Tag Archives: charles dobie

Buttermilk Falls — Location Location Location

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Buttermilk Falls — Location Location Location
The Buchanan Scrapbook

This is the front piece photo of “The Canadian Mississippi River”. The book’s caption reads: ” Buttermilk Falls at Snow Road, on Antoine Creek within sight of the Mississippi River. This picture must have been taken in the early part of the 20th century because of lack of vegetation

The Canadian Mississippi River Hilda Geddes MAP
Gregory C. SprouleIt’s on Highway 509 at Snow Road Station

Frankie B Gray

Stopped by not long ago and there were lots of children playing and swimming there, looked like they were having a blast! Beautiful spot

Freda Ellenbergerreally great in the spring with just a bit of ice still

Ryan Hunter-I drive by it everyday on the way to work. It feeds into Millar’s lake near the bridge that the 509 crosses the Mississippi. Theres a small cottage right next to it so if you visit, make sure not to trespass on thier section

Gregory C. SprouleBlair Paul Morrows road off 509 was at one time Morrows cottages

The Canadian Mississippi River Hilda Geddes

June 15, 1915

Mrs. Jim Kennedy and some of her children were taking jim’s midnight lunch over to him at the mill as he was the night watchman. While crossing the birdge her wee son Bert tripped on something and rolled under the birdge railiing. He fell into the water and was drowned. The men searched all night , but there is quite a curren there and his body was not found until next morning.

1911 Census

Name:Bert Kennedy
Gender:Male
Marital status:Single
Race or Tribe:English
Age:4
Birth Date:Oct 1906
Birth Place:Ontario
Census Year:1911
Relation to Head of House:Son
Province:Ontario
District:Frontenac
District Number:69
Sub-District:32 – Palmerston, Canonto (north and south)
Sub-District Number:32
Place of Habitation:Palmerston
Family Number:59
Neighbors:View others on page
Household Members:NameAgeJames Kennedy34Mary Kennedy27Bert Kennedy4Flossie Kennedy6Ellesie Kennedy1Lottie S Kennedy2/12

 If you have not read  The Canadian Mississippi River by Hilda Geddes.. run don’t walk!

The Saylor Store on Snow Road (McLaren Depot)

History of McLaren’s Depot — by Evelyn Gemmill and Elaine DeLisle

The old Cornucopia Lodge on Snow Road

A History of Snow Road & McLaren’s Depot

Margaret Closs Lanark and Snow Road- Genealogy

Mississippi Station?

Hughes’ Rapids on Millar’s Lake.
This photo and the one above appear on page 66 of “The Canadian Mississippi River“. The book’s caption for this photo reads: ” Roll top dam at foot of Hughes’ Rapids at the head of Millar’s Lake. “

Ragged Chutes —This appears on page 60 of “The Canadian Mississippi River“. The book’s caption reads: ” Upper Dam at Ragged Chutes in river driving days. “
Ragged Chutes.
This appears on page 62 of “The Canadian Mississippi River“. The book’s caption reads: ” Ragged Chutes in river driving days. “Ragged Chutes”

Frontenac County Ontario :
Collection of Glass Negatives
from the Snow Road area, circa 1900

This collection of glass negatives was found in an antique store in Perth, Ontario. They were taken in Snow Road or in the immediate area. Twelve of the photos appear in Hilda Geddes’ book “The Canadian Mississippi River“, published 1988, reprinted 1992, by General Publishing House, Inc., Burnstown, ON. I’ve identified those photos according to the captions in Hilda’s book.

The source of these negatives is a mystery. The Perth antique dealer told me that an elderly couple walked in and offered the negatives for sale — they didn’t leave their names and no other information is available.

I’ve oriented the published photos according to how they appear in the book, but it is possible that some or all of the others need to be “flipped” horizontally.= Charles Dobie

realted reading

Hilda Geddes — The Queen of Snow Road and the Mississippi

Geddes Rapids Bridge 1903 — Dalhousie Lake

Mr. and Mrs Geddes of Snow Road

Mrs. James Prentice Hatmaker Milliner of Lanark

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Mrs. James Prentice Hatmaker Milliner of Lanark
Photo-Kathleen Anne Palmer-O’Neil

Marion Umpherson Prentice, 1850-1918

With Files from– Kathleen Anne Palmer-O’Neil

My great-grandfather James Prentice, son of immigrant parents James Prentice and Mary Ann Fraser Prentice, was born in Lanarkshire, Scotland in 1850.

