Tag Archives: churches

More About Churches and Things Part 2

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More About Churches and Things Part 2

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Ramsay was surveyed in 1820-21, and during 1821 most of it was settled by military settlers from Perth, which were mostly Scottish and Presbyterian. They had no minister until a call was issued in October 1833 to Rev. John Fairbairn.

Ministers had visited Ramsay at times from Perth, Beckwith, and Lanark when baptism and communion services were held in homes, schoolhouses and barns. The following June seventh, elders were chosen. On the 29th the first communion service by their own minister was held in John Gemmill’s house some 158 received communion.

That summer trustees purchased two and a half acres for $12.50 for a church and Cemetery. Begun in 1835, the church was finished in 1836.  By 1845 a split in the congregation the Free Church was built across the road from Auld Kirk.

Soon there were four churches: They were the St. Andrew’s Church of Scotland, completed about 1835 and still maintained in its original structural condition. The Canadian or Free Presbyterian church, built ten years later. Three were Presbyterian on the eighth line of Ramsay and the Methodist church. The Reformed Presbyterians were  in a log church built in 1843.

An Anglican church in Almonte followed, and the parish of Almonte was separated in about 1860 from that of Carleton Place.  A Roman Catholic church built at a Mr. Slattery’s, in Almonte about 1840 was burned down more than twenty-five years later and was replaced by the present stone church building completed in 1876.

The Baptists built a small Almonte church and the township’s Reformed or Cameronian Presbyterians moved their place of services in about 1867 to the former Canadian Presbyterian church on the Eighth Line, later building their present church facing the Mississippi’s Almonte bay.

Then the great move began. In the 1860’s Almonte’s woollen mills were attracting workers, and it became a fast growing community.  All the churches moved to Almonte but one. The Reformed Presbyterians bought the Free Church in 1877, remaining until 1891. Before the move to town, people walked to church from all parts of the township.

Did you know that Auld Kirk had a library of 700 to 800 books? Hymn books and organs were not then in use so psalms and paraphrases were sung, led by the precentor  with his tuning fork: which was used at the annual Decoration Services. While much beloved as an historic monument and original home of two Almonte congregations, it had been long unused.

In 1933 the high pulpit and seats were brought back from the Pakenham church, a stone floor was laid, a door restored, windows repaired, a new fence and gates built. The cemetery at Auld Kirk is owned by the congregation not by the United Church of Canada, and from the beginning burials have been and are from most Protestant denominations.

 

 

 

historicalnotes

“Auld Kirk” 1836

This stone church, an attractive example of an early form of Gothic Revival architecture, was constructed in 1835-36 on land obtain from John Mitchell, one of Ramsay Township’s earliest settlers.  Built by the local congregation of the Established Church of Scotland it was also attended by Presbyterians from adjoining townships.  The early settlers of Ramsay were visited by ministers from Drummond and Beckwith  but in 1834 the first resident minister, the Reverend John Fairburn was inducted.  In January 1864, during the ministry of the Reverend John McMorine (1846 – 1867), a new church was opened in nearby Almonte.  Although little used since then, the “Auld Kirk” stands as a memorial to the pioneer Presbyterian Settlers.

Everything You Wanted to Know About Auld Kirk

Before and After — Auld Kirk

The Very Sad Tale of Cecil Cummings of Carleton Place

Almonte and Ramsay Pioneers – Rafted Down to Their Locations

The Remains of the Bethel Methodist Church

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The Remains of the Bethel Methodist Church

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Photo by: fiso

Bethel Methodist Church

Concession 11, Bennett Lake, Bathurst

In 1893, the Bethel Methodist Church was built. The brick building was erected to replace an old log building which was much too small for the congregation. In order to start a fund for the building of the church, Mr. William Pratt donated $100. Dedicated to the cause, Mr. Pratt also collected funds for the church, gathering $300 in one day. Members from the community all pitched in where they could donating money, lumber and hard work.

