Tag Archives: Church

The Mystery of Cross Keys Part 2

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The Mystery of Cross Keys Part 2

On Sunday at Beckwith; the people in an old shanty that was in such a state of ruin that cats and dogs could pass between the logs; and they will neither repair nor provide firewood lest it might make the minister comfortable. And they are seeking a new one from Scotland. Six months later, he records in his diary: “I set out for Beckwith to aid Mr. Buchanan at Sacrament. The barn and all it contained had been burned. This had been used for a church and was erected by the congregation. No steps had been taken to rebuild anything. On Saturday I preached in an old shanty: and the Sunday services, which began at eleven o’clock and lasted till four o’clock in the afternoon, were held in an open field near by, the people having erected a tent for preaching in, using logs in parallel lines for seats.

One hundred umbrellas were used to protect from the sun’s rays. During these years the Buchanans endured many of the discomforts of pioneer life. Long afterward the youngest of the children published under the title “The Pioneer Pastor,” her recollections of her father’s pastorate in Beckwith. She describes the hardships borne by these men from the High lands. Harvesting was beginning when her family arrived. Cutting grain with the old-fashioned sickle and scythe on ground dotted thickly with stumps was slow, wearisome work.

Reaping machines, mowing machines, horse rakes and other labor-saving implements now in vogue to lighten the task and multiply a hundred-fold the efficiency of the farmer had not yet been evolved. A cumbrous plow, hard to pull and harder to guide, a V-shaped harrow, alike heavy and unwieldy, a clumsy sled, home-made rakes weighty as iron and sure to blister the hands of the user, forked-stick pitch-forks, and gnarled flails certain to raise bumps on the heads, of unskilled threshers, with two or three scythes and sickles, represented the average farm equipment. Not a grist-mill, saw-mill, factory, shop, school-house, post-office, chimney or stove to be found in Beckwith in those earliest days of its settlement.

Two arm-chairs, made for Dr. and Mrs. Buchanan by Donald Kennedy, were the first in the township. Sawed boards, shingles and plastered walls were luxuries. Split logs furnished the materials for benches, tables, floors and roofs. The first year men carried flour and provisions on their backs from Perth and Brockville. Families subsisted for months on scanty fare. Their homes were shanties, chinked between the logs with wood and mud, often without a window, cold in winter, stifling in summer, uncomfortable always. A hole in the roof let out such smoke as happened to travel in its direction.

And the women bore more than their share of the burden. Besides their care of house and children they worked in the fields all spring and summer, burning brush, logging, planting and reaping. Much of the cooking, washing and mending was done before dawn or after dark while the men slept peacefully. At noon they prepared dinner, ate a bite hastily and hurried back to drudge until the sun went down. Then they got supper, put the youngsters to bed, patched, darned and did a multitude of chores. For them, toiling to better the conditions of their loved ones, never striking for higher wages, sixteen hours of constant labor was a short day. No respite, no vacation, nothing but hard work.

The Sabbath was the one breathing-spell in the week. Autumn and winter only varied the style of work. The women carded wool with hand-cards and spun it on small wheels, for stocking-yarn and the weaver’s loom. Knitting was an endless task by the light of the hearth fire or the feeble flicker of a tallow-dip; and everybody wore homespun.

Threshing wheat and oats wth the flail employed the men until good sleighing came. Then the whole neighborhood would go in company to Bytown—now Ottawa— to market their produce. Starting at midnight the line of ox-sleds would reach Richmond about daylight, stop an hour to vest and feed, travel all day and be at Bytown by dark. Next day they’would sell their grain, buy a few necessary articles, travel all night to Richmond and be home the third evening.

At one time fifteen wolves walked past the Buchanan yard, heading for the sheep pen. R attling tin pans and blowing a horn frightened them off. On another occasion two of the girls, going to see a sick woman, were assailed by a fierce wolf on the way back. “He followed us some distance,” says the chronicler, “grew bolder, ran up and took a bite out of my dress, almost pulling me down. My loud exclamation,

‘Begone, you brute,’ and clapping our hands put the impudent fellow to flight. We skipped home in short metre, regardless of sticks, stones and mud holes.

Unhappily, the relations between the old Minister and some of his congregation became, in time, less cordial. Most of the members before coming to Canada had been in communion with the established Church of Scotland—the Auld Kirk. Dr. Buchanan was an adherent of the Secession Church, and strongly opposed to anything like union of Church and State. Besides, after ten years in this rough, new charge, old age was making him less, able to meet all the claims of his scattered congregation.

There was urgent need of a new church building. That enterprise brought to a head all the dissensions and discontent which had been brewing. At first logs were taken out to erect a better church. They lay unused. Finally in 1832 it was determined to put up a stone building. When the walls were nearing completion a meeting of the congregation was called and Dr. Buchanan was requested to join the Auld Kirk (the Established Church) if he expected to preach in the new edifice.

One of his daughters has left her account of what followed, and, whether strictly accurate or not, it is vivid and touching. She writes: “Always a seceder, opposed to the union of church and state, my father positively declined to give up his honest convictions. He asked if they found any fault with his preaching or conduct; all answered, “No, none whatever.” Father then reminded them of his long and arduous services. He said: “I have preached in the open air, in wretched cabins, and in cold school rooms. I have taught day school for years without receiving one penny for my labor. I have spent stormy nights and weary days visiting the pick and dying, walking through swamps and paths that no horse could travel, without any charge for my medical services. Now you wish me, when you propose to have a comfortable house of worship, to sell my principles. That I shall never do. The God that has brought me thus far is able to keep me to the end, and my trust, is in Him.”

