Tag Archives: cheese

Cheesemakers of Lanark County — Eastern Dairy School- Stuart McIntosh

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Cheesemakers of Lanark County — Eastern Dairy School- Stuart McIntosh




Dads cheesemaker’ class of 1925 thanks to Stuart McIntosh — “D.H. McIntosh”

Following, once again, the apparent success of a western Ontario institution, the Dominion Dairy Branch opened the Eastern Dairy School the following year through the Queen’s University’s School of Mining and Agriculture at their Kingston campus.

The long courses included: practical, laboratory-based classes in testing milk, cheese and butter making, repairing boilers, and keeping factory accounts, but also required students to attend lectures in bacteriology and chemistry.

The Eastern Dairy School stressed that “In the cheese-making department students…are encouraged to discuss matters connected with their art.

Experimentation was central to these dual goals, and the calendar for the Eastern Dairy School stressed that “In the cheese-making department” students…are encouraged to discuss matters connected with their art,  and to experiment.

The Eastern Dairy School’s program calendar stated that, “students may remain at the school as long as they wish, provided they show an interest in their work and conduct themselves in an orderly manner.

Beginning in 1911, only cheese- and buttermakers with aprofessional certificate from the Eastern Dairy School or OAC would be allowed to manage a cheese factory or creamery, unless granted a “special permit from the minister of Agriculture on the grounds of experience and competency.

CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
24 Feb 1925, Tue  •  Page 14
CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
14 Dec 1918, Sat  •  Page 25
CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
14 Dec 1918, Sat  •  Page 25

Balderson Cheese Factory — The Buchanan Scrapbook

Clippings and Words of Local Cheese Factories

Rosebank Cheese Factory

Questions on the McCreary Settlement and the IXL Cheese Factory

Say Cheese! It’s an IXL Story

The Old Union Hall Cheese Factory By Berenice McKay

Archie Guthrie’s Notes on Lanark Mines Hall’s Mills and Cheese 1993

The Cheese Souffle that Went from Balderson to Carleton Place– Little Known Fact

Some Fromage About the Hopetown Cheese Factory

Poutine Curds From the Appleton Cheese Factory?

Pakenham Cheese & Butter Factory– McCreary Blair Storey

Watson’s Corners And Vicinity 1891–Shetland Ponies and Cheese

When the Cheese Crashed Through the Floor

Balderson Cheese Factory — The Buchanan Scrapbook

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Balderson Cheese Factory — The Buchanan Scrapbook
With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..
Cheesemakers: W. Brown 1881-1887, J. Milton 1888-1891, W.D. Simes 1892-1901, E.E. Haley 1902-1904, J.M. Scott 1905-1911, T.K. Whyte 1912-1917, M. Haley 1918-1921, A. Quinn 1922-1929, G. Spencer 1930, P. Kirkham 1931-1937, J.L. Prentice 1937-1939, C.J. Bell 1939-1941, J. Somerville 1941-1942, W. Partridge 1943, C. Gallery 1944-1955, R. Lucas 1956-1958, P. George 1959-1960, O. Matte 1961-1966, Y. Leroux 1966-1974, L. Lalonde 1975-1980, N. Matte 1980.
John Closs —Lawrence Lalonde and Yves Leroux from Balderson Cheese on the outside.Young men. Andrea McCoy Centre

Mrs.James Balderson, sr., died at the family home, ninth line of Bathurst, onFriday, the 21st instant, at the age of 74 years.  She had been ill for over three months.  Deceased was born on the third concession of Bathurst, her maiden name being Mary Noonan, daughter of the late James Noonan,one of the prominent men of his day in this district.

Her marriage took place on May 26th, 1858, and had she lived a week longer, her married life would have spanned fifty-one years.  She settled with her husband on the ninth line, and there they lived for over half a century in peace and prosperity.   She is survived by her husband and the following family: James, in Bathurst; Miss Hannah, Toronto;William at home; Miss Annie, New York; Geo. Formerly of COURIER, now in San Francisco; Tom, in Bathurst; and Robert, teacher at Harper.

James and D.R. Noonan, town are brothers,and Mrs. O’Neil, Oswego, and Mrs. Lee, of Buffalo, are sisters.  Here is the first death in the family since the celebration of the golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. James Noonan last winter at which she was present.  The funeral took place on Sunday afternoon to St. John’s church, thence to the parish cemetery.

Balderson in 1905 boasted few trees along the dirt road which was the main road to Perth. In the top photo from the left: the original Balderson cheese factory erected in 1881, the Noonan Blacksmith Shop, Cowie home, Anglican Church and rectory. From the right: the Noonan home, Jone’s Store, Haley property (1962), J.M. McGregor property, J.C. McGregor barn and home. Balderson at one time was known as Clarksville.– Perth Remembered

Ralph Barrie Son of Nettie and Harry Barrie Balderson

Fame and Murder Came to Balderson in 1828

Balderson–Lanark Era–R.S. McTavish

Before and After in Balderson

Oh Woe is Emily J Publow of Balderson

Being A Charles Dobbie Groupie — Balderson Before Selfies

The Day the Balderson Telephone Co Disappeared

It’s Your Balderson News 1913

TWO HEARTS MADE ONE at Balderson Corners — Annie Findlay and “Short Jack” Mclntyre

Clippings and Words of Local Cheese Factories

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Clippings and Words of Local Cheese Factories
This is a photograph of the Rosedale Union Hall Cheese Factory, taken about 1910. Notice the old containers which held the farmer’s milk from which the popular cheese was made. At this time, horse drawn wagons were the only way of delivering and picking up products from the factory.— Read —The Old Union Hall Cheese Factory By Berenice McKay

Rising costs of production, fewer fanners shipping milk, and difficulty in hiring a cheese maker, were problems of the 50s, Some farmers quit the factory and sent their milk to the dairy in Almonte, but some continued and in 1959, president, Neil McIntosh said they thought they had done the proper thing by sticking with the factory. 

