Tag Archives: Church

The Remains of the Bethel Methodist Church

Standard
The Remains of the Bethel Methodist Church

P1110635.jpeg

Photo by: fiso

Bethel Methodist Church

Concession 11, Bennett Lake, Bathurst

In 1893, the Bethel Methodist Church was built. The brick building was erected to replace an old log building which was much too small for the congregation. In order to start a fund for the building of the church, Mr. William Pratt donated $100. Dedicated to the cause, Mr. Pratt also collected funds for the church, gathering $300 in one day. Members from the community all pitched in where they could donating money, lumber and hard work.

P1110638.jpeg

Photo by: fiso

Mr. Dick Campbell was responsible for the stone work, the Bishop Bros did the framework and Messrs. Charlton and Buchanan did the brick work. The minister at the time, Reverend Barry Pierce painted the church. During the construction of the church, the workers boarded free of charge at Mr. William Pratt’s. The church was free of debt when it was completed, and with the small remaining funds, a shed was built for the church.

P1110636

Photo by: fiso

The church held no socials or suppers and people donated what they could. Money, food, fuel and horse fodder were all donated to the minister from church goers. The first wedding to be held in the church was between Thomas North and Margaret Pratt, and the last wedding, the union of Harold McGinnis and Violet VanAlstine was held in 1942.

In 1947 Maberly’s sister church, Bethel United Church, built in 1893 and located eight miles north of Maberly on the 11th concession of Bathurst Township, collapsed. The roof collapsed in 1959 and at this point the building had been vacant for some time. A monument can be found where the church once stood on Bennett Lake Road.  With files from Tay Valley History

P1110642.jpeg

Photo by : fiso

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

  1. relatedreading

The Almonte Fire 1955– Almonte United Church

For the Love of St. Andrew’s– 130th Anniversary

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Drummond Centre United Church — and The Ireton Brothers 38 Year Reunion–Names Names Names

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

St. Augustine’s Church and Christ Church

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

Advertisements

St. Augustine’s Church and Christ Church

Standard
St. Augustine’s Church and Christ Church

 

23Apr-16C 404.jpeg

 

Built in 1854, St. Augustine’s had a seating capacity of 120 to welcome Irish Anglican worshippers from the Prospect area who had previously made do in a school house. The church closed in 1967 but the building, cemetery and grounds are still maintained by the Ashton Parish. A service is still held here once a year during the first Sunday in August.

23Apr-16C 405.jpeg

 - Church of 14 f 6 1 . By MARION G. ROGERS...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  03 Oct 1970, Sat,  Page 46

 

23Apr-16C 408.jpeg

 - Large' Gathering Attends Deticatioh Of Ashton...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  01 Jun 1929, Sat,  Page 5

August 1934 A Delightful Evening

The social held last Monday evening in the beautiful grove, on the farm of Mr. and Mrs. Cameron McTavish, first concession of Drummond, under the auspices of St. Angustine’s church, will stand out as one of the most enjoyable events of the summer months to be field in that section. A most elaborate program had been arranged and all entered heartily into the festivities. Read more Who were the Carleton Place Orioles?

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

The Almonte Fire 1955– Almonte United Church

For the Love of St. Andrew’s– 130th Anniversary

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Drummond Centre United Church — and The Ireton Brothers 38 Year Reunion–Names Names Names

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Old Churches of Lanark County

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

The Old Church in Island Brook That Needs a Home

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

The Church that Died

St James and St Mary’s Christmas Bazaar 1998 -Who Do You Know?

Old Churches of Lanark County

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!

I Bet You Didn’t Know this About St. James in Carleton Place

Standard
I Bet You Didn’t Know this About St. James in Carleton Place

 

100_9647.jpg

Photo Linda Seccaspina

The first church built in 1834 was a frame building, built in the Georgian style and was a 64 feet long and 32 wide and had a gallery.

The tower of the church which was 44 feet high was maintained over a porch that was the width of the buildings that had 4 columns supporting its roof.

In August of 1834 Bishop Charles James Stewart of Quebec came and confirmed 97 of their parishioners. The congregation of St. James was 300, of which most were farming families.

dio

They began to build the present stone building in 1881 and it officially opened on Wednesday, January 11, 1882.

The church bell dates back to 1896, and at one time it rang with help of a rope outside and a ‘special rhythm’ by the bell ringer. It was also used as a local fire alarm which used to call the local volunteers. It weighs 3/4 of a ton.