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Photo by: fiso

Mr. Dick Campbell was responsible for the stone work, the Bishop Bros did the framework and Messrs. Charlton and Buchanan did the brick work. The minister at the time, Reverend Barry Pierce painted the church. During the construction of the church, the workers boarded free of charge at Mr. William Pratt’s. The church was free of debt when it was completed, and with the small remaining funds, a shed was built for the church.

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Photo by: fiso

The church held no socials or suppers and people donated what they could. Money, food, fuel and horse fodder were all donated to the minister from church goers. The first wedding to be held in the church was between Thomas North and Margaret Pratt, and the last wedding, the union of Harold McGinnis and Violet VanAlstine was held in 1942.

In 1947 Maberly’s sister church, Bethel United Church, built in 1893 and located eight miles north of Maberly on the 11th concession of Bathurst Township, collapsed. The roof collapsed in 1959 and at this point the building had been vacant for some time. A monument can be found where the church once stood on Bennett Lake Road.  With files from Tay Valley History

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Photo by : fiso

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

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The Almonte Fire 1955– Almonte United Church

For the Love of St. Andrew’s– 130th Anniversary

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Drummond Centre United Church — and The Ireton Brothers 38 Year Reunion–Names Names Names

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

St. Augustine’s Church and Christ Church

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

Did You Know They Moved St. Paul’s Cemetery?

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Did You Know They Moved St. Paul’s Cemetery?

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1979

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photo-– Scott Reid– 175th Anniversary of St. Paul’s

Reverend Michael Harris travelled afar setting up local parishes as early as 1819 in Lanark County, and St. Paul’s Anglican Church was one of them. Set in the midst of the original cemetery overlooking the Perth Highway, the church partially built in 1852 celebrated its 175th anniversary this year.

The mission of Lanark dates from 1819 when the Rev. Michael Harris began ministering to the people in the community. St. Paul’s was built in 1842 on land donated by Mr. James H. Manahan. A new parsonage was built by 1899 and renovated in 1906 at which time the church was enlarged.  It missed being damaged by the Lanark Village fire  in 1959 but was considerably damaged by fire in 1945 and while repairs were being made, services were held in the Congregational Church. The parsonage was sold around 1990. 

It hasn’t changed much except for the small hall to the right that was built in 1964, but the belfry, porch, tower, sanctuary and vestry were added on in 1906. It thankfully escaped the Lanark fire of 1959 but it suffered fire damage to the roof and interior in 1945.

Their first organ was an old pump organ and then the United Church gave thenm mone that was powered by a hand pump. In 1953 someone willed the church their home and the contents and after the house was sold it bought Sr. Paul’s a new pulpit.

The cemetery in the churchyard was closed in 1917 and a new burial ground was obtained. St. Paul’s Church celebrated its centenary on June 28, 1942. The dead were buried strictly in the churchyards in those days, but back in 1917 local health officials requested that the original old cemetery built on the hill next to the church be closed and moved two miles out of town.  People worried about risks to public health and they came not only from the dank odours of the churchyards, but from the very water the people drank. In many cases, the springs for the drinking supply tracked right through the graveyards of the original churchyards.

historicalnotes

Did you know suicides, if they were buried in consecrated ground at all, were usually deposited in the north end, although their corpses were not allowed to pass through the cemetery gates to enter. They had to be passed over the top of the stone wall or fence. In the case of St. James in Carleton Place they were buried outside the fence.

They once tried to ban the use of coffins altogether for health reasons, insisting that ‘all people should be buried in sacks’ for sanitary purposes. The Victorians recognized the dangers of lead coffins, and made it mandatory that pine be used as an alternative as it ‘decays rapidly,’ thus allowing the corpse to return to the earth more naturally.

