Tag Archives: carleton place library

The History of the Carleton Place Library

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The History of the Carleton Place Library

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A HISTORY OF THE CARLETON PLACE PUBLIC LIBRARY

A History of the Carleton Place Public Libraryclick here

In honour of Janet Baril’s Retirement, Head Librarian 1984-2013

Starting in 1829, the Ramsay and Lanark Circulation Library originally served the townspeople of Carleton Place.  It had over 500 volumes, and was located in the Anglican Church which stood at Lot 16, 1st Con. Ramsay, opposite the Union Hall and schoolhouse.

Our present library began on March 14, 1846, as a Subscription Library with 65 original members.  The entry fee was 2 shillings and the yearly fee was 5 shillings.  The subscription list continued until 1850.  By 1851, the Carleton Place library was operating out of the school house on Bridge Street, later Central School, which became the site of the post office.  Some pages are missing until a partial list appears in 1864 when the record ends.

The officers and directors of the Carleton Place Library and Mechanics’ Institute for 1851 were:

President:  James Duncan (blacksmith); Vice President:  William Peden (merchant); Treasurer:  Robert Bell, M.P.P. ; Secretary:  David Lawson (store clerk, postmaster) ; Librarian:  Johnston Neilson (schoolmaster) ; Directors:  George Dunnet (merchant), Duncan McGregor, James C. Poole (newspaper publisher), Thomas Patterson (Ramsay farmer), John McCarton (Ramsay farmer).

April 5, 1865:  “The Carleton Place Library will be open on Monday next, and on the first Monday of every month hereafter.  Person wishing to read can on payment of .25 cent per quarter of a year.”

Interest in the library seemed to have dwindled until 1883 with the formation of the Carleton Place Mechanics Institute.  The object of this Association was to:  “establish a reading room and library, procure suitable apartments (sic) and deliver courses or lectures on useful and interesting subjects, as well as supply its members with the means of instruction in Arts, Sciences, Literature and General knowledge.”  They housed the library wherever there was an empty building, or an individual would take it to their home.  The Mechanics Institute looked after the library until 1895, when legislation was passed in Ontario whereby the Mechanics Institute became the Public Library, free of subscription dues.  The Town by-law taking over the Library was not passed in its’ complete form until January, 1897.  Upon completion of the Town Hall in that year, the Public Library began its’ long stay there.  At this time the book collection was 2,458 volumes, and the number of books taken out during the year was 4,418. 

In 1897, the Art Loan Exhibit, an exhibit of Lanark and Renfrew’s social and natural history was put together by the library at the Opera Hall in the new Town Hall.

Information from 1956 shows that “At present there are about 1,000 borrowers, approximately 8,000 volumes to choose from, and a yearly and growing circulation of over 20,000…on the library tables there is an excellent range of daily papers as well as periodicals of Canadian, English and U.S. origin, which can be read in the quiet and well-lighted main room…the library is housed in the town hall main floor, a central and convenient place for its users…”

In 1966 the Eastern Ontario Regional Library System was set up.  This allowed for a pooling of book resources and interests of all Public Libraries in the ten counties of Eastern Ontario. 

In 1970 the new library was built on land donated by the Town and funded by private individuals.  It measured 3200 sq. ft., four times the size of the Town Hall library.  Once again, in 1979, the Library needed more space and was expanded to double its’ size.

Then in September, 1986, the Library was vandalized and set on fire, destroying the adult fiction collection and causing water and smoke damage to the rest of the collection.  The library was moved to temporary quarters in the Mews Professional Building on Lansdowne Avenue, until the library was rebuilt and the fire damage cleaned up.  The Library returned to its’ home in February, 1987, with an official opening on May 23, 1987.

In 1994, the Library held 35,569 volumes and 93,040 volumes circulated during the year.  Also, 910 volumes were loaned to other libraries in Ontario and 966 volumes were borrowed from them.

Computerization came to the library in 1992 in the form of an automated system.  No more card catalogues, or hand-written patron library cards.  The future had arrived!

As a millennium project, the library underwent a massive renovation starting in

June 1999, and ending in February 2000.  At that time, the large Barbara Walsh meeting room on the east side of the building was turned into a much needed larger children’s area, with a new and smaller Barbara Walsh room added to the front of the building.  Glass fronted offices were added close to the new circulation desk, along with public internet access terminals and storage areas.  A local history/microfilm room was located near the Beckwith Street side of the building.