In 1874 James married Marion Umpherson, who was born at Umphersons Mills, Poland, Lanark County, in 1850. She was the daughter of James Umpherson and Agnes Waddell. Marion was working as a weaver at the time of her marriage. (Early spelling was “Umpherston“).

Upon the sudden death of her husband, Marion Umpherson Prentice found herself with a year-old son, James “Lorne” Prentice, and a 6-year-old daughter, Agnes Kathleen Prentice, to raise. She had received no money from her mother-in-law’s large estate: since her husband had died, his share of his mother’s estate went into trust for his children (James Lorne and Agnes Prentice) until they were 21 — despite the fact she was left with $1,736.72 worth of unpaid promissory notes along with many other unpaid bad debts from her husband’s business.

Obviously a stalwart woman ahead of her time, she did not immediately remarry to have the help of a husband to raise her children. No doubt with the help of her family raising the children and working at her old weaving job, she persevered for about 10 years until about 1890 when she purchased a millinery shop on the main street of Lanark Village. An early female entrepeneur, she and the assistants she hired kept up-to-date with millinery trends by attending regular fashion shows in the cities. In the big window of her shop she displayed her collection of hand-made hats — further back in the shop one could find “ladies delicate things” — intricately hand-sewn.

While business boomed, she raised her children, ran a successful business and, when her son James Lorne’s young wife Katie Jane Molyneaux (1882-1915) died leaving three young children, she raised them as well for four years until Lorne remarried. When daughter Agnes “Minnie” married James McLean, a tailor, she moved them into the house beside her own home/shop where Agnes obviously was still available to assist her — and her husband. Agnes had become a formidable seamstress in her own right, (her wedding photo shows some of her beautiful handwork); both she and her mother Marion passed their considerable sewing and hand-work knowledge down to Lorne’s young daughter, Jessie Marion Prentice, my mother, and to the nieces of James’ brothers, several of whom became “town seamstresses” both in Lanark County and in the wilds of the new Red River Settlement of Manitoba where some of James’ brothers settled in their middle years.

When she died in 1918 Marion left a considerable estate including several unpaid promissary notes showing she had continued her and her husband’s earlier practice of lending money over the years to family members. She never “retired” from her business and she never remarried. Her official cause of death in 1918 was “exhaustion”. She is buried beside her husband in Lanark Village Cemetery.

Marion Umpherson Prentice in front of her shop.

Lanark Era, 9 Oct 1895: “Mrs. James Prentice has returned home from a prolonged trip throughout Western Ontario.”

Perth Courier, 10 Apr 1896: “Mrs. James Prentice, having purchased the millinery business of the late Mrs. Dougherty, and engaged the services of Miss Pepper as Milliner, will have her “Millinery Opening” on Friday and Saturday, 10th and 11th of April.”

Lanark Era, 23 Nov 1897: “At Mrs. Prentice’s you will find the latest and most fashionable styles in Millinery and the lowest prices. . . . etc.” (Advertisment).

Lanark Era, 16 Mar 1898: “Mrs. James Prentice and her milliner, Miss Rice, are in Ottawa this week attending the spring openings.”

Lanark Era, 1 Apr 1898: “Clydesville – Mrs. Prentice displays beautiful millinery.”

Lanark Era, 29 June 1904: “Ladore – Mrs. J. Prentice and Mrs. J.G. McLean (Agnes Prentice McLean, dau), were the guests of Mrs. Wm. Umpherson on thursday last.”

Lanark Era, 27 June 1906: “Miss Laura Manion, who has been employd as milliner with Mrs. Prentice, left for her home in Arnprior on Sat. last.”

Lanark Era, 6 Mar 1907: Local news: “Mrs. James Prentice and her milliner are attending the Millinery opening in Toronto.”

Perth Courier, 16 Oct 1903: Lanark Links: “Miss McCargar and Mrs. Prentice had their millinery openings on Wed. of this week. Their show rooms are filled with the latest creations in the line of millinery. Miss McCargar has had her rooms changed from the rear of the second flat of the McDonald block to the front part.”

Almonte Gazette, 8 Aug 1904: Lanark Links: “The Lanark Millinery houses were in full feather last Friday, the spring opening day. The displays at Miss McCargan’s, Mrs. Prentice’s and Mrs. Cohen’s excelled those of former years, and were viewed by a large number of the town’s fairer sex.”

