Tag Archives: Church

In Memory of David Scharf — Almonte United Church Tragedy

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In Memory of David Scharf — Almonte United Church Tragedy

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Brian Scharf was looking and still looking for photos of  the Almonte United Church steeple placement after the church fire , Steeple was placed by Hurdman Brothers crane. My grandfather was killed at the church after the steeple placement,crushed by crane being dismantled. This is what I found– if anyone has clearer photos please email me.

Charlene Scharf-Lafleur added that it was an accidental death. Thank you.

Mark as done

Charlene Scharf-Lafleur
David R Scharf accidental death

sav_77@yahoo.com

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 19 Jun 1956, Tue,
  3. Page 19

 

Gail Grabe I remember that day vividly, Brian. I was a young student at Church Street school just a few blocks away. Not sure of the year but it was a horrible tragedy, every time I am in Almonte and drive by the site I think of it.

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 19 Jun 1956, Tue,
  3. Page 16

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 27 Jun 1956, Wed,
  3. Page 14

 

Almonte Gazette June 21 1956

MAN ON CHURCH JOB
DIES WHEN CRUSHED
BY BOOM ON CRANE
An inquest has been ordered into
the tragic death of David
Seharf, 47 years old of North
Gower, an employee of Hurdman
Bridge & Construction Co., Ottawa,
who was crushed under a
I huge crane which was being tak-
| en apart after lifting the bell and
| steeple onto the Almonte United
I Church tower, Monday afternoon^
CMr. Scharf, lying under a joint
in the crane boom, had just removed
two pins holding two sections
together when he was crushed.
Hard To Understand
Walter Hurdman, of Hurdman
Brothers Contractors, owners of
the crane, said Mr. Scharf, an experienced
rigger, apparently pulled
the pins before his fellow
worker, Albert Lacelle loosened
the cable which keeps the boom
in the air. Normal procedure is to
loosen the cable, then Jake out
of the pins.
Mr. Lacelle could not understand
why the dead man had not
waited. “We take the crane apart
two or three times a day,” he
said.
The accident happened in front
of the church and was a great
shock to spectators who had been
watching the operation of the
giant crane.
The district coroner, Dr. A. A.
Metcalfe considered the circumstances
and decided that there
was no need of an inquest. The
man had been pronounced dead
by Dr. O. H. Schulte” Constables
Keith Crockt’ord and John A.
Ellis investigated the mishap. .
Dr. Metcalfe advised the County
Crown Attorney Mr. J. A. B. Dulmage,
Q.C. of Smiths Falls that in
his opinion there were no factors
that would call for an inquest.
Mr. Dulmage assented. But next
day Mr. W. J. Munro of Ottawa,
provincial inspector for the Ont.
Dept, of Labor, conferred with
Dr. Metcalfe and told him he
thought it might be a good idea
to hold an inquest. It is, presumed
that he was considering the mechanical
circumstances and the possibilities
of future accidents of a
like nature as there was no apparent
evidence of anything else.
When Dr. Metcalfe acquainted
Mr. Dulmage with this request
from the Labor Dept, inspector,
the Crown Attorney agreed that
an inquiry should go forward. The
date was set for Tuesday evening,
June 26, in the town hall, Almonte.
The accident victim, Mr. Scharf,
was born in Cyrville but lived in
Ottawa the greater part of his
life. He moved to North Gower
four years ago. He is survived by
his wife, a son, two daughters and
a number of brothers and sisters.
He attended the Anglican Church.
The body was conveyed to the
funeral parlors of Hulse & Playfair
in, Ottawa and the funeral
was conducted this Thursday afternoon
by Archdeacon C. G. Hepburn.
NOT ON COMMITTEE
Owing to an error in the report
of last week’s council meeting it
was made to appear that the special
committee appointed some
time ago to deal with the Hartley
mill situation was ’composed of
Councillors P. W. Strickland,
Archie Levitan and Reeve A. W.
Smith. As a matter of fact Mr.
Levitan did not serve on the committee
and Councillor A. H. Whitten
should have been given the
credit. Mr. Strickland was chairman.
This mistake was not
brought to the attention of the
Gazette by Mr. Whitten but was
noticed in going over the clerk’s
minutes. The committee worked
hard to get a buyer for the good
building which seemed to have become
a sort of industrial orphan
through a series of back-firing
deals.