The year 1959 had been one of the best they ever had. The average test of milk was 3.5, and the cheese all scored Number One. It proved that good cheese could be made in a small factory.  In 1960, Mr and Mrs Drew had the highest scoring cheese in Ontario. Great Britain was the biggest buyer of cheese, and cheese brought 40 cents a pound in 1962, and whey butter was 45 cents a pound. 

Read Rosebank Cheese Factory

It was impossible to hire a cheesemaker in 1970 and so the Rosedale butter and cheese factory had to cease operations; and real estate and equipment were put up for sale. Mrs. Clifford and Mr.Clifford Thornton bought the new factory in 1972 and changed it into a home. 

In 1974, at the last factory meeting, it was decided to pay back the shares, and the balance would be divided among the patrons who had continued to ship milk until the factory ceased operation. The cheesemakers who made cheese in the new factory from 1947 to 1969 were Elwyn Gawlcy, one year George Affleck, four years, Bill Villeneuve, one year, Ken Jackson , one 1 year, James Drew and Mrs Drew, 10 years, Grant Cassel, one year, Ed Hollister, one year, and Carl Casselfnan, one year.

Photo from Gypsies Preachers and Big White Bears — Read-Some Fromage About the Hopetown Cheese Factory

For many years, the cheese boxes were made in Hopetown, Ontario from elm. The cheese boxes were round and had a round slip over the lid with a four-inch deep lip. They were rather slippery to handlle, unless you wore gloves. There were m any different types and ways of getting milk to the factory. The close farmers had round wheeled buggies or the large 8 gallon milk can.

Both cheese factories had living quarters up over the factory, but as it has been said by different cheesemakers, it was very, very warm. Mr. Albert Miller and family slept in a tent out in the yard all summer, the years he made cheese at the old Rosedale Union Hall cheese factory fro m 1910-1913. It was said also that one of the farmers, who got more whey than his share, had pigs and you could hear them squealing three miles away. They were called the squealing whey pigs, and he also fed them middlings mixed with the whey. They knew when feeding time was.

Many of the cheesemakers boarded at Mr.John Dunlop’s in the earlier years. There were many cheese factories just within a few miles of each other. Boyd’s Settlement, Clayton, Tommy Barr’s at the 8th line of Lanark, Hopetown, The IXL, “ Mississippi P ride,” (was named after a young lad y), and Fairplay.There was a fire at the Boyd Settlement cheese factory a few years ago, and Elvin McKay was asked if he would clean up the mess with the bulldozer. He went down, but what he saw he didn’t like, and changed his mind.

Some of the people that were there were sick at the look and smell of all that gooey, stringy melted and burnt and half burnt cheese, well, it was enough to make anyone sick. Some of it looked like yellow grease, about 36 inches deep. It was an impossibility to clean it up with a bulldozer. Don Gibson shoved the gooey mess o ff the cement the best he could pick it up by bucket from the tractor. It was loaded into manure spreaders, and wagons until days, and there were tons of melted cheese.

Another view of the Union Hall Cheese Factory, taken around 1910. Shown In the foreground from left to right are Charlie Dunlap, manager of the Belmonte Hotel In Almonte, Jim Somerville, Matt Somerville’s father and Albert Miller.

read-Questions on the McCreary Settlement and the IXL Cheese Factory

Did you Know Mother Goose Came from Blakeney and Union Hall ?

The Union Hall Knitter — John Morrow

Sparks are Flying at Union Hall

Some Fromage About the Hopetown Cheese Factory

Poutine Curds From the Appleton Cheese Factory?

Pakenham Cheese & Butter Factory– McCreary Blair Storey

Watson’s Corners And Vicinity 1891–Shetland Ponies and Cheese

When the Cheese Crashed Through the Floor

Say Cheese! It’s an IXL Story

FOR THE SUNDAY DRIVER 1990 — Then and Now

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FOR THE SUNDAY DRIVER 1990 — Then and Now

This was written in 1990. Somethings have changed, some things have not. I thought because a nice weekend is predicted that I would publish this old 1990 tourist blog.

Today’s drive takes you to four small villages founded at the turn of the century: Plum Hollow, Athens, Delta and Forfar. About a 90-minute drive south of Ottawa, you can purchase locally-made cheeses and candy, discover the history of the area through the Delta Mill Museum and admire the murals of Athens.

1971-The old cheese maker of Plum Hollow; Claude Flood; 73; warns the end of small cheese factories will mean the end to first-quality Canadian cheddar. Ontario’s small cheese factories are being strangled into extinction by new regulations and dwindling milk supplies.

First stop is Plum Hollow, where Blackland’s Country Candy factory is situated in a century-old building that used to house the Plum Hollow Cheese Factory. It’s open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and while you can still purchase locally-made cheese there, you will also find a tempting assortment of fudge, hard candies, jams and jellies and elegant filled chocolates. Colored wicker baskets and flower-printed boxes can be made into a gift hamper, filled with items from the shop. Choose your favorite of 16 flavors of hard ice-cream.

The Witch of Plum Hollow’s home– if you click here there are about 15 stories about the witch of Plum Hollow

The Plum Hollow Witch 101 – Mother Barnes

To get to Plum Hollow, take Hwy. 7 southwest. At Carleton Place, join up with Hwy. 15 which heads south through Smiths Falls. Connect with Hwy. 29 as you leave Smiths Falls and drive 36 kilometres south to Toledo. Veer to the ET3 right down Road 8, and turn left down Road 5 after Bellamy’s Mills. Another eight km will take you to Plum Hollow.

