Tag Archives: chatterton

Mrs. Chatterton Mrs. Chatterton

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Mrs. Chatterton Mrs. Chatterton

 

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Duncan McIntosh and operated as a hotel under the name of McIntosh House, it was bought in 1882 by the widow Mary J. Chatterton. By 1886 she has sold to Peter Salter, who ran it until about 1890. The Chatterton House Hotel guest register dating from 1886 to1889 was transferred from the City of Ottawa Archives Photo to the Carleton Place & Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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Mrs. Mary Chatteron was the mistress of flirtation and also had rather a large appetite, and she is one of my favourite people of Carleton Place. She owned what is now the Queen’s Hotel for several years in the 1800’s. As legend goes, Mary Chatterton ran a lot of her “Chatterton House” in the Queen’s Hotel alleyway. It was well reputed that Mrs. Chatterton served more than alcohol to her clients!

An advertisement for Chatterton House read: the proprietress has spent a large portion of her time in catering to the wants of the travelling public and this house has become justly famous for its good cheer and pleasant associations.” 

She later sold it to Albert Salter. Mr Salter according to newspaper reports in June 1 of 1899 had reconstructed the old Chatterton House with a veneering of brick- raising it two stories and added a large wing. Obviously that was not working out.

On the 20th of October 1899 it was noted in the newspaper that Mr Salter, proprietor of the well known Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place had disposed of the property, with Mrs Chatteron once again being the purchaser. The price was noted being up into the double tens with five figures.

 

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The newspaper account reported Mrs Chatterton had conducted a business on the same site some years ago and was a most amiable and obliging hostess. Mr Salter had purchased the property from her and added much to the accommodations to suit the requirements of the times. “He retires after a successful career and will devote his energies and wide resources to the perfection and personal superintendence of the Queen;s Royal hotel at Lake Park which will be enlarged and greatly improved in many respects before the opening of the news season. In the meantime he and his family will live privately in town.”

IN 1900 Albert Salter gave up the then Queen’s Hotel and it looks like he was a hotellier of all trades. It was documented in the newspapers that he took possession of the Revere Hotel which was on the corner of Bridge and High Street. That seemed odd as in another newspaper report it was mentioned that in 1900 Mr J Mc Claren of Perth bought the Revere Hotel had bought the hotel for $2700. So it seems Mr. Salter was micro managing many businesses, running the place, and did not own it. Nothing different than what happens in today’s world.

On 7 Nov 1900 the Ottawa Journal reported that Mary Chatterton had taken over the complete management of the Queen’s Hotel. There was no word if the alleyway business re-opened. Today I found more genealogy about the family, so documenting it.

 

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One thing about Mrs. Chatterton who owned the Queen’s Hotel among other businesses– she owned a lot of local property
Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 08 Sep 1905, Fri, Page 11

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MARY JANE NEELIN (BARBARA MORPHYJOHNEDMOND) was born 1856, and died June 1920 in Carleton Place, Ontario, Canada. Jeremiah F Chatterton and Mary J Neelin married on Tuesday, November 4, 1873 in Carleton Place, Lanark, Ontario. 

1881 Lanark County, Carleton Place (Village)

 

46 CHATTERTON EVA 7
46 CHATTERTON LERRY 33
46 CHATTERTON MARY 27

 

Child of MARY NEELIN and JEREMIAH CHATTERTON was: 

i. EVA5 CHATTERTON, b. 1874
James (Hilliard) MacDougall was the son of Duncan MacDougall and Harriett Hill. He was born November 6, 1866 and married Eva Chatterton on November  14, 1894 at St. James Church in Carleton Place.
 Perth Courier, November 30, 1894

McDoogal-Chatterton—Married, at Carleton Place on the 15th inst., at the residence of the bride’s mother, by Rev. Archibald Elliott, rector of St. James Church, Mr. J. Hill McDoogal to Miss Eva Chatterton, only daughter of Mrs. M. Chatterton.

006557-94 James Hill MACDOUGALL, 27, commercial traveller, Canada, Carleton Place, s/o Duncan & Harriet MACDOUGALL, married Eva CHATTERTON, 20, Canada, Carleton Place, d/o Jerrimiah (as written) & Mary CHATTERTON, witn: Charles BURGESS & Caroline NERLIN, not given, 14 Nov, 1894 at residence of bride’s father Carleton Place

There was a discrepsency of course where they were married. Was it at St. James or her mother’s home.
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 Mary Neelin Chatterton’s sister

Caroline G. Burgess (born Neelin), 1869 – 1915 married Charles F. Burgess.They had 2 sons:  and Caroline Neelin Burgess was Mary Chatteton’s sister.

Perth Courier, December 7, 1894–Burgess-Neelin—Married, on the 28th November at the residence of the bride’s sister, Mrs. Mary Chatterton, by Rev. John Grenfill, Mr. Charles Frederick Burgess of Galetta, Carleton County, son of John Burgess, Esq., of Baltimore, Ontario to Miss Carrie Neelin of Almonte, daughter of William Neelin, Esq., of Carleton Place.