The church bell used to count hours replacing the now silent Post Office clock.

In 1974 lightening struck the bell that was now electronically controlled. Beginning at 8 am the hour was tolled until 7 pm. At noon, 6 and 7 pm carillon hymns once played.

Canon Jarvis 1884-90 designed the oak furnishings of the chancel. In 1830 the kneeler and the communion rail needlepoint was done by the rector’s wife Mrs. E. Boswell.

Other current needlepoint cushions and kneelers were handmade and donated by long time organist Ralph Langtry.

In 1903 a Cassavant Pipe Organ was installed and it was an air hand pumped which was electrified in 1955, and rebuilt in 1974 with a new console and was dedicated that year.

If you sit in the second section, first pew on the right hand side you will see some signatures carved in the upper pew. About 90 years ago Miss E.Virtue and her accomplice Master C. Mull did it–Read–If You Squint Really Hard Can you see a Yeti?

Muriel Simpson who lived on Campbell Street was a faithful parishioner of St. James Anglican Church. If you look at the big cross that hangs in the church, she and her husband Eric donated it. I know because she told me a couple of hundred times.

Muriel made an impact on me, and there is never ever a day that I will not forget her. You see, she made me promise that I would sit in her spot in a certain church pew after she died.  If you were sitting in it when she was alive she made you move. She told me that bad things would happen to me if I didn’t sit on her spot upon her demise. Read more here..The “Margaret Thatcher” of Campbell Street

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  27 Jan 1939, Fri,  Page 23

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

St. James…..

Imagine if All the People…. Photos of Father David Andrew’s Retirement Party

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

Father David Andrew – Just Call Me Father D!

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

St James and St Mary’s Christmas Bazaar 1998 -Who Do You Know?

Memories of The Old Church Halls

 

Local Churches…

PAKENHAM PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1897– $338.50 on the Cornerstone?

Drummond Centre United Church — and The Ireton Brothers 38 Year Reunion–Names Names Names

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Old Churches of Lanark County

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

The Old Church in Island Brook That Needs a Home

The Church that Died

Old Churches of Lanark County

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!

 

 

 

download (3).jpg

Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

 

halloweendd.jpg

 

Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–
Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

Join us and learn about the history under your feet! This year’s St. James Cemetery Walk will take place Thursday October 19th and october 21– Museum Curator Jennfer Irwin will lead you through the gravestones and introduce you to some of our most memorable lost souls!
Be ready for a few surprises along the way….
This walk takes place in the dark on uneven ground. Please wear proper footwear and bring a small flashlight if you like.
Tickets available at the Museum, 267 Edmund Street. Two dates!!!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1211329495678960/

OCT 28th
Downtown Carleton Place Halloween Trick or Treat Day–https://www.facebook.com/events/489742168060479/

unnamed (1)

Did You Know They Moved St. Paul’s Cemetery?

Standard
Did You Know They Moved St. Paul’s Cemetery?

 

img.jpg

1979

2879019738.jpg

photo-– Scott Reid– 175th Anniversary of St. Paul’s

 

Reverend Michael Harris travelled afar setting up local parishes as early as 1819 in Lanark County, and St. Paul’s Anglican Church was one of them. Set in the midst of the original cemetery overlooking the Perth Highway, the church partially built in 1852 celebrated its 175th anniversary this year.

The mission of Lanark dates from 1819 when the Rev. Michael Harris began ministering to the people in the community. St. Paul’s was built in 1842 on land donated by Mr. James H. Manahan. A new parsonage was built by 1899 and renovated in 1906 at which time the church was enlarged.  It missed being damaged by the Lanark Village fire  in 1959 but was considerably damaged by fire in 1945 and while repairs were being made, services were held in the Congregational Church. The parsonage was sold around 1990. 

It hasn’t changed much except for the small hall to the right that was built in 1964, but the belfry, porch, tower, sanctuary and vestry were added on in 1906. It thankfully escaped the Lanark fire of 1959 but it suffered fire damage to the roof and interior in 1945.

Their first organ was an old pump organ and then the United Church gave thenm mone that was powered by a hand pump. In 1953 someone willed the church their home and the contents and after the house was sold it bought Sr. Paul’s a new pulpit.