relatedreading

The Almonte Fire 1955– Almonte United Church

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St. Peter’s Celestine Church Pakenham

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St. Peter’s Celestine Church Pakenham

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Photo- Marilyn Snedden

By Mary Cook, Mississippi Life EMC Jan 1992

St. Peter Celestine Roman Catholic Church in Pakenham stands as a testimony to a century of dedication by parishioners who have preserved its grandeur and its place in the community for 100 years. This year, it celebrates its centennial, virtually unchanged since the day it was dedicated and blessed in 1892.

One can almost sense the determination of the parish priest at the time, Father Dominic Lavin, as he set about to oversee the construction of St. Peter Celestine. He worked against the odds.

As well as tending to the spiritual and often the physical needs of about 200 families in the Pakenham and Fitzroy areas, he almost single-handedly oversaw the raising of the money to build the church. Parishioners sold produce, cows and one member sold her flock of turkeys to add to the coffers. Men worked in the bush, earning $75 for the entire winter, and then donating the full sum to the cause.

Father Levin cajoled and encouraged, and in the end he was able to oversee the opening of the church debt free.

He had raised $18,000, and when the cornerstone was blessed on July 31,1892, every piece of mortar, stone and wood had been paid for. There were no outstanding bills. The price included a six bed rectory. The doors were opened, and the church was debt free. The fact that there was nothing inside the magnificent structure was not a deterrent to the worshippers. There was no money left over for fancy pews, painted walls, and altar adornments.

It wasn’t until 1901 that the church finally was decorated inside. This time-span allowed the building to settle and when it came time to work on the interior, the building was solid on its foundations, and there was no shifting to mar the magnificent interior. Sadly, the beloved first priest of the new church died shortly after the dedication.

St. Peter Celestine sits atop a hill in the village of Pakenham, magnificent and mighty. And it isn’t only church members who say it is probably the most beautiful church in the Ottawa Valley. The interior has been completely restored, and yet the integrity of the original design has never been compromised. It remains the same as it was when a young Kathleen Noonan, now 97, sat in one of the pews and watched Montreal artists hand paint the angels. It is believed that they used the face of the young girl as their model. And many say the likeness is remarkable, so no one is refuting the legend.

Today, the same sense of dedication that built and saw the church grow over the past 100 years prevails amongst the parishioners. People like Corinne MacFarlane and Terry Currie who have spent most of a lifetime in the church community see St. Peter Celestine as a solid force in their lives. They have been babies baptized, then married, and finally buried from inside this magnificent church building. They have seen the membership wane and grow back up to where there are now about 170 dedicated families on the roll.

St. Peter Celestine goes into its second century as solid as it was the day it was built. Worth many more thousands today than it was when it was built 100 years ago, its value to the community cannot be measured in dollars and cents.

Father William Penney has read the proclamation declaring the commencement of Centennial Year and over the next few months the church will continue to mark this year of celebration with many events including a special Mass to be celebrated by Archbishop Marcel Gervais.

This commemoration year will be a memorial to those early pioneers who had a vision 100 years ago and who worked tirelessly to ensure that future generations would reap the benefits of their labours.

Photos and Text by St. Peter’s Celestine  Church

  • In 1990, the parish embarked on a project to restore the interior of the church in time for the 100th Anniversary in 1992. These are some of the photos during the course of the project.
                                                    THE RESTORER: STANISLAW DUSKO

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The beautiful restoration of St. Peter Celestine in 1991 demands that we recognize the skill and dedication of the restorer, Stanislaw Dusko.

