Tag Archives: carleton place high school

CPHS High School Commencement 1956– Who Do You Know?

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CPHS High School Commencement 1956– Who Do You Know?

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal03 Nov 1956, SatPage 48

 

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Norma Neilson today

 

Thanks to Penny Trafford we have this update and found one of our CPHS graduates yesterday.. Norma Neilson–her Father owned the Lyme Kiln on Napoleon Street in Carleton Place-

Norma’s Mom Veva was an active Church member, loved her flower gardens and was well known around the Valley for her beautiful quilts. Veva won many ribbons in all the Fall Fairs around. The Neilsons owned the brick house next to Penny before Stewart Comba. Veva had her flower gardens on the lot that her house sits on before they moved up the street and she had about three lots along Elizabeth Street filled with flower beds, which all have houses on them now.

and if you graduated in 1956 chances are you danced to this..

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

1967 Carleton Place High School Grads.. Name them?

High School Confidential — More Vintage Shenanigans at Carleton Place High School

Reefer Madness at Carleton Place High School

Straight Outta Carleton Place High School–Cheerleaders and Things

Straight Outta Carleton Place High School–Prom Tickets

Straight Outta Carleton Place High School –Hurdis–isms

Doo Wah Diddy Diddy —The 1964 Royalty? Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

Who Were These CPHS Students? Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

Straight Outta Carleton Place High School — Wava McDaniel Baker

Straight Outta Carleton Place High –Teachers 1963

The Improved Stereo Remix of 1963 –Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

If You Ever Smoked in the Boys Room—– Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

1963 Rule of Thumb for a Strong Physique — Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

The History of Mom Dancing –Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

Dissecting a Rat- Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

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Workin’ My Way Back to 1980- 1981 CPHS

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Check out the CPHS Reunion Facebook page and the Carleton Place High School Alumni Facebook page

CPHS Clothing from the Time Worn Display at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

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1967 Carleton Place High School Grads.. Name them?

Straight Outta Carleton Place High School–Prom Tickets

Straight Outta Carleton Place High School –Hurdis–isms

Doo Wah Diddy Diddy —The 1964 Royalty? Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

Who Were These CPHS Students? Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

Straight Outta Carleton Place High School — Wava McDaniel Baker

Straight Outta Carleton Place High –Teachers 1963

The Improved Stereo Remix of 1963 –Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

If You Ever Smoked in the Boys Room—– Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

1963 Rule of Thumb for a Strong Physique — Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

The History of Mom Dancing –Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

Dissecting a Rat- Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News

 

Is Santa a World Fusion Eater?

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In Carleton Place he loves pancakes–Come see him at the CPHS’s Annual Breakfast with Santa: Sat., Nov 26, 8-11am
Breakfast with Santa will run this Saturday. Live music from the CPHS band, a pancake breakfast, crafts and, of course, Mr and Mrs Claus will be available— $5 for children and $8 for adults. All community members are welcome to join in and get Saturday the day of the Santa Claus parade off to a rocking start!

So what does Santa eat?

In the United States and Canada, Santa is known for his penchant for cookies, so children across the country leave him cookies by the baker’s dozen along with a nice glass of milk to wash it down. This ritual of leaving out cookies and milk for Santa (and sometimes carrots for his reindeer,) has become a tradition in the U.S., but it’s not the standard worldwide. Here’s a guide to Santa’s buffet as he travels across the globe.

Australia

Santa starts his Christmas Eve journey with a nice cold beer, courtesy of little kids in Australia. They may also leave some cookies and milk and even a few carrots for the reindeer. But the beer comes first — maybe it’s to keep Santa warm on the long night ahead.

Sweden

After that beer and his long flight, Santa — or Tomte, a mythological creature from Scandinavian folklore traditionally associated with the winter season — might be feeling a little tired. Fortunately, the good children of Sweden leave out a cup of coffee to keep him awake for the rest of his journey.

Denmark

The next stop on Santa’s buffet is Denmark, where he can find a bowl of risengrod, or rice pudding, waiting for him on Christmas Eve. According to Denmark lore, the magical elves, Nisser and Tomte, will cause mischief if the bowl of risengrod is missing.

The Netherlands

The children in the Netherlands leave gifts for Sinterklaas’ — that’s the horse — instead of the big man himself. Kids leave carrots, hay, and water and in exchange are given marzipan, chocolate coins, hot cocoa and mandarin oranges.

Germany

By now, Santa and his steed have had enough to eat and drink, but he does take time to read the personalized letters that children leave out for Christkind, the German’s nickname for him. In the morning, German children wake up to find that their letters are gone and presents have been left in their place.

