Tag Archives: caves

Documenting Updates to THE CAVE AT POOLEY’S BRIDGE STORY (2019) Part 2

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Documenting Updates to THE CAVE AT POOLEY’S BRIDGE STORY (2019) Part 2

Lost Ottawa
September 22, 2014  · 

Ottawa’s oldest bridge … Pooley’s Bridge near the Pumping Station in Lebreton Flats, built in 1873.
This is tailrace where water from the station flows back into the Ottawa. Now a white water canoeing course.
The bridge was named after Colonel Henry Pooley, who built the original wooden bridge on this spot for Colonel By. It is the oldest surviving bridge in Ottawa.CA 018817

The story

In July of 2019 I documented THE CAVE AT POOLEY’S BRIDGE STORY. As Jaan Kolk once mentioned: Lieut. Pooley built quite a narrow bridge – out of round logs. That would have been the one still in place in 1858 when this story took place. (It was not replaced by a stone bridge until 1873.) There are “caves” under Pooley’s bridge‘ and they are said to go under the Fleet Street pumping station.

The Hub and the Spokes: Or, The Capital and Its Environs
By Anson Albert Gard

1888- pinterest

At one time in the old Model school a rumor went around that some had discovered a cave near the town-end of Pooly’s Bridge, and a number of the boys arranged to meet with candles after school hours to explore it. As I was one of the small boys I was not invited, but I soon heard that the expedition was a failure, and that they could only go a short distance into the opening, which was simply a large scrape in the rock formation, which was later found to continue under the large hill behind, and could be seen on the surface in a field near Christ Church. When I visited this place some years later, I found that it had been made a dumping place for all sorts ot rubbish, and the same use had been made of the mouth.” –1923

Well, the cave ran in an angular direction from the face of the hill towards Christ Church. We got in about 75 feet in a stooped position and then we had to get on our knees and we got about 40 feet further, when what found that ahead of us was only a large crevice n the rock.” Read more here-THE CAVE AT POOLEY’S BRIDGE STORY.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 Feb 1899, Thu  •  Page 4
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Apr 1930, Sat  •  Page 2

“The incident involved the discovery of a wide and deep fissure in the rock below Wellington street This discovery was made when corporation employee started to widen Wellington street just east of Pooley ‘ bridge. This work was being done in connection with the building of the pump bouse, and the general improvement of the locality. In order to widen the thorough fare considerable filling in had to be done on the north side of Wellington street at the juncture of Wellington with Pooley’s bridge. It was when the filling process was being considered that the presence of the fissure was discovered. It was found that beginning at the level of the water of the tail-race, about 30 or 30 feet east of Pooley’s bridge, there waa a large fissure in the rock wall which extended in a northerly direction. At the water edge the top of the fissure was about the height of a man and could be entered in an upright position. At that point it was about three feet wide, giving the appearance of a cave mouth.” read more below


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Mar 1930, Sat  •  Page 36

Comment-

from Andre Fillion

33 Somerset

I shared the original story by Samuel Cherry with his great-great grandson. I wasn’t sure of any family relationship, but knew that his ancestral home was 33 Somerset St. W., which was the address of Samuel Cherry. He was very grateful to be able to read of his great-great grandfather’s adventure when he was a boy. He has a family photo taken around the turn of the century of the entire Cherry family on the front veranda of 33 Somerset, if you’d like to see it. Andre Fillion

THE CAVE AT POOLEY’S BRIDGE STORY. ( linda seccaspina 2019)

THE LEGEND OF POOLEY’S CAVE | OTTAWA REWIND( Andrew King 2021_

Historical Caves — Pelissier’s Cave

Where Was Meyers Cave?

Snow Road Adventures- Hikes in the Old Cave — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of PerthSo Where Were the Caves in Carleton Place?

Now You see it, Now You Don’t: The Disappearing and Reappearing of the Tim Horton’s Subterranean

THE CAVE AT POOLEY’S BRIDGE STORY

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THE CAVE AT POOLEY’S BRIDGE STORY

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CLIPPED FROM

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 Jan 1899, Mon  •  Page 7

 

The following text is taken from the Wikipedia site concerning LeBreton Flats.

“Pooley’s Bridge, Ottawa’s oldest bridge, is a stone arch bicycle/pedestrian bridge located in Ottawa’s LeBreton Flats east of the Canadian War Museum and south of the Portage Bridge. The three span closed spandrel stone arch structure, built in 1873, was designated as a heritage structure by the City of Ottawa in 1994. It is located beside the Fleet Street Pumping Station (Ottawa’s original water works) at the end of Fleet Street.