Lanark Era, Jan 23, 1918: Obituary, “Death of Mrs. James Prentice“: There passed away to her eternal reward on Tuesday evening the 22nd inst. Mrs. James Prentice, relict of the late James Prentice, at the age of 67 years and 7 months. Mrs. Prentice was born at Umpherston’s Mills, Lavant Twp. She was the daughter of the late James Umpherston of this village and has lived here for more than 50 years. 45 years ago she married the late James Prentice who was a harnessmaker in Lanark Village, and who died in 1880. About 25 years ago she started a millinery business and fancy store and conducted the same until her death. She has been in failing health for about 2 years, but only took to her bed at New Year’s, and her death was due to a paralytic stroke. One brother, Mr. William Umpherston of Poland, surviving her. She leaves one son, Mr. Lorne Prentice, and a daughter, Mrs. Jas. G. McLean of this village to mourn the loss of a kind and dutiful mother. It is a unique coincidence that her death occurred on the same day of the same month as that of her father. In the village and community she was known as a kind and inoffensive neighbour and her traits of character had endeared her to all who knew her. The funeral takes place Thursday, the 24th inst, from Zion Church to Lanark Village cemetery, Revs. Messrs. Dustin and MacLeod officiating.

With Files from– Kathleen Anne Palmer-O’Neil


Name:Marion Prentice
Gender:Female
Marital Status:Widowed
Age:39
Birth Year:abt 1852
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Date:1891
Residence Place:Lanark Village, Lanark North, Ontario, Canada
Relation to Head:Head
Religion:Congregationalist
Occupation:Seammaster
Can Read:Yes
Can Write:Yes
French Canadian:No
Father’s Birth Place:Scotland
Mother’s Birth Place:Ontario
Neighbours:View others on page
Household MembersAgeRelationshipMarion Prentice39HeadAgnes Prentice16DaughterJames Prentice11Son
Enumeration District:83

Related reading

Nelson R Baker- Fashionable Tailor of Lanark

McLean the Tailor from Lanark and Other News

Community Comments– Lanark Village Postcard

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    More Tidbits About Lanark Village
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    2. Please take the Devil Out of Me? Rev. James Wilson of Lanark
    3. Does Anyone Remember Cohen’s in Lanark Village?
    4. Till Death Do Us Part in Lanark County?
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    6. Lanark Village Old Boys Reunion 1913 Names Names Names
    7. Lanark Village Social Notes– Hot Weather and Names Names Names 

100 Hands Thrown Out of Work –Lanark Village

A Walk through Lanark Village in 1871

Lanark Village News 1887–The $5 Wager and Other Things

Life in Lanark Village 1820 — Bad Roads Distilleries and Discontent!

So What Did We Find Out About this Photo from Lanark Village?

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Remembering a Shoemaker in Lanark Village–Thomas Wilson

Lanark Village 1913 — Clippings Old Boys Week

So What Did We Find Out About this Photo from Lanark Village?

Sandy Caldwell King of the River Boys

More Clippings– Lanark Fire 1959

The Aftermath of the Lanark Fire June 1959

The Lanark Fire of 1895

Lanark Fire 1959– Hour by Hour

The Lanark Fire June 15th 1959

UFO Sightings in Lanark County 1982 — Lanark Village

John Strang Lanark Village

Lanark Village Social Notes– Hot Weather and Names Names Names 1900

More Tidbits About Lanark Village

Lanark Village 1952

Hi Linda
Your article about the Orange lodge reminded me of a pic of my grandfather (James Lorne Prentice who you have featured a few times).  Only because some one suggested the pin on his lapel in this photo might be that of the orange lodge or something.  

Stay safe

– LeeAnne

Newmarket, Ontario

McLean the Tailor from Lanark and Other News

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Wedding photo of James George McLean and Agnes Kathleen Prentice.
Photo is courtesy of Michael Umpherson–Kathleen Anne Palmer-O’Neil 

Lanark Village News–May 28 1897

Quite a number of new buildings are being erected in the village this year.

Mr. Noonan, of Perth, gathered-up quite a number of hogs in this district last week.

Miss Kate Mason, sister of Mr. Wm. Mason, left for her home in Carleton Place this week.

Mr. A. E. Hamilton has started butchering, and has his meat market in Robert Robertson’s old stand.

The Queen’s birthday passed off very quietly in the village. There were a few picnics along the riverside.