In December 2010, the library began to provide access to e-books through  Southern Ontario Library Service, for all Carleton Place and area patrons.  Ancestry Library Edition also became available early in 2011 for local family history buffs.

Statistics from 2011 show the Library holding approximately 63,000 items, with 108,280 circulating throughout the year.  As well, patrons borrowed approximately 2,440 e-books, and Ancestry Library Edition saw approximately 11,691 research hits.  Also, 1,273 volumes were loaned to other libraries in Ontario and 1,245 volumes were borrowed from them.

Librarians:

 David Lawson          1846-1851

Johnston Neilson    1851-1887

Peter McRostie       1887-1909

Emma McRostie     1909-1941

Louise Elliott           1941-1960

Barbara Walsh        1960-1984

Janet Baril                1984-2013

Carleton Place 200th fact-Thanks to Laura @Restovation — we now have this complete photo on file and available for all to look at online. Thank you. Downtown Carleton Place 1909—Built on the south side of the Mississippi riverbanks the new town hall was just about to be opened. The building which faced Bridge Street was to house “a joint” town hall, fire and police station, concert hall and new library.It was advertised as a building that would astonish strangers by its proportions and ornateness. The cost was currently at $25,000 and there were still yet bills to be settled. There was a good many ratepayers that were furious that the cost was above and beyond of the initial quote of $12,000 and they swore that council would be held responsible for such monstrous costs at the next election. In fact the media wrote that the council was said to have run away with their duties to their constituents, and it was built solely as a monument to them.

Read–

Carleton Place Library 110th Anniversary — Comments About the Old Library

What If Books Were Banned in the Carleton Place Library? It’s Banned Book Week!

I Wish Adults Knew —– Bad Art Night at the Carleton Place Library

Did You Know? The Oldest Library in Lanark County

Did You Know About the Rules of the Dalhousie Library? 1828 –The Library Pioneers

The Lanark Library and Florence Bowes

Carleton Place Library 110th Anniversary — Comments About the Old Library

Elizabeth Kelly — Mary Cook News Archives

Judi Judi Judi —- The Carleton Place Public Librarian

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Judi Judi Judi  —- The Carleton Place Public Librarian

 

 

Yes, the rumours are true. After 27 years at the library, our amazing Judi has decided it’s time to start a new chapter in her life. She’s retiring at the end of December, and we’re inviting everyone to help us send her off in style.

Please join us on Monday, December 16th from 1:30pm-3:00pm as we celebrate with cake and refreshments. Come and share your well wishes, a fun memory, and let her know she’ll be missed.

There aren’t many people in this world like Judi Simpson, and we’ve been lucky enough to hear her laughter, share in her joyous events over the years, and marvel at her gift for recommending books to readers of all ages. We’ll miss her terribly, but we know she’ll be busy with that new granddaughter, and enjoying the idea of sleeping in once in a while!

Congratulations, Judi!

 

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Here are some statements from staff:

“Before working at the library, my family and I were regular library users and my children’s favourite librarian was Judi. She was always so welcoming to young families and made people feel welcome by greeting them with a personal hello. As a staff member, I discovered  a friend who loves to laugh as much a I do. Her reader’s advisor skills are unparalleled and will leave a hole for the rest of us to fill in her absence. She will be missed by kids, adults and staff alike.”  -Sheila

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“Here are the things I love about Judi!!

She is so welcoming and kind

She made me feel at home from day 1

She is a really great grandma!

She is genuine

She has become a friend in such a short time

And I’m really really going to miss her!” – Kristine

 

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“What sticks out for me in many of my memories of Judi is her unique ability to make a connection with anyone.  Working at a library, people from all walks of life come through our doors.  Judi has always been able to show kindness and share a joke with anyone.  She never hesitates to take an extra needed moment with a patron, and when they visit the library again, Judi is sure make them feel welcome with by remembering a tidbit about them:  their child’s name, or perhaps their favourite hockey team.

This leads to a common occurrence here at the library:  our staff often laugh at the frequency of patrons walking into the library to ask at the desk, “Is Judi here?”  followed by a disappointed face when she is not.  We love how beloved she is by our community.

