Tag Archives: cancer

Love Comes to Carleton Place — In Memory of Samantha Mitchell part 2

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Love Comes to Carleton Place — In Memory of Samantha Mitchell part 2
The Pink Free Library coming to Carleton Place in honour of Samantha Mitchell

I just started writing and I am already crying. There was a ‘celebration of life’ Saturday at the KIN Vineyards in Carp, Ontario and I was crying there too. Of course you could rent me out to weddings, funerals and bar mitzvahs— but the passing of Samantha Mitchell was not only a huge loss for the family, but for the community. If you don’t know who Sam was please click here-Samantha Mitchell –Warrior

Also check what she has written in her blog and on her Facebook page. For seven years Samantha Mitchell had metastatic breast cancer and it never stopped her once. Even though she went through hundreds of rounds of radiation and chemotherapy, multiple craniotomies and dozens of hospital stays she carried on her advocacy for the breast cancer community. She wasn’t afraid of anything anymore and cancer didn’t bring her to her knees; it brought her to her feet.

Did you know this powerhouse of a woman help raised $30,000 for cancer research? Why I Fundraise For MBC click -and on Saturday the giving kept going. Now in Samantha’s memory they are erecting ” Sammy’s Memorial Little Free Library” on Lake Ave East.

We have checked with Len at the Town Hall and all is kosherfor the placement, but now the family is collecting donations for the free library with all extra monies to be donated to Sammy’s favourite cancer charity : ReThink Breast Cancer

So if you have an extra dollar or two think of sending some dollars for Sammy and watch out for the pink library coming to Lake Ave East.

We are currently accepting e transfer donations directly to myself (jeff@thestashandco.com). These funds will go directly to the construction of the little free library, bronze plaque, and surrounding garden. Any extra funds will be donated to ReThink Breast Cancer, the charity that Samantha worked with. Thank you so much! Jeff MItchell

Jeff and Sammy Mitchell

Amanda WintonI have this really beautiful and vivid memory of you dancing at Zaphod’s to Robyn’s Dancing On My Own. – but there you were on the dance floor, looking like you had just walked out of a glossy fashion magazine.I am so thankful to have been on that dance floor with you, both literally and metaphorically. You are exceptional in every way.

KIN Vineyards–2225 Craig’s Side Rd, Carp, ON K0A 1L0

Bianca Adam

June 16  · I’m so incredibly grateful I got to know you in this thing we call life. I’ll happily be your Fred Flinstone any day. 😉

“If it was my wife or sister I wouldn’t recommend they do anymore treatment. In fact, your quality of life may be longer and better”.
It’s been the better part of 6 years and being given permission to be still now, to be grateful and applauded for what I’ve been able to accomplish feels good. My mantra has always been to fight for those living with MBC when they couldn’t anymore – now the time has come when I hope someone will do that for me.
This time I’m left with now is this insurmountable decision – one that you think you’ve made when you’re well (“I would never jeapordize any of my QOL!), to letting that fear creep in (“well maybe I can handle one more treatment”).
I know I want to enjoy the time I do have – which looks a lot like printing photos for new vinyl photo albums, getting my health records documented on my blog, seeing my friends and family, putting some early work into this years Turning the Page on Cancer, snuggling dogs and (hopefully) being able to see the gorgeous end of the renovation.
I still desperately want everyone around me to be normal. I know that this can make others feel uncomfortable and not know what to say or how to react, just know I appreciate your trying.
As for a timeline, I know after 6+ years no one can tell me definitively how to navigate this. My oncologists have told me to expect sooner then later but they aren’t sure.
That’s the cancer update I never wanted to post. Now it’s done and I feel an immense weight lifted off me. I posted more in my blog which is at the link in my profile.
#metastaticbreastcancer #talkingtomycancer #stage4breastcancer
http://un-organizedmind.blogspot.com/…/dying-with-grace…
Greg ThaggardYou humble and strengthen me Sam
Joanne BrunetSamantha from the day I met you… I saw someone who did everything what’s right and did it with Grace!!! ❤️❤️
Emma Elizabeth Good-JobI love you Sam for all your courage, strength, honesty, grace and pure heart of gold. You are an inspiration of hope to literally everyone! Including me… big hug and I miss so dearly seeing you and your mom. Bless you for being you. 💕
Samantha DreilingLove you Sam, you are a light to so many. Thank you for always sharing your story and being so open and vulnerable. You are a true gift. I can’t begin to imagine what you’ve been through, but you’ve blessed the world by being you 💕 I hope you get to do as much as you can and feel happiness and peace in your heart 💓💓💓 sending love always, Sammi xo
Jeff NeedhamYour bravery is everlasting inspiration. I see it in your family into our community you are a tour de force Samantha. I love ❤️ these posts you bring brilliant perspective where no one I have ever witnessed has. You are a tremendous Champion of our cause. Inspirational life of a trophy 🏆 wife…anyone who gets a glimpse gets fuel for their 💔s…I want to play all the music 🎶 you love ❤️ all at once every time I read one of your posts.
Glenn JungSamantha Mitchell Sam, you are a inspiration to many and should be to all. With how you have shown us true courage, dignity, resilience and compassion through this. You are loved by so many and cherished by even more. Thankyou for continuing to share this journey with all of us. We are sending you big hugs!!

