back almost to the pioner davs of this little hamlet and who retains vivid recollections of the scenes is Mrs. John Reid. presently residing’ with her daugh’er, Mr D. M Chambers, at 195 Howell avenue. Mrs. Reid. who is a daughter of the late William Young, who con- ducted a tailoring establishment In Appleton for many years, was born eighty-four years ago on a farm on the ninth concession of Ramsay, but she was very young when her parents took up their residence in Appleton. Mm. Reids mother wss Agnes Templeton. daughter of the late James Templeton, one of the pioneer settlers in Ramsay township.

The Templetons and their daughter and son-in-law emigrated to this country from England in the early 1840s. They came over in one of the old-time sailing vessels taking nine weeks to make the crossing. When they reached Montreal thev had to drive to Smiths Falls and then walk the rest of the distance over blazed trails through the forest, carrying their belongings with them.

At that time there was nothing but virgin forest where the village of Appleton stands today. When the Youngs moved into the village of Appleton In the middle 1850s, several industries had already been established there, mainly through the enterprise of the Teskey family, who were among the most prominent and influential citizens of the district at that time.

Robert Teskey ran the sawmill and Adam Teskev was in charge of the woollen factory. The only other industry at that time was a tannery, conducted by J. and P. Cram. There were two blacksmith shops, presided over by Martin Manho. Read more below…


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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Jul 1935, Sat  •  Page 2

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Jul 1916, Sat  •  Page 16


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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Jun 1929, Tue  •  Page 7
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Sep 1917, Tue  •  Page 13


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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Mar 1947, Thu  •  Page 17

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
26 Dec 1900, Wed  •  Page 1

Unraveled and Threadbare

Fumerton Family– Appleton

Local News and Farming–More Letters from Appleton 1921-Amy and George Buchanan-Doug B. McCarten

Update — Teacher Fired in Appleton School May 1931 –Annie Neilson

Convictions: Moonshine in Darling, Party in Appleton and Firetrucks 1948

Mr. Allen’s Chickens– Appleton

Appleton–Memories of Arthur Robinson –The Federated Women’s Institutes of Eastern Ontario

Snippets– James Wilson and Nelson Syme — Appleton

Another Memory of the Cavers family in Appleton

Twenty Two Dollars a Week and Mississippi Hotel Clippings

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Twenty Two Dollars a Week and Mississippi Hotel Clippings
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
07 Dec 1910, Wed  •  Page 1

also read-David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

1920s photo–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Mississippi/ Grand Hotel

Napoleon Lavallee bought the property for $50 in 1869 and opened the hotel in 1872 after he sold the Leland Hotel/ Carleton House on Bridge Street.  The McIlquham family bought it 11 years later in 1883 and when Joe Belisle worked there from 1917-1920 it had ornate woodwork, a grand staircase and the stone facade had wooden white wrap-around verandas. The elegant dining room tables were covered in  fine lace linen and gleaming cutlery, and the Mississippi Hotel became known for its homemade food and attracted travelling salesman from far and wide. The salesmen set up trunks in their rooms offering everything from dishes to clothing that was scooped up by local merchants that came to buy at the hotel. The place was packed daily with fans from Stittsville, Smiths Falls and Perth–and if you talk to Gerald Hastie people came in early for the fresh baked pies, and by noon they were pretty well sold out.The only known photo of Napoleon Lavallee sits on my wall–read-The Napoleon of Carleton Place

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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
13 Jan 1897, Wed  •  Page 1
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Sep 1919, Fri  •  Page 4
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Dec 1909, Mon  •  Page 3
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
26 Mar 1902, Wed  •  Page 5
Karen LloydIn the 1950s Buck Fraser lived at the Mississippi Hotel. He used to stand out at the front in a white dress shirt having a cigarette. I don’t know where he worked .
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 May 1913, Tue  •  Page 2

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Aug 1899, Thu  •  Page 7
Jennifer Fenwick Irwin–Carleton Place Museum This was taken the morning after the fire.
Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire- read-Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
24 Nov 1909, Wed  •  Page 1
Buffalo robe or Sasktchewan Robe

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 May 1899, Sat  •  Page 6
Former dinner plates from the old Mississippi Hotel/ Grand Hotel– **
Adin Wesley Daigle**

November 19 at 11:37 AM ·
📷
A recent addition to the collection , a couple plates from the Mississippi hotel in Carleton place 😍👍

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Sep 1912, Fri  •  Page 9
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Dec 1914, Sat  •  Page 12
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Jul 1899, Thu  •  Page 7
The Old Side Door of the Mississippi Hotel

David McIntosh –Front Desk Man at the Mississippi Hotel

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel

Murders and Mysteries of the Mississippi Hotel

Thieves at the Mississippi Hotel–When Crime Began to Soar

All About Lorraine Lemay –Mississippi Hotel

Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

The Napoleon of Carleton Place

Grandma’s Butterscotch Pie

Mississippi Hotel Beer — Brading’s Beer

In the Mississippi Hotel Mood with Mrs. Glen Miller

The Mystery Murals of The Queen’s and Mississippi Hotel

Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire

Romancing the Mississippi Hotel in 1961

Where Was Linda? A Necromancer Photo Blog -Victorian Seance at the Mississippi Hotel

Spooky Night at the Seccaspina Hotel

Ray Paquette’s Memories- McNeely and the Mississippi Hotel and Doughnuts?