France

In France, children leave out carrots for the reindeer and biscuits for Santa or Père Noël as he is known here. Some children leave these treats in their shoes and in the morning the treats are gone and their shoes have been filled with small toys and trinkets.

United Kingdom

By the time Santa gets to the U.K., he’s ready for a proper meal. Fortunately, the kids here leave him mince pie — filled with dried fruit or the more ancient tradition of meat pies. The children also leave him a nip of sherry to chill his weary bones.

Ireland

This might be the stop that Santa Claus looks forward to most of all. In Ireland, the children treat him to a pint of Guinness and maybe another mince pie or two. Now Jolly Old St.Nick is ready for his leap over the Atlantic.

Argentina

Kids in Argentina spoil Santa’s reindeer after their long flight from Europe, leaving them hay and water to sustain them through the rest of the night.

Chile

In Chile, children leave pan de pascua for Viejo Pascuero, or Old Man Christmas. This special treat is a spongy, rich cake flavored with rum and filled with dried fruits and nuts.

United States

Kids in the U.S. treat Santa to a buffet of cookies and milk as he heads across the country delivering his goods. The traditional treat is gingerbread, but sugar cookies, chocolate chip, and macaroons work just as well. And many kids remember Santa’s reindeer, leaving carrots and oats for them too.

Related reading:

Carleton Place Santa Claus Parade Photos

Santa Claus Parade 2015 — Photos- Bob McDonald

Carleton Place Santa Claus Parade 2007

The Carleton Place Santa Claus Parade 2003

Carleton Place Christmas Parade 1987

The Night Santa Claus Came to Town – Holiday Parade Photos! 2012

What Would You Do With a Carleton Place Scarf?

Stories from a Photograph–The Class of 1944-1945

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Video sent in by a reader

Although the fighting was overseas, the repercussions of total war were felt in nearly all areas of the nation’s social, political, and economic life. Education was no exception.In elementary schools, high schools, and universities, the war affected enrolment, the availability of teachers and professors, lessons and curriculum, extracurricular activities, and student culture. It also brought militarized forms of student involvement and spurred patriotic fundraising, salvaging, saving, and thrift campaigns regarded as essential to the war effort at home. Through their education, children, youth, and young adults were taught lessons about the war’s meaning that allowed them to make sense of their role in this global conflict. Attention to documents and materials illustrating the war’s impact on education furthers our understanding of the Second World War.

 

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Photo from the Carleton Place Canadian files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum–I took this photo from one of the newspapers over a year and half ago.. I wish I knew where it came from so I could provide the hidden names.:(

 

Despite being far from the fields of battle, Canadian educational institutions were both directly and indirectly affected by the war. Thousands of students and recent graduates of high schools and universities rushed to enlist, their names carefully and proudly recorded by their alma mater. On a broader level, the conflict impacted the expansion of schooling and altered public perceptions of the role of education in society. The diversion of funds and government energies resulted in the cutting of courses, reductions in supplies and equipment, and postponed the construction of additional schools and facilities needed to accommodate increased enrolment. The war impacted practically every phase of the school curriculum and, at least for its duration, altered athletics, the activities of societies and clubs, and social events. At the same time, the manpower crisis affected teacher training and resulted in a teacher shortage.Wartime Canada

A reader sent me the short video that she took of a friend’s photo. This individual went to Carleton Place High School and still had this photo from 1944-1945. Because it was wartime she was one of the very few that could afford to buy one as money was short for most families. Hard to believe isn’t it? If you notice a lot of the boys were in uniform as it was mandatory to be in the cadets and wear your uniforms.

 

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                               Allan Lim (Courtesy of the Lim family)– from the Lim Family site

If you pause the video there is a tall Asian man in the back row on the left hand side. That would either be Allan or Bill Lim. Allan, keen to contribute to Canada’s war effort in the Second World War, joined the RCAF in 1942 at aged 18. He was the only Chinese man in his group of 27 pilot trainees. His brother, Bill, a chemical engineer, married Evelyn Yip, one of the few Chinese women to serve with the Canadian navy.

So that her children could continue in school rather than dropping out to work in the café (New York Cafe), Mrs. Lim (Helen) hired married women in town to help. They, in turn, were happy to be working. These women became wonderful friends of the family. I have placed links below to stories about the Lim family.

From one photo we found out another link to Carleton Place past. Please share your photos.. thank you.