Judi’s mark on this library will be felt for a long time.” -Meriah

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Being one of the longest remaining staff members at the Carleton Place Public Library, Judi has been a part of my career and life for the past 17 years, and I can’t imagine this place without her. How many Tuesday nights did we commiserate over a heavy snowfall, or laugh endlessly as one of our young patrons visited with us at the front desk? She was my partner in crime during crazy hair Storytime sessions, my confidant while I worked on super-secret summer plans, and my guide when I needed advice on how to handle a problem with one of my class visits.

 

I’ll miss her quick wit, her genius with book recommendations, and her willingness to always give a new computer skill a try. But most of all, I’ll miss seeing her come through these doors, already mid-story about her walk in, with a wide smile and a question at the ready about my day. It’ll be a very different library without Judi.

 

I wish her many afternoon naps, plenty of time with her sweet granddaughter, and a treat basket that she can fill with her wonderful baking. Happy retirement, Judi!” – Heidi

 

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Years ago my brother-in-law called to tell me that my sister Robin was sick, so the next day I drove down to see her. The minute I walked in the door and looked at her I saw my late mother’s eyes looking at me. I knew she was terminally ill although everyone around her had such hope. Within three weeks she was diagnosed with the family disease called Lymphoma.

And so began the 3 hour return journey every second day to see her at the Kingston Cancer Hospital. Most times she was unconscious and did not know I was there. One day I sat in the waiting room and saw a copy of the teen book series “Sweet Valley High” and started reading it. Suddenly the book’s characters Jessica and Elizabeth Wakefield became people I could rely on to get me through the day. If you asked me today what the stories were about I could not tell you. But every second day I was at the Carleton Place library checking out “Sweet Valley High” books as I was living their normal lives in my mind.

Every time one of the nurses in the ICU unit would see me they would ask me what was going on in Sweet Valley High. While I sat beside my dying sister I read to her about the twin’s daily antics that did not include a cell phone or texting.  My sister died that August  and the only thing that got me though everything was continuing to read books. I think I read every Sweet Valley High Book in the Carleton Place library and not once did the librarian question why. All she ever did was stamp my books and keep me going with her words and love. Thank you Judi!

 

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McDiarmid Family– Murals and Vimy Ridge

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The McDiarmid Brothers of Carleton Place and World War I–Emma Kinsman-Please watch Emma’s video

The McDiarmid Brothers of Carleton Place and World War I

I was searching for something about a Munroe child being an acrobat in the New York World’s Fair and somehow I came across this video and text from the Carleton Place Library. This fits right in with our upcoming Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Gala Dinner featuring Julian Smith who will discuss his work on the restoration of the Vimy Ridge Memorial– I thought this was great.

McDiarmid Brothers— from The Carleton Place Library

We are so honoured and proud to share with you this local documentary prepared in 2007 to commemorate the 90thanniversary of the Battle at Vimy Ridge produced by our summer student, Emma Kinsman. The video was presented and placed at the Perth Regional Historica Fair in 2007.

From the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

The video centers on the McDiarmid brothers of Carleton Place. Four of the six McDiarmid brothers enlisted in the First World War with only 1 returning home. Harold and Victor McDiarmid were killed at Vimy Ridge, and Arthur, who returned home to die after being exposed to poisonous gas.

Following the war, Mary McDiarmid and her only surviving veteran son, Leo, unveiled the Cenotaph in Carleton Place which was created to honour the town’s fallen sons.

his documentary was made in 2007 to commemorate the 90th anniversary of the Battle at Vimy Ridge. It was produced by Emma Kinsman about the McDiarmid brothers of Carleton Place. Four of the sixMcDiarmid brothers enlisted in the First World War with only one returning home. Harold and Victor McDiarmid were killed at Vimy Ridge, and Arthur returned home to die after being exposed to poisonous gas. Following the war, Mary McDiarmid and her only surviving veteran son, Leo, unveiled the new Cenotaph in Carleton Place which was created to honour the town’s fallen sons.

 

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This is the second panel of the Giant Tiger Mural. It’s a full one! From left to right: Mary McDiarmid, local teacher and David Findlay, founder of the Findlay Foundry, with the Gillies McLaren sawmill and workers in the background, at center, an ariel view of Carleton Place showing the Findlay Foundry on the north bank of the river, a wagon load of stoves heading to the train station to be shipped and the CPR train bridge with a train heading north. Various lumber mills, churches and our town hall fill the background. Carleton Place has a full and varied history!–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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Please check out the event page here..