CLIPPED FROMThe Daily StandardKingston, Ontario, Canada13 Jun 1919, Fri  •  Page 6

Clippings and Memories of Deachman’s Bridge

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Clippings and Memories of Deachman’s Bridge
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
07 Jun 1905, Wed  •  Page 1


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The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
28 Jun 1946, Fri  •  Page 2
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
26 May 1909, Wed  •  Page 4
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
17 Feb 1909, Wed  •  Page 8
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
17 May 1911, Wed  •  Page 1
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
14 Apr 1909, Wed  •  Page 1
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
07 Sep 1904, Wed  •  Page 8
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The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
14 Apr 1909, Wed  •  Page 1
Replaced in 1946– Photo Laurie Yuill

Bird Watching-

#11 Deachman’s Bridge, Lanark

How to Get There: Go to Lanark Village on Highway 511. In the middle of the village on the

main street (George), turn east on Owen and then onto Rosetta Road. Observation Point: The bridge is over the Clyde River, just out of the village.

Watch For: Swallows under the bridge, various water birds and black terns upriver. Continue on Rosetta Road for good open rural birding.

Seasonal Information: May to October is best at the bridge. All seasons for open rural areas. for more click here..

Theresa Barr

That bridge flooded every year until late into the 1970s. The ditches would fill with water to the dump corner. The road always closed for at least 2 weeks every spring.

Leanne Schonauer

Even till this day sometimes the bridge still floods in the spring and my in-laws Joan and Ernie McDougall have to cross Caldwell’s fields to get out. They live on Herrans Lane right at the bridge

Brady Scanlan

Spent a lot of time fishing at that bridge.

Crystal Cordick

My kids caught alot of fish off that bridge!

Blair T. Paul, Artist – Canadian and International

As a boy, I fished off that bridge many times with my Dad, brothers and friends. It was the place to go!

John McDougall

i fished off that bridge alot of times fishing bull heads

Susan M. Storie

Fond memories of fishing as a child there, with my dad and brother, uncles

Ken Barr

Apparently my name is carved into the top rail of this bridge. I still remember the talking to I got from my dad, because it was his knife I was using. This would have been about 1971. Ernie and Pete Hall and me spent months at this bridge fishing.

Theresa Barr

Ken Barr only one place. Lol. We tried carving our name many places on the bridge

Ken Barr
January 8, 2021  · 
Photo taken in spring 2019.

Arthur Whyte

Spent many an hour fishing off that bridge.

Les Morris

I spent half my life in that bridge

Blair PaulLanark Village Community Group
April 17, 2021  · Blair PaulThis is NOT Deachman’s Bridge, but it reminded me of the days spent out there fishing when I was a kid.

This photo I found on line reminds of the old days of fishing off Deachman’s Bridge outside of Lanark a little ways. Jim Paul and I would jump on our bikes, and head there whenever we could, and sometimes we even caught something…but if you are a fisherman/woman, you know the real fun is just being there.

Jeanie Maennling

each year a Mother turtle lays her eggs here. Unfortunately some creatures show up in the evening for a feast on the aforementioned eggs. Hopefully one or two hatch, but she lays about 30 eggs each time. Walked there today but no indication that she has been there yet.

Ben Willis

As a young lad dad would take us out to deachmans bridge we all caught our first here

Stories About Deachman’s Bridge?

relatedreading.jpg

Why the Appleton Bridge Collapsed…

The Day the Appleton Bridge Collapsed

Lawsuits in Carleton Place — The Collapse of the Appleton Bridge

Memories of the Pickerel Run Innisville

The Floating Bridges of Lanark County

The Sullivans —- Floating Bridge Builders

Down by the Old Pike Hole–The Island Bridges of Carleton Place- Before and After

Was the McNeely Bridge Funded on “Drinkin’ Fines”?

So Which William Built the Carleton Place Railway Bridge?

The Mystery Ruins and the Floating Sidewalk Near the McNeely Bridge

Rideau Ferry Road– Black Snakes Bridges and SS#6

What Happened on the CPR Railway Bridge?