Mr. Dusko was born at Skole, Poland in 1943 and received his education in that country. He graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts, Gdansk, with a Masters of Arts degree in 1971. His first job was as a ceramics designer at the famous Cmielow porcelain factory. In 1972-73 he was set and costume designer for the Gdynia Musical Theatre, before becoming director of the State School of Arts and Crafts in Gdynia from 1973 to 1977. During this period he was an artistic consultant in the restoration of Gdynia medieval City Hall. In 1976, Mr. Dusko was curator for the Karpacz International Workshop for Painters.

He left Poland for Austria where he worked on church restoration before emigrating to Canada. Since his arrival in our country Stanislaw Dusko has directed the repair or restoration of heritage buildings across southern Ontario. His projects have included the Victoria Memorial Museum (Museum of Nature) in Ottawa, where he was involved in repairs of the museum’s mosaics. He also worked on the Rideau Chapel restoration in the National Gallery.

The scrupulous restoration of St. Peter Celestine is a tribute to the skill and sensitivity of Stanislaw Dusko.

Confirmation on August 25th, 1913

Archbishop Charles  Hugh  Gauthier, Father P.Corkery, &  Father Thomas O’Neill

Confirmation-1913

Cahill, Helen (s)
Cahill, Ellen (s)
Carabine, William & Jennie (Dowdall)  & Edward Carabine
Corkery, Joseph (s)
Costello, Martin & Ellen (Mulvihill), Leo Francis & Hilary William
Costello, Tom (s)
Costello, Jno (s)
Costello, Wilfred (s)
Cox, Mrs. (s)
Curry, Jno & Mary(McDonald) & Edward Joseph
Doyle, Wm. & Mary (Ruddy)  & Mary Olive
Farrell, Patrick & Eliza (Colton), Jno Patrick Leo & Matthew Lawrence
Farrell, Mrs. M. (s)
Gerard, Lar & Ellen (Farrell) & Jno Joseph
Gerard, Genevive (s)
Green, Jno (s)
Green, Philip & Mary (Levi), Ellen & Philip Alphonsus
Hage rty, Alex & Bella (Barber) & Wm. Edward
Hagerty, Jno (s)
Henehan, Wary (s)
Heney, Lar (s)
Heney, Jno & Elizabeth (Haley), Margaret $ary & Charles A. Vincent
Heney, Joseph (s)
Herrick, Dan (s)
Herrick, Jno (s)
Herrick, Pat & Margaret (Jordan), Patrick Jordan & James Francis
Keyes, Wm & Dehlia (Nugent) & Wm Arthur
Lesage, Alex & (McFarlane) & Veronica
Lesage, Lionel (s)
Lunney, Jas.  (s )
McCrea, Elizabeth (s)
McCrea, Jas  (s)
McDonald, Jno & Annie (McMahon), Teresa & Anna Mary, Gertrude & Elizabeth
McGrath, B. V. (s)
McManus, Jno & Josephine (Beaudry), Mary & Michael Edward
Mooney, Martin (s)
Mooney,$ary (s)
Mooney, Wm & Margaret (Stanton) & Agnes
Noonan, George (s)
Noonan, Peter & Margaret JMcGowan), Margaret & Jno Francis
Nugent, Sly (s)
O’Neill, Dan & Agnes (Mooney), Alice, Agnes Mary, James Edmond & Daniel Wm
O’Neill, Jno & Maggie (Ryan) & Alphonse B, .Jno
O’Neill, Margaret (s)
O’Neill, Mary (s)
O’Neill, T.J. (s)
Quigley, Wm (s)
Ryan, Charles (s)
Ryan, Jno (s)
Ryan, Mary (s)
Ryan, Wm & Minnie (Devine), Mary Loetta, Wm Arthur & Andrew Joseph
Ruddy, Annie

 

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 20 Mar 1971, Sat,
  3. Page 46

 -

  1. Clipped from

    1. The Ottawa Journal,
    2. 09 Nov 1897, Tue,
    3. Page 6

       

      relatedreading

       

      PAKENHAM PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1897– $338.50 on the Cornerstone?