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  23 Jan 1945, Tue,  Page 16

Other Churches

May be an image of outdoors

May be an image of outdoors

Sacred Heart of Jesus Church under construction about 1890’s, Lanark Village.
Drovers who transported the limestone for the above church from the W. C. Stead quarry.
Ken Potter

Where was the S.C. Stead quarry?
Blair T. Paul, Artist – Canadian and International

Great photos…where was the quarry? It was believed that at the end of Paul Drive, west of what used to be Playfair’s Planing Mill there was a quarry. We always called it that as kids anyway.
Ken Potter

Blair T. Paul, Artist – Canadian and International Interesting. I live at 121 Paul dr at the end of the road. It is possible that it was quarried out of the side of the steep hill next to what is now Centennial Truss. I know that is lots of limestone on my property.
Doris Quinn

My late husbands ancestors helped build this Church. Bringing the stones etc. At the time they questioned themselves thinking that soon their Church in Ferguson’s Falls would be closed and they would all travel over the hills to Lanark. And so it is. Understandable though as Lanark had a bigger population. Sacred Heart Church in Lanark opened in 1903.
My late husband, James Quinn was direct descendant of John Quinn, one of the seven Irish men who came over from Ireland in 1820. So yes I have always loved this type of history and have accumulated a lot over the years. Now to get it into the book I always planned to write. At it a bit each week.🙂

relatedreading

PAKENHAM PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1897– $338.50 on the Cornerstone?

St. Andrew’s Pakenham celebrates 175th anniversary October 9– 2015– Click here–Millstone

For the Love of St. Andrew’s– 130th Anniversary

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Old Churches of Lanark County

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Old Churches of Lanark County

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

The Old Church in Island Brook That Needs a Home

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

The Church that Died

St James and St Mary’s Christmas Bazaar 1998 -Who Do You Know?

Old Churches of Lanark County

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

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Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

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Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

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Baptist-church.jpgFirst Baptist Church- from Perth Remembered

Perth Courier, May 31, 1889

The New Baptist Church

The opening of the now very complete Baptist Church, on D’Arcy Street, under Rev. D. Laing, took place last Sunday and marks another step in the progress of the church history of this town.  The people of Perth have the reputation of being an eminently church going people which estimation does them no more than simple justice.  This being the case, it follows that they should desire a convenient and modern place of worship.

The old church in which the Baptist congregation worshipped for so long had been brought to a knowledge of a better life and around which so many sweet memories had been woven—had become too small for the proper prosecution of church work and somewhat more than a year ago the congregation determined to erect a new edifice and the contract for the new building was let in April of last year and on the 28th June the cornerstone was laid by Mrs. McMillan, the oldest consistent member of the church here.

 

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First Baptist Church- from Perth Remembered–The original First Baptist Church in Perth in the location of the present building. The building to the left of the church is the Parsonage of the First Baptist Church at 21 D’Arcy Street. Note the wooden sidewalks. In 1925 the roof of this house was raised to provide for a full second story.

Only two members who witnessed the erection of the first church survived to see the opening of the second, Mrs. McMillan of Perth and Mrs. James McLaren of Drummond.  The church is of red brick with stone foundation and a basement.  Cathedral stained glass windows ornament the front and the ceiling and other woodwork is of dressed pine relived by imitation of cherry.  The aisles are carpeted.  The pulpit desk is small but of neat design and colour.  Behind this is a handsome pulpit sofa presented by D. Hogg and behind this is the main baptistery.

Electric light is used and the building is to be heated by furnaces.  On the building committee were Dr. Kellock, chairman, J.F. Kellock, H. S. Leckie, Robert Ritchie, William Allan.  The history of the congregation from its organization to the present time was given in a very interesting and concise form by Dr. Kellock at the Monday night meeting as follows;  In the year 1841 through the generous efforts of some friends in and around Perth, a chapel was erected on the side of the present building.  This structure of 30 by 48 feet was plain and innocent of paint.

Baptist ministers visited Perth and preached from time to time but the church was not organized until after the arrival of Rev. R. A. Fyfe who began his missionary labours here in April of 1842.  The church was organized by him on the 31st Oct., 1842 having been dismissed from the Beckwith Church for this purpose. These with three others formed the constituent members.  The only survivor of those is Mrs. (Cal) McMillan of Perth and Mrs. James McLaren of Drummond and who were, after a lapse of 47 years, present at the opening of the service on the night of the 26th inst.  The Rev. R.A. Fyfe (afterward Dr. Fyfe), the devoted and honored head and founder of Woodstock College, was the first pastor with a stipend of sixty pounds a year, half of which might be paid in country produce or store goods.