A friend’s advice to anyone wanting a suit of clothes to fit well, sit well, and wear well: Go to McLean, the tailor, Lanark.

So who was McLean? He was actually pretty easy to find thanks to the words of Kathleen Anne Palmer-O’Neil on one of Charles Dobie’s history pages

James George McLean was the son of James McLean, (born 1825, Dalhousie Twp., died 1910 McDonalds Corners, Dalhousie, Twp.) and Catherine “Kate” Gunn, (born 1830, near Hopetown, Lanark County, died 1908, McDonalds Corners, Dalhousie Twp.) Both are buried in Crawfords Cemetery, Dalhousie Twp. James Senior was the son of Hugh McLean and Sarah McFadden.

James George McLean was a tailor with his shop on the main St. of Lanark Village, next door to his mother-in-law’s, Marion Umpherson Prentice, millinery shop. In the mid 1990’s his name could still be seen in the cement sidewalk in front of that building.

In 1907 he ran an advertisement stating he was committed to: ” 1 – use only the very best cloth; 2 – to employ the best “mechanics” available; 3 – to shrink all cloth thoroughly before cutting; 4 – to deliver garments on the day agreed to; 5 – to ensure a perfect fit”.

In later years James and Agnes ran the post office in Perth, living in the back part of the lovely old heritage stone building.

James, his wife Agnes Kathleen Prentice and daughter Marion spent winters in California (Los Angeles and San Diego) every year until Marion was older, travelling by train and sending postcards from stopovers in Chicago (cards still remain). The Lanark Era announced on Mar 23, 1910 that “Mr. Nelson R. Baker has bought the stock and goodwill of Mr. J.G. McLean’s Tailoring establishment” and reported again on April 6, 1910 “owing to hundreds of requests from the people of Lanark and surrounding country, McLean the tailor has decided to stay with his customers instead of going back South”

Lanark Co. Commercial Directory for 1881-82:McLean: James G; (Scott & McLean). A Large stock of Tweeds, Flannels, Blankets, Shawls, Knitting & Weaving Yarns constantly on hand at lowest cash prices or in exchange for Wove, Roll Carding & Cloth. Dressing Prompty attended to – Mill, Packenham.”

Lanark Era, 1 Nov 1895: “Elphin – Mr. J.G. McLean has left McDonalds Corners for Lanark and Mr. J.G. Scott is about to open up the former place . . . . “

Lanark Era, May 11, 1904:Mr. J.G. McLean, merchant tailor, now does his pleasure driving in a pneumatic-tired buggy — the first of the kind introduced in Lanark.”

Lanark Era, Feb 20, 1909: “McLean the tailor now sells hats.”

Lanark Era, July 7, 1909:Mr. J.G. McLean commenced the erection of a summer cottage at Dalhousie Lake last week.”

Lanark Era, Jan 5, 1910:Mr. & Mrs. J.G. McLean leave Thurs to spend the winter in southern California. Most of the time will be spent in Los Angeles and San Diego. Mr. McLean will be back in time to attend to business when spring trade opens up.”

Perth Courier, Jan 1940: “Died: At the GWM Hospital, on Monday, January 1st, 1940, James G. McLean of Perth, formerly of Lanark, aged 69 years.”–Kathleen Anne Palmer-O’Neil 

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
01 Dec 1915, Wed  •  Page 4


CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
16 Nov 1898, Wed  •  Page 4

The old Cornucopia Lodge on Snow Road

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Alex Trombley’s at Snow Road or old hotel (to the right).  Charles Dobie Collection

Perth Courier, Feb. 6, 1964

History of Cornucopia Lodge #29, I.O.O.F. Snow  Road, by Mrs. A.M. Woods

In our village of fewer than 100 residents we have an Oddfellows Lodge and hall of which we are very proud.  Fro some little time prior to 1893 when Snow Road was a booming lumber town an organization known as the Manchester Order of Oddfellows was instituted and held meetings in one of the lumber company’s buildings.

On October 12, 1893, this was changed to the Independent Order of Oddfellows and the charter now hanging in our lodge room bears the names of William Millar, Fred Clarke, Walter Geddes, Christopher Forbes and Hugh Colquhoun.  Other members of that date were Thoms Miller, George Weir, A.V. LeFleur, G.A. Marion, Louis Trombley, George Hawkins, James Richards, Elisha Buffam, George Warner, Sam Bolton, James Hawkins, Frank Halliday, James R. Duncan, August Morreau, William Waite, Delbert Wood, Robert Wood, Ed Bishop, Fred Chappel, Andrew McPhee and Duncan Ferguson (with apologies to others whose names are not available).