Tales from Oliver’s Ferry

The Tragic Tale of the Rideau Ferry Swing Bridge

Geddes Rapids Bridge 1903 — Dalhousie Lake

The Sharbot Lake Floating Bridge

Clippings of the Old Albion Hotel

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Clippings of  the Old Albion Hotel
Lost Ottawa
July 5, 2020  · 
No Sunday Driving after you’ve visited this Ottawa watering hole for a pint or three — it’s the Albion Hotel in May of 1957.
First opened in 1871 (although there was apparently previous hostelry on the site dating back to 1844). Now known as the Albion Rooms and part of the Novotel at Daly and Nicholas.
Plus a new looking Chevy passing by … new for then, anyway.
(City of Ottawa Archives CA046463)

It didn’t seem ironic to regulars having a final round at the Albion Motor Hotel that the last day of business at Ottawa’s oldest hotel would fall on Friday the 13th. They know the 140-year-old hotel will still stand as a heritage site in new development slated to start in spring of 1985. But most who came to hoist their glasses in farewell to their favorite watering hole don’t think any bar can live up to to what they consider the “friendliest place in town.” Sure the 50 rooms at the Albion are a little shabby now, and the Rideau Centre across the street makes the modest building pale in comparison. “But where else could you be insulted with such love by your waiter?” said Matt Napier, referring to the hotel’s crusty 72-year-old beerslinger, Ralph Moisan. Napier is now studying in at the University of Windsor, but the former customs officer extended his visit to Ottawa for coffin” of his former Ottawa hang-out. As for Moisan, who worked 30 years at the Belle Claire Hotel on Queen Street before it closed in 1974, most of what he had to say to customers about how he felt about the end of an era at the landmark was unprintable. But there was a trace of a tear in his eye when Moisan finally admitted he looked upon the Albion closing as “losing my second home,” though he insists he can still find employment as a bar waiter “just about anywhere.” Thomas C. Assaly Corp. and Jarvis Freedman, head of Equity Management International Ltd., were given approval by Ottawa Council last week to develop the city block surrounding the hotel. An 18-storey, 243-unit apartment building, 300-room hotel and recreational complex is planned on the site bounded by Daly Avenue, Nicholas, Waller and Besserer streets. The project is expected to cost about $75 million. Ken MacLennan, director of marketing for Assaly, said Friday that close to $5 million will be spent to renovate the Albion, designated a historical site in 1983. “The building will be renovated to the same state as in its heydays during the end of the last century, and will most likely Fred Cattroll. Citizen be turned into a restaurant serving customers at the new hotel,” said MacLennan. At least three sides of the building must remain standing. The fourth wall, facing Nicholas Street, will be torn down since that side of the original building underwent major renovations in the 1950s, when the Albion was owned by former NHL hockey star William Touhey.


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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Apr 1866, Tue  •  Page 1

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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Jul 1874, Mon  •  Page 2


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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Jun 1877, Tue  •  Page 4

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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Jul 1874, Mon  •  Page 2
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Jul 1984, Fri  •  Page 43

If you look at my hanging fixtures on my porches (6) and the lights in my 2nd floor TV room (6) they all came from the Albion Hotel..

In July of 1984, Cumberland Township councillor Brian Coburn landed a good deal on a slightly used bar. At the same time, Ottawa collector Ian Macdonald was picking up some mirrors and chairs from the 1930s and an area farmer was buying a 40-year-old baler. But what they really bought were chunks of local history as the Albion Hotel, Ottawa’s oldest, bares its body and sells its soul this week. Because the 140-year-old hotel is to be incorporated in a $75-million hotel and residential complex, everything inside cash registers, pillows, switchboard and bar stools is to be sold, beginning today.

At a sale for dealers Wednesday, most of the larger items, such as stoves, bars and kitchen equipment, were bought. Macdonald is opening a 1 930s-st vie restaurant on Clarence Street in September. “I heard about the Albion closing and thought ‘Hey, that place is the 1930s personified’,” he said while walking out with chairs and octagon tables. Coburn, meanwhile, got a bonus with his buys, which included the $1,700 bar. As he and several helpers dismantled it, dozens of old, rusty coins were uncovered about $10 worth, some dating back to the 1920s. Coburn plans to use part of the bar and refrigerating equipment in his Navan restaurant, the Ballycastle, and save the rest for expansion.

The baler was used by hotel staff to crush and package paper and cardboard. The new owner intends to use it to bale wood shavings in his horse barn. Al Cohen, of Cohen and Cohen wreckers, handling the sale, said at least 100 dealers visited the hotel Wednesday. He predicted the hotel, at Nicholas and Daly streets, would be swamped today. For those wanting memorabilia, Albion Hotel blankets are selling for $5, while tavern chairs are going for $25. A sign promoting happy hour has a $2 price tag while another proclaiming the hotel’s ‘Showgirl Revue’ will cost $49. Black and white televisions are selling for $25, while glasses are 50 cents and red lounge chairs are $19. While some shoppers had history in mind, others were there strictly on business. Steve Valois, general manager of Capital Food Equipment, was eyeing a gas stove that had a $1,500 price tag.