Collecting donations for the free library with all extra monies to be donated to Sammy’s favourite cancer charity : ReThink Breast Cancer

E transfer donations directly to (jeff@thestashandco.com). These funds will go directly to the construction of the little free library, bronze plaque, and surrounding garden. Any extra funds will be donated to ReThink Breast Cancer, the charity that Samantha worked with. Thank you so much! Jeff Mitchell

“Today will never come again. Be a blessing. Be a friend. Encourage someone. Take time to care. Let your words heal, and not wound.”

Read more about Sam here —Samantha Mitchell –Warrior

This is not goodbye Samantha Mitchell– we will keep the memories alive

Samantha Mitchell –Warrior

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Samantha Mitchell –Warrior
Samantha Mitchell
October 13, 2020  · 

The number of women expected to get breast cancer in her lifetime: 1 in 8

The number of women expected to be diagnosed with Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC) in her lifetime:Unknown

There is no data and statistics recorded for those of us living with stage IV. When we progress from early to late stage it isn’t recorded. We want more research, but we don’t even have the basis to found it on.

I’m fighting tirelessly to create stage 4 awareness. We need you to be an MBC ally – it shows you understand, will advocate and support #MBC.

Last night I shared Jeff Mitchell’s Facebook post about his wife Samantha’s passing. I had put up a post of my own, but later took it down— it is not what Samantha would have wanted. Not being able to sleep I was up until 3 am reading what she had written in her blog and on her Facebook page. Sammy would not have wanted us to call her an angel like I did last night– even though she was. She would have wanted me to keep spreading the word about breast cancer, I know that. I know she would not want us to cry, but insist we all carry on and continue her cause. But, my eyes are still red and puffy missing someone I didn’t know that well, but yes, I knew her heart well.

The first time I met her was in a line at the IDA Post Office. She came up to me and said, “Hi Linda!” I laughed and asked her how she knew me. She said, “People have told me, you will know her when you see her!” I guess she was right, but I was so impressed with our initial meeting that it reminded me to tell her a story I wrote about a pink frypan I had bought years ago to support Breast Cancer Awareness Month. 

Anytime that I glanced at it I thought of all those that have been ravaged by this horrible disease. No matter how hard I tried, I could not bring myself to use the pan. I did not want to scorch the sides, mimicking cancer invading the body–nor did I want to get the pan dirty. But then I asked myself if cancer was clean. If the pink colour faded from washing, would the hope of a cure fade too?

I looked at it day after day, and thought that if I didn’t use it, I was giving up hope for the pan, and for the people that suffer from breast cancer. Finally I took it down and laid it on the stove. I watched the butter melt with tears in my eyes. I cooked slowly with it, and thought about how silly I had been. I use it everyday now in celebration for those I do not know, and for those I do. Sammy smiled when I told her the story and I told her I would keep sharing her story, which I did, and will continue. After all, if you don’t have faith, then what do you have? Absolutely nothing. No cures, no hope, and and in my case–an unused pink frying pan.

Samantha Mitchell is in Carleton Place, Ontario.

For seven years Samantha Mitchell had metastatic breast cancer and it never stopped her once. Even though she went through hundreds of rounds of radiation and chemotherapy, multiple craniotomies and dozens of hospital stays she carried on her advocacy for the breast cancer community. She wasn’t afraid of anything anymore and cancer didn’t bring her to her knees; it brought her to her feet. Whether you’re a mother or father, or a husband or a son, or a niece or nephew or uncle, breast cancer doesn’t discriminate and today Jeff and Joyce Mitchell’s family mourn the loss of a daughter-in-law and Sammy’s husband Jeff mourns the loss of his wife.

Sammy, you were braver than you believed, stronger than you seemed, smarter than you thought, and twice as beautiful as you’d ever imagined. I knew that the first time I met you. I know you would want the world to see what breast cancer does so I am putting up all kinds of pictures. If Sammy was here she would say,

”Never give up–life is worth living”, and as Sammy and I both know–scars are actually tattoos with better stories.

Linda Seccaspina, July 5, 2021

The family asks in lieu of flowers donations can be made to Rethink Breast Cancer , which was an MBC charity close to Samanthas heart.