The hall was built in 1893 with much of the lumber and labor donated and in June of 1894 a picnic was held in what is now known as the old picnic grounds near the burnt school one quarter of a mile north of the present village.  A special train on the K & P Line from Kingston brought other lodges and a host of visitors to the Snow Road Station.  Here they were met by a brass band from Lanark and escorted to the picnic areas.  The day’s activities included ball games, races, contests of all kinds and the inevitable tug of war between the farmers and the lumbermen.  A balloon ascension was followed by interested spectators until it landed in Alec Duncan’s field a mile or so away.  Meals were served at tables or around the caboose as preferred.  Frank Hunter, a noted  river driver cook, was in charge of the caboose dinner.  Water was brought by hose from a near by spring into barrels for the day’s operation.  Home made lemonade and buttermilk took the place of bottled pop and ice cream cones and there were wonderful fire works in the evening. The special train made a late return trip to Kingston.  This was the largest picnic ever held in this district and the proceeds largely financed the cash expenditures for the new hall and furnishings.  One item is recalled—the carpet for the long room cost approximately $140 and is still in attractive condition.

A side light of the big picnic might be mentioned as it reflects credit on the Odd Fellows as guardians of public morals.  A few visitors who were interested in making a less than honest dollar were ordered from the grounds with their gambling devices.  They continued business by the road side near the K & P station but with fewer patrons.

The original members of the K & P Lodge #299 have gone to their reward but their descendants are still in command and proud of their lodge.  In lean years a mere handful carried on but were always ready to act the good Samaritans.  The lodge owns and lends free of charge a hospital bed, a wheel chair and crutches to any one who has need for them.  The hall is also free for the use of the church and school, etc.

 

Author’s Note--A dispensation was also granted for McLaren’s Depot. This village is located in a lumbering district, and a number of the brothers of Cornucopia Lodge, who were applicants for the charter, were employed in that business.

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McLaren’s Depot.
This appears on page 13 of “The Canadian Mississippi River“. The book’s caption reads: ” A back view of McLaren’s Depot taken from the top of Toboggan Hill. Picture possibly taken in the early 1900’s. “
The manager’s house is at bottom right.- Charles Dobie Collection

 

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Roads in those days were little better than paths through the bush. About the year 1856 the government decided to build the settlers a road, so a government engineer was sent, a man by the name of John Snow, so the road was named for him, being called the Snow Road.

Lumbering and the manufacture of potash were the chief industries of this time. A firm by the name of Skeads were the first lumberers of the district, then the Gilmours, Gillies and Mclaren, and the Canadian Lumber Company. Men were poorly paid, worked from daylight until dark and the food consisted mainly of bread, pork and beans, with tea.

 

Read–

A History of Snow Road & McLaren’s Depot

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Do You Know These Gingers?

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Unknown man. Photo is from a Perth, Ontario, studio—Submitted by Kathleen Anne Palmer-O’Neil

Yesterday I found these two cool photos of unknown Lanark County ginger haired lads on Charles Dobie’s photo page submitted by Katherine Price. You don’t have to even tell me that these chaps have red hair because–gingers have unspoken bonds when we spot each other– even though one of us gets their ginger hair from a dye bottle.

Just so you know Gingers supposedly don’t have souls, and it has been said that they earn a freckle for every soul they steal. The gene for red hair is recessive, so a person needs two copies of that gene for it to show up or be expressed. That means even if both parents carry the gene, just one in four of their children are likely to turn out to be a redhead. As a result, families that have no redheads for decades can suddenly discover a carrot top in their midst.

All things kind and gingerful,  but some redheads do not have freckles or fair skin, but have still been cursed with the orange hair and the term used to describe these beings is “day walkers”. Did you know the ancient Greeks believed that redheads would turn into Vampires after they die? I do admit some of us are so pale, like myself, and if we take off our shirt at the beach we might explode. I have been told personally many times that I am so pale that I glow in the dark.

 

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The myth that redheads might die off in the near future has drawn considerable attentions. Due to the recessive nature of the red hair, it takes 2 carriers (Rr) to have a red-headed child. With the increase of globalization and inter-ethnic mixing in marriage, it is reasonable to expect that the chance of 2 red hair carriers getting married and bearing children would be declining.

