Tag Archives: Church

Fire in Zion Memorial Church January 1950

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Fire in Zion Memorial Church January 1950

January 19 1950

Zion United Church, CarletonPlace, was practically destroyed in an early morning fire last Sunday. The loss is estimated at $150,000 according to present day values. Insurance of $35,000 was carried. It is understood the congregation has decided to rebuild the edifice in spite of the fact that there is another United Church in the town as is the case in Almonte. 

The caretaker of the church discovered the fire when he went to stoke the furnace about five o’clock in the morning. As he was about to leave the main body of the building at 6.45 he saw smoke curling up behind the pipe organ and when he went to investigate he found that end of the church in flames. It is thought the fire started in the boiler room because the room from which the flames broke out is located directly over the heating plant.

In the battle to quell the fire which followed one new member of the Ocean Wave brigade, Ken Drummond, was injured by a falling piece of masonry. His back was badly bruised. Another had a nail puncture through his foot. Rev. E. C. Kelloway is pastor of the church which has a membership of some 300. It is understood that an invitation to worship at Memorial Park United Church, temporarily, was passed over in favor of services in the town hall. 

Mr. H. R. Davey, local contractor and planing mill operator, was engaged on Wednesday to take lumber to the scene of the fire and make temporary repairs to the shattered roof. Mr. Davey found that the floor of the church was partly intact under a heavy layer of debris and ashes. The fine basement was not too badly damaged.

City of Ottawa archives

Related reading

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

Chris Redmond

Joann Voyce6 min. ago

Sorry Chris but it was never Zion United .They were Zion ( Presbyterian) and Memorial Park United. Zion was the Free Presbyterian as opposed to St Andrews on Bridge which was Church of Scotland

3 days ago

In that era it was simply Zion United Church — the “Memorial” came only in the 1960s when Zion (on Albert St) merged with Memorial Park United Church (on Franklin Street)

Dan Williams

3 days ago

At that time this was Memorial Park United Church. Zion United Church was where the condo’s now are at the corner of Albert and Beckwith. When they united they became Zion Memorial United Church. The church in the picture was never Zion United Church.

Ray Paquette

3 days ago

A point of correction. When that fire occurred the United Church, Zion and Memorial Park had not amalgamated. The fire occurred on a Saturday afternoon when most of the young boys who chased the fire trucks were occupied at the Roxy Theatre with the Saturday afternoon matinee, yours truly included. After the movie ended, we all left the theatre and tore down to Judson Street to watch the OWFC in action…

Joann Voyce

3 days ago

This was Memorial Park United from the union of the Methodist and Presbyterians It was originally the Methodist Church. Zion was always Zion Presbyterian until the most recent union

Bill Mains59 sec. ago

The church which burned in 1950, was Zion United Church, which was formerly Zion Presbyterian Church until it became Zion United at church Union in 1925. Memorial Park Methodist Church, became Memorial Park United Church in 1925. Memorial Park burned a few years later in the mid 1950’s and was restored. The two churches amalgamated to Zion Memorial about 1965 when the Memorial Park building became the sanctuary and the Zion building became the Christian Education building until it was sold some time after 1970.

Clippings of St. John’s Church Innisville

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Clippings of St. John’s Church Innisville
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
11 Oct 1911, Wed  •  Page 1

in 1888 St. George’s severed the connection with Almonte and became united with St. John’s Church at Boyd’s now known as St. John’s Church, Innisville. And for the first time the records state “that St. George’s Clayton and St. John’s Innisville, were made into a separate parish under the rectorship of Rev. John Osborne.”

St John’s Anglican Church, Innisville. Church was built in 1911.
Photo courtesy of Catherine and Joe Phelan, Perth, ON. File date is 29 August, 2009. Charles Dobie click

Parish of Mississippi Lake
October 23, 2017  · 
St John’s Innisville held a great yard sale this past weekend, with all sorts of treasures to be found. Thanks to Nancy, Jean, and Peter for their help and salesmanship!

Parish of Mississippi Lake
October 31, 2017  · 

On Sunday, St John’s Innisville hosted a fabulous concert by award-winning bluegrass band, Concession 23! Thanks to the talented musicians, faithful organizers, and toe-tapping audience for a great afternoon, enjoyed by all.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Aug 1973, Sat  •  Page 42

However in 1888 they severed the connection with Almonte and became united with St. John’s Church at Boyd’s now known as St. John’s Church, Innisville. And for the first time the records state “that St. George’s Clayton and St. John’s Innisville, were made into a separate parish under the rectorship of Rev. John Osborne.”