Samantha Mitchell is in Carleton Place, Ontario.
June 9 at 4:05 PM  · 

Cancer has allowed me to appreciate how much love and support I have around me. It has given me a sense of worth and accomplishment with the success of @turningthepageoncancer. This year, it has also allowed me to have some stability so I am able to enjoy “me” time. I’m thankful for all of this. I still don’t ever want you to tell me “everything happens for a reason” though 😬

Samantha Mitchell

February 4

  · 

Samantha Mitchell
October 25, 2020  · 

Why I Fundraise For MBC click

Rosemary McNaughton- Little Red Door Arrives at Bates and Innes

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Rosemary McNaughton- Little Red Door Arrives at Bates and Innes

 

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The drive to target women began before the Second World War and gathered pace throughout the rest of the 20th century. “Women are paying a deadly price for being targeted by tobacco advertisers in the post-war years, health experts claimed yesterday.”

Women were targeted but, according to the graph on the CRUK website, their smoking prevalence remained fairly constant between 1948 and 1975, whence it began decreasing. Obviously the advertising campaign wasn’t too successful! Yet here we have ASH creating the impression that it was, trying to deceive us that it’s now the “pretty” packaging, covered with health warnings and gory images, that is “appealing”.

 

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All photos Ottawa Journal April 20 1960-Carleton Place Bates and Innes Mill

 

In April of 1960 millworkers walked through the doors of good health in Lanark County. Rosemary McNaughton was part of the Canadian Cancer Society’s Little Red Door program. On April 20 the workers at Bates & Innes in Carleton Place shared McNaughton’s films, literature and words of advice.

The registered nurse set up her movie projector in an unused wool- carding room on an uneven floor. She laid out pamphlets in vice president’s Jack Stewart’s office and talked to everyone about what she knew about the truths and the myths of cancer. She visited with workers and even spent and hour with worried staff that had stricken family members.

By closing time the folks that worked at the Bates and Innes mill knew all about the seven signs of cancer. That was 1960, and here it is 2017 and there is still no cure.

 

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Jack Stewart and Ms. McNaughton who was on her way to the mills in Appleton and Smiths Falls and District

 

 

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Max Keeping 1942-2015

The Peculiar Case of Jeanetta Lena McHardy

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The Peculiar Case of Jeanetta Lena McHardy

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Distressing Results Following Vaccination—A Young Daughter of David McHardy of Fergus, the Victim—Has Suffered the Most Intense Agony —Doctors Failed to Help her. 

Author’s note–This story about Dr. Williams’ Pink Pills has flashed by me a few times and today I decided to investigate what happened to this young woman who had such a “miraculous cure”. Before the internet, maybe it would not be such an easy access, and what really happened to young Jenneta Lena McHardy of Fergus, Ontario might have never come to light. Another voice asking for their tale to be told?

Almonte Gazette June 18 1897

From the Fergus News-Record

Nearly every person in this section is acquainted with Mr. David McHardy,
the popular leader of St. Andrew’s church choir, Fergus, Ontario. Our reporter called upon Mr. McHardy at his home in Upper Nichol recently, and from him and his estimable wife a tale of terrible suffering was elicited, suffering that has brought a once exceptionally strong and healthy child to the verge of the grave.

The subject of the sketch,(Jeanette)Lena McHardy, is fourteen years of age, and her parents say she has not grown any since her illness began some two years and a
half ago. Her terrible suffering dates from the time she was vaccinated in June, 1894, and what she has undergone has aroused the deepest sympathy of all the friends of the family.

In conversation with Mr. McHardy and his wife, the following facts were
elicited : “Two years ago last June,” said the father, “Lena was vaccinated by a doctor in Fergus. The arm was very sore and swollen all summer, and became so bad that it was a mass of sores from the shoulder to the elbow.”

 

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In October 1894 a large lump appeared on her back, over one of the lungs. The doctor who vaccinated her treated her all that summer, calling very frequently, but the
medicine he gave her did no good and she was growing weaker and weaker.

When the lump broke out on her back another doctor was consulted, who said she was in a very bad state of health. Her constitution appeared to be completely undermined, and her appetite had completely failed. The last doctor called in gave some outward applications, and lanced the gathering, but it did not give the patient any benefit. Nine such gatherings have appeared since that time, but each broke and disappeared of its own accord, only, however, to be followed by another.

The child became very puny, and little or no food would remain in her stomach.
At night ‘She would fairly rave with the pain in her arm and back, and consequently her trouble was aggravated by a loss of sleep. She had the best of attendance but to no avail,and she was slowly but surely sinking.