Three deacons, a treasurer, a clerk and five trustees constituted the first office bearers.  Mr. Fyfe continued his ministry for about a year when he was summoned to Montreal to take the oversight of the Baptist College in that city.  He was succeeded by Rev. James Cooper (afterwards Dr. Cooper) just from Scotland, a faithful, earnest pastor, whose memory is dear to all.  In 1847 he was succeeded by Rev. P. McDonald, who left the following year when Mr. Fyfe resumed the pastorate but owing to the failure of his wife’s health he was compelled to leave once more after another year’s service.  The following ministers have been in charge since that time 1847 viz:  Rev. Messrs. Porterfield, R. Hamilton, John Cameron, Ashton, J. Mackie, Thomas Henderson, R. Nutt (?), W.A. Caldwell, J. Forth, J. W. Thorne and D. Laing, the present pastor.

Fourteen pastors in 47 years, an average pastorate of over three years; the longest that of Mr. Forth, 8 years and 4 months, the shortest that of Mr. Porterfield, six months.  Most of these were faithful, earnest, godly men, some of them afterwards attaining to the highest positions of honour in the denomination.

 

historicalnotes

In 1841 the original church was erected on the site of the present building. The building 30 feet by 48 feet, plain, unpretentious and void of paint, was erected on the site of the present brick church on D’Arcy street, and REV. R.A. FIFE was the first minister.  A year afterwards Mr. Fife was called to take charge of the Baptist College in Montreal and was succeeded in Perth by REV. JAMES COOPER. The old building in its lifetime had undergone repairs and additions as circumstances demanded. In 1851 the addition of a tower gave it a more ecclesiastical appearance.

In April, 1888, the contract for the edifice having been let the old historical church in which the Baptists had worshipped for two or three generations, where so many had been brought to the knowledge of a better life, the scene of many hallowed memories, was torn down. While the new one was being built the congregation met for worship in the Music Hall. On the 28th June, the corner stone was laid by Mrs. McMillan, the oldest member of the church, assisted by Hattie Kennedy (Mrs. Arthur Jackson) and Margaret Robertson, the two youngest members.

Services appropriate to the occasion were held, an eloquent address being delivered by Dr. Castle, principal of McMaster College, Toronto. In 1875 a vestry was added at the rear of the main building but the old chapel had to be replaced and a new structure was built in 1889. The opening of the new church took place on Sunday, May 31st, 1889.– from Perth Remembered

 

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The Klassens in Concert
Public · Hosted by First Baptist Church, Perth, Ontario

Friday, April 28 at 7 PM – 8:30 PM

17 D’Arcy St, Perth, ON K7H 2T9, Canada

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

Related Reading:

 

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Old Churches of Lanark County

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

The Old Church in Island Brook That Needs a Home

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

The Church that Died

The Church that Died

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FreaktographyPhotographer, Urban Explorer, Recreational Trespasser

 

A rarity among Ontario’s abandoned places are churches, Ontario’s back roads are full of vacant and abandoned homes and buildings, however churches are a rare find. Cities like Detroit, Buffalo and other U.S. cities offer a full range of abandonments, including churches from large cathedral like to smaller community churches.

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Located in a small town in Southern Ontario, many people have probably driven past this church and paid it no attention. The grounds seem to be maintained and there is a cemetery on the property, many of the graves with freshly laid flowers. The outside looks like most older rural churches and there are no real external signs of abandonment.

 

 

I walked the perimeter of this church looking for any signs of life or recent activity, no signs of activity could be found anywhere and it was quickly determined that this church was abandoned.

The interior smelled of dust and years of abandonment. Oddly, the inside looked almost as though the last service had taken place just last Sunday. All of the chairs were perfectly lined up inside, a pillow still sat on the front row pew and bibles still stacked on some chairs.

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The chairs, bibles and floors were coated with a thick layer of dust, the air inside was thick and old and there was a great deal of water damage and mold growing on the walls. Spider webs stretched from the walls onto the perfectly lined up chairs.

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At the front of the abandoned church sits the piano, silenced from years of vacancy and also coated with dust and topped off with a bouquet of artificial flowers.