Perth Courier 1889

Innisville Inklings—Mrs. John Findlay and children of Deloraine, Manitoba, arrived to meet her friends last week in the County of Lanark, the place she was born and brought up. At present she is with her father John Kellough, Ramsay. She is a sister to Mrs. Sutherland, Boyd’s. Her husband was left behind but he sold his possessions in Manitoba and is now taking a trip to British Columbia. After he is through with his journeys he will return to meet his fair partner in life in this dear old home of his.

Innisville Inklings: Miss Murphy, a young lady of Wolfe Island, was visiting her brother-in-law Michael Grey for the past several weeks. She returned to her home last week. — Two boys of our own raising when called by name are Messrs. James Sullivan and Francis Lambert. These two sturdies have been farming near Grand Forks, Dakota for some years past. They give very satisfactory reports of their new home and claim that their success has been abundant. At present we are enjoying their visit but do not know how long they intend to stay.

Innisville Inklings: John Sutherland is this week visiting the place of his boyhood that is, in Gananoque. He was born there and I am sure he will feel small when he is shown the place where the notable event took place. — Mr. Samuel Rathwell, a young law student of Toronto University, son of John Rathwell, Esq., is now on his holiday visiting friends. — John Findlay son of John Kellough Ramsay, visited friends in this part last week. He sold his possessions in Manitoba and for the last several weeks was visiting at Gladstone, Man. He is now at Ottawa. — Arthur Jackson is for a spell freed from intense study and can now enjoy some relaxation. — Wesley Halfpenny, a relative to people in Boyd’s, is, I suppose, spending his vacation delightfully in the quiet part of the country. He is from below the capital.

Innisville Inklings: A grand time was spent last Wednesday, 26th Dec., in the hall at Innisville. The concert was got up in aid of the Sunday School of St. John’s and Trinity Churches. Mr. A. Code of Ottawa filled the responsible position of chairman and in a most acceptable style. The Messrs Bert of Almonte took part in the program. Beautiful choruses were sung by the Rathwells and Kinches; readings and recitations by Messrs R. Patterson, Carleton Place, T. Rathwell and F. Rathwell and many more taking part in the entertainment which proved a noble exercise.

Innisville Inklings: A happy evening was spent at the residence of J. Rathwell on New Year’s night. A large party of young folk were assembled together and had a splendid time. People cannot miss but enjoy themselves with our genial and illustrious reeve. He is so full of fun that he can make your sides ache laughing.

Innisville Inklings: Mr. John Sullivan sold his farm of 100 acres and all the stock except one team of horses to Mr. Thomas Ruttle, about a week ago, for $2,500.

Innisville Inklings: Mr. John Sullivan left last week for Harrisville, New York. The rest of the family left a week or so ago. The young folks of Ferguson’s Falls showed their love to the family by making some parties for them. We are sorry to miss friend Jack so if there is anything better on the other side of the line then what fair Lanark possesses then our ardent wish is that he may possess it. John was a good neighbor one who was always ready in time of need and one that we regret to lose.

Innisville Inklings: Mr. Thomas Willows has erected a rich and magnificent bronze colored Scotch granite monument to memorialize the departure of his beloved wife Mary Code Willows and his little son Milton Willows

Innisville Inklings: Mr. John Finlay, who has lately come from Manitoba and who has been visiting friends here and in other parts has, we understand, bought out the dairy business of Robert Lattimer, Carleton Place, and intends taking possession of said business on the 12th Feb.
Innisville Inklings: Miss Murphy, a young lady of Wolfe Island, was visiting her brother-in-law Michael Grey for the past several weeks. She returned to her home last week. — Two boys of our own raising when called by name are Messrs. James Sullivan and Francis Lambert. These two sturdies have been farming near Grand Forks, Dakota for some years past. They give very satisfactory reports of their new home and claim that their success has been abundant. At present we are enjoying their visit but do not know how long they intend to stay.



Innisville Inklings: Benjamin Murdoch, a former music teacher in this county wrote a letter lately to one of his friends in this part and in it he states his intention as follows: that he and his wife (formerly a young lady of Clayton) will come across the ocean next summer to visit

Lanark Baptist Church – Elaine Playfair’s Clippings

The Deachman Brothers Revivals of Lanark County

Dont’ bring Home a Baptist Preacher!