    4. Pakenham — Sherriff’s Bush Shangri- La

    5. Quotes on Andrew Dickson and Local Quarries

      The House Across the Way- Dickson House

      Dickson Hall Fire Pakenham-H. H. Dickson

? In the Belfry of St. James

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? In the Belfry of St. James

 

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Boys will be boys as they say. Back in 1872 there were a few local lads who played a Halloween trick on the sexton of the Carleton Place Anglican church. On the day pf Halloween the church had some repairs done and was occupied, but ladders that were somehow forgotten still were against the roof and ran up to the belfry.

Halloween that year either fell on a Friday or a Saturday, so obviously the workmen were thinking more of the weekend than their ladders. Anyways the time was close enough to Sunday to give a suggestion to the local boys who were ready to celebrate Halloween. Those were the days when boys thought nothing of dragging a buggy on top of a shed on Halloween, so why tie something to a beam in the belfry. Two boys ascended by the ladders next to the church, cut the bell rope, then tied it to a beam in the belfry.

On the Sunday morning following Halloween a large crowd of boys assembled outside the church before the morning service, while a couple crept into the church to see what would happen when the sexton tried to ring the bell. These boys saw the sexton tug and tug at the rope. The rope did not move. The sexton looked surprised. After a time it dawned on him that something was wrong.

He ascended the bell-tower and there he found out what was happening.. But before the cut rope had been re-tied the congregation had begun to arrive, all asking each other why the bell had not been rung as usual. Some suggested that the Sexton had taken sick. But in due time the facts leaked out. On the next Halloween the sexton stayed in the church. The boys however, did not attempt to repeat their exploit.

 

St James Timeline

  • 1834-Founding of the Parish & first Church built
  • 1881-Decision was made to replace the original Church (cost of $3,999)
  • 1882-First service conducted in present Church
  • 1892-93-Rectory built at the corner of Edmund & William Streets
  • 1903-Present bell in the tower was installed to replace and earlier one
  • 1903-Casavant pipe organ installed
  • 1903-Oak altar (presently in the chapel) given in memory of Canon Burke
  • 1903-Vault was constructed in southeast portion of clergy reserve
  • 1913-Electricity arrives at St James
  • 1924-Elliott Memorial Hall built
  • 1966-Church wing with offices, washrooms & choir room added to church building
  • 1973-Church organ rebuilt
  • 1975-First major renovation since its erection in 1882
    • New freestanding altar & surrounding altar rail
    • Choir stalls moved from chancel to the transept
    • More participatory liturgy introduced
  • 1977-Old rectory sold & new one built next to clergy reserve
  • 2007-“New” rectory sold & property severed from the clergy reserve
  • 2013-Old church wing removed from church building
  • 2013-New Parish Hall with offices, accessible washrooms, choir room, classrooms created to replace old structure. Joined to church with glass link.
  • 2017-Elliott Memorial Hall sold

Names Names Names of St. James Carleton Place Genealogy

 

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 Friday night October 5- FREE! Donations to the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum would be appreciated–

AND it’s on!!! Explore the amusing and ghastly tales of old Carleton Place. Escape into the past as your offbeat guide Linda Seccaspina provides you with an eerie, educational, yet fun-filled adventure. Learn about many of Carleton Place’s historic figures and just like you they walk the dark streets of Carleton Place in search of nightly entertainment, yet, they don’t know that they themselves are the entertainment. Walkabout begins Friday night October 5 at 7 pm in front of Scott Reid’s Office–224 Bridge Street– the former Leland Hotel –and ends at the Grand Hotel. About one hour.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

  1. relatedreading

    The Ghost Lights in St. James Cemetery

  2. The Shadow People of Lake Ave East

    When the Psychics Came to Town– Madame Monsuer

    Ed Fleming — The First Funeral Parlour in Carleton Place

    Howls in the Night in Carleton Place — Our Haunted Heritage

    The Devil You Say in Carleton Place? Our Haunted Heritage

    Outside Looking in at The Eccentric Family of Henry Stafford — Our Haunted Heritage