It’s Canada’s 150th birthday…
It’s the 120th anniversary of the Carleton Place Town Hall…
We are also honouring the 100th anniversary of Vimy Ridge.
Join us this year at our annual fundraising Heritage Dinner as we honour these milstones. Architect Julian Smith will discuss his work on the restoration of the Memorial. Recently named to the Order of Canada, Mr. Smith has worked in both the heritage and contemporary fields on culturally significant sites in Canada (including Carelton Place), the U.S., Europe and Asia.

Tickets are $50 per person (with a $25 tax receipt). Dinner by Leatherworks Catering, with live musical entertainment and a silent auction. More details to follow.
All proceeds raised enable the Society’s continuing support of the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, their exhibitions, programming and public education events. This is our major fundraising event of the year. Other annual fundraisers include the Junk and Disorderly Sale on March 25/26 and our Vintage Clothing Sale held this year from April 21 – 23.
Tickets available beginning January 23 at the Carleton Place Chamber of Commerce and at the Museum.–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

 

 

 

 

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Victor McDiarmid, age 18, poses with his sisters Jane and Evangeline at the Carleton Place Train Station in 1916. Victor was on his way overseas to fight in WWI with the 75th Battalion, 1st Central Ontario Regiment.

A high school student and skilled hockey player, Victor was one of four brothers who served in WWI. Only one came home.

Victor was reported “missing, presumed dead” at Vimy Ridge, April 8, 1917. Victor’s body was never found. His name is on the Vimy Memorial, Pas de Calais, France. We will remember.

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Photo of a McDiarmid lunch c. 1914 at their home on McArthur Avenue-Photo—Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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These McDiarmid girls posed by the rapids on McArthur Island in the spring of 1914.-Photo—Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
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McDiarmid ladies! A family Easter party c.1914.-Photo—Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Perth Courier, May 20, 1881

McDiarmid—Died, at Carleton Place on the 13th May, Ormand M. McDiarmid, youngest son of Mr. Duncan McDiarmid, aged 9 months and four days.

Perth Courier, Sept. 8, 1899

We regret to announce the death of Mrs. W.R. McGinnis of Carleton Place, from Bright’s Disease, on Friday morning last in her 48th (?) year.  The maiden name of the deceased was Matilda McDiarmid and she was a sister of Messrs. William, Duncan, and Robert McDiarmid of Carleton Place.  She was a member of the Baptist Church.  Her husband died 13 years ago of typhoid fever at Toronto

 

Perth Courier, July 30, 1897

James H. Reilly, once a resident of Carleton Place, died at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan on Thursday of last week.  The body was brought to Carleton Place by William McDiarmid, Jr., to be buried from the home of his uncle D. McNeely in Cram’s Cemetery.

 

 

Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 150th Birthday – Part 2

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0The Millstone has published its first instalment of 365 FACTS ABOUT MISSISSIPPI MILLS. It will be a series of posts for Canada’s 150th birthday this year — “365 Facts About Mississippi Mills.” So I thought I would begin to a few about Carleton Place.

The facts below are from the flyer passed out on January 1: Carleton Place-A Valley Town at Confederation 1867 by the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum. I have personally added some extra tidbits under the facts.

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Photo and text–These children attended Central School on Bridge Street where the post office stands today. They are pretty bundled up!… maybe the wood stove wasn’t throwing much heat that day? Taken in the mid 1920’s – note the bare electric bulb, inkwells, and map of North America.

Fact- School Children attended the Central School on Bridge Street, the older student’s attended Hurd’s Hall on Bridge Street-

Did you know the building was built to form the letter T so the whole student body could be under the eye of one teacher? Read how crowded the Central School became in: The ‘Crowded House’ of Central School in Carleton Place

Hurd’s Hall was used for a lot of purposes and finally turned into a residence. Did you know the building was once hit by a car? Read all the fact’s about Hurd’s Hall here: The Most Photographed Home in Carleton Place

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Photo

Fact-The town had a weekly newspaper the Carleton Place Herald and a Mechanic’s Institute with a circulating library for members.

The Carleton Place Library was established in March, 1846 as a subscription library under the management of the Carleton Place Library Association and Mechanics Institute.