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

The Little White Country Church in Prestonvale- The Buchanan Scrapbooks

Another One Bites the Dust –In Memory of the Holiness Movement Church Building (Hornerites)

The Ramsay Free Church on the 8th Concession

More About Churches and Things Part 2

Robert M. More — Reformed Presbyterian Church of Almonte– By Sarah More

Miss Christena Dunlop –Teacher Church Street School

The Unbelievable History of the Cameronian Church

More Notations of Christ Church Ashton

The Church On the Hill in the Middle of Hood

Everything You Wanted to Know About Auld Kirk

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Old Churches of Lanark County

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

Dugald Campbell –Memories of Ramsay Township and Almonte–Ministers Hunters and Schools

St. Andrew’s United Church

Clayton United Church Quilt Fran Cooper

And They Kept Singing in Church While it was on Fire

In Memory of David Scharf — Almonte United Church Tragedy

The Almonte Fire 1955– Almonte United Church

St. Peter’s Celestine Church Pakenham

PAKENHAM PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1897– $338.50 on the Cornerstone?

Did You Know the Ashton Anglican Church Dates Back to 1845?

Lanark’s First Church in the Middle of the Forest

At Church on Sunday Morning From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

The Remains of the Bethel Methodist Church

For the Love of St. Andrew’s– 130th Anniversary

Drummond Centre United Church — and The Ireton Brothers 38 Year Reunion–Names Names Names

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

St. Augustine’s Church and Christ Church

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

The Little White Country Church in Prestonvale- The Buchanan Scrapbooks

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The Little White Country Church in Prestonvale- The Buchanan Scrapbooks

The Buchanan ScrapbooksWith files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

In his diary, Rev. William Bell, first Presbyterian minister in Perth, speaks of Armstrong’s Corners, the hotel, the blacksmith shop, and the first winter road across the black ash swamp.  He also reports the serious accident he experienced during February, 1857.  Driving a borrowed horse and cutter to Lanark, the horse ran away while going down the steep hill at Stanley’s and struck a stump with such violence as to break the shafts from the cutter.  Mr. Bell was thrown against the stump, cutting his scalp.  He reported in his diary that four men rushed from Mr. Armstrong’s blacksmith shop and carried him into the house where his wound was dressed by Mr. McNichol and Mr. Armstrong lent him new shafts and harness which enabled him to drive back to Perth– read more here..Where was Prestonvale?

Read more here about Prestonvale–Where was Prestonvale?

Photo-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum– read more here ..Where was Prestonvale?

This is the Old Baptist Church located in Drummond Township near Prestonvale, Ont.

Feb. 28, 1873 – Last Saturday the corpse of D. McPherson, who had lived in this section for 29
years, came into the Union House from the Mattawa. Mr. McPherson had been dead for over
three weeks but until Saturday no means of bringing his body for interment could be found. It
appears that he had been working in some of the shanties where his services were no longer
required and he was provided with and a quantity of money. On his way here he got on a
‘spree’ in which condition he kept himself until his pocket was empty. From some of the
numerous effects of that fatal cup he died and this adds another to the long list of deaths from
strong drink. Deceased was over 50 years of age and was interred at Prestonvale Cemetery.


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 May 1955, Mon  •  Page 34

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Jan 1897, Sat  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada03 Mar 1932, Thu  •  Page 4

The Ramsay Free Church on the 8th Concession

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Micky MulliganThis was a church on the 8th Concession just up the road from the Auld Kirk. The church is gone, but the house (McGregor homestead) is still in place. Painting done by Robert Tait McKenzie

Free Kirk Methodist Church On 8th Line

Thanks Rose Mary Sarsfield–The old church referred to here would have been the Ramsay Free Church. According to Winston MacIntoshin “The Wind Bloweth where it Listeth” there are few early records of this church. It was known as the Eighth Line Canada Presbyterian Church. It was located WLot 15 Con 8. This would be kitty corner to the Auld Kirk. The first minister was defrocked for lasciviousness. The third minister was Rev. Wm. McKenzie father of Tait MacKenzie. During his pastorate the St. John’s Presbyterian Church which is still in use in Almonte was built. The attached water colour sketch was done by Tait MacKenzie about 1888Ramsay Free Church and Manse, located on lot 15, concession 8, Ramsay Township.The manse is still being used as a private residence today, but the church has gone. You can see the church to the left of the manse in the picture. These buildings were built around 1840 – 1850.