Friends advised a treatment with Dr. Williams’ Pink Pills and as a last resort they were tried. To the surprise of both parents and friends Lena began to improve soon after beginning the use of the pills. Her appetite returned, she became stronger and her general health with Dr. Williams’ Pink Pills that her parents are looking for a complete cure.

Mr and Mrs. McHardy thank Dr. Williams’ Pink Pills  for the present improved condition of their child, as they have done her more good than the scores of bottles of doctor’s medicine which she took. Dr. Williams’ Pink Pills are a blood builder and nerve restorer. They supply the blood with its life and health-giving properties, thus driving disease from the system.

There are numerous pink coloured imitations, against which the public are warned. The genuine Pink Pills and can only be had only in boxes the wrapper around which- bears the fall trade mark,

“Dr. Williams’ Pink Pills for Pale People.” Refuse all others.

Author’s Note-

Yes, there really was a McHardy family and Lena was Jeannette Lena McHardy’s second name (she was Jenneta Lena McHardy in the ancestry archives).  Born September 12, 1884.  She died September 12,1898, a little over a year after this was in the newspaper. I looked up her symptoms and and she probably had a form of cancer called neuroblastoma. While the ferrous sulphate ingredient in the Pink Pills would have had a genuine effect against anemia–but they were no cure for cancer. Her cause of death listed was blood poisoning.

 

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Almonte Gazette

 

historicalnotes

Yes, there really is a McHardy family and Lena was Jeannette Lena McHardy’s second name (she was Jenneta Lena McHardy in the ancestry archives).  Born September 12, 1884.  She died September 12,1898 a little over a year after this was in the newspaper. I looked up her symptoms and and she probably had a form of cancer called neuroblastoma. While the ferrous sulphate ingredient in the Pink Pills would have had a genuine effect against anemia– they were no cure for cancer.

Name Jenneta Lena McHardy
Event Type Burial
Event Date 1898
Event Place Fergus, Wellington, Ontario, Canada

Birth Date 12 Sep 1884
Death Date 06 Feb 1898
Affiliate Record Identifier 61538055
Cemetery Belsyde Cemetery

Birth: Sep. 12, 1884
Guelph
Wellington County
Ontario, Canada
Death: Feb. 6, 1898
Guelph
Wellington County
Ontario, Canada

Daughter of David McHardy & Annie Thomson.Birth record shows first name as “Janitta Lina”; death record shows it as “Jenneta Lina”; gravestone shows only “Lena”

Death record shows date of death, Feb. 6th; stone carved Feb 8th.

Cause of death: blood poisoning, 14 yrs.

Family links:
Parents:
David McHardy (1847 – 1937)
Annie Thomson McHardy (1859 – 1932)

Siblings:
Jenneta Lena McHardy (1884 – 1898)
Roy Marshall McHardy (1889 – 1969)*
Lloyd Moffatt McHardy (1893 – 1976)*

*<span class="fakeLink" style="color: #000088; text-decoration: underline;" title="header=[  Reverse Relationships:] body=[This relationship was not directly added to this memorial. Rather, it is calculated based on information added to the related person’s memorial. For example: if Joe Public is linked to Jane Public as a spouse, a reciprocal link will automatically be added to Jane Public’s memorial. ] fade=[on] fadespeed=[.09]”>Calculated relationship

Burial:
Belsyde Cemetery
Fergus
Wellington County
Ontario, Canada

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David McHardy, the youngest son, who succeeded his father on the homestead, married Annie Thompson and their family included George, Stanley, Roy, Lloyd and Jeanette. (Lena). If you look her up on ancestry.com she is listed as Janetta Lina MchardyGeorge McHardy
George McHardy arrived in Upper Nichol in 1835, when he purchased the farm of Donald Wallace. A native of Perthshire, Scotland, his wife was Margaret Marshall, and their family was composed of James, George, John, Edward, David, Catherine, Margaret and Agnes.

Roy McHardy, who married Viola Allan, had a grocery store in Fergus, and also engaged in the milling business, while Lloyd McHardy, who married a daughter of J.B. Chalmers, was a successful hardware merchant in Fergus.
The following item appeared in the Fergus News-Record of November 1, 1900, under the heading of “Coffee and Peanuts”:
“Who would have believed that fully matured coffee and peanuts were grown within a mile of Fergus this past summer. Well such is the case and the grower of same is David McHardy of Nichol”.
When David McHardy left Nichol, his farm was purchased by James A. Martin

 

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Dr Williams’ Pink Pills for Pale People–

There’s another big-business remedy, this time originating in Canada. “Dr Williams” was a brand name, and the pills were manufactured by George T. Fulford of Brockville, Ontario. Born in 1852, Fulford went into the patent medicine business in 1886 and four years later bought the rights to the Pink Pills recipe from Dr William Jackson for $53.01. The Pills arrived in Britain by 1893, and the company had premises on Holborn Viaduct, London.