If you are bitten by a ginger, we advise you to immediately clean the wound out with either alcohol or peroxide. Keep pouring the liquid on to the wound until it turns a dull white, and immediately call 999. I do remember one of my fellow Gingers in Grade 4  shaving off his red hair and returning to school in the accompaniment of his father sporting a Mohawk. That was in 1960, when shaving your hair off and having a Mohawk was not cool, except on former late wrestlers like Little Beaver.

Remember there is an unspoken bond between gingers- yes, even those of us who inherited our  hair colour from Clairol. Heaven won’t let us in and Hell is afraid we will take over.

Quick name 10 dead redheads.. You can’t can you?


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Unknown people. Photo taken in a dry goods store or pharmacy. Submitted by Kathleen Anne Palmer-O’Neil

Can you provide details, corrections or missing names?
Please email here.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

 

 

RUSSELL RESTAURANT, RUSSELL, ONTARIO, circa 1926

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From Charles Dobbie- Local History

The 17 photos on this page were found in the same envelope and were purchased at a flea market in Smiths Falls, Ontario, summer of 2004. None of the people are identified, and indeed, the only identification is the “Russell Restaurant” sign. The people standing in front of the restaurant are obviously members of the staff, and the man in the suit (second photo) must be the owner.

 

The restaurant and automobile photos seem to have been taken at different times (the automobile photos are a little bit darker), but seem to be all from the 1920’s. The sale of wine and beer in the restaurant surprised me — didn’t Canada have prohibition?

Staff in front of Russell Restaurant

A Little Known Fact About McDonald’s Corners

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The village of McDonald’s Corners, was named after three McDonald families who were among the village’s first inhabitants who were Scottish immigrants in 1821. Similar to most rural villages in Lanark County, McDonald’s Corners was once a self-sufficient community providing the local community with general stores, inns, shops along with the local blacksmith and carriage maker’s businesses, and of course a church and a school.

Perth Courier, Jan. 27, 1899

It is proposed to change the name of McDonald’s Corners in Dalhousie Township to Minto after the new Scottish governor general.  There are petitions in circulation both for the change and against and there are reasons on both sides of the question.  Minto is much shorter and is a historic name; McDonald’s Corners was the name the pioneers gave and is endeared to many especially the older people.

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Purdon Family- McDonalds Corners- Charles Dobie

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School and students at McDonald’s Corners about 1880-Charles Dobie

The school is still used on a daily basis as a community centre and craft studio

 

 

Did You Know About the Crotch Lake Disaster?

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In 1857 Crotch Lake caused a flood from the lake to the Ottawa River.  Many of the local bridges across the Mississippi River were swept away, including all three in Dalhousie and one in North Sherbrooke Townships.The flood also washed away the Currie’s Grist Mill at the head of Dalhousie Lake (one of the first to be built and operated on the Mississippi River). Family legend has it that John Currie was so respected by the community that they all banded together to pay to rebuild his mill.

It also wiped out everything along the Mississippi riverbank down as far as Ferguson Falls. Ten people were killed. The only bridge to survive was the Ferguson’s Falls Bridge, and all the other bridges were destroyed from the dam at Crotch Lake to this point. By the 1880s, the rebuilt dams that were used to transport logs began to fall into disrepair as the timber industry declined.

 

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This appears on page 53 of “The Canadian Mississippi River“. The book’s caption reads: ” Crotch Lake Dam. This picture was taken many years ago (From Alex Trombley’s collection).- Charles Dobie

Present day dam

Dam on King's Falls | Mapio.net

historicalnotes

Inside the walls of the Crawford Cemetery, Lavant Mill Road  was once the site of the first Presbyterian log church, built on property donated by John Crawford, a staunch Presbyterian, at whose home the earliest services were held. The Crawford cemetery developed around this first church and continued to expand after the new church was constructed in Elphin and the original church was no longer standing.

It is also a burying ground for some of Lanark Highland’s pioneers. James Millar is also buried here who was drowned taking supplies up-river for the re-building of the dam after the Crotch Lake disaster of 1857.

James Millar was married to Elizabeth “Granny Millar” Smith on Apr.5,1842 at Perth, Ontario. James drowned on July 7,1857 while searching for bodies, following the Crotch Lake Dam disaster in 1857. The dam burst while repairs were being made. The resulting flood destroyed bridges and mills all the way down the Mississippi river to Ferguson Falls in Lanark County.

