Tag Archives: cameron

How Did Settlers Make Their Lime?

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How Did Settlers Make Their Lime?

Making Lime was a huge process often connected with the logging bees in the early days. Large quantities of lime were necessary for filling cracks in the walls, and building chimneys for the log house. The timber from at least half an of land was formed into an immense pile, on the top of which was constructed a frame on which to place the limestone. Some 20 ox carts loads of stone  were then drawn and thrown on top of the heap, after being broken into small pieces by a sledge hammer. The pile was then fired and would be consumed over the night and though its red coals remained hot for a week when the white lime could be covered and collected.

 

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I found this illustration in the Delmer Dunlop (Carleton Place) Collection  at Archives Lanark. This is obviously a local area kiln. Anyone have any idea? Thanks!

 

 

historicalnotes

Carleton Place

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Feb 1901, Thu  •  Page 3

Mississippi Mills

Norman Paul’s grandfather and father had operated a booming lime business hauling quarried white limestone to a lime-kiln that still exists today. Account books still kept in Paul’s home, the main part of which was built in 1848, show the finished lime was hauled by wagon or shipped to such communities as Brockville, Merrickville, Carleton Place, Arnprior and Carp where it serves to bind together historic stone buildings to this day. There’s also a prized medal in the same house honoring its recipient for the quality of lime provided for competition in the Colonial and Indian Exhibition in London in 1886.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Jun 1911, Tue  •  Page 4

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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 Jul 1895, Mon  •  Page 3

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
31 Oct 1974, Thu  •  Page 3

So What Happened to the Lost Colony of St. Armand?

Explosives Go Missing! Stories From Old Photos

Looking for the Artist of this Carleton Place Painting-The Lime Kiln

Archie Guthrie’s Notes on Lanark Mines Hall’s Mills and Cheese 1993

A Giant’s Kettle in the Middle of Lanark County

Looking for Information–Janet Kathryn Heddleston — Carleton Place

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Looking for Information–Janet Kathryn Heddleston — Carleton Place

mississippilakemap1879.jpg

Debbie Curry emailed the LCGS and asked the following:

 

Hi, looking for anyone who grew up in the 1940’s in Carleton Place. My mother lived at: according to voters list 16 Grant street with her family, the Heddlestons, there was also a Donald or Dan (Don) Cameron who was a butcher (author’s note–see historical) and his wife Hattie Thoms or Thomas. (author’s note- see historical)

 

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Her name was Janet Kathryn Heddleston born in 1931. I know they had lived on Grant street across from her grandfather William Heddleston and Janet McClenaghan, but I was surprised to see that the Camerons also lived in the house. But, I remember my grandfather mentioning the name Hattie as if it was his mother. So, a bit confusing.There is another bit of a mystery,is the above child with my mother taken in 1950 in Carleton Place, I know my mother babysat before she graduated from the Taber Business college in 1949 I was told that the children were from a Native family. Thank you for helping

 

 - Miss Irene Heddleston Paid Final Tribute...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  29 Dec 1950, Fri,  Page 7

 - Carleton Place (Special ta The Journal.)...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Mar 1901, Mon,  Page 10

 

historicalnotes

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  25 Apr 1950, Tue,  Page 8

 

Bridge to Albert Street (side 2) 1940s

 

W. Hooper Residence

Salvation Army Hall

Phillip Levine Hardware- Also David Thompson painter

Samuel Wilson Furniture

White’s Tinsmith Shop

Don Cameron Butcher

 

Some of the business owners that worked out of 26 Bridge Street included Fevaeroux’s Bakery in the 1960s, Judy McGlade Financial, Tom’s Bike Repair, and  Don Cameron/ Danny’s Meat Market until he moved to Bell Street. 

 

 

.Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

The Taber Business College- Women in the 20s

Looking for Napiers

The Whiskey Keg Chair of Lanark County

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The Whiskey Keg Chair of Lanark County

In the 70s there were rumours of a rocking chair with a whisky keg attached beneath the seat somewhere in Lanark County. Of course most thought it was one of Lanark County’s famous yarns started in a living room somewhere with a beer or two and then travelled down the country roads to become a fact– or sort of a fact.

Fallbrook’s own Walter Cameron was consulted about the story and one would think with his then 50 years experience in blacksmithing and wood working he might know a thing or two about the elusive whisky keg rocking chair. Instead he had some tales about different chairs that existed in Lanark County. Take the Cameron chair that is in the picture below. It came into the Cameron family in 1874 and it was said it had been use 15 years prior to that.

 

 

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1971 Photo Cameron chair

 

 

In the old days before lead pencils were used to help in the construction of the chair they were marked with a wooden scribe and people used to be asked to sit on a seat and then the chair was made around them. A fine chair it was, but that wasn’t the chair everyone was looking for.

Finally, someone suggested this particular chair might be found in Middleville and the story went that it might just be some sort of wooden box under a chair that Grandpa kept his bottle in for a nip or two or Grandma kept her knitting.

So the story ended in a conclusion that there really was no whiskey keg chair just a simple stovepipe under the chair to keep a magazine or two. In the end we owe it to each other to tell stories and no stories lives on unless someone wants to listen.

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)