He said the company, which specializes in used restaurant equipment, could turn the stove into a new-looking appliance by cleaning and sandblasting it. Thomas C. Assaly Corp. and Jarvis Freed-man, co-owners of the hotel, plan to build an 18-storey, 243-unit apartment building, 300-room hotel and recreational complex. The Albion was designated a heritage site in 1983 and $5-million is to be spent renovating the hotel. Construction is to start next spring, 1985.

Lost Ottawa
August 23, 2013  · 

Friday night’s alright … for the Albion Hotel at 1 Daly Street, shown here in 1875, shortly after it opened. The Court House and Jail across the street provided a steady stream of customers.

I never drank there, but I believe this place became, shall we say, rather notorious in more recent decades. Now it has regained respectability by being incorporated as a wing of the Novatel Hotel.

Barry Augerahhh, the big “A”, safest bar in town, ’cause that’s where all the cops and judges from next door drank.

Andrew Bartholomew ChaplinThe Albion was a watering hole for the members of NDHQ’s Directorate of History that was lodged on the fourth floor of the Ogilvy Building in the 1970s.

Lost Ottawa

September 3, 2015  · Raymond Bjornson shares this picture described as the Albion Hotel, a favorite Ottawa watering hole.No source, or date, alas.

Tania LevyThe portion of the Albion incorporated into the hotel, as its restaurant/bar is still there. It used to be Trio and was renamed The Albion Rooms recently. They make an excellent Caesar!

Not Hogwarth’s —- It’s Hoggards of Ottawa! Besserer Street History

The Brunswick Hotel — The “dollar-a-day” Huckell Hotel — (Murphy-Gamble Limited)

From Carleton Place to “the Laff” — The Life and Times of Peter Prosser Salter

British Hotel Pakenham –Mrs. McFarlane

Hotels of Early Carleton Place

Did You Know we Once Had a Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel

A Piece of Almonte History for Sale –A. H. Whitten- Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel — 1990s More history

Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

Meeting Your Neighbours — Paul Latour and The Almonte Hotel

Food Review of the Smorgasbord at The Queen’s Royal Hotel 1947

What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

Documenting Some Queen’s Hotel Photos

The Little White Country Church in Prestonvale- The Buchanan Scrapbooks

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The Little White Country Church in Prestonvale- The Buchanan Scrapbooks

The Buchanan ScrapbooksWith files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

In his diary, Rev. William Bell, first Presbyterian minister in Perth, speaks of Armstrong’s Corners, the hotel, the blacksmith shop, and the first winter road across the black ash swamp.  He also reports the serious accident he experienced during February, 1857.  Driving a borrowed horse and cutter to Lanark, the horse ran away while going down the steep hill at Stanley’s and struck a stump with such violence as to break the shafts from the cutter.  Mr. Bell was thrown against the stump, cutting his scalp.  He reported in his diary that four men rushed from Mr. Armstrong’s blacksmith shop and carried him into the house where his wound was dressed by Mr. McNichol and Mr. Armstrong lent him new shafts and harness which enabled him to drive back to Perth– read more here..Where was Prestonvale?

Read more here about Prestonvale–Where was Prestonvale?

Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum– read more here ..Where was Prestonvale?

This is the Old Baptist Church located in Drummond Township near Prestonvale, Ont.

Feb. 28, 1873 – Last Saturday the corpse of D. McPherson, who had lived in this section for 29
years, came into the Union House from the Mattawa. Mr. McPherson had been dead for over
three weeks but until Saturday no means of bringing his body for interment could be found. It
appears that he had been working in some of the shanties where his services were no longer
required and he was provided with and a quantity of money. On his way here he got on a
‘spree’ in which condition he kept himself until his pocket was empty. From some of the
numerous effects of that fatal cup he died and this adds another to the long list of deaths from
strong drink. Deceased was over 50 years of age and was interred at Prestonvale Cemetery.


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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 May 1955, Mon  •  Page 34

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Jan 1897, Sat  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada03 Mar 1932, Thu  •  Page 4

Putting Leckie’s Corners Back on the Map — The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

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Putting Leckie’s Corners Back on the Map —  The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings
With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

Photo below from Tweedsmuir History Book 1– Ramsay W.I.

Remembering Leckie’s Corners 1887

Stories of Ramsay Township– Leckies Corner’s – James Templeton Daughter’s 1931

Remembering Leckie’s Corners 1887

Tidbits About Ramsay S.S. #9 The Tannery School

The House on the Hill — Up the 8th Line of Ramsay — Jaan Kolk Files

Some Cold Hard Facts- First Tailor in Ramsay and a Cow Without a Bell