The Pink Pills included ferrous sulphate, so they would have had a geniune effect against anaemia, but they were weaker and far more expensive than the ordinary iron pills commonly prescribed by physicians.

Fulford, who was appointed to the Senate in 1900, used an “advertorial” style to promote his products. The ads, like the one below,  appeared to be news stories reporting a miracle in some distant town – the miracle always turning out to be a result of someone taking Dr Williams’ Pink Pills.

In 1905, Senator Fulford had the dubious honour of becoming the first Canadian to be killed in an automobile accident, but his company remained in business until 1989.–The Quack Doctor

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (US

 

relatedreading

It’s Electrifying! Dr Scott’s Electric Corset

Did You Know Who was Cooking in Back of Lancaster’s Grocery Store? Dr. Howard I Presume! – Part 3

One of Us– Memories of Bill Bagg

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Photo- Linda Seccaspina

Today I looked at the lamp I bought from Bill Bagg when he lived in the Brown house on Mill Street and let out a loud sigh. It was very fitting that my late husband’s photo was under it as they shared the same health struggles for their last few years. They might have been as different as night and day but in the end their pain and frustration was the same.

I’m not going to write about his life and family as you can get all that in the newspaper-but, what I am going to write about is how Bill and I walked through the last days of my late husband’s life. You never argued with Bill ever, especially about three things, well maybe 4: local politics, history, his old dog Tick, and most importantly God.

I could understand his frustrations about his dog being picked up, put to sleep, and sent to the dog food company in Smiths Falls in the 80’s. Yes, everyone knows my frustrations with local politics, so I wasn’t going to question that– but it was the God thing that baffled me. How anyone, especially Bill Bagg, could have such a direct line to God made me scratch my head sometimes, but I never doubted it–ever.

My husband Angelo and Bill both discovered they had colon cancer at the same time and today I feel like I am reliving Angelo’s death over again. When Bill was going through something so was Angelo, and I knew how they felt because if one told me then I knew how the other one was.

There were two differences though: Bill had an operation to remove a tumour and Angelo did not because of a fear from a past experience. Angelo died February 8, 2014 and Bill died on Tuesday night– almost a 3 year span. I knew Bill would have better luck not only because of the operation– but because he seemed to have this one on one with God. Was it because of that large pendant he constantly wore– or was it something I just didn’t know? I remember the first time Bill and I discussed cancer like it was yesterday.

 

 

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Photo of Bill Bagg–Amanda Todd-Peters and  Peggy Powell

 

 

*”Pushing the large church doors open at St. James I felt rivers of emotions fill my inner soul. I shouldn’t be here I thought to myself, as I knew I was setting myself up. I sat in one of the pews, stared at the stained glass windows, and tried to hold back my tears. People were going to wonder why I was back in town so soon and I had yet to tell anyone what was really going on. For days I had spoken of family emergencies and real estate deals to those that asked, but I kept the truth inside my heart. I knew he didn’t want the whole world to know his deadly secret, and I respected that.


I glanced through the hymn book and was thankful it wasn’t Sunday. Organ music would be attempting to pull more tears out of me than what I was presently trying to hide. Not wanting anyone to see the distress I was in I kept to myself and looked at no one. I knew the time was coming when I would have to release the inner sadness, but I just didn’t want it to be today.


As people came in they stared at me and I had a feeling some knew my secret but were too kind to ask. Time seemed to move by at a snail’s pace and I kept lowering my head so no one would see my tear-stained face. Taking deep breaths didn’t help and I wanted to sob for a very long time. When I finally pulled myself together it was time to meet and greet. *Bill looked at me point blank  and asked why I was back. The world began to spin and I could no longer hold it in and I looked at him and said quietly.

“Ange has stage 4 colon cancer.”


He put his arms around me as I cried and said:


“You’ve come to the right place I’ve got cancer too!”


For months he tried to get Angelo to talk to someone of a higher power but my husband was having none of it. Bill kept saying if he just talked to God his suffering would be lighter. In Ange’s mind he thought going to church wasn’t going to help him anymore than standing in a garage made you a car. Having been raised with a tough religious Italian Mother kind of muddled his thoughts about God, and anyways you didn’t argue with him, just like you didn’t argue with Bill.

But Bill never gave up on Angelo and he kept telling me God was ready to hear his voice. Angelo never did have that talk with God until the last two days he was alive. A former tenant sent a rosary to him and when he saw it he clasped it like it was a piece of gold. I had never in my whole life seen him do something like that. I knew he was scared and felt lost and by clutching that rosary he felt that God knew where he was. One hour before he died he asked for a priest to come to the house — but it never happened.