The cemetery in the churchyard was closed in 1917 and a new burial ground was obtained. St. Paul’s Church celebrated its centenary on June 28, 1942. The dead were buried strictly in the churchyards in those days, but back in 1917 local health officials requested that the original old cemetery built on the hill next to the church be closed and moved two miles out of town.  People worried about risks to public health and they came not only from the dank odours of the churchyards, but from the very water the people drank. In many cases, the springs for the drinking supply tracked right through the graveyards of the original churchyards.

 

 

historicalnotes

Did you know suicides, if they were buried in consecrated ground at all, were usually deposited in the north end, although their corpses were not allowed to pass through the cemetery gates to enter. They had to be passed over the top of the stone wall or fence. In the case of St. James in Carleton Place they were buried outside the fence.

They once tried to ban the use of coffins altogether for health reasons, insisting that ‘all people should be buried in sacks’ for sanitary purposes. The Victorians recognized the dangers of lead coffins, and made it mandatory that pine be used as an alternative as it ‘decays rapidly,’ thus allowing the corpse to return to the earth more naturally.

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  22 Aug 1928, Wed,  Page 3

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  04 Mar 1959, Wed,  Page 25

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  23 Jan 1945, Tue,  Page 16

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

 

relatedreading

PAKENHAM PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1897– $338.50 on the Cornerstone?

St. Andrew’s Pakenham celebrates 175th anniversary October 9– 2015– Click here–Millstone

 

For the Love of St. Andrew’s– 130th Anniversary

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Old Churches of Lanark County

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Old Churches of Lanark County

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

The Old Church in Island Brook That Needs a Home

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

The Church that Died

St James and St Mary’s Christmas Bazaar 1998 -Who Do You Know?

Old Churches of Lanark County

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!

 

 

Screenshot 2017-08-15 at 18.jpg

I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

unnamed (1)

PAKENHAM PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1897– $338.50 on the Cornerstone?

Standard
PAKENHAM PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1897– $338.50 on the Cornerstone?

 

Screenshot 2017-06-14 at 08.jpg

Illustration-Almonte Gazette June 18 1897

Laying the Corner-Stone of the Interesting Occasion—A Report of the Proceedings.

Almonte Gazette June 18 1897

Tuesday of this week was a red letter occasion with the Presbyterians of Pakenham, for on that day the corner-stone of the new church they are erecting was laid with appropriate ceremonies by Mrs. Francis, one of the oldest members of the congregation and the head of a family to whose generosity in a large measure is due the successful carrying through of the plans of the building committee.

The day proved an ideal one, and a large crowd was present. Many Almonters drove down. A preliminary service was held in the old church at eleven o’clock a.m., at which a fine sermon was preached by an old and highly esteemed former pastor—Rev. Jas. Stuart, of Prescott.  and  the Rev. gentleman had as the basis of his remarks Ephesians 2 :20 , 21,.

From this he preached a sermon appropriate to the occasion. It was retrospective, introspective and prospective—it recounted the past, with its joys and successes, as well as the darker side of the picture, which included a reference to the absence of many of the old familiar faces, called to their reward and it looked into things as they are at present; and it spoke of the doings of the day in a spirit that hoped and expected much from the future for the congregation and the community.

The lessons were impressive, and were listened to with great interest by those who were privileged to be in attendance. Rev. Mr. Stuart is always welcomed to Pakenham,
and his visit and his words of cheer and encouragement on this occasion were greatly appreciated.

Rev. A. E. Mitchell, B.A., of Almonte, assisted at the service. The singing by the choir was worthy of mention. It was of a high order. Rev. R. J, Hutcheon, M.A., and Mr. A. Haydon, M.A., assisted in the musical part, and sang a duet during the service.

 

St-Andrews-700x525.jpg

Photo —Millstone

At the close of the forenoon service the congregation, and in fact the bulk of the villagers—to appearance, at least—repaired to the agricultural hall, where for two hours a large staff of waiters were kept busy serving dinner. In the evening tea was served in the same place, in all probably 500 meals being given—a good day’s work for the committee in charge of that department.

At half-past two in the afternoon the most interesting part of the proceedings
took place—the laying of the corner-stone and the ceremonies connection therewith.On the site set apart for the sacred edifice, and from a platform erected in a suitable place a number of the clergymen delivered addresses in harmony with the occasion. Rev. E. S. Logie, the energetic young pastor, was master of ceremonies, and discharged his duties with a skill that won him great praise. He asked the audience to open the proceedings.