THE RAMSAY FREE CHURCH
COMMUNION ROLL — 1846

Published in the LCGS newsletter, November, 1996.Surnames have been put in bold type to aid viewing. The list is presented here as published. It seems to show the names in family groupings, thus the names have not been sorted alphabetically.THE RAMSAY FREE CHURCH OR CANADA PRESBYTERIAN CHURCHThese people seceded from the Church of Scotland, the Auld Kirk in 1845 and in 1846 built the Free Church, a large frame plaster cast Church on Lot 15 West Concession 8, across the corner from the Auld Kirk. The church was destroyed by fire in 1926. It had been used as a barn. The manse, a white frame house still stands and was long used as a farm dwelling. In it Dr. Robert Tait McKENZIE was born and later it was the dwelling of Mr. & Mrs. Wm. ALLEN, Mr. David WILSON and Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth McGREGOR.The ministers who lived there were:
1846 – 185 Rev. Wm. G. JOHNSTON
1853 – 185 Rev. James SMITH
1859 – 1868 Rev. Wm. McKENZIE
1870 – 1874 Rev. Howard STEELE
1875 – 1890 Rev. Robert KNOWLES at Blakeney and ClaytonWhen St. John’s Church was opened in 1868 services were continued in the church on the 8th line, but in a few years it was decided by the Ramsay Presbyterians to close it and a church was built in 1873 in Clayton and one in Blakeney in 1876. The Free Church building was sold to the Reformed Presbyterian Church in 1876 and used until 1891.This story on the Ramsay Free Church was documented several years ago as a New Horizons Project of the North Lanark Historical Society.Rev. Wm. G. JOHNSTONE, first minister click here to read the rest http://lcgsresourcelibrary.com/articles/A-RAMSAY.HTM

Sarah MoreMy father, The Rev. Dr. Robert More, Jr., included this 1876 photo of the Ramsay Free Church in his book, “Ramsay Eighth Line Church 175th Anniversary (1830-2005).” He also writes that Rev. James Milligan D.D., of Ryegate, Vt., a Covenanter missionary, organized a congregation in Ramsay on September 9, 1830… The Free Church building was used until 12 November 1891 when the new Almonte Reformed Presbyterian Church was dedicated on Bay Hill… Many years later it [the old Free Church building] burnt (July 1, 1926.)

Marilyn Vallentyne GendronYes of course, now I recognize this house, it’s not on the corner of the Wolfe grove and county road 8, it’s up from the corner on the left hand side on the 8th line. We were living in the house on the corner (the old manse) when Hugh and Liz Findlay bought this house probably from Grant Campbell who bought the farm farm Ken McGregor. Grant split up the farm house to have the acres and barn for the horses, so now you know the rest of the story.

BY “WHB” July 2 1926–Almonte Gazette

A foundation of historic interest was destroyed in the early hours of Friday morning ( July1,1926) when a barn, belonging to Mr. D. Wilson of the 8th Line of Ramsay, went up in smoke. This barn, where yesterday the fatted calf- disported himself, was once the place of penitence for the prodigal himself, for it was originally a church.

The ‘Great ‘Disruption in Scotland in 1843 directed the congregation of the Auld Kirk at the 8th Line; and part of that congregation, when it went out or was locked out of a church meeting during the Disruption festivities, organized a church of its own affiliated with the Free Church of Scotland. The building burnt on Friday was their church until the one now occupied by the Continuing Presbyterians was built in Almonte in the early 60’s. A graveyard was opened alongside of the old Free Church; but as the soil was not well adapted for burial purposes it was soon abandoned, and many of the bodies interred there were removed to other cemeteries.

This writer’s recollection of his first church service is that of one in the old Free Church when Rev. Mr. Steele was the minister. With other lads I walked to church barefooted, carrying shoes and stockings until the Tannery creek was reached, where linal ablutions and dolling-up were made. Little is now remembered of the service itself save that it. seemed very long, although it was divided into two parts by an intermission for lunch. Grace before and after meat as if saintly elders would have done. The Precentor with his tuning fork, as he stood up beside the pulpit to raise the tune, attracted my attention at once and well do I remember his frowning impatience with those leisurely wailers who persisted in tailing off half a line or so behind him and the bulk of the congregation in the singing of the long-metre melodies he appeared to favor.

The Caretaker was another interesting official to the country boy, for he had enviable foresight into which dogs had thoroughbred training on oatmeal. Pity the caretaker could not have exercised his remarkaible, powers of discrimination upon church members then and since, for he might have prevented many a church squabble. Taking up the collection was a fearsome ceremony. A long pole, at the end of which dangled a bag looking like a weatherbeaten wasps nest, was passed along the length of the pew, lifted over the heads of the worshippers to those in the next pew, and hauled back again to the aisle. The lady at the far end had to bow her head, in prayer perhaps, to save her bonnet being knocked off, and those across the aisle had to be on the alert to avoid being punched in the eye, by the end of the pole on its return trip.