These words moved not a few to tears. Others, determined to have their way, continued the discussion. ‘If you join the Kirk,” one man shouted, “you will get into the new building; if you don’t you will eat thin kale.” Father replied to this coarse assault in the language of the Psalmist—“I have been young and now I am old, yet give I never seen the righteous forsaken, nor his seed, begging bread.” Several of the leaders said: “We were born in the Kirk and we will die in the Kirk.” Some protested against the proceedings. But the opponents of the old minister prevailed, and by the time the stone church was completed, the new minister Rev. John Smith, arrived to occupy its pulpit.

At his own home Dr. Buchanan continued to hold services for the few who were loyal to him; but his bodily strength was, failing, and even th a t small rem nant dwindled away. Two or three years passed, and death claimed him in the 74th year of his age and the 45th of his ministry. He was buried in the old Craig Street cemetery at Perth. Rev. Mr. Bell gave up his own plot there so that the remains of the old clergyman might rest near those of his eldest daughter, Mrs. John Ferguson.

At the new stone church, under the faithful service of Rev. Mr. Smith, there was peace and progress for some years. Then came that conflict which led to the “Disruption” in the Established Church in Scotland, the history of which is familiar. There was an unselfish and heroic side to the fight against the claims of ‘Heritors’ and other secular powers to force Ministers into the charge of Churches against the wishes of the congregation. Almost four hundred ministers walked out of the General Assembly of the Church, protesting against this interference in Church matters by secular powers. They knew that in so doing they were sacrificing their comfortable manses, their glebes and their assured stipends. In cold cash this meant a yearly loss equivalent to more th an $1,000,000 today.

From that sacrifice and secession arose the Free Church of Scotland. The conflict on the principle involved spread to Canada. They took their Church politics seriously, those Presbyterians of a century ago.

How the Beckwith Scotch Turned Defeat into Victory

Tales of Beckwith — Edward Kidd 11 Years Old

The Man who Disappeared– Stories of Dr. G. E. Kidd

The Spirit of the 7th Line

The Beckwith Baptist Church

The Gnarled Beckwith Oak

So Where is that Gnarled Oak in Beckwith?

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Update on The Manse in Beckwith

Beckwith Mystery — Anyone Remember a Meteor Coming Down on the 7th Line?

A Trip Along the Ramsay Sixth Line –W.J. Burns

The Haunted Canoe from the Jock River

The Mystery of Cross Keys –Part 1

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The Mystery of Cross Keys –Part 1

Church cross keys

Four miles beyond Carleton Place on the Franktown highway is an interesting road which the old timers called the “Cross Keys.” It is the line between the sixth and seventh concessions of the township of Beckwith. It runs easterly, a mile or so between quiet homesteads; then comes to a dead end. A heavy cedar log fence bars further progress. There, inside the farm fence, near the roadside, are the crumbling walls of a ruined church.No one knows why they calledit Cross Keys but the corner was once called Ladies Corners.

Their story may interest those who love the records of old times in our county of Lanark. In 1819 some hundreds of Highland Scots, mostly from Perthshire, sailed from their home land in the ships Sophia, Curlew and Jean, and settled in the township of Beckwith. It is fairly certain that the last stage of their journey from Montreal was by way of Nepean and the new road through Richmond Village which the foxbitten Duke of that name had planned.

It led to Franktown—named after Col. Francis Cockburn, companion on that walk from Perth to Richmond Village which ended so tragically in the Duke’s death from hydrophobia in Chapman’s shanty near the Richmond road. Today a cairn at the roadside reminds the passer-by of that strange death of one of Canada’s governors. read-The Haunted Canoe from the Jock River

The new settlers were located in the usual way, and entered into the hard but hopeful life of settlers in the Upper Canada bush. Twenty miles of swamp and forest separated them from Perth, the capital of a community of retired army officers and discharged soldiers, and of Scotch immigrants, mostly of the mechanic class.

There, since 1817, Rev. William Bell had ministered to a Presbyterian congregation, and from that centre had travelled far and wide on missionary journeys. After the arrival of the Beckwith highlanders, he went there occasionally to preach and to baptize the children. He urged them to get a minister of their own, and prepared a petition to the Presbytery in Edinburgh for this purpose. He wrote, in 1820, enclosing this petition:—

“The petitioners are mostly from Perthshire. A minister who can preach in Gaelic will be very comfortable A fine gentleman’ will not suit the people here. A plain, pious and diligent minister is the one they want. A bond I sent to them has been returned with 54 names subscribed, each of them pledging two bushels of wheat yearly. Money for the last twelve months has almost disappeared, so that barter is the only means by which business can be transacted. People have now, however, plenty to eat.

Disputes on the subject of the KIRK have not yet been introduced among us. In the fall of 1821 the Beckwith people formally asked the Presbytery of Edinburgh to send them a Minister. A ‘Call’ was prepared, signed by nearly all the adults and forwarded in due course to Scotland. This interesting document stipulated that the man chosen must be:

“Of Godly carriage” and conversation, well qualified to expound the Scriptures, gifted in prayer, SKILLED IN THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE, and able to preach in Gaelic and English. For one who could satisfy these requirements the congregation would guarantee a yearly stipend of £75, about $300 in 1821. The call was answered and Rev. George Buchanan, a graduate in medicine of Edinburgh University and Licentiate of the Associated (Presbyterian) Synod consented to come to this rough field of labor in the new world.