With the doxology—”Praise God from whom all blessings flow,” etc.—which was rendered with vigor, led by the choir and the audience. Rev. Dr. Campbell, of Renfrew, then read a suitable passage of scripture. Prayer followed, after which Rev. Mr. Logie read the list of articles to be deposited in the corner-stone, as follows: A coin of the realm, copies of the Morrin College Magazine, theDaily Witness, the Presbyterian
Record, the Forester, the Almonte Gazette, the I.O.O.F. constitution and bylaws, a list of the memb and bylaws, a list of the members of the congregation at- the present date.

Then were the names of the board of managers, the building committee, the secretary and treasurer of the congregation, and the superintendent and teachers of the Sabbath school. After the reading of this list the crowd gathered closer while the pastor presented Mrs. Francis with a handsome silver trowel and asked her to perform the work of laying the corner-stone. The stone was well and truly laid by the venerable lady, after which Kir. Logie announced that an opportunity would be given those who wished to give a contribution in aid of the building fund.

A stream of contributors swelled the receipts to a generous sum. Then came an earnest patriotic address from Rev. D. J. McLean, M.A., of Arnprior, delivered with the fluency for which that gentleman is noted. He spoke of what should characterize a temple erected to God’o service. It was an influence for good in the community, advancing the cause of civilization, diffusing the light of liberty and knowledge and truth, and promoting the highest and best interests of the people. He warmly commended the members and adherents of the Pakenham congregation for their generosity, and concluded a polished address by extending his best wishes.

Rev. Dr. Campbell, of Renfrew, was the next speaker. He is well known as one of
the oldest and ablest members of the Lanark and Renfrew Presbytery, and in his address he was able to refer to incidents in connection with the earlier life of the Pakenham branches of the Presbyterian church in a most interesting manner. He began by joining heartily in all the kind expressions made use of by the preceding
speaker.

He spoke feelingly of those who in former years had laid broad and deep the foundations on which much of the success achieved had been built—of the late Rev. Dr. Mann, who came to this section nearly sixty years ago, and travelled through the length and breadth- of this and the adjoining county in the service of the Master.

The speaker paid tribute to that man of God and the work he did. He also gave credit for the foundation work done by one whom he was glad to see present—one who had travelled side by side with Dr. Mann for many years—Rev. Jas. Stuart. Both had labored earnestly and successfully in the earlier years in Pakenham for the glory of God and the good of the people, and, while many of the parents who had been brought to Christ through their efforts had been called home, their children remained to carry on the work.

Dr. Campbell closed a concise but comprehensive address with words of warm encouragement to pastor and people on the joyful occasion of laying the foundation stone of their new temple. Rev. Hugh Taylor, of Lochwinnoch, one of the brainiest preachers in the bounds of the presbytery, was next called on, and gave an address that did . credit. He was one of Mr. Logics predecessors at Pakenham, and felt a great interest in the work of the day. He congratulated pastor and people on their success in arranging for such a beautiful new edifice as had been begun. He was pleased to see so many old familiar faces present.

Some were missing—he missed them; but he was pleased to see so many of the fathers and mothers in Israel present, and that to one of them had been accorded the honor of laying the corner-stone. While pastor at Pakenham, he said, it had been long his desire to see a new church built, and, though it was not to be in his time, he was exceedingly pleased to note the success of the congregation.

The building now in course of erection was the fourth Presbyterian church in Pakenham. The first was destroyed; part of the second still remains; they had worshipped that forenoon in the third; and they would soon worship in the fourth. Their material prosperity was keeping up well with their spiritual prosperity.

He spoke of the change of site—the coming down among the people, to show the deep interest felt in their concerns; of the plan, which showed a good Sabbath school building, where the foundation of Christian life was laid; of the C. E society, one of the grandest institutions to develop Christian life in the young people of the community.

“ You are a Christian people here,” he said. Contrary to the views of many he saw no indications of church’ union, and he maintained that no one present would live to see the union of the various denominations. The spirit of union was good, but it was impossible to get people to agree. It should rejoice the hearts of all that the foundations had been laid a new church that would help the upward life of the community. He expressed the hope that many would be brought to the Lord as the result of the work now being undertaken, and closed a really excellent address with
renewed congratulations and good wishes.