Was it a little too late? It wasn’t in Bill’s mind and he said,  “In God’s eyes, you are never too far gone in any situation.” 

I saw Bill at Walmart a few weeks ago and I knew he didn’t have much time left. I recognized the red jacket, the grey hair, and that voice, but nothing else reminded me of him. Hunched over pushing a shopping cart I felt the pain of his every step. A million memories flashed through my mind of how he used to be and no longer was.

It’s crazy that someone who used to be part of your life is no longer here– and he gave me so much to remember him by. The trouble is you think you have time and you don’t, as Angelo finally realized those last few days. If you look up to the sky today and hear a rumble just smile as you know God now has his hands full. Bill is probably directing heavenly traffic along with Angelo.  It has now become one hell of a heaven and as Bill would say:

“God Bless Ya!”

 

“Bill had a deep love of God but his God was not the one in stained glass windows.  He saw God as omnipresent, in everything and everywhere.  We argued constantly about theology but when I listened closely I usually found we were saying the same thing.  We just loved to argue with each other!  He had a heart as big as the moon and I will miss him terribly. Requiem in peace Bill, until we meet again.”The Rev’d. Canon David Andrew but as we know him our beloved Father D.

 

  • *From my book Cancer Calls Collect– Bill was referred to as a woman in the book as I did not want to name names in such a personal recount.

 

historicalnotes

The first time I met Bill Bagg was in the Carleton Place Library at a Carleton Place Historical meeting. Was it 1981 or 1982? Anyways, he recognized me as he was a writer with the Ottawa Journal and was quite familiar with my eclectic Ottawa store.

 

He came over to me and said,

 

“You didn’t move here did you?

 

“You know they are going to run you out of town when they find out right?”

 

And with that he let out of one of his big “from the belly laughs” and looked at me and said,

 

“God Love Ya” and proceeded to tell anyone who would listen what “a den of sin” I ran in Ottawa.
And so was my first encounter with Bill Bagg

Related reading

 

Before and After with Bill Bagg and the Mississippi Gorge

Angelo Michael Seccaspina – Obituary

 

 

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BAGG, Carden William– By Carden Bagg

A legend in his own mind, Bill Bagg of Carleton Place died on April 25th, 2017. Born in Barrie, ON on the Ides of March in 1945 while his father was fighting in WWII, Carden William Bagg grew up with his sister Gini in Cornwall. His parents, Alec and Judy fought often and with an intensity that fuelled Bill’s fiery love of family. After settling in Ottawa as a young man, Bill travelled to the Arctic, worked as a surveyor, sold insurance, and was a country manager for the Ottawa Journal. Early on, he developed a love of antiques and Canadiana and was a proud founder of the Bytown Bottle Club. He met Kathleen at a party while on a date with another girl. They married, had four children, built a cottage on Carson Lake and moved to Carleton Place where they began Mill House Antiques. In spite of a divorce and several long-term partners, Kathleen was “the love of his life,” something he never let her forget. Bill remained in Carleton Place and became part of the fabric of the town. He knew its history and would expound upon it at will. He proudly served on town council and was a fixture at St. James Anglican Church. His reputation as an antique dealer reached well beyond Lanark County, in part due to his unforgettably crammed shop Mississippi Gorge Antiques as well as the years he spent Sundays at his booth at the Stittsville Flea Market. More than that, he left an impression on every person he met. He was a story-teller at heart and somehow drew out personal histories from even the most reticent bystanders. Larger than life, charming, quick-witted, quirky, sentimental, loyal, outspoken, Bill was a showman who loved fully and freely and lived to make people smile. His greatest pride were his children Kelly (Martin), Shannon (Jim), Carden (Rachelle), and Victoria (Ryan) and his greatest joy were his grandchildren Alex, Andrew, Simon, Grace, Eve, James, Virginia, Marianne, Gail, Cecilia, Annie, Greta, Nate, and Sammy. He was a friend to many souls over the years and a father figure to Michael and Brian. Bill spent his final days surrounded by his family, exactly where he would want to be, across from the nurses’ station at the Carleton Place Hospital, just a few blocks away from his house. Thank you, in particular, to Dr. Maria, Lindsey, Pam, Sarah, Elizabeth, and Rebecca for the outstanding care of our father. He often talked about what we should do when he got on the spaceship. We’ll do just that. Tha-a-a-nks for the memories, Dad. Thank you very mu-u-u-ch.

Friends and family are welcome to celebrate Bill in the hall at St. James Anglican Church (225 Edmund Street, Carleton Place) on Monday, May 1st from 5-7pm. A funeral service will be held at 7:00pm.