Athens

Athens

The village of Athens, farther south, has become famous in recent years for its historical murals painted on the sides of shops. Scenes take you back to a summer band concert and a picnic at the turn of the century and the working life of the community. Look for the likeness of “Duke,” the resident German shepherd, at the bottom corner of the lumber mill scene on the H & R feed store.

To get to Athens from Plum Hollow, drive south down Road 5 for eight km. Park on the main street and wander the sidewalks to view the murals. Before you continue your trip, take a few minutes to walk along the side streets of Athens. There are many beautifully kept old buildings, some of which are represented in the murals. Head south to Church Street and wander through the cemetery. Many of the moss-encrusted stones date back to the early 1800s and provide a glimpse into the hardships and events that ruled the lives of the people of the area.

House of Industry Athens Farmersville

Monument erected to honour 400 buried in unmarked grave

Farmersville 1859 County Directory (Athens)

Head north from Main at the Pro Hardware store. Next stop is the village of Delta, one of the earliest settlements in the township. From Athens, take Hwy. 42 west for 15 km. Delta is home to the oldest mill in Ontario, a beautifully preserved grist mill that’s the subject of many Keirsted paintings.

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In the early 1800s this mill was thought to be the best building of its kind in Upper Canada and today the Delta Mill Society is working to restore the building to working order. You can visit the mill for free between 10 and 5; displays of equipment in the ground-floor museum depict the history and operations of the mill and its patrons. You can purchase note-card photographs of the building at the gift counter. Now continue on to Forfar, 10 km west along Hwy. 42.

No Drinking in Delta! Did You Know this About Delta?

FORFAR

Heather HeinsRideau Lakes Community Forum

Sunflower Bakery in Perth has moved to forfar . We bought some amazing multigrain bread and fresh buns , pies , brownies etc all made there . also a huge selection of variety of cheeses which we bought 4 varieties , and tons of other great items other stores do not carry . They also make fresh sandwiches , soup and have an ice cream counter . Open 7 days a week . Fresh baking is a huge plus for the area

Forfar Dairy

The Forfar Dairy (open today from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.) is on the left as the highway veers west through the village. Here you can purchase Cheddar, which is aged up to four years, as well as whey, cream and various butters. The shop also sells flavored teas and mustards, cloth bags of dressing and muffin mixes as well as hard candy and honey. Next door, the Forfar Dairy gift shop is open from 10 until 5.

Town draws crowds for curds By Doug McCann Visitors can always tell when it is 1 p.m. in the tiny village of Forfar. A small crowd of cheese fanciers gathers in the entrance of the Forfar Cheese Factory, eager to buy those first bags of fresh curds. There are usually lots of curds left by 2 or 3 p.m., but somehow I p.m. is the magic hour for true curd connoisseurs. This hamlet of perhaps 40 people has been put on the map by its cheese factory. The factory’s motto is, “The Cheese that made Leeds County famous” in reference to its winning several prizes for Cheddar throughout the years. Dave Dean, the factory’s master cheesemaker in residence, has made Cheddar cheese for 40 years, 12 of them at Forfar. In recent years, the factory began producing flavored ‘pop’ cheeses like garlic and caraway seed, which are excellent. But, to get a better idea of what this little factory stands for, try its Cheddar: It’s some of the best in the world. For a special treat, buy a wedge of four-year-old rare Cheddar. It costs a bit more but is well worth the extra price. The factory does not provide tours of its facility, but you can peer through the viewing window and watch the various stages of cheese-making. You might meet one of the cheese-makers if they have time, but don’t count on it since the staff keeps busy producing about 1,000 pounds of cheese per day. The Forfar factory’s cheese prices are often less than those of the large food stores. The cheese curd, is $1.95 per pound while other cheeses range from about $2.00 to (5.00 per pound, depending on age. To get to Forfar, drive past Smiths Falls and Portland on Highway 15 until you reach Crosby, about GO miles from Ottawa. Then, make a sharp left onto Highway 42 and drive about three miles until you reach Forfar.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa JournalOttawa, Ontario, Canada02 Aug 1980, Sat  •  Page 128

Faecbook page

Forfar Cheese Factory

NOw-1536 County Rd 42 Elgin, ON, Canada

Some time ago I posted the photo of my grandfather, Clayton Coon, coming back to the Young’s HIll farm. He had taken milk to the Forfar Cheese factory and was returning with the milk cans loaded with whey for the pigs. That’s the photo on the right, which I have re-posted. The photo on the left mother took (1928), probably to showcase the flowering trees but, more importantly, if you look to the lower left you can see those same milk cans stored ourside to dry. I am always curious about how they did things–Roger Irwin

Stagecoach Restaurant

Newboro

If you’re ready for a meal, continue about 10 km west along Hwy. 42 to the village of Newboro and the Stagecoach Restaurant. It serves brunch from 11 until 2 and is open for other meals until 9 p.m. You can return home through the scenic village of Westport, then up County Road 10 to Perth, or retrace Newboro Dennis Leung, Citizen your route back to Hwy. 15. Many readers have given us tips about this lovely area.

For a current up to date tourist information click below

The Backroads to Delta, Plum Hollow and Athens

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1995 fire Plum Hollow Cheese

They actually hadn’t produced any cheese there since the early ’80s, probably strong armed out of business along with other small producers by the likes of Kraft or Parmalat, an interesting story in itself.

Since then it functioned as a candy shop, and an antique shop but that’s the limit of my memory. The loss is a historical one for the area, one less monument to a time when a small producer could thrive along with the surrounding farms, etc.