Rev. Jas. Stuart spoke in terms of warm commendation of the efforts of Rev. Mr, Logie and his people in undertaking the erection of a fine new church. It was the jubilee year, and they had taken a grand means of celebrating it.

The pastor and people are to be congratulated on the success of Tuesday’s proceedings, everything being carried out most satisfactory to all concerned. The total receipts of the day amounted to over $430.00, and $338.50 of which was placed on the cornerstone.

Mr. J. McDowall, the contractor for the stonework of the church, prepared the cornerstone for laying, and as it was pronounced “well and truly laid,” so the rest of the work under Mr. McD’s. superintendence will without doubt be pronounced when
he has completed his contract, if the work he has already done can be taken as a specimen of what the whole will be like.

 

almontegsmall

Almonte Gazette

 

historicalnotes

Pakenham Township was named after Sir Edward Pakenham who was the brother-in-law of the Duke of Wellington.


Pakenham:
Was a postal station from 1832. It is located on the Mississippi River. It was known as Dickson’s Mills then Pakenham Mills. In 1842 the village’s population was 250 persons. It contained 3 churches – Episcopal, Presbyterian and Methodist, post office, grist mill, saw mill, carding machine & cloth factory, four stores, a tannery, two taverns and some shops.


Cedar Hill:
The village was built around the first school (L6 C8). It was first called Upper Pakenham. In the Historical Atlas for Lanark County, it is marked Cedar Hill PO.

By the 1890s, Dalkeith Street was the location of both the Methodist parsonage and the Presbyterian manse.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (US

 

relatedreading

 

 

St. Andrew’s Pakenham celebrates 175th anniversary October 9– 2015– Click here–Millstone

 

For the Love of St. Andrew’s– 130th Anniversary

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Old Churches of Lanark County

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Standard
Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

BaptistCPlace.JPG

Baptist Church – Carleton Place, Ontario.

almontegsmall.jpgMarch 29 1873– Almonte Gazette-–The handsome new brick church in Carleton Place, erected by the Wesleyan Methodists, will be dedicated on Sabbath next, 31st at 10.30 a.m. The Rev. Mr. Elliott will conduct the service and also preach in the afternoon. The Rev. Mr. McDowell will also preach in the evening. A tea-meeting will be held on Monday evening following, at which a number of speakers will be present. 

The Baptists organized in 1822 as the New Testament Baptists which was just one year after the founding of Morphy’s Falls/ Carleton Place.  Two missionaries arrived in Beckwith on a Wednesday evening and remained with the Baptist people for about twelve days. They began with a prayer meeting in one of the homes, and held further meetings on the succeeding evenings of that week.  The first log church was built in 1817  Lot 27, Con 6 of Drummond in 1817. It was then replaced with a large permanent brick building beginning late in the year of 1907.

The property that the current Carleton Place Baptist church sits on at the corner of Bridge and Herriot Street was once just very dense bush. A short distance from this present church was another place of worship that the Baptists attended that was simply known as the Town Line Church.  The Rev. Lawrence Halcroft (1798-1887), a resident of Carleton Place for over forty years, came here by call in 1843 and for eleven years was minister of the local Baptist Church and they met every Sunday just after 2 pm.

a059316-v8 (1).jpg

Miss Gillies in front of the Gillies home on Bridge Street with the Baptist Church on the right- Photo- Public Archives

The present day Carleton Place Baptist Church that sits on Bridge Street today was actually built in 1831 by the Wesleyan Methodists. The Carleton Place Methodist congregation was first organized by the Rev. Mr. John Black in 1829, and in 1831 and they built the first church in the village of Carleton Place/Morphy’s  Falls. The Carleton Place Baptists were at first led by a layman named John McEwen, but in April 1843 a Scottish immigrant named Lawrence Halcroft arrived in the village. Halcroft was soon ordained and became pastor of the churches at Tennyson and Drummond as well as Carleton Place. In 1868 the Baptists in Beckwith decided it was cheaper to repair the Town Line church in Carleton Place than build a new one in Black’s Corners.