 

 



 

What If You Were 4 Years-Old and Facing Things You Fear?

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The chances of winning a lottery is  1 in 175,000,000- but the chances of a child getting cancer is 1 in 285. If you were a child and diagnosed with cancer, what would you understand? You might kind of “get it” if it was explained in simple terms- or, maybe you might even blame yourself and need your parents to assure you that you didn’t cause the cancer.

You also might be frightened that your parents and siblings might abandon you, or be afraid you might have to spend the rest of your life in a hospital. As a child I was always worried about pain even though the nurses told me that tests would make me better. But in the end, who really understands the word cancer? Life is not a simple straight line, it has many ups and downs– so why has Rachel lost her innocence, hopes, and dreams to right now.

“Children ride tricycles in the hallway of the hospital, not in the park. They know the names of their chemos instead of their classmates. Nurses and doctors are their new family and they think hair is overrated. Their laughter can make a heart melt and their strength will make a grown person cry. If you’ve ever seen a kid fight cancer, it will change your life forever.”

Little four-year-olds shouldn’t have to battle cancer and have to grow up in hospitals. It just shouldn’t happen. Please support Rachel on the links below.

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Rachel, who is barely 4, got diagnosed with ALL leukaemia (Acute_lymphoblastic_leukaemia) which is cancer of the white blood cells. It is one thing to be an adult and hear this diagnosis– but imagine if you are the parents of a young child getting this news. The world is so unpredictable and things happen quickly, unexpectedly, and all of a sudden you are not in control of our own existence– or your childs.

Links you need to click on:

Go Fund Me Page

Love for Rachel Page

Fill the Freezer Page

For Every Mountain –There is a Miracle–Rachel

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For Every Mountain –There is a Miracle–Rachel

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I can’t remember a time I didn’t know Peter and Cheryl Ferrill. Neighbours for years–it seems like yesterday that their daughters Brittany and Holly would come into my yard and I would watch them play with my sons. If we could only remain so young and innocent– but life goes on. Through the years the girls have grown up, gotten married, and had children. You never ever want anything to happen to the people you know and love. But, everything in life is completely accidental and random– and sometimes bad things happen to very good people.


In July, Holly and Mike’s daughter Rachel, who is barely 4, got diagnosed with ALL leukaemia (Acute_lymphoblastic_leukaemia) which is cancer of the white blood cells. It is one thing to be an adult and hear this diagnosis– but imagine if you are the parents of a young child getting this news. The world is so unpredictable and things happen quickly, unexpectedly, and all of a sudden you are not in control of our own existence– or your childs.

Since the diagnosis Rachel has been at CHEO with her family by her side. She has already had surgery for the bone marrow  and chemo. Rachel has a long road to recovery and is already been such a strong tough child. Maybe even more than you or I might be.

I saw Cheryl a few weeks ago and I just wanted to scream–

Why your granddaughter?

Why Holly and Mike’s child?


The trouble with life is there are no answers– and don’t even attempt to look for them because there are none. Seeing our children in pain is the last thing we want to witness-because whatever pain they feel– well, we feel it at least twice– and we wish it was our own.

So what can I do to help? What can you do to help? Well, we shouldn’t be content to wait and see– all of us need the determination to make the right things happen for this family. People coming together as a community of neighbours is a great start– and if we don’t step up to help, then who will.

No one can fight alone–or should they. Please support the events for our little 4 year-old hero called Rachel who lives in this community and might even be your neighbour. Remember that all of us were born with the ability to change someone’s life–let’s not waste it.

 

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Links you need to click on:

Go Fund Me Page

Love for Rachel Page

Fill the Freezer Page

 

 

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Cancer and Family 1903- Almonte Gazette

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Patients back then were fearful of doctors. Not only were cancers very uncommon compared to today, they appear to have differed in other key respects. These figures suggest that breast cancer during the Victorian period was significantly less rapidly progressive than is the case today, probably due to the Victorians’ significantly higher intakes of a range of micro- and phytonutrients which slow cancer growth.

They typically ate eight to ten portions of fruit and vegetables daily, in a diet that contained far higher levels of vitamins and minerals than occur in today’s nutrient-depleted, refined and processed foods. They also consumed less salt, sugar, alcohol and tobacco.

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This would explain why they were so effectively protected against cancer, and heart disease,–surprisingly, figures show that in the mid-Victorian period, cancers and heart disease were under 10 per cent of the levels we are experiencing today.

In summary, although the mid-Victorians lived as long as we do, they were relatively immune to the chronic degenerative diseases that are the most important causes of ill health and death today.

However some did succumb to the disease and here is a tragic story of one poor woman in Almonte. Please read the Almonte Gazette.. your past history awaits you.