It was a very picturesque factory located on a hill. Approaching eastbound on the road it pops into view across a golden meadow, approaching westbound it springs into view at a sharp curve in the road, the golden meadow stretching out behind it.

Plum Hollow

Begin hereThe Plum Hollow Witch 101 – Mother Barnes

Rosebank Cheese Factory

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Rosebank Cheese Factory
ROSEBANK CHEESE FACTORY

June 3, 1893

Mr. Walroth, of Maberly, is in charge of the new cheese factory established this season at Rosebank. The inspector has pronounced the factory first-class in every respect. The farmers who promoted and carried through this enterprise so successfully are deserving of great praise ; but they will doubtless receive a more financial reward in the future.

Ramsay Township. 

Appleton J. B. Wylie Almonte. 

Clayton J. Drummond, Sec Clayton. . 

tl.X.L H. McCreary, Sec McCreary. 

Mississippi Pride J. B. W T ylie Almonte. 

Rosebank J. B. Wylie Almonte. 

Rosedale J. B. Wylie Almonte. 

Sherbrooke N. and S. Township. 

Fall River Mrs. Jno. Palmer, Sec Maberly. 

Lake View Miss L. Norris, Sec Althorpe. 

Maberly W. Walroth Maberly. 
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 May 1946, Sat  •  Page 6
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The Windsor Star
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
27 Jan 1923, Sat  •  Page 26
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CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Oct 1945, Sat  •  Page 3

Questions on the McCreary Settlement and the IXL Cheese Factory

Say Cheese! It’s an IXL Story

The Old Union Hall Cheese Factory By Berenice McKay

Some Fromage About the Hopetown Cheese Factory

Poutine Curds From the Appleton Cheese Factory?

Pakenham Cheese & Butter Factory– McCreary Blair Storey

Watson’s Corners And Vicinity 1891–Shetland Ponies and Cheese

When the Cheese Crashed Through the Floor

The Old Union Hall Cheese Factory By Berenice McKay

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The Old Union Hall Cheese Factory  By Berenice McKay

 

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This is a photograph of the Rosedale Union Hall Cheese Factory, taken about 1910. Notice the old containers which held the farmer’s milk from which the popular cheese was made. At this time, horse drawn wagons were the only way of delivering and picking up products from the factory.

A bygone era.

Editor’s Note:

Many area residents have undoubtedly heard of the old Union Hall Cheese Factory in Ramsay Township. A landmark at one time, it was well known throughout Eastern Ontario as a source of some of the most delicious cheese manufactured anywhere. Mrs. Berneice E. McKay did extensive research on the cheese factory, wrote this history of it, which will run in segments in succeeding weeks.

By, Berenice McKay.

One of Mr. John Dunlop’s accomplishments, was the building of the first cheese factory on his property in the year 1873, on the east half of lot 16 on the 1st concession of Ramsay Township.

This replaced the old milk pans, by which cheesemakers would leave milk overnight in a pan, the cream would rise to the top when cold and it would be skimmed off into a crock, when enough cream was saved to the acquired amount for the old dash churn.

Those old dash churns were a large crock about 10 to 12 inches in diameter and about 24 to 30 inches high. The also had a heavy crockery lid with a hole in the middle, and there was a long broom-like handle. On the bottom there was nailed a cross-piece a little smaller than the inside of the churn. This was made of a special wood; “white birds eye maple.” If it wasn’t it would taint the butter.

Sometimes a worker would dash away, “up and down” and keep turning the dash piece of wood. Sometimes it would take hours before the butter would break and you would know by the sound of the dashing or cream. Then the milk would separate from the butter and that, of course, was buttermilk, which some people really like. If the cream was sour, the butter was made faster. If the cream was sweet it took much longer.

In 1874 on June 4 cheese was first made in the district, and twice a day the farmers drew their milk from their cows to it vats.

During the 1874 and later, when the cheese was being made at the Rosedale Union Hall Cheese Factory, Andrew Stevenson would load a wagon up with 25 or 30 boxes of cheese, and head for Pembroke with a team of horses. At this time the building of the railroad was in full swing and camps were set up in different places.

Cheese sold from seven cents to eight cents a pound and some of the places where he stopped they bought 10 boxes of cheese from the wagon. The best place to store it was in a trench in the ground and covered over with earth; it kept quite well. One bachelor cooked everything in the fireplace and baked beans in the sand. His name was Herb Bolton and lived about a mile from Albert Miller’s. Oh the smell of that fresh bread really made one hungry.

The first factor was a picturesque three-story building with a cottage roof, and a balcony above which were four windows. (No one has pictures of this building at this time.) They were burned at the time of Wm. Dunlop’s fire.

The cheese was hoisted to the third storey and kept there until fall. The cheese had to be turned every day to be kept from molding. One 75-pound cheese fell to the floor and it just exploded when, in the fall, they were loading up to take to sell.

There was only one piece of machinery and that was the machine, that chopped the curd. Everything else was done by hand. Each cheese was pressed alone, and they weighed only 75 pounds each.

The water supply came from a spring on the Dunlop property, and was piped down to the cheese factory by the use of tamarack poles five to six inch in diameter and about 20 feet long. They were bored by a steel auger and were driven by horse power, from one end to the other of these tamarack poles. They were put together with space piping. A blacksmith made the ring to seal each joint, and it was a distance of about two hundred yards north.

In the autumn the cheese was shipped to markets. Now, the cheese is turned every day and shipped every week when they are eight days old.

Later Mr. Everett went into partnership with Mr. Dunlop and together they made repairs. They removed the top storey, which was then Mr. Wm. Dunlop’s garage (now Mr. Norman Dunlop’s garage, his son’s).