Looking for ancestors?- The Crawford Cemetery Facebook page have pictures of gravestones on their Facebook page

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Being A Charles Dobbie Groupie — Balderson Before Selfies

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Being A Charles Dobbie Groupie — Balderson Before Selfies

A selfie isn’t fundamentally about the photographer’s relationship with the camera, it’s about the photographer’s relationship with an audience. In other words, selfies are more parts communication than self-admiration (though there’s a healthy dose of that, too)  Our local museums love getting old photographs because sometimes you can see what the past was like in the backgrounds of these pictures.

I have been a groupie of many things through my life– lately, it is the historical photograph and recordings of Charles Dobbie.

Photographs of a fair, c.1912, Balderson, Ontari

Here are some I wanted to share.

 

Photos of a Fair, at Balderson, Ont., c. 1912. Charles Dobie-https://www.ontariohistory.org/fair.htm

The  photographs below are from the Dawson Kerr collection in the Perth Museum, Perth, Ont. Mr. Kerr was raised in in the village of Fallbrook, Ont., just a couple of miles north-west of Balderson, where this fair was located (see Don McGregor’s email to me below). I had previously speculated on this website that the location of the fair was Fallbrook, but Don McGregor has set the record straight. The two photos show different views of the same crowd.

On Sept. 29, 2005 I received an email from Donald McGregor, who grew up on his grandfather’s farm which is shown in these photographs. I’ve combined his original email with two others of October 17 & 18, in which he answers my question about the fate of the original Balderson Presbyterian Church. He says in part:

” . . . The second complete set of photos is definitely identified as taken place at Balderson. The location is on the farm of James C. McGregor, presently occupied by James C. McGregor a great-grandson, and Howard J. McGregor a grandson.

The fair was set up with the tents just south of the present barn built in 1948, along side the Lanark Road (Hwy 511). I grew up in Balderson on this farm — Donald C. McGregor b. 1941.

The building on the extreme right of the panoramic view is a machine shed which was once the original Balderson Presbyterian Church built about 1839 and moved to this location . . . by my grandfather J. C. McGregor.

The “Old Church” as it was called in my farm days was moved to the very spot where the School Fair tent was located. The new Presbyterian Church was officially dedicated Sept 1904, although the old church was located temporarily close to the original location. It was therefore moved to the McGregor farm 1905. It remained as a machine shed for about 65 years until it was moved from the roadside location to an adjoining field in 1970. It remained there until it was torn down in July 1975. I was there the day that it was pulled down by chains from a tractor. Ironically, the morticed joints assembled by the earliest Scottish Presbyterians in 1839, sturdily held in place, and only after several attempts did the frame finally succumb and was pulled to the ground. Howard McGregor and his son Jim were responsible for moving and relocating and demolition.

The windmill as seen over the top of the barn, that part which is still standing at the east end of the barn beside the road, was installed in about 1912 ???

In the Perth Courier, there was reference to a prize list from this fair which I would believe included schools from the Bathurst and Drummond Twps. My uncle Neil McGregor participated in this fair and won a prize. He was born in 1901, and if attending this school would have been 10 – 11 years old.

(Quoting an) article from the Perth Courier re: School Fair at Balderson 1912 & 1913. Ten school sections were represented at the fair which probably included the schools of Bathurst and Drummond. The Balderson School was a union of both Bathurst and Drummond. In 1912 Neil McGregor won a prize for potatoes and in 1913 he placed 4th with another pupil for an oratorical presentation “Stick to the Farm”. Ironically it was Neil’s brother John (b. 1899) who was to be the farmer while Neil worked for a bank in Montreal.

The elm trees are evident in the photo. These trees lined the west side of the Lanark Road (Hwy 511) in front of the McGregor property. At one time there were close to 20 stately elms which must have been planted mid 1800’s. Several were gone before the 1940’s and the last was removed in the 1970’s for widening of the road. Also Dutch Elm disease had taken its toll, and wind storms. “

Balderson Photos 2015—Linda Seccaspina

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photograph of a fair, Balderson, Ont. 1912
Second photograph of a fair in Balderson, Ont. The windmill seen over the top of the barn was installed c. 1912.