His daughter writes of him that—“Although sixty years old his eye was not dimmed nor his natural strength abated. Gaelic and English he spoke with equal readiness, while scarcely less familiar with Latin, Greek and Hebrew. Of medium height and compact build, vigorous in mind and body, brisk in movement and pleasing in address. With his wife and ten children he sailed from Greenock in May, 1822, in the good ship the Earl of Buckinghamshire which had in previous years brought out hundreds of settlers for North Lanark. An ocean voyage of 38 days brought the travellers to Quebec. Thence part of the route was by water; and many a weary mile by land over roads and through swamps almost impassable.

From Brockville the tiring journey in wagons heavily loaded with furniture and supplies lasted alnost a week, ending at Franktown. McKim’s log tavern and three shanties in a patch of half cleared ground made up that so called village. More than one of the younger Buchanans tearfully begged their parents to be taken back to Scotland. No abode awaited them.

James Wall, a big-hearted Irishm and not a Presbyterian—offered them the use of a small log shack he had just put up; and in it the new Minister’s family lived for six weeks. It had one room, and neither door nor window. Quilts and blankets served as doors and partitions. Cooking was done on the flat stone which served as a hearth in the fireplace. More smoke stayed inside than found its way out. Millions of mosquitoes and black flies added to their discomfort. Wolves prowled around the house in the darkness, uttering dismal howls.

Their first Sabbath was clear and bright and a crowd gathered from far and near to the open air service. A huge tree had been cut down, the stump of which, sawed off straight, sufficed for a pulpit. First in English; then, after an intermisson, in Gaelic, Mr. Buchanan preached to his congregation. And aged men and women, not a few, shed tears of joy to hear the gospel again in the language of their native glens.

Children baptised at that time bore names still familiar in the district:

Peter Stewart, James McDiarmid, Alexander Campbell, Daniel Ferguson, Robert Scott, Mary Carmichael, Janet Cram: These appear on the first page of the Church Register of baptisms. And the congregation was Scottish through and through: Carmichael, Kennedy, Dewar, Ferguson, Stewart, Anderson, McGregor, McEwen, Cram, McArthur, McTavish, Snclair, McLaren are characteristic names among the heads of families which composed th at congregation of one hundred and fifteen years ago

Dr. Buchanan selected for his home lot 14 in the 7th Concession of Beckwith—on the road known as the Cross Keys. The family lived six weeks in Wall’s shack. Then, harvesting finished, the people turned out in force, cut logs, and built a large shanty for their minister. They roofed it with troughs, laid a big flat stone against the wall for a chimney, left a space at the ridge for smoke to escape, smoothed one side of split logs for the floor, and put in a door and two windows.

There was no lumber for partitions, so curtains were used to divide the interior. And this was the Beckwith Manse for about a year. That winter men were hired to clear some of the land and take out timber for a new house which was ready by September, 1823. It had plank floors, a stone chimney, several rooms and a cellar.

A rude building had been put up for church services. For years there was ” little” improvement in this respect.

Today all that remains is a sign hidden by the trees and the remains of scattered stone.

The Spirit of the 7th Line

The Beckwith Baptist Church

The Gnarled Beckwith Oak

So Where is that Gnarled Oak in Beckwith?

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Update on The Manse in Beckwith

Beckwith Mystery — Anyone Remember a Meteor Coming Down on the 7th Line?

A Trip Along the Ramsay Sixth Line –W.J. Burns

The Haunted Canoe from the Jock River

Thanks to Donna she sent some more info on our cover photo today. Know your ancestors thanks to Donna Mcfarlane
This is the Rev. James Carmichael who preached one of the last sermons at the old church on the Beckwith Township 7th line….mentioned in one of your articles
jhe preached at the seventh line of Beckwith as a visiting minister,,,,, he was at the church in the photo for over 50 years it is a community called Strange in York…
The on line pamphlet regarding his 50 years as minister to that church… and on pager 43 it refers to his place of birth as Beckwith

Hot Summer Days- August 6 1900 –Congregational Church Fire

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Hot Summer Days- August 6 1900 –Congregational Church Fire
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Aug 1900, Tue  •  Page 3

Monday afternoon about 4:30 a furious electric storm passed over Lanark Village and surrounding country. The tower of the Congregational church was struck at a distance of about 100 feet
from the ground, the ball of fire descending and breaking its way through the corner of the church. The alarm was given, and the firemen were quickly on hand and soon bad a stream playing on the burning tower. About five o’clock the flames seemed to be checked, but tne water
in the tank ran low, and again it made headway. The bose were changed on to the factory steam pump, and with this strong flow the fire was com­ pletely extinguished about eight o’clock. About
twenty feet of the spire feB, and the remainder of
it is completely rimmed out. The body of the church is badly soaked with water, and the rafters la the attic are badly burned. ~ The loss is placed at about $2,500; fully insured. Servioes win be held in the town hall next Sabbath morning

Authorities say that Monday was the hottest day for 46 years

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
08 Aug 1900, Wed  •  Page 4

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
08 Aug 1900, Wed  •  Page 4


CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
12 Sep 1900, Wed  •  Page 1

Fire in Zion Memorial Church January 1950

The Almonte Fire of 1909

Judge Senkler and the Almonte Fire Bug

The Almonte Fire– Bridge and Water Street 1903

Miss Eva Denault- Almonte 1911 Fire Heroine

The Storm of 1953

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The Storm of 1953

August 1953

A freak electrical storm, accompanied by a veritable cloud burst that lasted for about ten minutes and then settled down to a tapering off rain, started a little after seven o’clock on Monday evening. The late afternoon had been oppressive with a humid heat that presaged a thunderstorm or perhaps hail.