They installed steam pipes and put in a new plank floor. They had a steam pump to pump the whey into the tank outside. A new vat and boiler were installed in 1888. A few years later the cement floor and steel roof were added. The steel roof still remains on the building but is rusted somewhat.

The first cheese was very soft as it was heat-cured. However, there have been great improvements made since those days.

Mr. Albert Graham Miller was interested in learning how to make cheese, and he went to work at the cheese factory in 1901. He was 15 or 16 years old, but it was John B. Wylie who owned it then, but Jack Hitchcock was cheesemaker and he worked under his supervision.

Mr. Albert Graham Miller is still living and is a patient in the Almonte Hospital. He is blind, but what a fantastic memory. He’s in his late 90s and was married to the late May Anderson from Middleville, Ont. and they had three sons. He made cheese for 44 years in various cheese factories.

In 1927 John B. Wylie sold the Union Hall or Rosedale Cheese Factory to Producers Dairy. In 1936, Alec Moses, cheesemaker, then won the John Echlin Cup for the most amount of cheese sold on the Perth Board in Lanark County. “The Echlin Cup was donated by Mr. Echlin the cheese inspector”.

In 1949 George Affleck, who now lives in Clayton, came very close to winning the Echlin Cup for the highest average score in Lanark county.

In later years the tamarack poles were replaced with galvanized piping, but the spring water still ran into a tank in front of the cheese factory for many many years. Winter and summer, the farmers watered their horses there.

Mr. Archie Robertson, who lived across the road, got their drinking water there, and also Mr. Roy Robertson his son. They never had a well, just a cistern and pump in the house for the needs of water other than drinking.

In 1933, a well was drilled at the factory. There was also a lean-too at the north end of the factory where they put in ice.

The whey tank was on the south side of a corner of the factory and was sunk into the ground three or four feet deep.

The cheese boxes were made at Bill Nichols in Carleton Place and cost 10 cents each in 1910-1913. They had a huge basket rack and a team of horses would bring a load of 400 cheese boxes at once to the Rosedale Union Hall Cheese Factory.

Many cheese makers served the community in the years from 1874 to 1969. Among them were Mr. Breen, Deacon and Stevenson, Yates, Hitchcock (1874-1909), Albert Miller (1910-1913), King and Drynan, 1940s; Wylie, Weedmark, Lanctot, Sauve, Mrs. Haskins, 1924-1931, Alec Moses, 1931-1946, Orland Moses, Harry McIntosh, Dave McIntosh.

In 1928, there were 41 patrons at Rosedale Union Hall Cheese Factory. The number of cows totaled 410. The average selling price for cheese was 21.2 cents per pound and the average price for whey butter was 36 cents a pound.

The depression years brought hard times and in 1932 cheese sold for 9.49 cents a pound and whey butter for 10.22 cents a pound. Gradually during the thirties production and prices increased. In 1943, there were 55 patrons sending their milk to the factory.

In 1946 the patrons of Rosedale bought the factory from Producers Dairy at the cost of $2,350.

As this old cheese factory was built in 1947 by the farmers of Union Hall district.

It was agreed to sell 35 shares at $100 each, a share to the patrons of the factory.

All profits or surplus after ordinary depreciation and expenses was to be credited to a reserve fund for a new building. Roy Robertson gave the acre of land, as his share, and the patrons were also asked to give gratis six days labour of eight hours a day. The Hydro never came until 1948 to Union Hall.

In 1949 George Affleck agreed to make cheese, Sundays included, for $1 per customer for 92 score cheese, 10 percent of bonuses on 93 and 94 score cheese and eight cents per pound for manufacturing butter.

Wood was tendered for each year. In 1950, 100 cords of wood was purchased. It cost from $6.50 and $9 per cord delivered.

Rosedale Union Hall Cheese Factory operated about 30 weeks out of the year. Usually beginning the latter part of April and closing in mid November.

 

 

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 - The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Sep 1942, Sat  •  Page 31

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LIPPED FROM

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Dec 1968, Wed  •  Page 59

 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Dec 1939, Sat  •  Page 5

 

Did you Know Mother Goose Came from Blakeney and Union Hall ?

The Union Hall Knitter — John Morrow

Sparks are Flying at Union Hall

 

Some Fromage About the Hopetown Cheese Factory

Poutine Curds From the Appleton Cheese Factory?

Pakenham Cheese & Butter Factory– McCreary Blair Storey

Watson’s Corners And Vicinity 1891–Shetland Ponies and Cheese

When the Cheese Crashed Through the Floor

Say Cheese! It’s an IXL Story

The Cheese Souffle that Went from Balderson to Carleton Place– Little Known Fact

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The Cheese Souffle that  Went from Balderson to Carleton Place– Little Known Fact

The Balderson Cheese Factory dates back to 1881 and was named after the village of Balderson which was originally founded by Sergeant John Balderson of the British Army. This company was created by fifty one milk shippers who collectively decided to form a dairy co-operative and build their own cheese factory which would provide them with a reliable and local market for their milk.

The Balderson Corner’s cheese factory grew in popularity and prospered over the next decate. In 1892-93 it was one of twelve local factories that was selected to contribute in the making of the Mammoth Cheese which was Canada’s unique dairy display at the Chicago World’s Fair. The company’s development continued without any major setbacks until in 1928 the factory was destroyed by fire. Fortunately the determination of the shareholders did not falter and rebuilding started immediately. No word if Carleton Place had cheese for life after that incident.