Did you know the Carleton Place Herald once sold small pets? Read the rest here: What Was Going On at The Carleton Place Herald Office With the Birds and the Bees? The James Poole estate sold the Carleton Place Herald, founded in 1850, to William H. Allen and Samual J. Allen ; and sold the family’s large stone residence at Bridge Street and the Town Line Road to David Gillies, son-in-law of James Poole.  William H. Allen continued publication of the Herald for sixty years. Did you know there was once a terrible fire at the Herald building?  Read the rest here: In the Year 1923 —- “BHM”– (Before Howard McNeely)

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Related Reading-

Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 15oth-part 1

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

Kindle Me This-Support Your Local Libraries

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When I was young and trying to endure a bad childhood books were my best friends. In those days our High School did not have a library, and we looked forward to the quarterly visits from the travelling Bookmobile.

 

We used to climb up the stairs to the interior of the truck in anticipation of what we might find. What character of what book would I live through when times became unbearable? Maybe Nancy Drew would take me along on one of her missions while I would sit for hours on end by myself while my father tended to my mother in the hospital.

 

 

As I got older and went out on my own I would always have a book and a library card in my tote bag. One could just walk into any library and smell the books that would take you anywhere you wanted to go. I used to love to see the smiles of children as they handed their books to the librarian, knowing that their parents would read stories and expose them to the world of fascinating words and ideas.

 

Fourteen years ago my brother-in-law called to tell me that my sister Robin was sick, so the next day I drove down to see her. The minute I walked in the door and looked at her I saw my late mother’s eyes looking at me. I knew she was terminally ill although everyone around her had such hope. Within three weeks her bowels ruptured and she was diagnosed with the family disease called Lymphoma.

 

 

And so began the 3 hour return journey every second day to see her at the Kingston Cancer Hospital. Most times she was unconscious and did not know I was there. One day I sat in the waiting room and saw a copy of the teen book series “Sweet Valley High” and started reading it. Suddenly the book’s characters Jessica and Elizabeth Wakefield became people I could rely on to get me through the day.

 

 

If you asked me today what the stories were about I could not tell you. But every second day I was at the library checking out “Sweet Valley High” books as I was living their normal lives in my mind.

 

 

Why was I not reading something a little deeper you ask? The truth be told is I could not handle anything more than that and the librarian never questioned me. My life was full of canyons of chaos so I had to live in a fictional world to have some sort of emotional comfort.

 

Every time one of the nurses in the ICU unit would see me they would ask me what was going on in Sweet Valley High. While I sat beside my dying sister I read to her about the twin’s daily antics that did not include a cell phone or texting.

 

 

 My sister died that August after they pulled the plug, deeming that she had no quality of life left. A few months later they found a lump – this time on me. What should I do?  The only thing that got me though everything was continuing to read books.

 

I think I read every Sweet Valley High Book in the Carleton Place library and not once did they question why. All they ever did was stamp my books and keep me going with their words and love.

 

I walked into the library last week and got my first library card since my sister died. People remembered me and we talked of books and life. I wondered why real books are now being subbed by tablet readers like Kindle and they stop going to the library.

Kindle to me is like a Swanson’s TV dinner. It mimics a real meal but it isn’t quite all that it should be. It fills you up but never comes through with the extra treats. Sure you can download words to read but do you get the social contact or the satisfaction of seeing a real human being and touching a well read book? Everything is just too easy these days and people no longer want to make an effort to do things.

 

 

 

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I look at my new library card in my purse and smile. I am making the effort as these books and librarians got me through tough times in life. I could never see a reading tablet give me memories like a library full of books has given me. I thank the words of Francine Pascal and the Carleton Place Library for seeing me through. You can’t get things like that on a Kindle no matter what new issue they try and sell. They will never ever create an edition with a literary heart because only libraries have that.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News

Fires in Carleton Place–James Gillies House

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There have been many many fires in Carleton Place– especially when the oil  lamps burned bright. Today I was looking over a large list of Carleton Place fires that spanned from 1851 until 1987.

What was life like when candles and oil lamps were all we had to light our villages towns and cities with? Dangerous, definitely, but never dull. No one really knows whether we were born with an instinctive fear of the dark, or we acquired it gradually as a result of the myriad awful dangers like fire that emerged after night fell. As a rough estimate, one 60-watt electric bulb generates the light of approximately 100 candles.

 

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Carleton Place Ocean Wave Dept on Bridge Street 1895- Photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Valerie Edwards also sent me a story about the Edwards Grocery  Store fire in 1905 which is also up today.