Related reading

The Lim Family, Carleton Place

Women Who Made a Difference in Carleton Place — Mrs. Lim of the New York Cafe

In Memory of Former Carleton Place Resident Bill Lim

New York New York in Carleton Place By Terry Skillen

Any of These CPHS Students Your Grandparents?

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Photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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RELATED READING

Fast Times at Carleton Place High

Straight Outta Carleton Place High School–Cheerleaders and Things

Straight Outta Carleton Place High School–Prom Tickets

Straight Outta Carleton Place High School –Hurdis–isms

Doo Wah Diddy Diddy —The 1964 Royalty? Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

Who Were These CPHS Students? Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

Straight Outta Carleton Place High School — Wava McDaniel Baker

Straight Outta Carleton Place High –Teachers 1963

The Improved Stereo Remix of 1963 –Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

If You Ever Smoked in the Boys Room—– Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

1963 Rule of Thumb for a Strong Physique — Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

The History of Mom Dancing –Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

Dissecting a Rat- Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

Fast Times at Carleton Place High

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Carleton Place High School Principal J. R. Mc Neill breathed a sigh of relief when his staff of 17 teachers and 357 students moved into the new High School two storey addition on Lake Ave West which cost $615,00.00 in the 50s.

The original 14-room school was built in 1924 to accommodate 250 students. With over 357 students cramming the halls of the High School- it forced Mr. McNeill to stagger lunch hours, convert the auditorium into two classrooms and abolishing the library to make another full time classroom.

The new addition was to contain a double gym, science  labs, a new shop, four classrooms, cafeteria room, music room, new change rooms and a  future metal shop. It would boost capacity to 520 students.

 

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Photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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RELATED READING

Straight Outta Carleton Place High School–Cheerleaders and Things

Straight Outta Carleton Place High School–Prom Tickets

Straight Outta Carleton Place High School –Hurdis–isms

Doo Wah Diddy Diddy —The 1964 Royalty? Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

Who Were These CPHS Students? Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

Straight Outta Carleton Place High School — Wava McDaniel Baker

Straight Outta Carleton Place High –Teachers 1963

The Improved Stereo Remix of 1963 –Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

If You Ever Smoked in the Boys Room—– Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

1963 Rule of Thumb for a Strong Physique — Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

The History of Mom Dancing –Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

Dissecting a Rat- Straight Outta Carleton Place High School

 

Update on Miss Powell from CPHS- John Edwards

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Photo of Miss Powell from Sherri Iona-This is Olive’s pic in 1968 yearbook. Not sure what year she retired but she was there when I graduated gr 12 in fall 71.
Yesterday you read Terry Kirkpatrick’s very funny story about Carleton Place teacher Miss Powell.Today iconic Lanark County historical architect submitted his memories about our Miss Powell. You can also read more about John and his fight to keep Lanark County architecture standing in related links.

I have very fond memories of Miss Powell. I recall everyone on the first day of the Grade Nine French class being given a sheet of foolscap upon which we would write down our parent’s names (maiden names of mums), siblings, aunts, uncles, etc. Miss Powell sought to understand who you were and whether any strengths or weaknesses in acquiring French were ‘genetic’.
On occasion, there were tears as the CPHS students (usually boys!) would butcher proper Parisian French pronunciation using their God-given Lanark Cty twang. Nevertheless, there was a genuine caring for her students. For years after graduating from CPHS a group of friends (Anne Morris, Andrea Armour, Bob Young, Liana Coleman, Scott Ferguson, Nancy Ryan, and several others would go to the Powell home on Dec. 24th and sing Christmas carols. Invariably, we were invited in for Turtles as they were listening to the Carol Service from King’s College in Cambridge. THANKS, Miss Powell.

That close-knit town seems long-gone now-John Edwards

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More about John Edwards and just one story about his many fights to keep just one of Lanark County buildings alive.

Sherri Iona–Funny we called them The Aunts, she and Fern. They were always together. But they were known around town as “old maids”. Sad . . . Wouldn’t happen today. As they got older, Dad took care of them. Then he died young, 64, and Aunt Joyce took over.

Sandy IwaniwI lived next to the Powell sisters when I first came to teach in Carleton Place. I started teaching in September of 1971 and they were both retired by then. I used to try to help them out when I could and spent many an afternoon listening to their stories with my cup of tee. They enjoyed having company.
Sandra RattrayI just loved Miss Powell. She was a great teacher. She also sang in the choir at our church and she treated me with extra care.

In memory of Miss Powell

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