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Cheesemakers: W. Brown 1881-1887, J. Milton 1888-1891, W.D. Simes 1892-1901, E.E. Haley 1902-1904, J.M. Scott 1905-1911, T.K. Whyte 1912-1917, M. Haley 1918-1921, A. Quinn 1922-1929, G. Spencer 1930, P. Kirkham 1931-1937, J.L. Prentice 1937-1939, C.J. Bell 1939-1941, J. Somerville 1941-1942, W. Partridge 1943, C. Gallery 1944-1955, R. Lucas 1956-1958, P. George 1959-1960, O. Matte 1961-1966, Y. Leroux 1966-1974, L. Lalonde 1975-1980, N. Matte 1980.

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1954 Balderson Cheese Factory

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John Closs Lawrence Lalonde and Yves Leroux from Balderson Cheese on the outside.Young men. Andrea McCoy Centre

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Prentice family at Balderson Cheese Factory, about 1942

Mrs.James Balderson, sr., died at the family home, ninth line of Bathurst, onFriday, the 21st instant, at the age of 74 years.  She had been ill for over three months.  Deceased was born on the third concession of Bathurst, her maiden name being Mary Noonan, daughter of the late James Noonan,one of the prominent men of his day in this district.

Her marriage took place on May 26th, 1858, and had she lived a week longer, her married life would have spanned fifty-one years.  She settled with her husband on the ninth line, and there they lived for over half a century in peace and prosperity.   She is survived by her husband and the following family: James, in Bathurst; Miss Hannah, Toronto;William at home; Miss Annie, New York; Geo. Formerly of COURIER, now in San Francisco; Tom, in Bathurst; and Robert, teacher at Harper.

James and D.R. Noonan, town are brothers,and Mrs. O’Neil, Oswego, and Mrs. Lee, of Buffalo, are sisters.  Here is the first death in the family since the celebration of the golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. James Noonan last winter at which she was present.  The funeral took place on Sunday afternoon to St. John’s church, thence to the parish cemetery. (28 May 1909 pg 4)

Balderson in 1905 boasted few trees along the dirt road which was the main road to Perth. In the top photo from the left: the original Balderson cheese factory erected in 1881, the Noonan Blacksmith Shop, Cowie home, Anglican Church and rectory. From the right: the Noonan home, Jone’s Store, Haley property (1962), J.M. McGregor property, J.C. McGregor barn and home. Balderson at one time was known as Clarksville.– Perth Remembered

relatedreading

When the Cheese Crashed Through the Floor

Fame and Murder Came to Balderson in 1828

Balderson–Lanark Era–R.S. McTavish

Before and After in Balderson

Oh Woe is Emily J Publow of Balderson

Being A Charles Dobbie Groupie — Balderson Before Selfies

The Day the Balderson Telephone Co Disappeared

It’s Your Balderson News 1913

Pakenham Cheese & Butter Factory– McCreary Blair Storey

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Pakenham Cheese & Butter Factory– McCreary Blair Storey

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PAKENHAM

A vïllage on the C P R , in Pakenham Township, Lanark County, Ontario 30 miles east of Perth, the county seat, and 9 miles north of Almonte, the nearest bank location. It has Anglican, Catholic, Methodist and Presbyterian churches and a public school.

Telegraph G N W and C P R. Telephone connection. Exp, Dom.
Pop, 600.

H H Dickson, Postmaster

Businesses:

Baxter M J Miss, dressmaker
Burrows J F, blacksmith
Christnlann L O, jeweler
Cowan William, shoemaker
Dack G A, propr Commercial Hotel
Dickson H H, grocer
Dickson J L, tinware
Dunnet B W, general store
Ellis .A.H, agricultural implement agent
Ellis G A, butcher
Francis J H, roller mill,
Francis & Brazeau, woolen mill
Gemmell E W, physician
Givens J, blacksmith
Grace P J, hotel
Graham. Alex, div court clerk
Graham Robert, carriagemaker
Halliday Wm, banker,
Harvey Augustine harnessmaker
Hudson William, confectioner
Lesage Alexander, boots & shoes
Lunney W J, harnessmaker
Jaynch John, cooper
1VIcClinton G, tanner
Mayne R H Mrs, grocery
Mayne & McVicar, livery
Murphy J E, physician
Pakenham Drug Co, C M Stewart, Manager
Quackenbush George, barber
Quigley J B, undertaker
Robertson J M, general store
Scott R & Son, general store
Sheehan J Mrs, hotel
Smith John, carriagemaker
Sproule Charles, blacksmith
Steen -L L Miss, milliner
Tait A H. tinsmith
Willoughby Isaac, tailor

 

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…from 1898-99 Eastern Ontario Gazetteer and Directory

PAKENHAM, a flourishing post village in Lanark County, Ontario, on the Mississippi River, with a station on the C.P.R. , 44 miles from Ottawa. It contains 4 churches (Roman Catholic, Episcopal, Presbyterian and Methodist) saw and flour mills, 1 woollen factory, 12 stores, 3 hotels, 1 bank, express and telegraph offices, etc., and has a large trade in lumber and country produce. Pop.  700  ..from Lovell’s 1906 Canada Gazetteer

 

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Dec 1947, Fri,  Page 28

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  31 Jan 1949, Mon,  Page 24