“The bridge is located at 9 Fleet Street, at the southwest edge of Bronson Park. It is very near and southeast of LeBreton Flats’ first new condo unit. It is south (but beyond some grassy area) of where Wellington Street meets the Portage Bridge. The city describes it as “over the channel tailrace of the Fleet Street Pumping Station”. The City waterworks building, including the pumping station and the aqueduct were designated as heritage in 1982 under the Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

“Pooley’s Bridge is one of six stone arch bridges in the Lebreton Flats, all built circa 1873, all are Heritage Bridges and all are designated to serve as pedestrian/bicycle facilities only. The five other bridges are all single span stone arch bridges over the aqueduct, west of Pooley’s Bridge. They are: Canada Central Railway Bridge, Broad Street Bridge, Lloyd Street Bridge, Grand Trunk Railway Bridge and Lett Street Bridge. The first bridge is owned by the National Capital Commission, second, third and fifth by the City of Ottawa and the fourth bridge is under the Region’s ownership. The third, fourth and fifth bridges are connected together.

“The condition of Pooley’s Bridge has been of concern for a number of years. It was necessary to undertake the controlled removal operations on the bridge in 1994, to ensure public safety. Due to anticipated failures, it was necessary in 1999, for the City of Ottawa to file an Application to Alter and make repairs to five other stone arch bridges in the area. The repairs required at the five stone arch bridges were relatively minor, but expensive.”

 

historicalnotes

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

relatedreading.jpg

Historical Caves — Pelissier’s Cave

        1. Where Was Meyers Cave?

          Snow Road Adventures- Hikes in the Old Cave — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

          So Where Were the Caves in Carleton Place?

        2. Now You see it, Now You Don’t: The Disappearing and Reappearing of the Tim Horton’s Subterranean

Historical Caves — Pelissier’s Cave

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Historical Caves — Pelissier’s Cave

Shortly after his arrival here in 1872, Lord Dufferin, Governor General, and his party paid a visit to Pelissier’s Cave in Cantley. They went up in the vice regal carriages, accompanied by a couple of Weldon Champness’ best victorias, which, filled by invited guests and driven by Mr. Champness’ best drivers. One of these was John Regan. Pelissier’s Cave at that time was in its infancy.

It had only a short time previously been discovered. The vice regal party went up well provided with eatables, which were carried in the quite proper type of English lunch hampers. The vice regal coachman and footmen prepared the luncheon and served the meal. Lord Hamilton, Lady Dufferin’s brother, was one of the party. Mr. Regan says Lord Hamilton was a distinguished looking six-footer.

At that period the entrance to Pelissier’s Cave was so small that it had to be entered on hands and knees. Mr. Pelissier had made for the descent a number of short lengths of ladder. These, when required, were bolted together to give the necessary length. A Good Climber. Mr. Regan says that though the descent was quite risky for even a man, Lady Dufferin showed absolutely no fear and descended and ascended the ladders in quite a business-like manner. The Dufferins enjoyed themselves greatly. They dropped stones into the lake at the bottom of the cave, shouted for echoes and marvelled at the beauty of the cave.

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© Gatineau Valley Historical Society

La Caverne de Pelliers. The Caverns of Pelissier

Image Reference: CD-004/01758-002.jpg
Date: c 1900
Photographer: A.T. Tardif, Hull, Quebec.
Location: Wilson’s Corners, Cantley, Quebec, Canada

Post card of the Pelissier Caverns at Wilson’s Corners aka Lafleche Caves.

Lord and Lady Dufferin Make a Winter Visit to Cantley

by Mary Holmes

It’s the depth of winter in 1874 in Canada. What better winter-time outing for Queen Victoria’s representative in Canada, the Governor General and Lady Dufferin, than a trip by horse and sleigh to Cantley, in the wilds of the Gatineau Valley bush. They set off to visit what we now know as Laflêche Cave on Thursday, February 19, 1874. According to reminiscences of one of the drivers, John Regan, in an ‘Old Time Stuff’ column in the Ottawa Citizen on April 7, 1928, they went up in the vice regal carriages, accompanied by a couple of Weldon Champness’s best victorias (carriages) which were driven by Mr. Champness’s best drivers. One of these was John Regan himself. Pelissier’s Cave had only been discovered a short time before their visit.