 Dark clouds blew up from the Huntley Township direction and others from the southeast seemed to meet in an overhead area and then things got going with hair-raising flashes of lightning and ear-splitting peals of thunder. A few minutes after the storm broke and two or three crashes and flashes frightened people off their front porches, the fire siren was heard. The firemen had to turn out in the midst of one of the worst downpours of rain anyone can remember. 

The phone call to the fire station stated that the steeple of the Reformed Presbyterian Church on the Bay Hill had been struck by lightning and that smoke was pouring from its base. Firemen had water turned on in record time. They had to chop a hole in the wooden portion of the tower to get at the flames. The spire is covered with steel as is the roof. No great damage was done to the interior of the building as the tower was cut off from below by closed trap doors. 

The storm was accompanied by a high wind that uprooted trees, littered lawns with limbs and cut off the power in the southern side of the town where branches fell across the wires. A strange thing about the visitation is that on the north side of the river there was little or no interference with the light service but there was a black-out on the business streets. Those stores which keep open in the evenings such as druggists’ were dark except for the odd candle or flashlight.

Aug 1953

 In the O’Brien Theatre it wasn’t hard to live up to the ancient slogan “the show must go on.” In the days of the power shortage during the last war the Ottawa Valley Amusement Co. installed gasoline driven electrical generators in their four theatres. So all the local manager had to do was turn on the machinery and the audience which happened to have got there ahead of the storm, were kept entertained.

It seemed strange on the pitch dark street to see the O’Brien main entrance lights and the sign blazing out like lone beacons. It is said that in the Legion and Hotel Almonte beverage room the boys quaffed their beer by lantern or candle light which imparted a sort of Old Country atmosphere to the places that is not present under ordinary circumstances. 

A softball game was going on at the time the storm broke and those in the grandstand had a splendid view of the lightning as it flashed in the distance across the river, and sometimes too close for comfort. At least one member of the audience—a fireman—had to plunge forth into the deluge when the siren blew. 

A strange thing about the rainfall, which some middle aged people declare was the heaviest they ever remember, is that there were only a few drops at the Auld Kirk Cemetery on the Eighth Line while the Anglican Cemetery, half way out from the town boundary, was in the very wet zone. 

It is not known what capers were cut by the storm but it is known that it was not bad in Ottawa and while they had a heavy rain in Perth and other points in the county there was no severe storm. The maintenance staff of the Almonte Public Utilities Commission had to turn out in the midst of the downpour as did the firemen. They had a mean job but they got the lights on in the business section about 8.30, for which they deserve a lot of credit when the amount of damage to the wires over a wide section is taken into consideration. 

They went off several times after that for short intervals and doubtless the electricians had to work nearly all night trying to repair the damage. From the standpoint of power users on the south side of the

river, it was fortunate that the storm struck in the evening when motors and machinery were closed down. 

Several large trees on Country Street in front of the home of Mr. Robt. Smithson, town foreman, were uprooted. It is estimated he will get five or six cords of wood out of the trunks and limbs although there is no doubt he would rather have the trees standing where they were. A fine big maple was uprooted in front of the residence of Mr. Gordon Houston. 

The story is told of one merchant on Mill Street who was creeping around his premises in the darkness holding a flashlight. Suddenly he came in front of a mirror and yelled, “help, help, there’s a robber in here!”

The Human Seal or Polar Bear Comes to Carleton Place and Almonte

The 1947 Almonte Flood

The Storm of 1867

Fire in Zion Memorial Church January 1950

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Fire in Zion Memorial Church January 1950

January 19 1950

Zion United Church, CarletonPlace, was practically destroyed in an early morning fire last Sunday. The loss is estimated at $150,000 according to present day values. Insurance of $35,000 was carried. It is understood the congregation has decided to rebuild the edifice in spite of the fact that there is another United Church in the town as is the case in Almonte. 

The caretaker of the church discovered the fire when he went to stoke the furnace about five o’clock in the morning. As he was about to leave the main body of the building at 6.45 he saw smoke curling up behind the pipe organ and when he went to investigate he found that end of the church in flames. It is thought the fire started in the boiler room because the room from which the flames broke out is located directly over the heating plant.

In the battle to quell the fire which followed one new member of the Ocean Wave brigade, Ken Drummond, was injured by a falling piece of masonry. His back was badly bruised. Another had a nail puncture through his foot. Rev. E. C. Kelloway is pastor of the church which has a membership of some 300. It is understood that an invitation to worship at Memorial Park United Church, temporarily, was passed over in favor of services in the town hall. 

Mr. H. R. Davey, local contractor and planing mill operator, was engaged on Wednesday to take lumber to the scene of the fire and make temporary repairs to the shattered roof. Mr. Davey found that the floor of the church was partly intact under a heavy layer of debris and ashes. The fine basement was not too badly damaged.

City of Ottawa archives

Related reading

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

Chris Redmond

Joann Voyce6 min. ago

Sorry Chris but it was never Zion United .They were Zion ( Presbyterian) and Memorial Park United. Zion was the Free Presbyterian as opposed to St Andrews on Bridge which was Church of Scotland

3 days ago

In that era it was simply Zion United Church — the “Memorial” came only in the 1960s when Zion (on Albert St) merged with Memorial Park United Church (on Franklin Street)

Dan Williams

3 days ago

At that time this was Memorial Park United Church. Zion United Church was where the condo’s now are at the corner of Albert and Beckwith. When they united they became Zion Memorial United Church. The church in the picture was never Zion United Church.