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  03 Feb 1949, Thu,  Page 7

Robert N. McCreary, Prominent Resident Pakenham Township (1948) – Striking tribute to the memory of Robert Nelson McCreary, M.A., whose death occurred early Sunday morning, January 30th, was paid Tuesday afternoon at the funeral which was one of the largest in the Pakenham community. The funeral was held from his late home, Pakenham township, to St. Andrew’s United Church , where Rev. H. A. Turner paid a moving tribute to Robert N. McCreary, one of the church’s elders, his devotion to his church and his life long service to the community. Rev. Alexander Mills of Arnprior assisted in the service. Born at McCreary’s, near Carleton Place on July 27th, 1867, a son of the late Joseph Campbell McCreary and Harriet Bailey, deceased received his education at Carleton Place and St. Catherines High School and later Perth Model School. He obtained his Master of Arts from Queen’s University in 1893 and for a time taught school. In April, 1898 he located on the farm where he resided until his death, which followed after a brief illness since New Years. In November, 1900 he was married at Pakenham to Edna Victoria Elliott, who passed away in August, 1946. Surviving are two sons and three daughters – Elliott and Miriam at home, Dr. Robert H. of Arnprior, Kathleen, Mrs. E. W. Stirtan of Oakville , and Edna, Mrs. G. R. Anderson of Kingston . One brother, Hiram McCreary, ex M.L.A. of Carleton Place , is the last surviving member of a family of ten. There are four grandchildren, George and Robert Stirtan, and Nancy and William Anderson. Robert N. McCreary was an active citizen in his own community during his fifty years resident there. In 1920 he was elected as reeve of Pakenham township and for twelve years served that municipality. During that time he was elected warden of Lanark County in 1925 and was a member of the first Mothers Allowance Board and Old Age Pension Board of the county. He was honoured as­ first president of Lanark County Educational Association. In his own community, being a prominent dairyman, he was secretary of Pakenham Cheese and Butter Association, an office he held for over thirty years. Having served, as a trustee of S.S. No. 5, he was appointed secretary and served a quarter of a century in that office. He was a staunch Liberal in politics, on several occasions was urged to, be a candidate in the Lanark constituency. The burial service was held in Pakenham United  cemetery, pallbearers being Harwood McCreary, Howard McCreary, Peter Moffatt, Elmer Ross, Charles Campbell and Dawson Kerr. Among the numerous floral offerings were wreaths from the Session of St. Andrew’s United Church , Pakenham; the Doctors and Staff of the A. & D. Memorial hospital, and Pakenham Township Council.

 

 

Many Pay Tribute To Late Douglas Harold Blair (1949) – Tribute to the memory of Douglas Harold Blair well known resident of Pakenham was paid by an exceptionally large funeral which was held on Friday July 1 with interment in Union cemetery, Pakenham. Douglas, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Blair, a member of one of the oldest and best – known families of this district, died on June 28 in the A. and D. hospital, following three weeks illness, at the age of 18 years. The funeral was held form his late home to St. Andrew’s United church, Pakenham, for service. Rev. S. B. Cary of Kinburn Presbyterian church, of which he was a member, assisted by Rev. T. A. Turner conducted the service. The United choirs were in attendance. Mrs. C. H. Campbell sang Douglas ‘ favourite hymn “In the Garden”. His passing at so early an age cast a gloom over the community where he was so, deservedly popular. He was a member of St. Andrew’s church, Sunday School and Young People’s association, Kinburn, active in sports; member of Pakenham Hockey, Club and Junior farmer’s group; former member of calf club. He attended the Pakenham Public and High Schools and was a brilliant student. He helped on his father’s farm for the past four years. Douglas is survived by his parents, one sister and two brothers, Isabel, Jimmie and Ray, all of whom live at home. Included in the floral offerings were; Wreaths, Pakenham cheese and butter Co. , and cheese maker; The Junior farmer’s Club. Sprays, St. Andrew’s church, Kinburn; St. Andrew’s choir and Young Peoples Association, Kinburn; Hockey and Athletic association, Kinburn, Pakenham ball club, Pakenham Hockey club. Basket, Royal Bank. Pallbearer were six cousins; John Bradley, Dalton Bradley, Ebert Smith, Ernest Dodds, Blair Erskine and Ralph Armstrong. Friends attended from Ottawa , Renfrew, Lanark, Ferguson Falls Arnprior, Almonte, Guelph , Carp Campbell’s Bay, Shawville, and Green Mount, Maryland.

 

 

 

historicalnotes

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 May 1946, Sat,  Page 6

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  08 Apr 1909, Thu,  Page 1

 

Almonte Gazette Pakenham August 6 1880

Street Improvements.— From’ the temporary manner in which our sidewalks are
being repaired, one would imagine they are not intended for use longer than this
summer.
K o w d t is m .—Last Thursday evening there was a disgraceful row immediately
opposite the P. O. If our lock-up cannot be made serviceable on occasion
we would like to know what it is for.

Witches. —Because we are deriving very little and in some cases no butter from our
travelling starved cows, many believe the cream is bewitched by a maliciously inclined
man or woman, supposed to receive power from the devil. It is astonishing how many Protestants, even church members,believe as strongly in superstition than they do in the Bible. We are inclined to ask what Protestant religion is doing when superstition is cultivated to such an alarming extent, W e must be getting back near the time when the witches were burned, and perhaps in our next we can give you the gratifying news of the capture and burning of this one.

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Watson’s Corners And Vicinity 1891–Shetland Ponies and Cheese

Some Fromage About the Hopetown Cheese Factory

Poutine Curds From the Appleton Cheese Factory?

When the Cheese Crashed Through the Floor

Say Cheese! It’s an IXL Story

 

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

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Some Fromage About the Hopetown Cheese Factory

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Photo from Gypsies Preachers and Big White Bears

 

 

The Hopetown Cheese Factory was built 1884 and served the community until 1933. Between 1933- and 1948 it became a cheese box factory, as everyone needed boxes for their cheese. The buildings no longer exist.