The church at 299 Bridge Street was a frame structure at its early beginnings, large enough to seat 250 persons. It was more than likely sold to the Baptists by the Wesleyan Methodists when they decided to move in 1888. According to some historical writings in newspaper archives the chapel was used as a grammar school in the early days as well as a church. In 1871, the wooden church was moved (*would love to know where it was moved to) and the present brick church on Bridge Street was built by Wesleyan Methodists, not the Baptists. When the Methodist’s congregation became larger they built and moved to a new church at the corner of Beckwith and Albert Streets. (Zion-Memorial United Church)

In June of 1891 it was moved and passed at a meeting that the Beckwith Church be recognized and received into the fellowship of Carleton Place. An argument erupted whether to honour the Sabbath on a Saturday or a Sunday. The two families that did not agree with Sunday were excluded from the church.

 

img (86).jpg

Photo- Ottawa Journal 1973

Sadly in September of 1973 there was a steeple fire in the Baptist Church which caused a lot of smoke and water damage. But, the original pews remained and two old ceiling fixture medallions were also saved. A new hall was added that consisted of 9 classrooms, a choir room and a minister study. Pastor Brian Affleck is currently the Senior Pastor at Carleton Place Baptist Church. He and his wife, Edith, have been ministering together here for the past 15 years.

Location
The church is located at 299 Bridge Street, which is at the corner of Bridge Street and Morphy Street in Carleton Place.  Parking is available on Morphy Street and James Street.

historicalnotes

Church Guide

Guide to Church Services, 1870.  St. James’ (Church of England) – ½ past 10 o’clock a.m. on each alternate Sabbath, and at 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. on the other Sabbath.  St. Andrew’s  (Church of Scotland) – 11 o’clock a.m. every Sabbath.  Zion Church (Canada Presbyterian) – ½ 2 o’clock p.m. every Sabbath.  Reform Presbyterian – 11 o’clock a.m., and 3 o’clock p.m., on alternate Sabbaths.  Wesleyan Methodist – ½ past 10 o’clock on alternate Sabbaths, and ½ past 6 o’clock on the other Sabbath.  Baptist – ½ past 2 o’clock every Sabbath.  Roman Catholic – occasionally, of which notice will be given.-Howard Morton Brown

*Searched for two hours in 1871 newspaper archives and could not find out where the building was moved too.. sigh…

As the Methodist numbers increased, a larger more central location was desired, and subscriptions were sought. Some 200 members and adherents participated, and construction began on the present site early in 1888. The cornerstone was laid on May 6 of that year. The first worship service was held in the new building on Sunday, 9 December, less than a year after the cornerstone was laid. The next year, the bell was placed in the tower.

After Union in 1925, when St. Andrew’s and the Methodist congregations joined and the church became Memorial Park United Church.

With files from: Beckwith by Glenn Lockwood, A History of Drummond Township by John C. Ebbs, The Almonte Gazette and the Ottawa Journal

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

Related reading:

Baptist Church Carleton Place

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Old Churches of Lanark County

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

The Old Church in Island Brook That Needs a Home

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

The Church that Died

St James and St Mary’s Christmas Bazaar 1998 -Who Do You Know?

Old Churches of Lanark County

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Standard
Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

First Baptist Church Perth ON_s.jpg

Baptist-church.jpgFirst Baptist Church- from Perth Remembered

Perth Courier, May 31, 1889

The New Baptist Church

The opening of the now very complete Baptist Church, on D’Arcy Street, under Rev. D. Laing, took place last Sunday and marks another step in the progress of the church history of this town.  The people of Perth have the reputation of being an eminently church going people which estimation does them no more than simple justice.  This being the case, it follows that they should desire a convenient and modern place of worship.

The old church in which the Baptist congregation worshipped for so long had been brought to a knowledge of a better life and around which so many sweet memories had been woven—had become too small for the proper prosecution of church work and somewhat more than a year ago the congregation determined to erect a new edifice and the contract for the new building was let in April of last year and on the 28th June the cornerstone was laid by Mrs. McMillan, the oldest consistent member of the church here.

 

FirstBaptistChurch-644x443.jpg

 

First Baptist Church- from Perth Remembered–The original First Baptist Church in Perth in the location of the present building. The building to the left of the church is the Parsonage of the First Baptist Church at 21 D’Arcy Street. Note the wooden sidewalks. In 1925 the roof of this house was raised to provide for a full second story.