Sitting, still opened to the last song played was the song book. “Songs from Testimony,” from which the last song to be played was “O How I Love Jesus” written and composed by Frederick Whitfield in 1855, 42 years before this church was opened.

“There is a Name I love to hear,
I love to sing its worth;
It sounds like music in my ear,
The sweetest Name on earth.”

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As I explored this small room, periodically interrupted by the pitter-patter of the raccoon’s now living in the ceiling, I found a number of very interesting items:

A stack of bibles across the front of the room, coated in dust and pigeon waste:

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The list of readings for the day of the last service:

“We Are a Separated People:

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Atop the alter at the head of the church sat the priests glasses along with a list of his notes for the day:

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Sitting on a wooden table behind the alter was a large heavy leather bound bible, worn and weathered from years upon years of use. With the church being over 100 years old, it’s a great thought that this bible may have been here since the churches opening day:

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Not wanting to overstay my welcome I grabbed a few more shots of the stained glass windows and of the cemetery outside. Since this visit, I have seen a few other small rural abandoned churches, but none with the atmosphere or quality of this one.

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For more from Freaktography Urban Exploration & Photography you can follow along on Facebook and you can also visit Freaktography.ca

More great abandoned photos BY Freaktography

 

Related reading:

Photographer Finds Money in a Local Abandoned Home

The Abandoned Farm House in Carleton Place — Disappearing Farms

Inside the Old Honey Pot — The Henderson Apiaries Carleton Place

Burning Down the House — Literally in Lanark County

Investigating the Basement of the Carleton Place Canadian – If These Walls Could Talk

Channeling John Gillies

 

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

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StPatricks

 

 

Perth Courier, December 19, 1968

St. Patrick’s Church, One of the Oldest Mission Churches in Ontario

St. Patrick’s Church, one of the oldest mission churches in Ontario, stands on the summit of a hill overlooking the Mississippi River in Ferguson’s Falls.  If this small edifice could speak, it would tell of the changes that have taken place in the district for the past 112 years.  In 1820 the first settlers came to Ferguson’s Falls.  At that time they had to walk through the woods to Perth to worship.  It was usually a two day trip, going in one day and returning the next day.  When any member of the community died, their remains were carried into Perth and buried in the old cemetery on the banks of the Tay River.

There was no church at that time and the first evidence of a priest coming was in 1820 when Father LaMothe came from Quebec.  He came at certain times during the year to those scattered throughout the county and held Mass in private homes.  He continued these visits until 1823 when he was replaced by Father Sweeney who did the missionary work in the territory.  Towards the end of 1823 Rev. Father McDonald came as the first resident pastor and for 15 years the priest labored.  He erected a frame church in Perth and in the outlying districts “stations” were erected and services were held at suitable times throughout the year.  The next priest to be sent to Perth was Rev. Hugh McDonagh in 1836(?).  During his pastorate the present church at Ferguson’s Falls was erected on account of the twenty miles or territory included in the parish at that time and the ever increasing congregation, it was decided that provision would have to be made to take care of the spiritual wants of the people who lived in the outlying portions of the parish and who had been required to make such long and tedious journeys to Perth to attend Mass.  Accordingly, in 1836, a church was built at Ferguson’s Falls.  Logs used to make the church were cut on the farm owned by a Mr. Scantlan.

Two years after it was built it was moved to the present site.  After it was placed on its permanent foundation the present vestry was added.  It was named St. Patrick’s Church in honor of the patron saint of Ireland.

On account of the slow mode of transport usually on horseback or by ox cart, as well as the extensive territory over which he presided, it was not until 1856 that the Archbishop of Kingston was able to make his first official visit to Ferguson’s Falls to take part in the dedication of the new church.

It was a mission church being part of the parish of Perth with Father McDonagh as its first pastor.  It was filled to capacity on Sundays and in fact, for a large percentage of the congregation, there was standing room only. People came to attend mass from McDonald’s Corners and above the “float bridge” in Lanark Township.