    The Funeral Train That Went Through Carleton Place — Our Haunted Heritage

    Stairway to Heaven in a Cemetery? Our Haunted Heritage

    Old Wives Tales of Death — Our Haunted Heritage

    Funerals With Dignity in Carleton Place – Just a Surrey with a Fringe on Top —- Our Haunted Heritage

    Death by Corset? Bring Out Your Dead and Other Notions! Our Haunted Heritage

    Things You Just Don’t say at a Funeral— Even if you Are a Professional Mourner

    The Non Kosher Grave — Our Haunted Heritage

    Linda’s Dreadful Dark Tales – When Irish Eyes Aren’t Smiling — Our Haunted Heritage

     Could the Giant Pike of Carleton Place Have Turned Into the Lake Memphremagog Monster?

    Carleton Place Was Once Featured in Ripley’s Believe it or Not! Our Haunted Heritage

    Young Hearts Run Free — Warning– Story Could be Upsetting to Some

    Twitching or Grave Dousing– Our Haunted Heritage

    Walking With Ghosts — Morals, Meningitis, and The Manse

Lanark’s First Church in the Middle of the Forest

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Lanark’s First Church in the Middle of the Forest

 - Lanark's First Under Trying Wood Was Sawn Front... - the 700 the and in he to his this the on of the...

Ottawa Citizen 1938

 

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Lanark Baptist, Sacred Heart Roman Catholic, St. Andrew’s United and St. Paul’s Anglican Perth Remembered

 

On the 23rd of January, 1821, back in Quebec, Dalhousie wrote
the Duke of Hamilton to suggest that contributions be sought in the
Glasgow area for the building of a church in New Lanark, a small village in
Lanark township pleasantly situated on the Clyde River about 15 miles from
Perth.

This was done and in 1823, £ 280 were sent to Canada from Scotland
for the purpose. Soon a stone church with eight windows was built.
It had a gallery across the back and room for three hundred persons.
But although the emigrants had sought a minister even before leaving
Scotland, one was not easily to be found.

In June, 1820, when the ship Commerce was docked at Greenock preparing
to sail for Quebec with one of the first shiploads of the Lanarkshire
emigrants, one of the Presbyterian Scots had handed a petition to the
Rev. Mr. Robert Easton, a Montreal Secession Presbyterian minister
standing on the landing. The petition, signed by the Presbyterian

emigrants, asked that a minister be sent to their new home in Upper Canada.
Easton seemed the logical man to receive the petition because he was in
Scotland for the purpose of raising funds to send Presbyterian clergymen
to British North America. No answer was received from Easton and over a
year later, in September 1821, the Presbyterian Church Committee at
Lanark, Upper Canada, again wrote Easton, now back in Montreal. The
Committee stated that sites for the church and school had been granted and
that a house is now in a state of forwardness to answer the double
purpose of church and school. But again, no answer was received.
By March, 1822, a schoolmaster had arrived in the township and “it was
agreed by the church managers that unless they had some answer to their
request for a minister they would apply directly to Earl Bathurst and the
Joint Committee in Edinburgh” – the latter committee had sent the Rev.
Mr. William Bell to the town of Perth. What the Lanark Committee evidently
did not know was that an ordained Presbyterian minister, the Rev. Mr.
John Gemmell, was already among them.

Gemmell, a 61 year old Ayrshire Scot and a Secession Presbyterian
minister, had been ordained to a “Lifter” congregation in Dairy, Ayrshire.
Because of inadequate payment of his salary,he had turned first to
medicine, receiving a medical degree from the University of Glasgow, and
then to the printing business. Gemmell and his family emigrated in 1821
to Lanar k township but it was not until August, 1822, that he held his first
church service in the township. Gemmell never managed to rally Lanark’s
Presbyterians around him:the ministry was but one third of his professional
interests, he outspokenly supported one party, even in his sermons, in
a divided community and he visited each community too infrequently – usually once a month. —Early Settlement in Lanark County and the Glasgow Colonial Society by E.A. McDougall