Only two members who witnessed the erection of the first church survived to see the opening of the second, Mrs. McMillan of Perth and Mrs. James McLaren of Drummond.  The church is of red brick with stone foundation and a basement.  Cathedral stained glass windows ornament the front and the ceiling and other woodwork is of dressed pine relived by imitation of cherry.  The aisles are carpeted.  The pulpit desk is small but of neat design and colour.  Behind this is a handsome pulpit sofa presented by D. Hogg and behind this is the main baptistery.

Electric light is used and the building is to be heated by furnaces.  On the building committee were Dr. Kellock, chairman, J.F. Kellock, H. S. Leckie, Robert Ritchie, William Allan.  The history of the congregation from its organization to the present time was given in a very interesting and concise form by Dr. Kellock at the Monday night meeting as follows;  In the year 1841 through the generous efforts of some friends in and around Perth, a chapel was erected on the side of the present building.  This structure of 30 by 48 feet was plain and innocent of paint.

Baptist ministers visited Perth and preached from time to time but the church was not organized until after the arrival of Rev. R. A. Fyfe who began his missionary labours here in April of 1842.  The church was organized by him on the 31st Oct., 1842 having been dismissed from the Beckwith Church for this purpose. These with three others formed the constituent members.  The only survivor of those is Mrs. (Cal) McMillan of Perth and Mrs. James McLaren of Drummond and who were, after a lapse of 47 years, present at the opening of the service on the night of the 26th inst.  The Rev. R.A. Fyfe (afterward Dr. Fyfe), the devoted and honored head and founder of Woodstock College, was the first pastor with a stipend of sixty pounds a year, half of which might be paid in country produce or store goods.

Three deacons, a treasurer, a clerk and five trustees constituted the first office bearers.  Mr. Fyfe continued his ministry for about a year when he was summoned to Montreal to take the oversight of the Baptist College in that city.  He was succeeded by Rev. James Cooper (afterwards Dr. Cooper) just from Scotland, a faithful, earnest pastor, whose memory is dear to all.  In 1847 he was succeeded by Rev. P. McDonald, who left the following year when Mr. Fyfe resumed the pastorate but owing to the failure of his wife’s health he was compelled to leave once more after another year’s service.  The following ministers have been in charge since that time 1847 viz:  Rev. Messrs. Porterfield, R. Hamilton, John Cameron, Ashton, J. Mackie, Thomas Henderson, R. Nutt (?), W.A. Caldwell, J. Forth, J. W. Thorne and D. Laing, the present pastor.

Fourteen pastors in 47 years, an average pastorate of over three years; the longest that of Mr. Forth, 8 years and 4 months, the shortest that of Mr. Porterfield, six months.  Most of these were faithful, earnest, godly men, some of them afterwards attaining to the highest positions of honour in the denomination.

 

historicalnotes

In 1841 the original church was erected on the site of the present building. The building 30 feet by 48 feet, plain, unpretentious and void of paint, was erected on the site of the present brick church on D’Arcy street, and REV. R.A. FIFE was the first minister.  A year afterwards Mr. Fife was called to take charge of the Baptist College in Montreal and was succeeded in Perth by REV. JAMES COOPER. The old building in its lifetime had undergone repairs and additions as circumstances demanded. In 1851 the addition of a tower gave it a more ecclesiastical appearance.

In April, 1888, the contract for the edifice having been let the old historical church in which the Baptists had worshipped for two or three generations, where so many had been brought to the knowledge of a better life, the scene of many hallowed memories, was torn down. While the new one was being built the congregation met for worship in the Music Hall. On the 28th June, the corner stone was laid by Mrs. McMillan, the oldest member of the church, assisted by Hattie Kennedy (Mrs. Arthur Jackson) and Margaret Robertson, the two youngest members.

Services appropriate to the occasion were held, an eloquent address being delivered by Dr. Castle, principal of McMaster College, Toronto. In 1875 a vestry was added at the rear of the main building but the old chapel had to be replaced and a new structure was built in 1889. The opening of the new church took place on Sunday, May 31st, 1889.– from Perth Remembered

 

17191919_1006100549523171_6636785513489663353_o.jpg

The Klassens in Concert
Public · Hosted by First Baptist Church, Perth, Ontario

Friday, April 28 at 7 PM – 8:30 PM

17 D’Arcy St, Perth, ON K7H 2T9, Canada

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

Related Reading:

 

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Old Churches of Lanark County

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

The Old Church in Island Brook That Needs a Home

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

The Church that Died