John Quinn was the first person buried in the cemetery adjoining the church.  The people who had died previously to that had been taken to Perth for burial because there was no cemetery in Ferguson’s Falls.  Since the opening of the church, several bodies have been brought back from Perth and re-buried.  Father McDonagh passed away in September of 18??(illegible).  His successor was Rev. Dr. Chisholm who was pastor for twelve lyears before he suddenly passed away from a heart attack on May 1, 1878(?)

Priests were sent from Kingston for the next twelve months to take charge of the congregation.  On the 1st of June, 1879, Rev. John O’Connor was installed.  He was later raised to the dignitary of Dean.  During his pastorate the new church at Carleton Place was formally opened.  Ferguson’s Falls then severed its long connection with the parish of Carleton Place thus becoming a mission of that parish.  Father Michael O’Donoghue was the first pastor.  In 1869 he was transferred to Perth and Father M. O’Rourke installed as pastor in Carleton Place and its mission church at Ferguson’s Falls.  He was later transferred to Westport where he remained until his death.

In October, 1907, Father Kearney was appointed for the first resident priest of Lanark parish and Ferguson’s Falls was transferred once more from Carleton Place to Lanark.  In 1912, the present steel roof was put on the church.

Father Carey was the next pastor.  During his pastorate, which ended in 1925, the fence was removed from around the church proper and a new one was erected. In 1925 Father Sullivan was installed as pastor and he remained there until the summer of 1928 when he was succeeded by Rev. Father Whelan.  Father Whelan had the interior of the church redecorated, the statues renovated and a grotto built at the rear of the statue of St. Theresa.

The next pastor was Father Clancy who remained until 1941 when he was transferred to Carleton Place.  He was succeeded by Rev. Father Healy.

In 1944 the cemetery grounds were improved and tombstones reset in proper formation.  This work was done in the form of bees by the parishioners.  A cobblestone cross designed by Father Healy was erected in the cemetery.  In 1945 the exterior of the church was painted by Mr. Watt of Lanark who also painted the surrounding fence.

 

You can read Arlene Stafford Wilson’s blog on the church here.

Related reading:

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

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1882

Since there has been great discussion about St. James Anglican Church I have decided we should all know a little background about the church. Above photo- St. James Thanksgiving 1884

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The Anglican Church in Carleton Place was served for a few years from Franktown– one of the original rectories by Royal patent. In 1883 it was made the centre of a new mission and Rev. E J Boswell was the first missionary. During his incumbency, the first St. James church was built. There were originally unshapely masses of windows and galleries of the early Canadian order of architecture. The unattractive structure was replaced in 1881/1884 with a seating capacity of 500. The following year the debt was paid off. In 1887 there were 256 families and a bible class with 300 names on the roll. Mr Brice McNeeely Jr. (his father owned the tannery)was the superintendent.

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St Mary’s Catholic Church on the other hand was built in two parts with some of the masses held in Lee’s Hotel in 1884. Half of St. Mary’s was built by the local congregation, with even some of the Protestants helping out. They had 75 families and the church seated 400.

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Elliot Hall was named after Canon Elliot. It was built across the street in 1923 on land originally used by the Canada Lumber Co. Across the street is St. James Park which was once home to the other half of the Canada Lumber Co and the proposed site of the Rosamond Woolen Mill. Carleton Place was once going to host the Rosamond Woolen Mills before the owner had a disagreement with an early village council. Angry, he moved his mill lock stock and barrel to Almonte, where in turn, the Penman Mill owners argued with Almonte’s town council, and they moved to Paris, Ontario.The Canada Lumber Co. was torn down in 1908 and a hydro electric dam was built there. The hydro dam was removed in 1973.

St James Anglican Church presently offers twice-weekly Eucharist services, weekly youth group and Bible studies, several women’s groups, a variety of youth activities, a choir, and an ever-expanding Outreach program to help the less fortunate in other parts of the world. Father David was once at the helm— and, if don’t know who he is by now–you can read about him here.