Ray Paquette

3 days ago

A point of correction. When that fire occurred the United Church, Zion and Memorial Park had not amalgamated. The fire occurred on a Saturday afternoon when most of the young boys who chased the fire trucks were occupied at the Roxy Theatre with the Saturday afternoon matinee, yours truly included. After the movie ended, we all left the theatre and tore down to Judson Street to watch the OWFC in action…

Joann Voyce

3 days ago

This was Memorial Park United from the union of the Methodist and Presbyterians It was originally the Methodist Church. Zion was always Zion Presbyterian until the most recent union

Bill Mains59 sec. ago

The church which burned in 1950, was Zion United Church, which was formerly Zion Presbyterian Church until it became Zion United at church Union in 1925. Memorial Park Methodist Church, became Memorial Park United Church in 1925. Memorial Park burned a few years later in the mid 1950’s and was restored. The two churches amalgamated to Zion Memorial about 1965 when the Memorial Park building became the sanctuary and the Zion building became the Christian Education building until it was sold some time after 1970.

Clippings of St. John’s Church Innisville

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Clippings of St. John’s Church Innisville
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
11 Oct 1911, Wed  •  Page 1

in 1888 St. George’s severed the connection with Almonte and became united with St. John’s Church at Boyd’s now known as St. John’s Church, Innisville. And for the first time the records state “that St. George’s Clayton and St. John’s Innisville, were made into a separate parish under the rectorship of Rev. John Osborne.”

St John’s Anglican Church, Innisville. Church was built in 1911.
Photo courtesy of Catherine and Joe Phelan, Perth, ON. File date is 29 August, 2009. Charles Dobie click

Parish of Mississippi Lake
October 23, 2017  · 
St John’s Innisville held a great yard sale this past weekend, with all sorts of treasures to be found. Thanks to Nancy, Jean, and Peter for their help and salesmanship!

Parish of Mississippi Lake
October 31, 2017  · 

On Sunday, St John’s Innisville hosted a fabulous concert by award-winning bluegrass band, Concession 23! Thanks to the talented musicians, faithful organizers, and toe-tapping audience for a great afternoon, enjoyed by all.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Aug 1973, Sat  •  Page 42

However in 1888 they severed the connection with Almonte and became united with St. John’s Church at Boyd’s now known as St. John’s Church, Innisville. And for the first time the records state “that St. George’s Clayton and St. John’s Innisville, were made into a separate parish under the rectorship of Rev. John Osborne.”

Perth Courier 1889

Innisville Inklings—Mrs. John Findlay and children of Deloraine, Manitoba, arrived to meet her friends last week in the County of Lanark, the place she was born and brought up. At present she is with her father John Kellough, Ramsay. She is a sister to Mrs. Sutherland, Boyd’s. Her husband was left behind but he sold his possessions in Manitoba and is now taking a trip to British Columbia. After he is through with his journeys he will return to meet his fair partner in life in this dear old home of his.

Innisville Inklings: Miss Murphy, a young lady of Wolfe Island, was visiting her brother-in-law Michael Grey for the past several weeks. She returned to her home last week. — Two boys of our own raising when called by name are Messrs. James Sullivan and Francis Lambert. These two sturdies have been farming near Grand Forks, Dakota for some years past. They give very satisfactory reports of their new home and claim that their success has been abundant. At present we are enjoying their visit but do not know how long they intend to stay.

Innisville Inklings: John Sutherland is this week visiting the place of his boyhood that is, in Gananoque. He was born there and I am sure he will feel small when he is shown the place where the notable event took place. — Mr. Samuel Rathwell, a young law student of Toronto University, son of John Rathwell, Esq., is now on his holiday visiting friends. — John Findlay son of John Kellough Ramsay, visited friends in this part last week. He sold his possessions in Manitoba and for the last several weeks was visiting at Gladstone, Man. He is now at Ottawa. — Arthur Jackson is for a spell freed from intense study and can now enjoy some relaxation. — Wesley Halfpenny, a relative to people in Boyd’s, is, I suppose, spending his vacation delightfully in the quiet part of the country. He is from below the capital.

Innisville Inklings: A grand time was spent last Wednesday, 26th Dec., in the hall at Innisville. The concert was got up in aid of the Sunday School of St. John’s and Trinity Churches. Mr. A. Code of Ottawa filled the responsible position of chairman and in a most acceptable style. The Messrs Bert of Almonte took part in the program. Beautiful choruses were sung by the Rathwells and Kinches; readings and recitations by Messrs R. Patterson, Carleton Place, T. Rathwell and F. Rathwell and many more taking part in the entertainment which proved a noble exercise.

Innisville Inklings: A happy evening was spent at the residence of J. Rathwell on New Year’s night. A large party of young folk were assembled together and had a splendid time. People cannot miss but enjoy themselves with our genial and illustrious reeve. He is so full of fun that he can make your sides ache laughing.

Innisville Inklings: Mr. John Sullivan sold his farm of 100 acres and all the stock except one team of horses to Mr. Thomas Ruttle, about a week ago, for $2,500.

Innisville Inklings: Mr. John Sullivan left last week for Harrisville, New York. The rest of the family left a week or so ago. The young folks of Ferguson’s Falls showed their love to the family by making some parties for them. We are sorry to miss friend Jack so if there is anything better on the other side of the line then what fair Lanark possesses then our ardent wish is that he may possess it. John was a good neighbor one who was always ready in time of need and one that we regret to lose.