Church-going was a sort of community reunion in those days, for everyone from babe’to grandsire helped to make “a great turn-oot on the Sawbbath.” Singly or in groups, from far and near they came, on foot, on horseback, and in wagon loads. With other gaping rustics ranged around I was filled with wonder and admiration by the appearance at church that day of a double-buggy — shining varnished (body, polished hub-caps, soup-ladle steps to the seats, real silver-mounted buggy harness on the prancing horses, and everything. Be-whiskered elders’ heads wagged- in grieved disapproval of such a display of finery at a place of worship; but I wonder what those saintly elders would have done if per of to-day had a daring flapper swept up to the church door in her limousine with her shapely silk-stockinged limbs draped gracefully over the windshield? Probably some think like what they did do at the advent of the double-buggy; retire to the privacy of the vestry to soothe their jangled nerves with a “wee drappie,” and to ponder over the vanity of human life and what the world is coming to.

But the old graveyard is neglected and overgrown, the church has vanished in smoke, even the “wee-drappie” is gone and little now is left to remind us of the seriousness in churchgoers in the old good old days save possibly the odor of sanctity of the smoke that may mingle arising from the ashes of the members of the old church.

On the last day of December in 1894 on Saturday afternoon Mr. and Mrs. Graham Forgie that lived on the 11th line of Ramsay, were driving home from Almonte. The team became unmanageable as they began their journey and finally ran away when they were on the outskirts of the town.

During the latter half of the 1800s, Ontario roads were in a serious state of neglect and deterioration. Historians call this the “dark age of the road” where roads were being uploaded and downloaded among levels of government. Roads were opened, roads were abandoned. But this would begin to change in the 1890s—when the first automobiles appeared

Mr. and Mrs. Forgie were thrown out of the buggy on a fence. Mr. Forgie escaped with a few bruises, but Mrs. Forgie was injured badly. Her breast bone and several ribs were fractured, and she was unconscious for some time. She is still in a serious state, and suffers so much that the poor woman was kept almost constantly under the influence of morphine. Dr. Hanley, who is attending Mrs. Forgie, says she is seriously injured, but is doing as well as could be expected They were also members of the The Ramsay Free Church and the congregation is praying for her.

The Ramsay Free Church continued to use this church until others were built in Clayton-the Presbyterian Church bought 2 1/2 acres of E Lot 15 Con 7 in 1840 and they sold it in 1867.

Rose Mary SarsfieldIt was a Free Church which was a breakaway group from the Church of Scotland (Auld Kirk) Presbyterians. The picture at the top is a painting done by Robert Tait McKenzie. His father Rev. Wm. McKenzie was an early minister in the Free Church. It was on the right hand side going to Carleton Place across the Wolf Grove road from the Auld Kirk.

Related reading

More About Churches and Things Part 2

So What is in St. Andrew’s Foundation?

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So What is in St. Andrew’s Foundation?
Robert McDonald
May 16 at 3:09 PM  · 

From today’s walk along Bridge St


June 24 1887 Almonte Gazette.

Rev. Dr. Grant, accompanied by Rev. D. McDonald, M.A., and Robt. Bell, Esq., descended from the St. Andrew’s to the platform prepared for them, and under a perfect torrent of rain, which scattered a number of people to places of shelter, proceeded to the important ceremony.

Mr. Bell laid in the cavity of the foundation stone a glass jar, in which was the programme of laying the stone, & list of the church officers, historical sketch of the church, the copper and silver coins of the Dominion, Canadian postage stamps of every denomination, the Canadian Almanac, and copies of newspapers. The jar had been corked, sealed with, wax, then covered with lead and fastened with wire; it is guaranteed to last for 500 years. The jar was wrapped in paper, the crevices filled with mortar, ‘and the large stone placed over it by the contractors, Messrs. W. & G. Willoughby, the Rev. Principal also having his hand in the work. The stone being placed, a short blessing was asked, and the people rushed to Zion church out of the pelting rain, where addresses were delivered.

Interior of St. Andrew’s Church, Carleton Place, Lanark County, Ontario

UNKNOWN PHOTOGRAPHERhttps://atticbooks.ca/products/125050

Hi Linda. I was going through some old pictures and thought you might like this one. I may have sent it to you before? I had been reading your article about the history of the e church . My grandmother, Eliza McRostie, is in the back row on the right. Unfortunately, I don’t have names for anyone else.Joan Halpenny.

Donna Sweeney LowryIt looks very much like the hall in St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, before there were removable partitions put up to divide the space into classrooms. And those are the dishes St.Andrews used.