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Father D just retired last year-photo by Linda Seccaspina

 

Guide to Church Services in 1870 in Carleton Place:

St. James’ (Church of England) – ½ past 10 o’clock a.m. on each alternate Sabbath, and at 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. on the other Sabbath.  St. Andrew’s  (Church of Scotland) – 11 o’clock a.m. every Sabbath.  Zion Church (Canada Presbyterian) – ½ 2 o’clock p.m. every Sabbath.  Reform Presbyterian – 11 o’clock a.m., and 3 o’clock p.m., on alternate Sabbaths.  Wesleyan Methodist – ½ past 10 o’clock on alternate Sabbaths, and ½ past 6 o’clock on the other Sabbath.  Baptist – ½ past 2 o’clock every Sabbath.  Roman Catholic – occasionally, of which notice will be given.

Photos- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum and Linda Seccaspina

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 14 Sep 1976, Tue, Page 53

John Edwards This was the first sale of land of “The Clergy Reserve”. It was originally 200 acres of land running from Ramsay 7 to Ramsay 8. It was the historic land allocated to the Church of England by Crown. Whne the Clergy Reserves were abolished in the 1850’s, St. James Anglican Church purchased the land for 100 British pounds. It was and is home to massive white pines which are still the defining element of the CP ‘skyline’ when the sun sets in the West. One only need to look up.

 

 

Related Reading:

Imagine if All the People…. Photos of Father David Andrew’s Retirement Party

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

Father David Andrew – Just Call Me Father D!

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

One of my favourite songs

This home was once located at the south east corner of Edmund and William Streets, and faced Edmund. At the time the photo was taken it was the home of George Warren. After being converted to a duplex, later families to live here included the Bakers, Drummonds, Taylors, and Lays.
Next door was the big Baden woodshop and second hand furniture shop. Prior to that, the big building housed Charles Whicher’s sign painting business.
St. James Anglican Parish Hall is now on this site.
Karen Robertson
George Warren was an uncle to my mom Isobel Warren. He use to have the license place at his house (not this house). I remember it was when everyone had to get their license on the same day not like today when it is on your birthday. My mom use to help him on that day.

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

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The Emotional Crowded Houses

Three other stories about St James in the book “The Tilted Kilt”

This is from my book “Cancer Calls Collect”

Pushing the large doors open I felt rivers of emotions fill my inner soul. I shouldn’t be here I thought to myself, as I knew I was setting myself up. I sat in one of the pews, stared at the stained glass windows, and tried to hold back my tears. People were going to wonder why I was back in town so soon, and I had yet to tell anyone what was really going on. For days I had spoke of family emergencies and real estate deals to those that asked, but I kept the truth inside my heart. I knew he didn’t want the whole world to know his deadly secret, and I respected that.

I glanced through the hymn book and was thankful it wasn’t Sunday with organ music attempting to pull more tears out of me than what I was presently trying to hide. Not wanting anyone to see the distress I was in I kept to myself, and looked at no one. I knew the time was coming when I would have to release the inner sadness, but I just didn’t want it to be today.

As people came in they stared at me, and I had a feeling some knew my secret but were too kind to ask. Time seemed to move by at a snails pace, and I kept lowering my head so no one would see my tear-stained face. Taking deep breaths didn’t help, and I wanted to sob for a very long time. When I finally pulled myself together it was time to meet and greet. Someone I had known for years asked me point blank why I was back. The world began to spin, and I could no longer hold it in and I looked at her and said quietly.

“He has stage 4 cancer.”

Arms curled around me as I cried, and they all enveloped me with a fog of love and compassion. An older woman slipped a small good luck stone from Ireland into my pocket and told me to keep it near always. As I put it in my pocket they said in unison,

“You’ve come to the right place!”
But had I? Could these people take away my fear and sadness and give him back his life? Where had they been during my other pivotal points of darkness? As I watched the last breath leave my sister’s body years ago I remembered having to ask everyone to leave to give her peace for her last moments. Yes, we need helping hands to aid us in our time of need, but in the end we have to learn to accept and deal with the inevitable all by ourselves because there will always be battles ahead.

“It doesn’t matter to me what you believe in- it’s what gets you by.”- Linda Seccaspina

Photo by Linda Seccaspina of St. James Anglican Church, Carleton Place, ON