Read more here.. CLICK

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        Clipped from

        1. The Ottawa Journal,
        2. 30 May 1887, Mon,
        3. Page 3Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.relatedreading

          Where Was Meyers Cave?

          Snow Road Adventures- Hikes in the Old Cave — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

          So Where Were the Caves in Carleton Place?

        4. Now You see it, Now You Don’t: The Disappearing and Reappearing of the Tim Horton’s Subterranean

Snow Road Adventures- Hikes in the Old Cave — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

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My Uncle Earl Lahey our Leader, his two children Earl and Linda. My older brother Jack, Sister Grace and my self the gangley one beside my brother, We are just so stylish and cute. Photo Noreen Tyers

 

Here we go another Snow Road adventure dug up from the summer holidays.   Hikes in the old Cave by Noreen Tyers

When I stop to think of the time we spent at Snow Road, I have to say that Uncle was the one who entertained the children.  We could always depend on him to do things that were adventuresome and fun.

There was an old wooden bridge that went across the Mississippi River to an island.  This bridge was in bad repair and had places where the boards had broken, so one had to watch where you placed your feet.  At the time we didn’t swim so that this was a challenge and maybe somewhat dangerous in today’s standards. Uncle Earl was always close by so he guided us along on so before long we were on the other side.

We always had to take a treat on our adventure and something to drink.  It was quite a walk from the bridge to the cave, where he was taking us.  We walked through a grass covered area the whole time I was watching for snakes.  It is so interesting how as a child the creatures always were rather big and always dangerous.

Another important item that traveled with Uncle Earl was light for inside the cave.   


We had reached the opening to the cave, it did look rather frightening and very dark.  We were not so sure that this was going to be as enjoyable as when we talked about it earlier.  Speaking for myself I could imagine other things that would be not quite so frightening. I am one that might be sticking close to the adult for protection and I am sure that there were a lot of questions, just out of sheer fright.  Inside the cave there were many things to see, bugs, spiders, bats hanging of the side of the walls. I often think of how it would have been great to be able to take photos, but in those days a camera would not have been what we needed in a rather dark, damp atmosphere.  To keep you in suspense a hat was one of the items I was told to have to ward off the bats. What I didn’t know at this early age was that bats usually sleep during the day and chances are they wouldn’t leave their spots on the wall of the cave.

At the time we did not know that Uncle Earl was afraid of spiders.  Now little ones were not too bad, he tolerated them, but if a big one happened to appear, you could watch him turn rather white in a hurry and leave the spot quickly.  When I think of it I am sure he was thinking that this was a bit of a chore and may not have been such a good idea. I do have to say that other than the pale face you never noticed any fright.

I was getting to the point where I thought it should be time to leave the cave and I just hoped that  we could find our way out. I am sure that the cave had been checked out before we ever started on our adventure but we sure didn’t know that.  I know that the trip through the cave would have been much quicker without the children. After a few minutes a bit of light appeared and we were at the entrance of the cave.

After our experience we were ready for our treat and drink and then make our way back to the house.  We did have to cross the bridge again but this time it was not quite as bad, seeing we did it already.


I am so glad that these memories have lasted and I am ready to write some of them down.  I am sure that I have not remembered everything but I can always add to it should I remember something of importance.From the Pen of
Noreen – June 2007




Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

relatedreading



Putting Brian on the Bus– Stories from my Childhood Noreen Tyers

My Childhood Memory of Richard’s Castle –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Grandpa’s Dandelion Wine — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

My Wedding Tiara — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Art of Learning How to Butter Your Toast the Right Way — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Smocked Dresses–From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Kitchen Stool — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Flying Teeth in Church — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Writings of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Memories of Grandpa’s Workshop — Noreen Tyers

Cleaning out Grandmas’ Fridge — Noreen Tyers Summer Vacation at Richard’s Castle

My Flower Seeds — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

So Where Were the Caves in Carleton Place?

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Doing some research for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum today found me at the Land Registry Offices in Almonte.  There were a lot of pages printed out while getting information for a home on High Street that we might not have needed, but there was an interesting  entry or two.

It mentioned the Willis burial plot on Lake Ave West , but a certain land transaction from 1892 to 1896 between the Crams, Sumners and Pattersons mentioned caves. This was  not in the country, but in the town proper. Were they small limestone caves by the river?

“part described with use of caves”

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Has anyone ever heard mention of caves in Carleton Place?

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Related reading:

The treacherous and mysterious underwater caves in the Ottawa Valley just got bought

http://www.ontariocaves.com/