Seems like Mrs Chatterton lost her child or they had been fighting over her before his death.. Perth Courier, March 31, 1882
Life Insurance—The late Mr. J. Chatterton of Carleton Place had taken out an endowment policy for $1,000, designating the payment of the sum should go to his little daughter Eva on his decease. An order has been issued by the High Court for the payment of the sum as soon as the guardian of the child has been appointed.
 - It is understood that Mr. Richard McLaren will...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  09 Jun 1899, Fri,  Page 4

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

 

 Mrs. Chatterton, Prostitutes, and Things You Maybe Don’t Want to Hear

Hell on Wheels at Lady Chatterton’s Hotel in Carleton Place

Tales of the Chatteron House Corset — Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 11

The First Mosh Pits in Carleton Place —

Searching for the Red-Headed Wench of Carleton Place

John Sparrow’s Royal Parilion – Chatterton House Hotel Carleton Placeunnamed (1)

 Mrs. Chatterton, Prostitutes, and Things You Maybe Don’t Want to Hear

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 Mrs. Chatterton, Prostitutes, and Things You Maybe Don’t Want to Hear

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Perth Courier, March 31, 1882

Life Insurance—The late Mr. J. Chatterton of Carleton Place had taken out an endowment policy for $1,000, designating the payment of the sum should go to his little daughter Eva on his decease.  An order has been issued by the High Court for the payment of the sum as soon as the guardian of the child has been appointed.

 

Why did Mr. Chatterton make such a demand? Why wasn’t Mrs. Chatterton, her mother, mentioned? If you have read my stories you will remember that Mrs. Chatterton was owner of the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place and also ran a ‘ladies of the night business’ on the side in the alleyway of the hotel. So it is no wonder that Mr. Chatteron found her an unfit mother.

Prostitution

The Victorian era was infamous for its prostitution. This may be due to the fact that some people believed that venereal diseases could be cured by sexual intercourse with children. This is why most prostitutes during this time were no other than children. A girl in the lower class, from ages 12 to 18, was paid 20 pounds; a girl in the middle class, of the same ages, was paid 100 pounds; and a girl of the upper class, 12 years old, was paid 400 pounds per job. This was way more money compared to a skilled worker of a normal job who only made about 62 pounds a year.

Since prostitutes made a large sum of money, it was the number one reason that women became prostitutes. Another reason women went into prostitution was because other jobs for women were limited and didn’t make nearly as much money. Prostitutes were more socially liberated than women in other classes. Prostitutes could also gather in pubs, meanwhile respected women could not.

Prostitution was not just good and lucrative, it was also very problematic. Although there were a number of prostitutes, there was still not enough to meet the demands. As a result, pimps, men who managed prostitutes, would go out and kidnap little girls to bring them into prostitution. Finally, there was the larger problem of venereal diseases.

A large majority of prostitutes had syphilis before they reached the age of 18. Soldiers and sailors in the army and navy were starting to get these diseases from the prostitutes which led to the Contagious Diseases Act. This law states as followed:

Should a member of a special force or a registered doctor believe that a woman was a common prostitute (a term left undefined), then he might lay such information before a Justice of the Peace who was then to summon the woman to a certified hospital established under the act for medical examination. Should she refuse, then the magistrate could order her to be taken to the hospital and there forcibly examined and if found, in either case, to be suffering from venereal disease, then she could be detained in a hospital for a period of up to three months. Resistance to examination or refusal to obey the hospital rules could be visited with one month’s imprisonment for the first offence and two months for any subsequent offence. They might, however, submit voluntarily to examination without a magistrate’s order, but if infected became liable for detention”

After this Act was enforced, women of this time formed the Ladies National Association for the Repeal of the Contagious Diseases Act. They tried to get the Contagious Diseases Acts repealed. Finally in 1886, these acts were repealed and were replaced with a new legislation. This legislation entitled the Criminal Law Amendment Act. These acts gave more protection to children from becoming prostitutes, made homosexuality a crime, and made the basis for prostitution to eventually become illegal.

 

 

historicalnotes

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal20 Oct 1899, FriPage 4

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Chatterton House was located in what we now know as The Queen’s Hotel at 142 Bridge Street. Built in 1870 by Duncan McIntosh and operated as a hotel under the name of McIntosh House, it was bought in 1882 by the widow Mary J. Chatterton. By 1886 she has sold to Peter Salter, who ran it until about 1890. Photo-Carleton Place & Beckwith Heritage Museum

8413-98 (Lanark Co): Washington PARSONS, 54, widower, millwright, of Arnprior, s/o Elias S. PARSONS & blank HARRINGTON, married Margaret FLEMING, 41, of NY state, d/o William FLEMING & blank BEAT, witn: Howard SINCLAIR & Mary CHATTERTON, both of Carleton Place, 14 Nov 1898 at Carleton Place

 

 

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Caroline G. Burgess (born Neelin), 1869 – 1915

Caroline G. Burgess was born in 1869, at birth place, to William Neelin and Barbara Neelin.
Caroline had 7 siblings: Mary Jane Chatterton, Eliza Neelin and 5 other siblings.
Caroline married Charles F. Burgess.
They had 2 sons: Basil S. Burgess and one other child.
Caroline passed away in 1915, at age 46.
Jeremiah F Chatterton and Mary J Neelin Married on Tuesday, November 4, 1873 in Carleton Place, Lanark, Ontario.

MARY JANE4 NEELIN (BARBARA3MORPHY, JOHN2, EDMOND1) was born 1856, and died June 1920 in Carleton Place, Ontario, Canada.She married JEREMIAH F. CHATTERTON.

Child of MARY NEELIN and JEREMIAH CHATTERTON is:

i. EVA5 CHATTERTON, b. 1874

 

Eva married  James MacDougall

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Hell on Wheels at Lady Chatterton’s Hotel in Carleton Place

Tales of the Chatteron House Corset — Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

The First Mosh Pits in Carleton Place — The Opera House of the Chatterton

What the Heck was Electric Soap? Chatterton House Hotel Registrar

House Hotel

John Sparrow’s Royal Parilion – Chatterton House Hotel Carleton Place