Innisville Inklings: Mr. Thomas Willows has erected a rich and magnificent bronze colored Scotch granite monument to memorialize the departure of his beloved wife Mary Code Willows and his little son Milton Willows

Innisville Inklings: Mr. John Finlay, who has lately come from Manitoba and who has been visiting friends here and in other parts has, we understand, bought out the dairy business of Robert Lattimer, Carleton Place, and intends taking possession of said business on the 12th Feb.
Innisville Inklings: Miss Murphy, a young lady of Wolfe Island, was visiting her brother-in-law Michael Grey for the past several weeks. She returned to her home last week. — Two boys of our own raising when called by name are Messrs. James Sullivan and Francis Lambert. These two sturdies have been farming near Grand Forks, Dakota for some years past. They give very satisfactory reports of their new home and claim that their success has been abundant. At present we are enjoying their visit but do not know how long they intend to stay.



Innisville Inklings: Benjamin Murdoch, a former music teacher in this county wrote a letter lately to one of his friends in this part and in it he states his intention as follows: that he and his wife (formerly a young lady of Clayton) will come across the ocean next summer to visit

Lanark Baptist Church – Elaine Playfair’s Clippings

The Deachman Brothers Revivals of Lanark County

Dont’ bring Home a Baptist Preacher!

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

The Little White Country Church in Prestonvale- The Buchanan Scrapbooks

Another One Bites the Dust –In Memory of the Holiness Movement Church Building (Hornerites)

The Ramsay Free Church on the 8th Concession

More About Churches and Things Part 2

Robert M. More — Reformed Presbyterian Church of Almonte– By Sarah More

Miss Christena Dunlop –Teacher Church Street School

The Unbelievable History of the Cameronian Church

More Notations of Christ Church Ashton

The Church On the Hill in the Middle of Hood

Everything You Wanted to Know About Auld Kirk

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Old Churches of Lanark County

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

Dugald Campbell –Memories of Ramsay Township and Almonte–Ministers Hunters and Schools

St. Andrew’s United Church

Clayton United Church Quilt Fran Cooper

And They Kept Singing in Church While it was on Fire

In Memory of David Scharf — Almonte United Church Tragedy

The Almonte Fire 1955– Almonte United Church

St. Peter’s Celestine Church Pakenham

PAKENHAM PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1897– $338.50 on the Cornerstone?

Did You Know the Ashton Anglican Church Dates Back to 1845?

Lanark’s First Church in the Middle of the Forest

At Church on Sunday Morning From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

The Remains of the Bethel Methodist Church

For the Love of St. Andrew’s– 130th Anniversary

Drummond Centre United Church — and The Ireton Brothers 38 Year Reunion–Names Names Names

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

St. Augustine’s Church and Christ Church

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

The Little White Country Church in Prestonvale- The Buchanan Scrapbooks

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The Little White Country Church in Prestonvale- The Buchanan Scrapbooks

The Buchanan ScrapbooksWith files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

In his diary, Rev. William Bell, first Presbyterian minister in Perth, speaks of Armstrong’s Corners, the hotel, the blacksmith shop, and the first winter road across the black ash swamp.  He also reports the serious accident he experienced during February, 1857.  Driving a borrowed horse and cutter to Lanark, the horse ran away while going down the steep hill at Stanley’s and struck a stump with such violence as to break the shafts from the cutter.  Mr. Bell was thrown against the stump, cutting his scalp.  He reported in his diary that four men rushed from Mr. Armstrong’s blacksmith shop and carried him into the house where his wound was dressed by Mr. McNichol and Mr. Armstrong lent him new shafts and harness which enabled him to drive back to Perth– read more here..Where was Prestonvale?

Read more here about Prestonvale–Where was Prestonvale?

Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum– read more here ..Where was Prestonvale?

This is the Old Baptist Church located in Drummond Township near Prestonvale, Ont.

Feb. 28, 1873 – Last Saturday the corpse of D. McPherson, who had lived in this section for 29
years, came into the Union House from the Mattawa. Mr. McPherson had been dead for over
three weeks but until Saturday no means of bringing his body for interment could be found. It
appears that he had been working in some of the shanties where his services were no longer
required and he was provided with and a quantity of money. On his way here he got on a
‘spree’ in which condition he kept himself until his pocket was empty. From some of the
numerous effects of that fatal cup he died and this adds another to the long list of deaths from
strong drink. Deceased was over 50 years of age and was interred at Prestonvale Cemetery.


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 May 1955, Mon  •  Page 34

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Jan 1897, Sat  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada03 Mar 1932, Thu  •  Page 4

The Ramsay Free Church on the 8th Concession

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Micky MulliganThis was a church on the 8th Concession just up the road from the Auld Kirk. The church is gone, but the house (McGregor homestead) is still in place. Painting done by Robert Tait McKenzie

Free Kirk Methodist Church On 8th Line

Thanks Rose Mary Sarsfield–The old church referred to here would have been the Ramsay Free Church. According to Winston MacIntoshin “The Wind Bloweth where it Listeth” there are few early records of this church. It was known as the Eighth Line Canada Presbyterian Church. It was located WLot 15 Con 8. This would be kitty corner to the Auld Kirk. The first minister was defrocked for lasciviousness. The third minister was Rev. Wm. McKenzie father of Tait MacKenzie. During his pastorate the St. John’s Presbyterian Church which is still in use in Almonte was built. The attached water colour sketch was done by Tait MacKenzie about 1888Ramsay Free Church and Manse, located on lot 15, concession 8, Ramsay Township.The manse is still being used as a private residence today, but the church has gone. You can see the church to the left of the manse in the picture. These buildings were built around 1840 – 1850.