When you drive down Beckwith Street and see the empty spots, it is a reminder of the 1910 fire. The park in back of the library once held this stately home belonging to the Gillies family and today we remember it and the Zion Church, Drill Shed, St. Andrew’s Manse, and the list goes on.

 

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James Gillies (1840-1909) home built in 1884 and sat on the corner of Franklin and Judson and destroyed by fire in the fire of 1911.  The house was valued at $20,000. This was what was left after the fire.  

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Photo from The Ottawa Journal, 21 May 1910, SatPage 12

 

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Wendy LeBlanc–
This fabulous home was destroyed in the 1910 fire that covered a good portion of its neighbourhood including the old Zion Church at the corner of Beckwith and Albert.
When we first came across this photo on the Museum, we were certain it wasn’t a CP home. Some follow-up sleuthing through the National Archives gave us the info we needed.
A couple of interesting facts … the home was only 25 years olb when it burned. Mrs. Gillies who was by then a widow donated the land to the town to be used in perpetuity as a public space. I remember tennis courts there ( the south-west corner of Franklin and Judson corner) when I was a kid.
By the way, Mrs. Gillies’ generous donation preceded the much-lauded similar donation of the Stewart family (Stewart Park) in Perth.

RELATED READING- Carleton Place Fires

The Howard Little- Olympia Fire on Bridge Street

Food Fit For Olympians in Carleton Place

The Moffat Street Fire in Carleton Place– Archie Hudson

In the Year 1923 —- “BHM”– (Before Howard McNeely)

Tales From the Maguire Block in Carleton Place

The Almonte Fire of 1909

Do You Know What This Building Used to Look Like in Carleton Place?

The Rencraft Fire Dept Photo Brings Back a Familiar Name

The Edwards Grocery Fire

Scotch Corners Union S.S. #10 School Fire

Who You Gonna Call? The Fire Boxes of Carleton Place

What if You Had a Fire and No One Came?

Fire, Could End All You’ve Become — Photos of those that Protect Carleton Place

Burning Down the House in Carleton Place

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!- Volume 1- Part 2

Carleton Place Main Street Fire — Okilman’s

The “Chosen Friends” of Carleton Place –The Fire of 1904

Trying to Straighten Out the Moffat Street Fire in Carleton Place–Archie Hudson? Harold Fischer?

Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire

Fire Drills, Loud Bells and a Whole Lot of Noise — Learning How Not to Burn in School

The Carleton Place Library Fire

I Wish Adults Knew —– Bad Art Night at the Carleton Place Library

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It was a chilly Tuesday night outside the Carleton Place Library.  Inside, there was a nice cozy room with adults, not kids, making Bad Art. First you had to draw yourself on paper on top of your head, then  you progressed to the real stuff. For a final reward medals and tootise roll pops were handed out to all.

And so it goes. There is no bad art. There are no bad artists. There are just people working toward something unseen. Being an adult can be fun when you are acting as a child like at Bad Art Night. After all adults are only kids grown up anyways.

Right?

So what kind of questions do we as adults and kids want everyone to know?

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That I am very talented but I hide my talents because I have stage fright.

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I wish everyone understood how to work their phones. —Kayla Barnes, Grade 4

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I wish you knew how to stop a nagging sister, or brother.

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I wish you understood what kids were talking about most of the time. —Sam Mazza Bergeron, Grade 3

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That we don’t get some of the words they tell us. —Cleo Miller-Young, Grade 4

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I wish you knew that sometimes my smile is a broken smile. I wish you understood my vision.—Tyler Smith, Grade 4

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That you have a right for everything and you learn from mistakes, just let mistakes happen– you learn from mistakes! —Morgan Curtis, Grade 3

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That everyone needs a friend. —Samantha Evans, Grade 3

And so, everyone made friends on Bad Art Night- Please join us next time!

101 Beckwith Street
Carleton Place, ON K7C 2T3
(613) 257-2702
Monday to Thursday: 1:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m
Friday: 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Saturday: 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
All materials can be signed out for three weeks, with the exception of DVDs, which can be signed out for one week.

Book Drop Hours:

Monday – Friday 9:00 am to 1:30 pm
Saturday 9:00 am to 10:00 am

Email: mcaswell@carletonplace.ca