Gloria Rattray WilsonLooks like St. Andrews Presbyterian church hall and the dishes look familiar

Just because I can… LLOLOL he is also one of the hearts and souls of St. Andrews– Pappy! who is Ken Hastie

Related reading

The Ladies of St. Andrews

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

For the Love of St. Andrew’s– 130th Anniversary

Almonte’s Methodist Christmas 1893

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Almonte’s Methodist Christmas 1893
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Dec 1893, Wed  •  Page 1

More About Churches and Things Part 2

The Unbelievable History of the Cameronian Church

More Notations of Christ Church Ashton

The Church On the Hill in the Middle of Hood

Everything You Wanted to Know About Auld Kirk

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Maberly Girl Lives For Five Years Without Church

St. Andrew’s United Church


Clayton United Church Quilt Fran Cooper

And They Kept Singing in Church While it was on Fire

In Memory of David Scharf — Almonte United Church Tragedy

The Almonte Fire 1955– Almonte United Church

St. Peter’s Celestine Church Pakenham

PAKENHAM PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1897– $338.50 on the Cornerstone?

Did You Know the Ashton Anglican Church Dates Back to 1845?

Lanark’s First Church in the Middle of the Forest

At Church on Sunday Morning From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

The Remains of the Bethel Methodist Church

For the Love of St. Andrew’s– 130th Anniversary

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Drummond Centre United Church — and The Ireton Brothers 38 Year Reunion–Names Names Names

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

St. Augustine’s Church and Christ Church

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

The Unbelievable History of the Cameronian Church

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The Unbelievable History of the Cameronian Church
Photo is from Almonte.com —Bay Hill towards cameronian church
The township’s Reformed or Cameronian Presbyterians moved their place of services in about 1867 to the former Canadian Presbyterian church on the Eighth Line, later building their present church facing the Mississippi’s Almonte bay–

A stranger coming into Almonte from the junction of Highways 29 and 44. 33 miles from Ottawa, it very likely to ask the first person he meets this question: “Say, what Is that quaint little church we pass halfway down the hill on the right-hand side of the road coming into town?”

The man at the gas pump or the waitress in the restaurant will tell him “That’s the Cameronian Church and it’s the only one in Canada.” This is a startling statement and the stranger cannot be blamed if he takes it with a grain of salt. Not now, but in less than a generation hence it could indeed be absolutely true which is a hard thing for any Christian willingly to want to prophesy.

The history, of this church is a story of the almost unbelievable , rectitude, integrity- sad-courage of a small group of God-fearing people. But the stranger will get very little information more than the accommodating waitress gave him, unless by chance he happened to meet a member of the congregation.

Perhaps some citizen who wished to appear very knowledgable might inform him:

They have no music in their church service and I mean no instrumental music, like piano or organ they just Sing the Psalms, no hymns. Strictly they’re Covenanters. I think- that’s it. The stranger is impressed and makes a mental note to tell the folks back home. This pretty church on the ‘ hillside which has always been known as the Cameronian Church by the people in Almonte is a Reformed Presbyterian-Church and the correct designation Is the Almonte Congregation of the Reformed Presbyterian Church–and in spite of popular opinion, it is not the only Reformed Presbyterian Church in Canada– not quite. But there is only one other.

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Lochiel Reformed Presbyterian Church - Brodie, Ontario, Canada -  Presbyterian Churches on Waymarking.com

It is at Lochiel, a crossroads near the village of Glen Sandfield in Glengarry County. True, there are a couple of mission stations in the Maritimesand there used to be a church in Toronto and one in Winnpeg but they no longer function as distinct congregations. As the congregation at Lochiel is considerably smaller than that at Almonte, it Is quite possible that some years away the statement that the Almonte Cameronian Church is the only one in Canada could indeed be true.

However, there is no question about it being the only Reformed Presbyterian , Church in Canada called the Cameronian Church. There are Reformed Presbyterian Churches in scattered regions of the United States, but none of them is known as Cameronian. Nor is its sister church at Lochiel in Canada known by any other name than Reformed Presbyterian.

In fact the present minister of the Church Rev. Robert More, Jr., who has done extensive research, on the Reformed Presbyterian Church In North . America, and has recently done the script for a film on the history’of the Church says this church is the only one in North America properly designated as Cameronian.

Why are the Almonte Covenanters or Reformed Presbyterians called Cameronians? It is a carry-over from the early Scotch Presbyterian settlement’ in the Ottawa Valley. It was simply that their neighbours persisted in calling these ever-faithful adherents to the Church of their fathers by the name Cameronian– and for a very good reason, too.

Most of the settlers belonged to the Church of Scotland or to a Secession Church, but there were a few faithful in the hills and glens of Scotland. Attendance at the Established Church was obligatory under heavy penalties enforced by magistrates, and dissenting Covenanter preachers were obliged to hold their services (conventicles) in the wilds.

One of these preachers was a man named Richard Cameron. A squad of Government soldiers hunted Richard Cameron’s small band of Dissenters through the wild country of Dumfries and Ayr and finally caught up with them. The small group of worshippers were poorly armed and outnumbered, but being Scots, they resolved to fight.