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

LANARK VILLAGE – 1851 DIRECTORY

Village of Lanark Business Directory 1886– 1887

Social News of the Lanarkites 1898

What is Heritage by Cheryl Thomas 11 Years Old Franktown

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What is Heritage by Cheryl Thomas 11 Years Old Franktown

 

St.James_Church

 

 

From the collection of teacher Doris Blackburn/ Karen Blackburn Chenier

 

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

  1. relatedreading

A Monument Back in Time –Time Travelling in Lanark County —Part 1

Like a Prayer I left My Mark in Franktown — Part 2

How Franktown Got Its Name

The Remains of the Bethel Methodist Church

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The Remains of the Bethel Methodist Church

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Photo by: fiso

Bethel Methodist Church

Concession 11, Bennett Lake, Bathurst

In 1893, the Bethel Methodist Church was built. The brick building was erected to replace an old log building which was much too small for the congregation. In order to start a fund for the building of the church, Mr. William Pratt donated $100. Dedicated to the cause, Mr. Pratt also collected funds for the church, gathering $300 in one day. Members from the community all pitched in where they could donating money, lumber and hard work.

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Photo by: fiso

Mr. Dick Campbell was responsible for the stone work, the Bishop Bros did the framework and Messrs. Charlton and Buchanan did the brick work. The minister at the time, Reverend Barry Pierce painted the church. During the construction of the church, the workers boarded free of charge at Mr. William Pratt’s. The church was free of debt when it was completed, and with the small remaining funds, a shed was built for the church.

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Photo by: fiso

The church held no socials or suppers and people donated what they could. Money, food, fuel and horse fodder were all donated to the minister from church goers. The first wedding to be held in the church was between Thomas North and Margaret Pratt, and the last wedding, the union of Harold McGinnis and Violet VanAlstine was held in 1942.

In 1947 Maberly’s sister church, Bethel United Church, built in 1893 and located eight miles north of Maberly on the 11th concession of Bathurst Township, collapsed. The roof collapsed in 1959 and at this point the building had been vacant for some time. A monument can be found where the church once stood on Bennett Lake Road.  With files from Tay Valley History

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Photo by : fiso

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

  1. relatedreading

The Almonte Fire 1955– Almonte United Church

For the Love of St. Andrew’s– 130th Anniversary

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Drummond Centre United Church — and The Ireton Brothers 38 Year Reunion–Names Names Names

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

St. Augustine’s Church and Christ Church

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

St. Augustine’s Church and Christ Church

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St. Augustine’s Church and Christ Church

 

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Built in 1854, St. Augustine’s had a seating capacity of 120 to welcome Irish Anglican worshippers from the Prospect area who had previously made do in a school house. The church closed in 1967 but the building, cemetery and grounds are still maintained by the Ashton Parish. A service is still held here once a year during the first Sunday in August.

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 - Church of 14 f 6 1 . By MARION G. ROGERS...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  03 Oct 1970, Sat,  Page 46

 

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 - Large' Gathering Attends Deticatioh Of Ashton...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  01 Jun 1929, Sat,  Page 5

August 1934 A Delightful Evening

The social held last Monday evening in the beautiful grove, on the farm of Mr. and Mrs. Cameron McTavish, first concession of Drummond, under the auspices of St. Angustine’s church, will stand out as one of the most enjoyable events of the summer months to be field in that section. A most elaborate program had been arranged and all entered heartily into the festivities. Read more Who were the Carleton Place Orioles?

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

The Almonte Fire 1955– Almonte United Church

For the Love of St. Andrew’s– 130th Anniversary

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Drummond Centre United Church — and The Ireton Brothers 38 Year Reunion–Names Names Names

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Old Churches of Lanark County

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

The Old Church in Island Brook That Needs a Home

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

The Church that Died

St James and St Mary’s Christmas Bazaar 1998 -Who Do You Know?

Old Churches of Lanark County

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!