Almonte Gazette 1903

A tragic case, came before *Mr. E. W. Smith, Almonte Justice of the Peace, who committed a man for trial. The elected instead asked to be tried by jury, and was permitted to return to Perth.


The case is a sad one. His wife is incurable with cancer, and while her sister is doing what she can for her, circumstances are depriving the invalid of the nourishment she should have. The husband is said to be a good worker, and does not look like a man who would be wantonly cruel, but the fact remains that be has neglected to support his wife, and she is suffering from that neglect. What the outcome of the trial may be cannot be predicted, but in the meantime it is a case where help might very well be given. Private donations can be made at the Gazette’s office that we might help this woman.

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1888 Almonte:  Isaac Needham of Pakenham, who appeared before Judge E.W. Smith, Esq., J.P.P. on a charge of threatening bodily injury to Hugh Gordon, and was bound over to keep the peace for one year and $200 and two sureties of $100 each.  Gazette

What Do You Do if You Just Can’t Walk Right In?

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I am the last one standing.. Me, Robin, Bernice (Bunny) and Arthur Knight- Cowansville Quebec 1958

 

I was going to write a funny story today but it is just not happening.  After writing about Merrywood on Rideau I felt sad for those who could not walk like everyone else.

My mother lost the use of her legs one snowy New Year’s Eve at a friends home when she was 30. My father thought she had consumed one drink too many, but after years of her fighting to get her legs back, he finally realized it had never really had been the liquour.

As a child I watched them say it was polio over and over. Then she had polio treatments, spinal surgeries and neurological tests slapped on her like a guinea pig. The specialists came one after another from all over the world to try their experiments on her at the former Montreal Rehabilitation Centre on Darlington Ave. and nothing ever worked.

For four years until she died at age 34 she wore black heavy polio leg braces and never gave up. My father even drove her to Oklahoma hoping faith healer Oral Roberts would cure her, only to be turned away as they could not afford all the pay tolls Roberts had on his property for those who visited him. I watched her sit on the hospital stairs each weekend and cry as she attempted to do something she would never do again-walk. But she never gave up and continued to play Glenn Miller tunes on the piano every afternoon in the hospital foyer for the patients– no matter how sad she felt about her future.

One day fluid began to violate her on a daily basis for a few months. Two days before she died in September of 1963 she burned her finger as she ironed my Confirmation dress. Instead of it blistering, a yellowish fluid began oozing from the burn.

She looked at my neighbour, and said calmly,

“Meg, my body is full of the poison now, I am going to die.”

All those years of fighting, all those year of frustration, she  died–just like that, at the age of 34. Years later when my sister Robin died of Lymphoma at the age of 40, the doctors confirmed my mother had actually died of Lymphoma on the spine. Lymphoma is a hard disease to detect, and information in those days was sparse.

The medical staff did not need to tell me what happened to my mother. I already had known as I had figured it out years ago. Yes, the disease with the capital ‘L’ has taken each one of my family, and I am the very last to speak.  At this every second in time I choose to speak the words of a family lost, so they might at least be remembered.

Today is the day you need to hug your family no matter how hard they irritate you. Don’t let the paralysis of anger allow you not to step into another day.  Family is family- the love is always there-embrace them.

 

Her Favourite Song exactly how she played it on the piano...

Video: Oral Rpberts –This particular boy was investigated by James Randi and found out it was just an act. He actually could walk.

 

 

 

Words by Linda Seccaspina 2013

Knitting for Knockers?

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What is this sheep doing? Come on down to the Wool Growers on Saturday during Lambs Down and find out. 

SATURDAY is Lambs Down at Wool Growers.(10-3). but come park at the Carleton Place Farmers Market –enjoy what we have at the market (830-1230) and take Arlee Sheet’s horse trolley over to Lambs Down. Don’t forget iconic George Chenier Sr. will be playing good old Lanark County music at the market from 10:30-12:30–

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Did you know that International Knit Day is June 18th? It’s also the same day as the Lambs Down Park Festival in Carleton Place.

The Real Wool Shop at Lambs Down is involved with Knitted Knockers of Canada. Knitted Knockers are special handmade breast prosthesis for women who have undergone mastectomies or other procedures to the breast. These soft comfortable lightweight prosthesis are available for FREE through the organization.

All of the organization’s knit “knockers” are made by volunteers and donated free of charge to women who have had a mastectomy.

The Real Wool Shop is looking for volunteer knitters to come out and knit knockers. They also carry the yarn and have the free pattern.

Contact Alison at the Real Wool Shop

Address: 142 Franktown Road, Carleton Place, ON K7C 4M7
Hours: 9:30AM–6PM

 

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Read all about it in this issue of Hometown News

 

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