They fought desperately but were overpowered by numbers; the members of the little group were either killed or taken prisoner. Richard Cameron and his brother Michael died fighting. The head and hands of Richard were cut off, taken to Edinburgh fixed to the Netherbow Port with the hands stretched out in the attitude of prayer.

In those days they were thorough in such grisly undertakings. “There,” said one of the soldiers, pointing tip at the head, “There’s the head and hands that lived praying and preaching, and died praying and fighting.

It is now nearly 370 years since Richard Cameron was slain in that brief but desperate-encounter. Yet today his name lives in Almonte when the descendants of the early Scottish settlers still refer to that small church, known as the Cameronian Church. So, whether we call these faithful people Reformed Presbyterians, Covenanters or Cameronians, their Church is certainly one unique in Canada.

In Carleton Place there were two Presbyterian Church buildings, both on William Street. That of the Cameronian Reformed Presbyterians had been built in the 1840’s. Construction of the stone church building which remains at the corner of St. Paul Street, facing the park of the old Commons, had been started in the 1840’s after the Disruption. It had been completed but lack of agreement had prevented it from being occupied. It was being used by Robert Bell for the lowly purpose of storing hay. Now it was renovated and fitted as the first St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church of Carleton Place, for the part of the Seventh Line Church of Scotland congregation living at and near the village.

The Cameronians

The Deachman Brothers Revivals of Lanark County

NOW

Welcome to Hillside Church

For almost 175 years, God has preserved our ministry here on the side of Bayhill in Almonte, Ontario. Generations of men and women have given their lives to celebrate and extend the Gospel of Jesus Christ in this beautiful church family. We consider it a privilege to build on that inheritance in this gospel – hope that is transforming us and our community. We strive to be ‘Christ-Centered and People-Focused’ in our calling here in Lanark County. We hope this website brings you a clearer sense of who we are, but to be honest, it would be best to discover us in person. We’re so glad you found us and welcome the chance to meet. CLICK

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he Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 Mar 1930, Sat  •  Page 32

More Notations of Christ Church Ashton

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More Notations of Christ Church Ashton
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Mar 1995, Sun  •  Page 24

From Homestead to suburb Church services in Ashton began five years before there was a church. While the Irish settlers were busy clearing the land and establishing homesteads,” services were held in a house. In 1845, the pioneers began to build a place of worship, cutting stone from the nearby Jock River and hauling it by ox cart. But by the turn of the century, extensive repairs were needed. The community decided to build a new church nearby. It was completed in 1915 at a cost of $5,000. The old church, visible here in the background, is now boarded up, though exterior restoration will be completed this year for 150th anniversary celebrations. 1995.

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Former Christ Church  Ashton
 
Jim Amy Kirkpatrick The first Christ Church Ashton was built in 1845 and in use until 1915. The south wall was built using ‘scrap’ stone so that the north wall (facing the road) would be built using good stone. John Bobier, stonemason, and John Shore, carpenter, were responsible for the construction..





Ted Hurdis Our confirmation class from St James had our first communion at the Ashton Anglican church.

Memories of Ashton Station Road –Ashton Feed Mill –Jennifer Fenwick Irwin Photos

  1. Wind Storm in Ashton- Heath Ridge Farms 1976 
  2. Dust on the Wind –Ashton Social Notes 1887-1897 Names Names Names
  3. Another Lanark County “Murdoch Mystery” –Elfreda Drummond of Ashton
  4. When Trains Crash —Ashton Train Accident 1950
  5. Mrs Crigger’s House in Ashton?

Memories of Ashton Station Road –Ashton Feed Mill –Jennifer Fenwick Irwin Photos

  1. Wind Storm in Ashton- Heath Ridge Farms 1976 
  2. Dust on the Wind –Ashton Social Notes 1887-1897 Names Names Names
  3. Another Lanark County “Murdoch Mystery” –Elfreda Drummond of Ashton
  4. When Trains Crash —Ashton Train Accident 1950
  5. Mrs Crigger’s House in Ashton?
  6. The Ashton Hotel– Questions Questions Flemmings and McFarlanes
  7. McFarlanes –Stewart’s Fire– and Other Things in Ashton
  8. Somewhere in Ashton-The Ashton Curmudgeon
  9. The Ashton Funeral to end all Funerals
  10. Did Anyone Ever Have Fun in Ashton?
  11. Ashton 101
  12. Did Anyone Have Fun in Ashton? Part 2- The Fleming House 
  13. How to Catch a Pigeon in Ashton
  14. The Ashton Carleton Place Car Theft Ring
  15. Did Samuel Pittard of Ashton Murder His Wife?
  16. Good Old Lanark County Music–From the 70s to now
  17. The John Shore House
  18. Jenkins: Ashton’s log and mortar-chinked history meets modern times

HOW CHRISTIE STREET GOT ITS NAME by Chris Redmond

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HOW CHRISTIE STREET GOT ITS NAME by Chris Redmond

 

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HOW CHRISTIE STREET GOT ITS NAME

 

by Chris Redmond

 

The street that connects Coleman Street to the new subdivision near Walmart has a name now: Christie Street, in honour of a young man who played an unusual role in the history of Carleton Place before he died in battle in 1917.