A selfie isn’t fundamentally about the photographer’s relationship with the camera, it’s about the photographer’s relationship with an audience. In other words, selfies are more parts communication than self-admiration (though there’s a healthy dose of that, too)  Our local museums love getting old photographs because sometimes you can see what the past was like in the backgrounds of these pictures.

I have been a groupie of many things through my life– lately, it is the historical photograph and recordings of Charles Dobbie.

http://www.ontariohistory.org

Photographs of a fair, c.1912, Balderson, Ontari

Here are some I wanted to share.

Photos of a Fair, at Balderson, Ont., c. 1912. Charles Dobie-https://www.ontariohistory.org/fair.htm

The  photographs below are from the Dawson Kerr collection in the Perth Museum, Perth, Ont. Mr. Kerr was raised in in the village of Fallbrook, Ont., just a couple of miles north-west of Balderson, where this fair was located (see Don McGregor’s email to me below). I had previously speculated on this website that the location of the fair was Fallbrook, but Don McGregor has set the record straight. The two photos show different views of the same crowd.

On Sept. 29, 2005 I received an email from Donald McGregor, who grew up on his grandfather’s farm which is shown in these photographs. I’ve combined his original email with two others of October 17 & 18, in which he answers my question about the fate of the original Balderson Presbyterian Church. He says in part:

” . . . The second complete set of photos is definitely identified as taken place at Balderson. The location is on the farm of James C. McGregor, presently occupied by James C. McGregor a great-grandson, and Howard J. McGregor a grandson.

The fair was set up with the tents just south of the present barn built in 1948, along side the Lanark Road (Hwy 511). I grew up in Balderson on this farm — Donald C. McGregor b. 1941.

The building on the extreme right of the panoramic view is a machine shed which was once the original Balderson Presbyterian Church built about 1839 and moved to this location . . . by my grandfather J. C. McGregor.

The “Old Church” as it was called in my farm days was moved to the very spot where the School Fair tent was located. The new Presbyterian Church was officially dedicated Sept 1904, although the old church was located temporarily close to the original location. It was therefore moved to the McGregor farm 1905. It remained as a machine shed for about 65 years until it was moved from the roadside location to an adjoining field in 1970. It remained there until it was torn down in July 1975. I was there the day that it was pulled down by chains from a tractor. Ironically, the morticed joints assembled by the earliest Scottish Presbyterians in 1839, sturdily held in place, and only after several attempts did the frame finally succumb and was pulled to the ground. Howard McGregor and his son Jim were responsible for moving and relocating and demolition.

The windmill as seen over the top of the barn, that part which is still standing at the east end of the barn beside the road, was installed in about 1912 ???

In the Perth Courier, there was reference to a prize list from this fair which I would believe included schools from the Bathurst and Drummond Twps. My uncle Neil McGregor participated in this fair and won a prize. He was born in 1901, and if attending this school would have been 10 – 11 years old.

(Quoting an) article from the Perth Courier re: School Fair at Balderson 1912 & 1913. Ten school sections were represented at the fair which probably included the schools of Bathurst and Drummond. The Balderson School was a union of both Bathurst and Drummond. In 1912 Neil McGregor won a prize for potatoes and in 1913 he placed 4th with another pupil for an oratorical presentation “Stick to the Farm”. Ironically it was Neil’s brother John (b. 1899) who was to be the farmer while Neil worked for a bank in Montreal.

The elm trees are evident in the photo. These trees lined the west side of the Lanark Road (Hwy 511) in front of the McGregor property. At one time there were close to 20 stately elms which must have been planted mid 1800’s. Several were gone before the 1940’s and the last was removed in the 1970’s for widening of the road. Also Dutch Elm disease had taken its toll, and wind storms. “

Balderson Photos 2015—Linda Seccaspina

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False Impressions- Lanark Era- Watt — Balderson

Donna Cameron Moon Photo– 1945– Balderson– Donna McFarlane

Balderson Cheese Factory — The Buchanan Scrapbook

Ralph Barrie Son of Nettie and Harry Barrie Balderson

Fame and Murder Came to Balderson in 1828

Balderson–Lanark Era–R.S. McTavish

Before and After in Balderson

Oh Woe is Emily J Publow of Balderson

Being A Charles Dobbie Groupie — Balderson Before Selfies

The Day the Balderson Telephone Co Disappeared

It’s Your Balderson News 1913

TWO HEARTS MADE ONE at Balderson Corners — Annie Findlay and “Short Jack” Mclntyre