THE RAMSAY FREE CHURCH
COMMUNION ROLL — 1846

Published in the LCGS newsletter, November, 1996.Surnames have been put in bold type to aid viewing. The list is presented here as published. It seems to show the names in family groupings, thus the names have not been sorted alphabetically.THE RAMSAY FREE CHURCH OR CANADA PRESBYTERIAN CHURCHThese people seceded from the Church of Scotland, the Auld Kirk in 1845 and in 1846 built the Free Church, a large frame plaster cast Church on Lot 15 West Concession 8, across the corner from the Auld Kirk. The church was destroyed by fire in 1926. It had been used as a barn. The manse, a white frame house still stands and was long used as a farm dwelling. In it Dr. Robert Tait McKENZIE was born and later it was the dwelling of Mr. & Mrs. Wm. ALLEN, Mr. David WILSON and Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth McGREGOR.The ministers who lived there were:
1846 – 185 Rev. Wm. G. JOHNSTON
1853 – 185 Rev. James SMITH
1859 – 1868 Rev. Wm. McKENZIE
1870 – 1874 Rev. Howard STEELE
1875 – 1890 Rev. Robert KNOWLES at Blakeney and ClaytonWhen St. John’s Church was opened in 1868 services were continued in the church on the 8th line, but in a few years it was decided by the Ramsay Presbyterians to close it and a church was built in 1873 in Clayton and one in Blakeney in 1876. The Free Church building was sold to the Reformed Presbyterian Church in 1876 and used until 1891.This story on the Ramsay Free Church was documented several years ago as a New Horizons Project of the North Lanark Historical Society.Rev. Wm. G. JOHNSTONE, first minister click here to read the rest http://lcgsresourcelibrary.com/articles/A-RAMSAY.HTM

Sarah MoreMy father, The Rev. Dr. Robert More, Jr., included this 1876 photo of the Ramsay Free Church in his book, “Ramsay Eighth Line Church 175th Anniversary (1830-2005).” He also writes that Rev. James Milligan D.D., of Ryegate, Vt., a Covenanter missionary, organized a congregation in Ramsay on September 9, 1830… The Free Church building was used until 12 November 1891 when the new Almonte Reformed Presbyterian Church was dedicated on Bay Hill… Many years later it [the old Free Church building] burnt (July 1, 1926.)

Marilyn Vallentyne GendronYes of course, now I recognize this house, it’s not on the corner of the Wolfe grove and county road 8, it’s up from the corner on the left hand side on the 8th line. We were living in the house on the corner (the old manse) when Hugh and Liz Findlay bought this house probably from Grant Campbell who bought the farm farm Ken McGregor. Grant split up the farm house to have the acres and barn for the horses, so now you know the rest of the story.

BY “WHB” July 2 1926–Almonte Gazette

A foundation of historic interest was destroyed in the early hours of Friday morning ( July1,1926) when a barn, belonging to Mr. D. Wilson of the 8th Line of Ramsay, went up in smoke. This barn, where yesterday the fatted calf- disported himself, was once the place of penitence for the prodigal himself, for it was originally a church.

The ‘Great ‘Disruption in Scotland in 1843 directed the congregation of the Auld Kirk at the 8th Line; and part of that congregation, when it went out or was locked out of a church meeting during the Disruption festivities, organized a church of its own affiliated with the Free Church of Scotland. The building burnt on Friday was their church until the one now occupied by the Continuing Presbyterians was built in Almonte in the early 60’s. A graveyard was opened alongside of the old Free Church; but as the soil was not well adapted for burial purposes it was soon abandoned, and many of the bodies interred there were removed to other cemeteries.

This writer’s recollection of his first church service is that of one in the old Free Church when Rev. Mr. Steele was the minister. With other lads I walked to church barefooted, carrying shoes and stockings until the Tannery creek was reached, where linal ablutions and dolling-up were made. Little is now remembered of the service itself save that it. seemed very long, although it was divided into two parts by an intermission for lunch. Grace before and after meat as if saintly elders would have done. The Precentor with his tuning fork, as he stood up beside the pulpit to raise the tune, attracted my attention at once and well do I remember his frowning impatience with those leisurely wailers who persisted in tailing off half a line or so behind him and the bulk of the congregation in the singing of the long-metre melodies he appeared to favor.

The Caretaker was another interesting official to the country boy, for he had enviable foresight into which dogs had thoroughbred training on oatmeal. Pity the caretaker could not have exercised his remarkaible, powers of discrimination upon church members then and since, for he might have prevented many a church squabble. Taking up the collection was a fearsome ceremony. A long pole, at the end of which dangled a bag looking like a weatherbeaten wasps nest, was passed along the length of the pew, lifted over the heads of the worshippers to those in the next pew, and hauled back again to the aisle. The lady at the far end had to bow her head, in prayer perhaps, to save her bonnet being knocked off, and those across the aisle had to be on the alert to avoid being punched in the eye, by the end of the pole on its return trip.

Church-going was a sort of community reunion in those days, for everyone from babe’to grandsire helped to make “a great turn-oot on the Sawbbath.” Singly or in groups, from far and near they came, on foot, on horseback, and in wagon loads. With other gaping rustics ranged around I was filled with wonder and admiration by the appearance at church that day of a double-buggy — shining varnished (body, polished hub-caps, soup-ladle steps to the seats, real silver-mounted buggy harness on the prancing horses, and everything. Be-whiskered elders’ heads wagged- in grieved disapproval of such a display of finery at a place of worship; but I wonder what those saintly elders would have done if per of to-day had a daring flapper swept up to the church door in her limousine with her shapely silk-stockinged limbs draped gracefully over the windshield? Probably some think like what they did do at the advent of the double-buggy; retire to the privacy of the vestry to soothe their jangled nerves with a “wee drappie,” and to ponder over the vanity of human life and what the world is coming to.