 

He was John H. H. (for Hatchell Halliday) Christie, who came to the town, and to Canada, to be a student minister at the Methodist Church on Franklin Street (what’s now Zion-Memorial United Church). He was born in Ireland, in a village called Glenavy in County Antrim, and interrupted his studies to cross the ocean to help meet an urgent need.

 

JHHChristie

It was a difficult time for churches in Canada, with the population growing faster than the church leadership could find ministers to look after them. The problem was worst in the western provinces, and would continue until three denominations merged to create

the United Church in 1925, but the shortage hit home in Carleton Place when Dr. J. H. Sparling, the well-liked Methodist minister, died suddenly. (To be precise, he dropped dead while out on a bicycle ride.)

The best that could be arranged for a replacement was John Christie, the 23-year-old student who came over to serve as the congregation’s minister. He was quickly very popular, perhaps especially with the mothers of daughters, and he was well known

for his charming tenor voice. Someone noted that one of his favourite hymns was “When the Roll Is Called Up Yonder”. But World War I was starting, and within a year the roll call he was answering was that of the Canadian Army Medical Corps. He headed back across the Atlantic with the Canadian Expeditionary.

 

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September 1934–Memorial Park and United Church Carleton Place

 

Force; starting out as a private, he was soon a corporal, then commissioned as a lieutenant, and in early 1917 he was assigned to the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles. Within three weeks he was dead, killed near the village of Givenchy-en-Gohelle during the Battle of Vimy Ridge in April 1917.

 

Circumstances of Death Registers

 

John Christie was one of five young men from Carleton Place who never returned from Vimy. He and other fallen soldiers were remembered at a service in the Methodist Church, where the four men’s photos were displayed at the front of the sanctuary, wrapped in a Union Jack. His body was buried in La Chaudière military cemetery near Vimy.

 

Grave Marker

John Hatchell Halliday Christie
2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles Battalion
10th April 1917, aged 25.​
Plot VII. C. 2.

Son of the Rev. William John Christie and Emma Jane Halliday Christie, of Barnbidge, Ireland.


 

It took until 1918 before the Methodist church found a new minister. After the war, in the 1920s, the area near the corner of Franklin and Beckwith Streets, which had been standing empty since Carleton Place’s great fire in 1910, was developed as Memorial Park. And when the Cenotaph was put up there, one of the names engraved on it was that of the Rev. John Christie.

 

historicalnotes

 

Newspaper Clipping

Newspaper Clipping – From the Perth Courier for 4 May 1917

 

Lt. Rev. John Hatchell Halliday Christie was 25 years of age when he lost his life on the second day of the Battle at Vimy Ridge. He too is buried in a Canadian war cemetery in France.

 

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Oct 1914, Mon  •  Page 10

 - The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Oct 1914, Fri  •  Page 7

 

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

Faces of Lanark County — Trudy Hardy — Rebel with a Collar

 

St. Andrew’s United Church

Clayton United Church Quilt Fran Cooper

And They Kept Singing in Church While it was on Fire

In Memory of David Scharf — Almonte United Church Tragedy

The Almonte Fire 1955– Almonte United Church

St. Peter’s Celestine Church Pakenham

PAKENHAM PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1897– $338.50 on the Cornerstone?

Did You Know the Ashton Anglican Church Dates Back to 1845?

Lanark’s First Church in the Middle of the Forest

At Church on Sunday Morning From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

The Remains of the Bethel Methodist Church

For the Love of St. Andrew’s– 130th Anniversary

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Drummond Centre United Church — and The Ireton Brothers 38 Year Reunion–Names Names Names

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

St. Augustine’s Church and Christ Church

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

They Nearly Demolished St. Mary’s

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They Nearly Demolished St. Mary’s

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 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 Dec 1987, Tue  •  Page 8

 

St. Mary’s —Kerri Ann Campbell’s Artwork and Photos

St James and St Mary’s Christmas Bazaar 1998 -Who Do You Know?

Sir John A. MacDonald and St. Mary’s

U Can’t Touch This! St. Mary’s Basketball Team 1990