Perth Courier, Nov. 30, 1888

The Hopetown Cheese Factory closed 20th November having been in operation 5 months.  The last shipment of cheese was made 13th Nov. but the patrons were settled with on the 20th notwithstanding the trouble with gassy milk in the fore part of the season which reflects great credit on the cheese maker Mr. McVeigh that not one number of cull cheese was made the goals having always brought the highest prices at the time of sale.  The committee for engaging a cheesemaker for the ensuing year have taken no action yet in the matter not knowing whether to hire a cheesemaker on salary or commission.

historicalnotes

James Lorne Prentice, cheesemaker

By Kathleen Anne Palmer-O’Neil

James Lorne Prentice, was a cheesemaker in Lanark County for over 44 years. He travelled about the county working in and setting up small cheese factories at Boyd’s Settlement (where my mother Jessie Marion Prentice was born), in Drummond Centre, Hopetown, Watson’s Corners and Balderson. Many of the smaller cheese factories scattered

J. Lorne Prentice & Kate Molyneaux wedding
James Lorne Prentice and Kate Molyneaux wedding


1905 in Hopetown, Ontario.
throughout the county had homes on the property for the cheesemaker and his family to live in, so Grandpa Prentice’s address would change often as he went from small factory to factory for a couple of years at a time in his younger days. In 1922 he bought a home at 25 Mary Street, Perth, and stayed put while running the Balderson Cheese Factory.

Lanark Era, 4 May 1898: Mr. Lorne Prentice is engaged as assistant cheesemaker in the Hopetown cheese factory.

Lanark Era, 3 May 1899: Lorne Prentice assumed his duties as assistant cheesemaker at Hopetown.

 

Malcolm H. Leininger, Lanark Village, has purchased the property and business of John White, merchant, Hopetown and moved up there on Saturday.  Mr. Leininger until lately, carried on the sash, door and planning factory business with Archibald Affleck, having bought the same from Mr. W.W. Campbell.

 

Honey and the Andersons of Hopetown

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News

Poutine Curds From the Appleton Cheese Factory?

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Photo from the North Lanark Regional Museum

Appleton Boat launch & private shed. The shed is built on the foundations of the old Cheese Factory.

Imagine if you could just pop over to Appleton and get some fresh cheese curds for your next poutine?

Appleton once had a cheese factory where local farmers brought their fresh milk, where children stopped for a quick snack of fresh curds and where cheddar cheese was made. The Appleton Boat Launch now sits where the cheese factory was.

The Appleton Cheese Factory was in operation by at least 1899. Much of the history of the Cheese Factory is recorded in several ledgers now in North Lanark Regional Museum Collection. These ledgers provide a record of all the local farmers who brought milk to the factory from 1918 to 1945. Each time a farmer brought milk it was weighed and recorded in the ledgers. At the end of the week the weights were tallied up and the farmer was paid.

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Appleton Cheese Factory Ledger from 1918
— Photo from the North Lanark Regional Museum

By the late 1920s the Appleton Cheese Factory had joined the much larger company known as The Producers Dairy Limited of Ottawa which included factories in Almonte, Shawville, Hull and Ottawa that produced butter, cheese, milk and cream.

As mechanization and the automobile increased in popularity, many local cheese factories were consolidated into larger industrial plants. The Appleton Cheese Factory was no longer in operation by the early-1950s with local milk going to other factories to be processed. Text from the North Lanark Regional Museum

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Mrs. Robert Cavanagh, the former Martha Patterson
Library and Archives Canada/Copy number e006580518/photo cropped

From the Carleton Place Herald, Tuesday March 20, 1895: “Robert Cavanagh has sold his cheese factory at Appleton to Messrs. Wylie and Everetts who will continue its operation. Mr. Cavanagh is now rid of all his factories and will rest from his labors for a season with a view to recruiting his health which is not returning as rapidly as his friends would desire.”

On the 1901 Census Martha was living with her husband Robert Cavanagh in Carleton Place. She gives her birth date as Sept 14, 1849; her age as 51. Her husband Robert Cavanagh gives his birth date as March 17, 1839 and his age as 62. Janet Lochead Patterson is also living with them, and also a Carrie I. Patterson, shown as niece, born October 28, 1884, aged 16. On the 1911 census, Martha and Robert are still in Carleton Place on Bell Street. Robert was 73, born in Ontario of Irish parentage and Martha was 61 years of age.

Robert Cavanagh died December 31, 1921 of myocarditis, arteriosclerosis and senility. He was Irish, aged 86, born in Beckwith in 1835 and had lived 31 years at the place of his death. Robert’s father was John Cavanagh and his mother’s maiden name Blake. The funeral arrangements were made by Patterson Brothers Funeral Home, Carleton Place. He was buried on January 2, 1922 at the 8th Concession Ramsay. Just a few months later, Robert’s wife, Martha died. Martha Mathilda Cavanagh was a housewife and had resided at Bell Street 54 years. She died April 4, 1922 of intestinal toxemia and facial neuralgia. W.A. Wilson, 9916 113th Street, Edmonton was the informant. The undertaker was Jas. Patterson. Martha was buried on April 6, 1922 at 8th Line Cemetery.–Charles Patterson

historicalnotes

1894 Jan. 2 Carleton Place Herald
District News – Appleton
“On Wednesday afternoon last the residence of Mr. R. W. Fum?erton was alive
with guests, the occasion being the marriage of his daughter, Miss Jennie M.
to Mr. Alex. McRae, of Carleton Place. Rev. G. T. Bayne performed the
ceremony. Miss Bella Fumerton, sister of the bride, acted as bridesmaid, and
Mr. J. A. McGregor discharged the duties of groom’s man. After the ceremony
the happy couple with their friends sat down to a sumptuous repast. The
bride was very popular and was the recipient of over fifty beautiful and cost
presents. To Mr. and Mrs. McRae we extend the congratulations of a host of
friends here”

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News

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