But the old graveyard is neglected and overgrown, the church has vanished in smoke, even the “wee-drappie” is gone and little now is left to remind us of the seriousness in churchgoers in the old good old days save possibly the odor of sanctity of the smoke that may mingle arising from the ashes of the members of the old church.

On the last day of December in 1894 on Saturday afternoon Mr. and Mrs. Graham Forgie that lived on the 11th line of Ramsay, were driving home from Almonte. The team became unmanageable as they began their journey and finally ran away when they were on the outskirts of the town.

During the latter half of the 1800s, Ontario roads were in a serious state of neglect and deterioration. Historians call this the “dark age of the road” where roads were being uploaded and downloaded among levels of government. Roads were opened, roads were abandoned. But this would begin to change in the 1890s—when the first automobiles appeared

Mr. and Mrs. Forgie were thrown out of the buggy on a fence. Mr. Forgie escaped with a few bruises, but Mrs. Forgie was injured badly. Her breast bone and several ribs were fractured, and she was unconscious for some time. She is still in a serious state, and suffers so much that the poor woman was kept almost constantly under the influence of morphine. Dr. Hanley, who is attending Mrs. Forgie, says she is seriously injured, but is doing as well as could be expected They were also members of the The Ramsay Free Church and the congregation is praying for her.

The Ramsay Free Church continued to use this church until others were built in Clayton-the Presbyterian Church bought 2 1/2 acres of E Lot 15 Con 7 in 1840 and they sold it in 1867.

Rose Mary SarsfieldIt was a Free Church which was a breakaway group from the Church of Scotland (Auld Kirk) Presbyterians. The picture at the top is a painting done by Robert Tait McKenzie. His father Rev. Wm. McKenzie was an early minister in the Free Church. It was on the right hand side going to Carleton Place across the Wolf Grove road from the Auld Kirk.

Related reading

More About Churches and Things Part 2

So What is in St. Andrew’s Foundation?

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So What is in St. Andrew’s Foundation?
Robert McDonald
May 16 at 3:09 PM  · 

From today’s walk along Bridge St


June 24 1887 Almonte Gazette.

Rev. Dr. Grant, accompanied by Rev. D. McDonald, M.A., and Robt. Bell, Esq., descended from the St. Andrew’s to the platform prepared for them, and under a perfect torrent of rain, which scattered a number of people to places of shelter, proceeded to the important ceremony.

Mr. Bell laid in the cavity of the foundation stone a glass jar, in which was the programme of laying the stone, & list of the church officers, historical sketch of the church, the copper and silver coins of the Dominion, Canadian postage stamps of every denomination, the Canadian Almanac, and copies of newspapers. The jar had been corked, sealed with, wax, then covered with lead and fastened with wire; it is guaranteed to last for 500 years. The jar was wrapped in paper, the crevices filled with mortar, ‘and the large stone placed over it by the contractors, Messrs. W. & G. Willoughby, the Rev. Principal also having his hand in the work. The stone being placed, a short blessing was asked, and the people rushed to Zion church out of the pelting rain, where addresses were delivered.

Interior of St. Andrew’s Church, Carleton Place, Lanark County, Ontario

UNKNOWN PHOTOGRAPHERhttps://atticbooks.ca/products/125050

Hi Linda. I was going through some old pictures and thought you might like this one. I may have sent it to you before? I had been reading your article about the history of the e church . My grandmother, Eliza McRostie, is in the back row on the right. Unfortunately, I don’t have names for anyone else.Joan Halpenny.

Donna Sweeney LowryIt looks very much like the hall in St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, before there were removable partitions put up to divide the space into classrooms. And those are the dishes St.Andrews used.

Gloria Rattray WilsonLooks like St. Andrews Presbyterian church hall and the dishes look familiar

Just because I can… LLOLOL he is also one of the hearts and souls of St. Andrews– Pappy! who is Ken Hastie

Related reading

The Ladies of St. Andrews

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

For the Love of St. Andrew’s– 130th Anniversary

Almonte’s Methodist Christmas 1893

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Almonte’s Methodist Christmas 1893
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Dec 1893, Wed  •  Page 1

More About Churches and Things Part 2

The Unbelievable History of the Cameronian Church

More Notations of Christ Church Ashton

The Church On the Hill in the Middle of Hood

Everything You Wanted to Know About Auld Kirk

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Maberly Girl Lives For Five Years Without Church

St. Andrew’s United Church


Clayton United Church Quilt Fran Cooper

And They Kept Singing in Church While it was on Fire

In Memory of David Scharf — Almonte United Church Tragedy

The Almonte Fire 1955– Almonte United Church

St. Peter’s Celestine Church Pakenham

PAKENHAM PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1897– $338.50 on the Cornerstone?

Did You Know the Ashton Anglican Church Dates Back to 1845?

Lanark’s First Church in the Middle of the Forest

At Church on Sunday Morning From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

The Remains of the Bethel Methodist Church

For the Love of St. Andrew’s– 130th Anniversary

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Drummond Centre United Church — and The Ireton Brothers 38 Year Reunion–Names Names Names

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

St. Augustine’s Church and Christ Church

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church